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January 2019 PM Update from Buenos Aires

Analysis of 2018 and outlook for 2019 in Argentina

 

REPORT

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina

 


 

It’s just finished a very difficult year for the Argentine Republic.

According to the preliminary balance of 2018 done by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), Argentina’s economy contracts by 2.6% in 2018.

A strong devaluation of the currency, an increase in interest rates and an inflation of almost 48% per year generating a diminution in family income, are indicators of this declining in the economy according to ECLAC.

The recession is not uniform for all industries; some sectors have maintained their growth, according to the Minister of Production and Labor, Dante Sica, who clarifies that some industries representing around 25% of employment in Argentina are still growing, such as fishing, knowledge-based services, energy, livestock, telecommunications and tourism.

Instead, the agricultural sector has had a bad year due to the great drought that had a strong impact on harvests. The domestic market, the textile industry, footwear and leather goods and food also fell. Construction is an industry that was growing at a good pace, but has slowed down after the devaluation.

In contrast, the energy sector, and in particular the oil and gas industry, had a great year, with a record production of unconventional hydrocarbons in the Vaca Muerta formation, of 30 thousand square kilometers located in the Neuquén Basin, in the Argentine Patagonia.

The boom in Vaca Muerta and the change in energy policy have generated other benefits, such as the fact that Argentina was able to suspend the contracting of a re-gasifier ship that was 10 years in the country receiving liquefied gas to supply the domestic market and that cost millions of dollars to the country.

Additionally, the executive director of the Chamber of the Chemical and Petrochemical Industry (CIQYP), Jorge de Zavaleta, affirms that the petrochemical industry, a sector that employs 110,000 employees in the value chain, sells US $ 25,000 million annually and represents a 12 % of the GDP, is the indistry that can add more added value in the coming years to the growing production of gas from the Neuquén formation of Vaca Muerta.

More…

To read entire report click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 

To cite this article: Boggi, C. (2019). Analysis of 2018 and outlook for 2019 in Argentina; Project Management Report from Argentina, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January). Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Boggi-argentina-regional-report-english.pdf

 



About the Author


CECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent
Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

 

 

 

Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector. Cecilia has an Executive Master in Business Administration from Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, Spain and also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths©, is a Professional Executive Coach accredited by Association for Coaching, UK, and alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012.  Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She was PMI’s Mentor for Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016.  Cecilia participated in the development of PMI’s PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team; she is professor of Project Management and Leadership in some Universities and Institutes in Latin America.

She can be contacted at [email protected] and www.activepmo.com

To view other works by Cecilia Boggi, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/cecilia-boggi/.

 

 

The Four Pillars of Portfolio Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  The Four Pillars of Portfolio Management: Organizational Agility, Strategy, Risk and Resources
Author:  Olivier Lazar
Publisher:  CRC Press / Routledge
List Price: $79.95
Format:  Hardcover, 170 pages
Publication Date: October 2018
ISBN: 9781138601321
Reviewer: Jan Watson, MBA, PMP
Review Date: December 2018

 



Introduction

Olivier Lazar details the four pillars of Portfolio Management as Organizational Agility, Your Organization’s Strategy, Risk, and Resources Demand Planning.  The book begins by describing the differences between Projects, Programs, and Portfolios. Throughout the book these differences and interactions with each other are explored. Olivier describes the principles from respected authors and consultants, expands upon those principles by including tools and figures to illustrate the relevant points, and relates real life experiences to demonstrate these principles.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Chapter 2 gives the Context of Portfolio Management including Uncertainty, Ambiguity, Complexity as well as Governance Models

Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6 are the four pillars: Organizational Agility (3), Your Organization’s Strategy (4), Risk (5), and Resource Demand Planning (6).

Chapter 7 discusses the Portfolio roadmap and delivering value aligned with the organization’s strategic vision.

Chapter 8 predicts the evolution of the future state of Portfolio Management including how humans will interact with AI.

Chapter 9 concludes the book with benefits of Portfolio Management and mindsets for success.

The Lexicon at the end defines the terms and key concepts used in the book, which may have been reformulated by Olivier from the definitions by PMI books and other expert materials.

Highlights

Uncertainty, ambiguity, and complexity play important roles when developing the strategic vision for the organization (an organization is a group of people, not a company). The organization’s strategic vision should be evaluated throughout the Portfolio Management processes and the organization’s decision-making process.

Portfolio managers need to balance the requirements identified in the strategic vision with risk and resource capabilities.

Highlights: What I liked!

Olivier explains how to use and modify tools and an agility mindset to help the Portfolio manager navigate ever changing organizational, business, stakeholder, competitor, and regulatory changes affecting the success of the Portfolio and organization overall.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Jan Watson, PMP

North Texas, USA

 

 

 

Jan Watson is a Project Management Professional with a Masters of Business Administration degree from Texas Christian University. She is a strategically-minded difference maker who improves business results through people, technology, proven LEAN Six Sigma DMAIC process (Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and full project life cycle management utilizing Project Management Institute – PMBOK, Scrum, and Agile methods.  Jan is a passionate senior project manager who blends solid planning, communication, leadership, and organization skills with proven consulting skills to achieve throughput objectives. She is also a successful researcher and strategist focused on leveraging new processes and innovative thinking to champion oversight and monitoring of projects. She can identify areas of opportunity and streamline processes to provide the highest level of service to customers.  Jan can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Q&As for the PMBOK Guide Sixth Edition

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Q&As for the PMBOK Guide Sixth Edition
Authors:  Unknown
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price:  $29.95
Format:  Spiral bound, 352 pages
Publication Date:  2017
ISBN: 9781628254617
Reviewer: TJ Semiz
Review Date: November 2018

 



Introduction

I am currently studying for my PMP exam. Therefore, I will not review the book from an existing Certified Project Manager point of view, but from a student perspective that is working on this exam to pass.

In addition to that, in my evaluation, I may not be able to comment on how these questions are relevant to the actual PMP exam question, as I have never taken the test before, but I can provide strong feedback about how this helped me to study for the exam.

Overview of Book’s Structure

  • This book (more of Questions and Answers to study PMP exam) organized very well from the beginning. It follows the same index of PMBOK guide ( Sixth Edition)
  • Is there any option to label the sections? Sometimes, it is very hard to go back and forth between questions sections.

Highlights

  • The book is structured to follow the chapters easily which aligns with PMBOK Sixth edition.
  • Answers are very detailed and also refers page numbers in PMBOK Sixt edition for more detailed information.
  • The metal spirals make it easier to navigate between questions and answers.
  • The book size 9 inches by 4 inches makes it easier to carry and gives a sensation of Q&A book.

Highlights: What I liked!

I like the book that it not only provides the answers to the questions but also refers to page and section numbers on PMBOK guide ( Sixth Edition)  to get more information. It is a great method for exam takers to read the section again where they answer the question wrong.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


TJ Semiz

Texas, USA

 

 

 

TJ Semiz is a Sr. Consultant for NCR hospitality division. He was part of different divisions in NCR for last eleven years with multiple responsibilities including Support Management, Subject Matter Expert for numerous Point of Sale Deployments, and Project Leader for various POS Database Standardization projects around the globe. TJ holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and Associate degree in Network Administration. Currently, he is attending Tulane University for a master’s degree in IT Management. He is passionate about project management, process improvement, learning & development, and an active member of Toastmasters International.

TJ Semiz can be reached at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts
Authors: Dennis L. Bolles and Darrel G. Hubbard
Publisher: PBMconcepts
List Price: $74.95
Format:  Soft cover, 480 pages
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978-0-98584484-4-6
Reviewer:  Masood Said, PMP
Review Date: November 2018

 



Introduction

This book, A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II. Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts is a collection of 8 case studies related to Project Management Offices (PMOs) in business environment.  This book is the second volume on the same subject written by the same authors. The first Volume ‘A Compendium of PMO Case Studies: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts’ was published in 2012 and is also related to PMOs in Business Environment.

The book is divided into 5 sections and 16 Chapters. Chapters 1-6 discusses the methodology used in carrying out research for compiling the book. Chapters 7-14 lists 8 case studies of 8 different PMOs in 8 different organizations. (One PMO per chapter).

It is a very informative book in which the authors, Dennis L. Bolles and Darrel G. Hubbard have carried out extensive research and have discussed, in detail, the organizations, framework, functions and other information related to the PMOs that are listed in the book.

The book has a total of 58 figures and 18 tables related to the case studies.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book has been divided into 5 Sections and 16 Chapters that are spread over 442 pages:

Section I: Project Business Management Construct, Framework, Model, and Organization.

Chapter 1 – Project Business Management (PBM) Organization
Chapter 2 – Project Business Management – The organization Models and Components

Section II: PBMO Research Methodology and 2015 Research Instrument

Chapter 3 – PBMO Case Study Research Methodology
Chapter 4 – PBMO 2015 Case Study Research Instrument

Section III: PBMO as a Business Functional Organization and PBMO Implementation and Operation

Chapter 5 – Research Results – PBMO as a Business Functional Organization
Chapter 6 – Research Results – PBMO implementation and Operation

Section IV – PMO Case Studies

Chapter 7 – United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) PMO Case Study
Chapter 8 – Ministry of Health Care PMO Case Study
Chapter 9 – Mayo Clinic PMO Case Study
Chapter 10 – Jamaica National Building Society (INBS) PMO Case Study
Chapter 11 – ENTEL (Empresa Nacional de Telecomunicaciones) Case           Study
Chapter 12 – Duke Energy Corporation PMO Case Study
Chapter 13 – DTE Energy Company PMO Case Study
Chapter 14 – The Doe Run Company PMO Case Study

Section 5 – Controlling/Program Performance Monitoring and Controlling

Glossary

Bibliography

About the Authors

Highlights

The book is very useful for any organization who would be interested in setting up a Project Management Office.  The book has discussed 8 different Project Management Offices in detail as case studies. This information is very useful for anyone wanting to setup a Project Management office in different business environments. These case studies give very good information on how to setup and manage Project Management Offices in difference business environments.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 
About the Reviewer


Masood Said, PMP

Lahore, Pakistan

 

 

 

Engr. Masood Said, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, BS.C (Mech. Engr.; MS-IT; EMBA-HR Mngt.) is a Mechanical Engineer with over 40 years of Project Management Experience. He has worked in Pakistan and the Middle East on various Oil and Gas projects. He has been a member of PMI since 2002.  Presently he is a trainer for PMP®; PMI-RMP®; PMI-ACP® certification courses. He also advises companies on optimization and improvement in processes.  Based in Lahore, Pakistan, he also travels to Dallas, Texas on a frequent basis.  Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Project Management Theory and Practice, 3rd Ed

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Project Management Theory and Practice, 3rd Ed.
Author: Gary Richardson and Brad Jackson 
Publisher: Auerbach Publications
List Price:  $99.95
Format: Hardcover, 610 pages
Publication Date: July 2018         
ISBN-13: 9780815360711
Reviewer: Elena Koulich, PMP
Review Date: December 2018

 



Introduction

If a group of seasoned project managers shared all the things they learned over the course of their careers, the amalgamation of their experiences would be this book. It takes a programmatic PMI model of project management and percolates it through the views and experiences of practitioners. The book uses an understandable language to bring often dry concepts to life and casts a broader view on project management vocabulary, models, concepts, and emerging trends.

Overview of Book’s Structure

While each of the seven main sections of the book can be approached independently, the book does have a layered structure with each section delving deeper into project management concepts.

  • Part I. Conceptual overview of the project environment. This part covers foundational topics such as the evolution of project management, industry trends, project life cycle, and project success factors. Nine chapters provide a solid backsplash for the rest of the book.
  • Part II. Foundation processes. This section addresses the key deliverables of a project – scope, cost, schedule, and quality.
  • Part III. Soft skill processes. Here the authors discuss such indispensable themes of project management as stakeholders, communication, human resources, and team management.
  • Part IV. Support processes. Topics of procurement, risk, and integration are covered at length in this part of the book. This part also concludes the coverage of the knowledge processes recognized in the basic model of PMI.
  • Part V. Advanced planning models. This part showcases different approaches to viewing life cycle and introduces such concepts as adaptive models, project simulation, and critical chain model.
  • Part VI. Project executing, monitoring and control. While the materials described in this section are still PMI model-driven – change management, earned value metrics, project closing – the book makes a solid attempt to add a flavor of reality.
  • Part VII. Project environmental support. The final section of the book casts a broader view on the role of the organization, portfolio and enterprise project management, and project governance on a project’s success.
  • Here authors suggest valuable resources on financial metrics, templates and project data repository.

Highlights 

The book aligns exceptionally well with the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) Guide and provides a sound foundation of project management topics. At the same time, the authors succeed in bringing these topics closer to real-life projects.

In addition to the classic model, the book brings in a thorough examination of other important areas of project management such as Agile lifecycle, ethics, portfolio, and earned value management, enterprise project management and work breakdown structure.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Elena Koulich, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 

 

 Elena Koulich is a research project manager with over 19 years of industry experience in biotech and clinical research, project management, human biospecimen management, and education. Elena has a Bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience, Master’s degree in Integrative Biology and MBA with focus on Data Analysis. She has Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and is a Director of Operations in the Dallas chapter of Project Management Institute (PMI).  Elena can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Mastering Import & Export Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Mastering Import & Export Management, 3rd Ed
Author:  Thomas A. Cook with Kelly Raia
Publisher:  AMACOM (now HarperCollins Leadership)
List Price:  $85.00 Hardcover and $53.99 eBook
Format: Hardcover and eBook, 688 pages
Publication Date: August 2017  
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3820-6
Reviewer: Patt Chowdhury, MBA, MM, CAPM
Review Date: December 2018

 


 
Introduction

Mastering Import & Export Management, Third Edition, is an expansive, detailed, yet easy-to-read reference covering virtually every topic that one needs to consider when conducting business across the globe.  Increasing globalization of business impacts organizations large and small, commercial and governmental.  Many professionals in purchasing, import/export, project management, specialized transportation, supply chain and logistics, and education will be grateful for the authors’ guidance through the navigation of the many laws, guidelines, contract terms, insurance and risk practices, processes, and old-fashioned, hard-learned experience of import/export traders shared by our authors.

This book also provides the reader with both historical perspective and some geo-political commentary which is important to fully understanding the business of global trade. Most importantly, the Third Edition provides up-to-date information that is relevant to this Post-9/11 world in which we conduct business, and an abundant appendix that permits one to examine actual documents that are required to fully execute the import and export of goods around the world.  While global trade is discussed, much of the specific advice is pointed at US organizations doing business with firms in other countries.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Mastering Import & Export Management, Third Edition is arranged in three broad sections: The Global Supply Chain, Export Operations and Import Operations.  The sections are preceded by a Foreword and Preface and followed by a 418-page appendix and eight-page alphabetical topic index.

Material is arranged as follows:

FOREWORD – by Spencer Ross, Chairman Emeritus, National Institute for World Trade, NY, NY

PREFACE

SECTION ONE: The Global Supply Chain – Eight chapters: Purchasing Management Skill Sets in Foreign Markets  ~ Freight, Logistics, and Specialized Transport ~ Risk Management in International Business ~ Technology in Global Trade ~ Global Personnel Deployment and Structure ~ Developing Resources in the Import/Export Supply Chain Management ~ Foreign Trade Zones, Bonded Warehouses, Free Trade Agreements, and Business with China ~ Essential Overview of Import/Export Compliance and Security Management: Post-9/11.

SECTION TWO: Export Operations – One chapter: Export Management: Incoterms, Documentation, Compliance, Operations, and Export Supply Chain Skill Sets

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Patt Chowdhury, MBA, MM, CAPM
®

North Texas, USA

 

 


Patt Chowdhury
, Managing Principal and Consultant at Patt Chowdhury Advisors LLC, is a marketing executive and cross-functional senior manager with extensive experience in program and project management, marketing operations, product management, process development and information technology at iconic, global Fortune 500 brands in the information technology and travel and transportation industries. She is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Dallas Gupta College of Business where she teaches marketing and management courses in the MBA and MS programs. Patt is a Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM®) and a Six Sigma Black Belt. She is a member of the PMI Dallas Chapter where she serves as Director, Lunch and Learn Program Series. She holds an MBA in International Management, a Master of Management (MM) degree in Telecommunications Management, a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration – Marketing and a certificate in Product Management.

Patt can be contacted at [email protected] or on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/pattchowdhury

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Benefits of using Lean IPD

as a Strategy for Better Project Management

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Saimon Satyanathan

SKEMA Business School

India and Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

The construction industry sees tremendous potential to improve the effectiveness and performance of projects. Thus, there is much wisdom in adopting Lean IPD which offers lean principles and a focus on collaboration and work flow reliability. In this paper, the benefits and restrictions experienced by participants in implementing Lean IPD are analysed. The paper eventually focuses on demonstrating that Lean IPD provides a better approach much effective towards Project Management.

The author will identify various project delivery methods including Lean IPD and then make a comparative study using the Multi-Attribute Decision-Making (MADM) analysis to illustrate the coherence with respect to some attributes. Further utilising these attributes and some selection criteria, the best possible alternative for businesses to consider for their project strategies is convincingly proved to be Lean IPD.

Keywords: Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), Lean Management, Lean IPD, Project Management, Business Strategy, Collaborative Contracting, Trust based Collaboration

INTRODUCTION

Motivation: A 2017 McKinsey study about capital-intensive Infrastructure Projects reported that only 2% of construction projects worldwide are completed and delivered within the estimated time and budget frames and to the satisfaction of all stakeholders![1] Why do we still continue to see this unsettling lack of positive results, and such bad Project Management outcomes?

One way to see a feasible answer to this issue is by adopting Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) in combination with a Lean approach to be executed as a part of the Business Strategy itself.

The AIA’s Centre for Integrated Practice (CIP) defines Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) as: “IPD is a method of project delivery distinguished by a contractual arrangement among a minimum of owner, constructor and design professional that aligns business interests of all parties.[2]

It contains the following contractual and behavioural principles:

Table 1: Principles of IPD [3]

According to the Guild of Project Controls Compendium and References (GPCCaR),IPD is a unique collaboration of people, systems, business structures and practices as a method that utilises the best skills of all participants to achieve the result, increase value to the owner, minimise waste, and maximise efficiency throughout all stages of project management, which can be distinguished into 8 main Phases as mentioned below:

  • Conceptualization
  • Criteria Design
  • Detailed Designing
  • Implementation Documentation
  • Agency Review
  • Buyout
  • Construction
  • Closeout”[4]

This project delivery method was formulated just about two decades back. The objective of such a venture is to increase value (efficiency in terms of cost-time-quality-stakeholder and customer satisfaction factors) and reduce waste while ensuring that productivity improves.

When continued to apply the Lean Principles to maintain focus on Customer Value, Streamlined Processes and Continuous Improvement, we can also approach all IPD Projects for waste elimination.[5] [6] [A huge opportunity: Figure A (Appendix) shows that only around 19% time is currently spent on lean execution.[7]]

A detailed work on the similarities between the philosophy approach of Lean and IPD (reduce waste, maximise efficiency); for good Project Management, can be studied from Table A (Appendix): ‘Comparative Analysis of Lean & IPD Principles’. It is safe to agree on the fact that both eventually promulgate a change in mindsets from ‘individual’ to ‘collective’.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Satyanathan, S. (2019). Benefits of using Lean IPD as a Strategy for Better Project Management, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Satyanathan-benefits-of-using-lean-ipd-for-better-pm-1.pdf

 



About the Author


Saimon Satyanathan

Paris, France

 

 

 

Saimon Satyanathan is a multilingual project management and business development professional specialising in the engineering domains and related consulting sector. He holds a B.Tech. in Aerospace Engineering and is currently completing his M.Sc. in Project and Programme Management & Business Development, from SKEMA Business School, Paris. Saimon is also certified in several credentials including PRINCE2, AgilePM, Six Sigma-Green Belt, and Environmental Management Systems.

Born and raised in Mumbai, he has lived in several other cities in India including Delhi and Bangalore, and is currently residing in Paris, France to pursue his M.Sc. Saimon also possesses a wide array of professional experience of approximately 5.5 years in total, at some prestigious mechanical/industrial engineering and aerospace engineering related firms in India initially, in the capacities of Intern, Project Engineer and Assistant Manager (Projects). His last experience in France was a 2 months’ Internship in Strategy & Business Development at Nexans S.A., France’s biggest cable conductors manufacturing and energy company, where he conducted extensive market research (Asian markets) and developed an entry and growth/expansion strategy for the firm.

Saimon can be contacted at [email protected]  or https://www.linkedin.com/in/saimonsatyan/

 

[1] Banaszak, J., Palter, R., Parsons, M. (2017). Stopping the insanity: Three ways to improve contractor-owner      relationships on capital projects. Voices on Infrastructure: McKinsey & Company. (p. 8-12).

[2] Cohen, J. (2010). Integrated Project Experiences in Collaboration: On the Path to IPD Delivery: Case (January) 4.

[3] Fish, A. (2011). IPD – The obstacles of Implementation, 9.

[4] Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) | Project Controls – planning, scheduling, cost management and forensic analysis  (Planning Planet). (n.d.), 12.6.3.2.

[5] Create a Lean, Construction Building Machine with Integrated Project Management. (2018, May 8).

[6] Pease, J. (n.d.). What is Integrated Project Delivery Part 2: Lean Operating System.

[7] Lean, I. (2017). Lean Construction & Integrated Project Delivery ( IPD ) Overview, 33.

 

Alternative Dispute Resolution at trade shows

What are the options for your events?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Adriana Rabe

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

Trade shows industry is a growing industry where disagreements between stakeholders can compromise the events. This paper presents the different approaches to a dispute to find the more appropriate method while managing conflict in events organizing. The research on this paper is based on the Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM) process, both the non-compensatory model and compensatory model techniques are applied. The different approaches to a dispute will be defined and assessed to understand which one is the more interesting to use. The results of this paper show that prevention is the preferred option. We will have a look at the benefits of using prevention as a dispute resolution method and the possible clauses that can be included in a written contract to prevent conflict from happening.

Keywords: Arbitration, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Conflict, Event Management, Event Organizing, Hospitality Industry, Litigation, Mediation, Trade Shows.

 

INTRODUCTION


“In mid-October, almost 14,000 persons coming from 100 different countries attended MIPCOM 2018, a trade show that gathers professionals from the TV industry in Cannes, in the well-known region the French Riviera”[1]. Among the attendees, we can find heads of acquisitions, commissioning editors, sales director, and other representatives. During the event, there were more than 2,000 exhibitors and approximately 4,700 companies that came to network, discover brand-new programs and build international partnerships. Since it involves numerous stakeholders, and at the same time divergent and probably conflicting interests among the parties, it is difficult to organize such a big event. Organizing an event of this size requires the promoters to entail numerous service providers that include car drivers, catering staff, goodies producers, hotels personals, registration staff, setting arrangements designers and many more. For Reed MIDEM, the company behind this entertainment content market, we can imagine that it represents thousands of interlocutors and hundreds of contractual agreements to deal with during all the preparation of the yearly project.

When the manager is assigned with a trade show (e.g. MIPCOM 2018), he or she is dealing with a project as defined in Wideman Comparative Glossary: “Any undertaking that has a defined objective, a cost parameter, and a time element for its development. A cluster of activities that are pulled together to deliver something of value to a customer”[2]. The organization of the trade show depends on assets (an asset is “anything owned that has a monetary value”[3]). For the trade show industry, the portfolio of assets are: the project team (human assets), software to plan and schedule, and the clients list (information assets), the venue the company books and the head-quarter of the company (physical assets), a budget allocated to the creation of the event (financial assets) and then the brand image or reputation of the company (intangible assets). According to GAPPS Program Typology[4], there are four types of programs. A program can be defined as a “collection of projects that together achieve a beneficial change for an organization”[5].

For the trade show industry, the program is a multi-project program. Indeed, each event is unique, but the company uses the same resources to achieve each trade show, and thus projects are interdependent. In the trade show industry, the portfolio of projects relates to the fact that the projects are “being undertaking by an organization unit”[6]: the Project/Program/Portfolio Management Offices. Each year, the trade events are organized in the same month. In the process of creating a trade show, we see that a certain number of persons with different roles and responsibilities are gathered, and they assemble resources to work together achieving coordinated activities. The team involved in the completion of the project gathers physical resources such as a venue, tables and chairs for the booths, accreditations and welcome packs (bags). During the preparation of the project, the team needs to consider possible constraints as soon as the project is initiated. Among the constraints, the risk of dispute, for example when you did not receive the bags and the accreditations you ordered, is an aspect analyzed by the project manager. He or she controls the execution and the quality of every deliverable to assess and avoid the happening of such risk.

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Rabe, A. (2019). Alternative Dispute Resolution at trade shows: What are the options for your events?, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Rabe-alternative-dispute-resolution-at-trade-shows.pdf

 



About the Author


Adriana Rabe

Paris, France

 

 

 

Adriana Rabe is a French student enrolled in SKEMA Business School since 2015 (Programme Grande Ecole). In 2018, after one semester in Brazil, she joined the Master of Science Project and Program Management and Business Development in Paris. Adriana has one year of experience in events organizing (mainly in conferences and trade shows). During her gap year, in 2017, she worked at the Forum des Images to plan the Co-Production Forum of Series Maria festival and at TV France International to organize booths for the French delegates. She has gotten the PRINCE2® and AgilePM® Foundation Certificates. She is looking forward to improving her knowledge in events organizing and start another adventure with new project teams.

Adriana lives in Paris, France and can be contacted at [email protected] or https://www.linkedin.com/in/adriana-rabe.

 

[1] Reed MIDEM. (n.d.). Discover MIP Entertainment Content Markets. Retrieve from http://www.mipcom.com/RM/RM_MIPCOM/marketing/2018/pdf/mip-markets-brochure-2018.pdf?v=636633495992575659

[2] Wideman, M. (n.d.). Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms v5.5. © R. Max Wideman, 2000-2017. Retrieved October 31, 2018, from http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/PMG_P12.htm#Project

[3] Wideman, M. (n.d.). Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms v5.5. © R. Max Wideman, 2000-2017. Retrieved October 31, 2018, from http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/PMG_A05.htm

[4] Planning Planet. (n.d.). Guild of Project Controls Compendium and Reference. Retrieved October 30, 2018, from http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

[5] Wideman, M. (n.d.). Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms v5.5. © R. Max Wideman, 2000-2017. Retrieved October 31, 2018, from http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/PMG_P10.htm – Program Director

[6] Wideman, M. (n.d.). Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms v5.5. © R. Max Wideman, 2000-2017. Retrieved October 31, 2018, from http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/PMG_P04.htm

 

Staffing Project Teams

The difference between being employed in France and China

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Ling Li

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France and China

 


 
ABSTRACT

The global talent market is increasingly competitive. In order to attract high-valued talents for a global project and remain competitive, it is essential to understand the better why employees stay in a company and help the company to future improve the people management skills. This paper aims to find out the best choice better for project staffing based between France and China, and actions the companies should take to remain competitive for hiring international project team members.

Through literature review, disjunctive method and the additive weighting analyses, we find out that France is the preferred alternative for attracting high valued project staff among the four investigated countries. China can be the preferred project staff-based place in the perspective of saving staffing cost. Organizations should enhance better benefits through the employment contract to remain or be more competitive. The Follow-on research on employment contract is suggested to conduct as a new economy mode emerges.

Keywords: Employment, Contract, International Talent, Attract, Project Team Members

INTRODUCTION

The employees are unique assets for a project, programme, and portfolio. A project can be “An investment that requires a set of logically linked and coordinated activities performed over a finite period of time in order to accomplish a unique result in support of a desired outcome”[1] . Without employees, to be more precisely, project team members, the project is impossible to achieve any objectives. According to Guild, there are four types of programme – Strategic programme, operational programme, multi-project programme, and Megaproject. The higher the complexity of the programme, the more organization assets need to acquire, create, expand upon and dispose of. Moreover, one of the five assets classes of the portfolio is the human asset which is controlled by HR. “Any organization, be it owner or contractor has a portfolio of assets (resources) available to dedicate to projects, with the objective is to develop the best “mix” of projects which will generate the most favourable return on those assets”[2]. It is essential to recruit and hire talents with high-valued expertise for the successes of project, programme, and portfolio for the HR managers so to achieve the objective.

The search for talent is becoming increasingly global. According to a survey by The Economist Intelligent Unit, “over half of the surveyed firms will look beyond their home regions to fill talent gaps. US and Japanese firms will increasingly look to east and south Asia (China and India, for example) for new talent, while the UK, German and French firms will look actively to eastern Europe for recruits[3]. Moreover, attracting various skills and diversified expertise and knowledge has become a significant element in the economic development process for many countries.

In recent decades, large projects tend to involve people from all around the world, extending the breadth of skills that a Project Manager or project team member should have. In particular, for the organizations who want to use talented people from the different cultural background and different skills at low cost, as an international project team could overcome the barriers of time and geographical location and efficiency, effectiveness and innovation follow. Global projects and geographically dispersed project team seems to be the norm in today’s globalized economy[4].  However, to attract and hire high-valued project team member remain the difficulty for most companies.

After conducting root cause analysis of attracting international project team member, it can be settled as follows:

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Li, L. (2019). Staffing Project Teams – The difference between being employed in France and China, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Li-staffing-project-teams-france-vs-china-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Ling Li

Paris, France

 

 

 

Ling Li is a talent acquisition professional with 4 years of experiences in Human Resource Management. Born in the south of China and raised in Shenzhen – a gleaming manifestation of China’s economic miracle, she gained a Human Resource Professional Certificate after university and started her HR career in Walmart China Headquarters. After worked in different industries – retail, trading service, ecommerce and digital marketing, currently she is completing her MSc in Project and Programme Management & Business Development from SKEMA Business School.

Ling has rich experience on Human Resource Management projects such as massive campus recruitment and internal HR operation innovation; she is also familiar with digital marketing operations. Ling is PMI CAPM, PRINCE 2, Agile PM and PEP Credentialed。

Ling Li lives in Paris, France and can be contacted at Email: [email protected]  or LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/liling92/

 

[1] Source: Adapted from a Linked In discussion initiated by William R. Duncan  1/13/2018-  https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6357416976318558208/

[2] Forrest, D., Williams, J., LeServe, M., Dua, M. R ., Giammalvo, D. P. D., Pope, R., … Yasir, R. (n.d.). GPCCAR M01-1 Introduction to managing project controls, Revision 1.02. In GUILD OF PROJECT CONTROLS COMPENDIUM and REFERENCE (CaR).

[3] “talent wars: The struggle for tomorrow’s workforce”. (2008). Retrieved from The Economist Intelligent Unit website: http://graphics.eiu.com/upload/sap_talent.pdf

[4] PMI. (November 11). Global projects: how to manage them successfully – Project Teams. Retrieved from https://www.pmi.org/learning/library/global-projects-manage-successfully-team-7146

 

 

Explore different contracts of intellectual property

in movie industry (USA) for Project Managers

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Colombe Gruau

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

As the project management science evolved, the influence of intellectual property components and contracts over the objectives of the projects has increased. Contracts need to fit in this changing environment. Contracts can play a meaningful role in the project’s success. Specific IP contacts hold tremendous potential in improving project management. The fundamental aim of this research is to evaluate how and to what extent specific IP contracts can affect project management. The paper ran a literature review on recent research to assess the main challenges with traditional contracts. Then, the paper established the awaited impact of specific IP contracts in movie industry on several aspects of the project manager’s activity. Finally, the paper analyzed how each effect and action of IP contracts can contribute to project management performances. The obtained results have shown that IP contracts could literally improve project management in many ways such as the efficiency and transparency in the management of project.

Keywords:  IP contract issue, Rights, Process, Script, Screen, USA, International, Copyrights, Movie Industry, knowledge, Intellectual Property

INTRODUCTION

Intellectual property is protected by law, for example through patents, copyrights and trademark registrations, which provides recognition and financial benefit to these creators. American cinema is now considered to be the industry that has most profoundly shaped and transformed cinema during its first century of existence, both in terms of content and techniques and in economic and cultural terms. In this profession, project management exists in a spectrum of industries, ranging from engineering and construction to information technology and manufacturing.

Table 1 Comparison of the Guild definition and the Movie industry definition [1]

Figure 1: Forms of contracts of Intellectual Property[2]

Here shown in Figure 1 are the main different contracts between the actors and the producer in the movie industry but also the forms of contracts between the actors and the theaters.

The purpose of intellectual property is to protect all forms of work such as series, documentaries, feature films, and short films and to avoid copying them in order to protect the creator.

The American film industry today holds a major place in our societies. He is internationally recognized, and his films are translated into different languages. According to the statistics of the National Film Centre in Paris, it can be seen that in the majority (if not all) of European countries the place of the American film industry overshadows that of the local one. The issue of copyright is an important element in the United States that has changed significantly over the past century, from 75 years from the date of publication to now 70 years after the author’s death if it is an individual author or from 95 to 120 years from the date of creation if it is a collective work. These last modifications try to cope with the digitization of data. Hollywood has recently pointed to some platforms in this new era of digitization, including Watch Series, Put locker”, TUBE+, Couch Tuner, Watch32, Project Free TV and Watch Free. The latter infringe copyright rules.

Managing well the different clauses in the movie industry are related to the way to manage a project in business development. Understanding that it’s essential to have clauses that protect both parties if there is a violation of the intellectual property of an artwork. In fact, the purpose of these contracts is to protect the creator’s work and give him rights to defend himself. The copyright owner may be the author, producer or publisher of the work in the cinema industry. A good understanding of intellectual property in cinema requires us to know a wide range of copyright relating to different elements of production, namely the script music, the director’s work, and the actors’ performance. However, it is important that each of these rights is properly described, transferred and assigned so that the producer can claim ownership of the film and license the related distribution rights.

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Gruau, C. (2019). Explore different contracts of intellectual property in movie industry (USA) for Project Managers, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Gruau-intellectual-property-contracts-in-movie-industry.pdf

 



About the Author


Columbe Gruau

Paris, France

 

 

 

Colombe Gruau is a 24 year old French student, currently pursuing a Master of Science degree in Project and Program Management and Business Development at Skema Business School.  Since her youngest age, she has a strong entrepreneural mindset and a powerful passion about digital technology and the Movie Industry.   After gaining significant experience from different positions in different industries, such as movie production, she worked closely with the best production managers.

Her numerous international experiences (internships, exchange semester) gave her the opportunity to develop adaptability and to become a confident problem solver. Being open-minded and world oriented increased her innovative skills. She is highly interested in project management and her main upcoming challenges, and is getting certified by Prince2, AgilePM, CAPM.

Colombe is not only defined by professional experiences. She has also several hobbies, including water skiing and wakeboarding, scuba diving and surfing. She loves to travel the world (Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, USA, Europe, etc.) and discover new fields.

You can contact her at [email protected] or https://www.linkedin.com/in/colombegruau/

 

[1] (By Author)

Adapted from a Linked In discussion initiated by William R. Duncan  1/13/2018-https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6357416976318558208/

Extraterritorial Applicability of U.S. Privacy Laws – Proskauer on International Litigation and Arbitration. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.proskauerguide.com/law_topics/28/I

Folger, J. (2010, March 31). The Economics Of Summer Blockbuster Movies. Retrieved from https://www.investopedia.com/financial-edge/0410/the-economics-of-summer-blockbuster-movies.aspx

Giammalvo, Paul D. (2015). Course Materials. Contributed Under Creative Commons License BY v 4.0. Retrieved from http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

Infographic: Disney-Fox Deal to Shake Up the Movie Industry. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.statista.com/chart/12307/market-share-of-major-film-studios/

17 Inspiring Online Marketing Strategies For Your Film Or TV Show. (2018, August 28). Retrieved from https://www.ventureharbour.com/ultimate-guide-marketing-films-tv-shows-online/

[2] 10 Main Forms of Primary Rights | Intellectual Property. (2016, July 12). Retrieved from http://www.biologydiscussion.com/biotechnology/intellectual-property-rights/10-main-forms-of-primary-rights-intellectual-property/38153

 

 

Litigations between artists and recording companies:

A trial of strength

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Vali Rachel Eymard

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

This paper was written as part of the international project contract class conducted by Dr Paul Giammalvo within the Msc Project and Program management and business development in SKEMA Business school.

This paper will enable artists and recording companies to manage successfully a project. Since litigations in the music industry is the key to whether the project is successful or not this paper will highlight the feasible alternatives that can be used by both parties to avoid disputes.

Thanks to a deep study using non-compensatory and multi-attribute decision-making models and the additive weighting technique we will be able to choose the best option to avoid expensive and time-consuming disputes. Among those feasible alternatives we have: prevention, negotiation, standing neutral, non-binding solution, private binding resolution and litigation.

This paper recommends both parties to use the prevention alternative in order to avoid any dispute to arise during the project management process. However, when a dispute does arise we recommend to use the alternative: standing neutral or non-binding solution.

Keywords: Disputes/ Music / Agreement / Artist / Contract / Intellectual property / Labels

 

INTRODUCTION

The music industry is a prosperous sector which generates each year billions of dollars. In fact in 2017 “the turnover for this industry reached $ 17.5 billion and the selling increased by 8%”[1]. However, this flourishing industry hides a much darker aspect that was during many years hidden from the public opinion but which tends now to be mediatized: the trial of strength between artists and recording companies. It is common nowadays to hear about litigation in the music industry, but sometimes those disputes involve more than a simple contract issue. The real challenge for artists and recording companies is to prevent those disputes and/or to resolve them which most of the time is not an easy task to do. This stake is even bigger for recording companies since “the increase of their already existing unpopularity in the eyes of the public opinion”[2].

A recording company is in charge of the development of the artist, his promotion, the diffusion and so on, basically, it monitors and follows the artist through his work and post work. The artist is the creative person whose goal is to produce a musical deliverable, he is linked to the recording company by a contract. “Recording companies and artists when engaged each other through a contract, commit themselves to the production of a deliverable and its diffusion”[3].

This contract between both parties organize itself around the management of a project which can be the production of a CD for example. In fact, we can regard the contract between an artist and its recording label as a real and concrete project. “A project is a temporary and unique end over” [4] and Project management can be defined as “the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations for the project”[5], thereby it is applicable here in the sense that producing a recorded song or a CD is unique (that is to say the deliverable produced is unique) and it is a temporary project since the contract defines the relationship and the tasks for a limited time.

Then it is not rare to see conflicts occurring between artists and recording companies, as in any project and contract, disagreements are numerous. In fact the sources of conflict in that kind of project are diverse: creation, promotion, marketing, sales, intellectual property… Most of the disputes take roots in the contract itself or in the managing way of the recording company regarding creative control for example.

Thereby, studying the litigations in this industry required to understand the main roots of the conflicts (cf diagram) and the possible resolution ways that can be implemented. According to Kaleena Scamman in ADR in the music industry “one of the unavoidable ways to resolve disputes is based on the use of arbitration and mediation”[6]. As in all contracts, arbitration is in fact really useful when it comes to resolving disputes before and after the contract is signed, but there are also other ways to tackle the subject such as negotiation clauses, prevention, non-binding solutions… The resolving method depends obviously on the dispute itself and its states.

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Eymard, V.R. (2019). Litigations between artists and recording companies: a trial of strength PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Eymard-litigations-between-artists-and-recording-companies.pdf

 



About the Author


Vali Rachel Eymard

Lille, France

 

 

 

 

Vali Eymard is a PGE Student at SKEMA Business School currently in Msc Project and Program Management and Business Development in Lille, France. She has a strong international background since she lived in Morocco for 8 years and in the USA for half a year. After graduating from the French High school of Marrakech she came back to France to do a Preparatory class for competitive entrance into French Business School during 2 years. She did a License in SKEMA BS in Management and she will be starting an Internship at GL Events as a business developer in January 2019. She has experience in event planning and business development since she worked as a consultant during one semester at HQ Raleigh USA an incubator for startups. She is currently working on the PRINCE 2 and AGILE PM certifications for this semester.

Vali Eymard can be contacted at [email protected] or at [email protected], you can also send her a message via her Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vali-eymard-24539a12a/

 

[1] Thomas Renard (April-2018) – L’industrie musicale a pesé 17.3 milliards de dollars en 2017- Booska Data on the music industry. Retrieved from: https://www.booska-p.com/new-l-industrie-musicale-a-pese-17-3-milliards-de-dollars-en-2017-n89716.html

[2] Arnaud Ferreri (august-2008) – Nouvelobs Les maisons de disques ont fait leur temps. Retrieved from:https://www.nouvelobs.com/rue89/rue89-rue89-culture/20080825.RUE5452/internet-et-la-musique-les-maisons-de-disques-ont-fait-leur-temps.html

[3] Didier Félix (2004) – Le contrat de travail de l’artiste-interprète – Report on the state law and the necessity to change it in the future. Retrieved from: https://www.cairn.info/revue-legicom-2004-3-page-65.htm

[4] William R. Duncan (1996) – A guide to the project management body of knowledge http://www2.fiit.stuba.sk/~bielik/courses/msi-slov/reporty/pmbok.pdf

[5] William R. Duncan (1996) – A guide to the project management body of knowledge http://www2.fiit.stuba.sk/~bielik/courses/msi-slov/reporty/pmbok.pdf

[6] Kaleena Scamman – ADR in the music industry: Tailoring dispute resolution to the different stages on the artist-label relationship. Retrieved from: https://cardozojcr.com/vol10no1/269-304.pdf

 

 

How to turn Brexit’s devastating impacts into opportunities?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Jules Dorlin

SKEMA Business School

Paris or Lille, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

Brexit will take place by March 2019 and deeply impact project management contracts. Thus, as it is an important part of any project managers’ job to plan and limit the risks that could negatively impact the project, visualize Brexit’s possible specific scenarios to develop the most adapted responses shows crucial advantages to face this unique situation. The main purpose of the research is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and the positives impacts it provides to project management. The paper ran a literature review of Brexit’s possible impacts on contracts based on recent research. Then, the paper highlights different behavior project managers can adopt to answer to this situation. Finally, the paper analysis the possible solutions and which one of them provides the best performances to project management. The results have shown that visualizing Brexit’s possible specific scenarios to develop the most adapted responses considerably reduces risks for project management.

Keywords:  Brexit – Impact – Commercial Contract – Forecast

 

INTRODUCTION

A referendum was held on Thursday 23 June 2016, to decide whether the United Kingdom will remain a member of the European Union or if it will leave it. “With a turnout reaching 71.8%, the leave won by 51,9% to 48,1%”.[1] These results triggered the first step of a long-term negotiating process planned to last several years. Do you know that contracts will get impacted by Brexit and that it is crucial to anticipate the potential outcomes to stay keep businesses safe after the United Kingdom leaves the European Union?

By March 2019, the United Kingdom won’t be part of the European Union anymore. Among the multitudes of treaties, bilateral and multilateral contracts that are going to be renegotiated, there are some commercial contract clauses that are going to be impacted. It appears that the United Kingdom will lose more than 750 international arrangements and will have to renegotiate many of them. Businesses between the United Kingdom and the European Union were highly facilitated by common treaties. Project managers from both the European Union and the United Kingdom will observe an impact on their contract’s clauses.

Most companies are already preparing themselves for this important event and are trying to forecast the potential impact Brexit will have on their contracts. Additionally, Brexit is a lesson to all project managers all over the world: “As a project manager, this is a chance you can’t afford to take. Even when you’re absolutely certain something won’t happen, always have a back-up plan ready just in case that “impossible” thing comes to pass”[2]

DIAGRAM 1. Brexit potential impact on contracts.[3]

Contractors from both the United Kingdom and the European Union must anticipated the impact caused by Brexit on major clauses and define strategic solutions if they want to stay efficient and profitable. Few major clauses are already identified and should trigger contractor’s attention such as contract pricing, DATA protection clauses which depend on whether a country is part of the European Union or not, compliance obligation especially regarding licenses but also dispute resolution clauses which are crucial in this very complex situation.

By the end of this research, we should be able to take the right decisions about post Brexit contracts especially about specifics clauses: contract pricing, DATA protection, compliance obligations and Governing Law and dispute resolution. This paper will focus on potential solutions for all these clauses and enable project managers to anticipate Brexit’s impact on these clauses.

More…

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Author Dorlin, J. (2019). How to turn Brexit’s devastating impacts into opportunities? PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Dorlin-how-to-turn-brexit-impacts-into-opportunities.pdf

 



About the Author


Jules Dorlin

Paris, France

 

 

 

 Jules Dorlin is a French Business Student at SKEMA Business school in Paris. He spent more than a year in Asia (India, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos) to discover new cultures and learn to think differently. He keeps a close connection with foreign countries which are the foundation of his open-mindedness. After getting his bachelor’s degree in business administration within a one-year apprenticeship program, he had the opportunity to keep working as a salesman or to join a French Business School. He decided to join SKEMA Business School in 2017 to improve his problem-solving skills and general knowledge of business. After an entire semester in Raleigh, North Carolina, he has most recently enrolled in a master’s degree at SKEMA Business School pursuing the specialization “MSc Project and Program Management & Business Development”. He will then pursue his studies in Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) to complete his theorical background before entering the labor market.

Jules can be contacted at [email protected] or on LinkedIn.

 

[1]  EU Referendum Results. (2018, October). Retrieved from https://www.bbc.com/news/politics/eu_referendum/results

[2] EU Referendum Results. (2018, October). Retrieved from https://www.bbc.com/news/politics/eu_referendum/results

[3] By author

 

 

Is the current FIFA regulation equally fair

for players and clubs?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Anta Diop

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT 

Underneath the sport aspect of football and the well-known FIFA competitions like the Football Worldcup or the UEFA Champions League, lays another aspect which we could call the « business » aspect of Football. Indeed, the football world is one of competition and rivalry as the clubs are continuously in a race to get the best players in the transfer market. In this world, most of the relationships are governed by contracts, which leads to disputes in case of disagreements. Disputes are particularly frequent between a club and a player because of contract termination linked with an injury or negative results in a medical examination. Therefore, the FIFA regulation includes several clauses to protect both parties from breach of contract.

However, some still argue that FIFA’s regulation benefits the players more than the clubs. To identify what would be the potential other alternatives to deal with disputes in football and understand which alternative is the best one, we will use several methods of qualitative and quantitative analysis and comparison in this paper.

The results of this analysis show us that the current regulation actually protects both clubs and players equally and that keeping the regulation as it is now is the best alternative.

Keywords: contracts, disputes, football, FIFA, dispute resolution, RSTP, breach of contract

 

INTRODUCTION

A few months ago, on July 15th 2018, France won the Football Worldcup. For one month, from June 14th to July 15th, the Worldcup was all that the whole world was talking about. This football competition is the second most followed sport event in the world behind the Olympic Games. Indeed, football is the most popular sport in the world and is even a part of the culture in certain countries.

The international governing body of football is the FIFA (the International Federation of Association Football). This federation gathers 211 national football associations around the world, which make up 6 confederations that represent the FIFA at the continental level. The FIFA’s authority in the football world is complete as this federation is responsible for organizing major football competition and governing football worldwide. It is also responsible for solving disputes and has a specific body to that effect: the Dispute Resolution Chamber (DRC). The main legal document that governs the status and transfers of football players is the « Regulation for the Status and Transfer of Players » (RSTP). The DRC refers to this document to make its decision during dispute resolution.

Disputes are not rare in the football world because most relationships are governed by contracts. Indeed, the relationship between a player and a club for example, or the transfer of a player between two clubs are both governed by contracts. When there is a disagreement between two parties linked by a contract, there is a need for proper dispute resolution. As per Max Wideman’s Comparative Glossary, « a contract is a legally binding agreement between two parties or more, which creates an obligation to do or not to do a particular thing »[1]. It is characterized by competent – that is to say not under age or insane – parties, a subject matter, a legal consideration and a mutuality of agreement and of obligation. In a contract, each party acquires rights and duties relative to the rights and duties of the other parties.

Root cause analysis[2] – 5 Why’s:

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Diop, A. (2019). Is the current FIFA regulation equally fair for players and clubs? PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Diop-is-current-fifa-regulation-fair-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Anta Diop

Paris, France

 

 

 

Anta DIOP is a French graduate student pursuing a Master of Science in Project Management at Skema Business School in Paris. She completed two years of preparatory class in economics before entering Skema BS. During her education in Skema, she had the opportunity to travel around the world and live in different countries, she studied in China for one semester and in the United States for another semester. She also gained experience in event and project management thanks to the internships she has integrated in her educational pathway. She passed the PMI exam during her MSc in Project Management and is now a Certified Associate in Project Management. After she finishes school, she would like to go back to Asia and work as a project manager in different industries to build a diverse experience in project management.

Anta lives in Paris and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

[1] Max Wideman’s Comparative Glossary (http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/)

[2] By Author

 

 

Model for professionals’ sports,

it could be a dream

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Romain Chapron

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

When I was young, I said, “Why could I not become a professional soccer player?”. But how many kids, students or teenagers have already thought of that? It’s a dream for everyone who are passionate for a sport to live thanks to it. Nowadays, players show their daily life in the social network and obviously it’s a dream life, everything it’s possible. Most of the footballer player earn very well his life. Unfortunately, it is not easy as it seems. Those top players represent the emerged part of the iceberg, the other has forgotten their study in order to focus their career in football, but it never happens anything after. That’s why making from your passion your own job is a tough career path. However, if you work hard and you make the right decisions at the good moment, it could be one of the most lucrative job in the world. Neymar is currently earning the amount of 1 € per second, only with his salary (which doesn’t cover his sponsorship compensation and rewards). But people forget one thing. He is one of the best guys in his job! We are used to comparing us (and our wages) to them and to say, “he is paid too much, just to kick a ball around”. But Neymar is not a common guy, he is one of the best soccer players in the world, he is valuable.

Keywords: Compensation, Contracts, Sports, Professional, Payment, FIFA, Sport clause, Contracts issue.

 

INTRODUCTION

Football is a global marketplace and top players relocate constantly. “Zinedine Zidane, for example, played for clubs in the Spain, Italy and France over the course of his career”[1]. Professional players sign contracts with clubs for a fixed term of up to five years. If a player transfers before their contract expires, the new club pays compensation to the old one. This is known as a transfer fee. Twice a year. FIFA regulation set out two annual periods during which clubs can buy in foreign players, known as transfer windows. The longer transfer window falls between seasons and the shorter one falls mid-season. In the space of ten years, the price of football transfer has totally skyrocketed. Each season, hundreds of millions of dollars are spent in order to engage the best footballer’s services possible. Last summer the transfer window is entered in a new era, the one of excesses. Indeed, “Paris Saint Germain has laid out more than 220 million to pay the buyout clause of the Brazilian superstar Neymar with a wage of £2.7m a month before tax”[2]. Obviously, there are much secret bonuses which is included in the Neymar contract. But how Neymar and his agent has negotiated perfectly his contract? If you want to do the same, you have to read this document.

In order to understand this phenomenon, it’s important to know the specificity of the sports contract. When you play for a professional sports team, you are the employee of a company (the club), as a consequence, you have also an employer. Like a traditional job, you have to sign a contract with your boss (the president of the club) and respect the different clause presented in your contract. But one of the particularities is that there are so many actors during a transfer. Indeed, not only the player has to sign the contract but also their agent, the club and all their lawyers.

The football agent act like a project manager in order to manage his player. The Career of the player is considered like a project where the main goal is to allow him to achieve his dream (it can be to join a club or to earn a huge wage). According to the Guild of Project Controls an asset is “a tangible or intangible resource with economic value that an individual, corporation or country owns or controls with the expectation that it will provide future benefit”[3].Nowadays the professional player is considered as a real human asset for the agent. Most of the time project manager in sport use the strategic program which is linked to a specific goal, increase the value of his portfolio. The Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards (GAPPS) based on research by Sergio Pellegrinelli offer a definition of the strategic program « Deliver assets and benefits that are directly linked to attaining the sponsoring organization’s future state » [4]..

In this way, the project manager (agent) has a portfolio of asset (player) where the main objective is to place them in the best club in order to get back a huge amount of money. Obviously, he has to represent their client, to act as the mediator between their client and his club, negotiate new deals with his present club on matters such as salary and personal terms and to help finalize new transfers. In the player contract, this includes details of salaries and bonuses, such as signing-on and loyalty bonuses. Players also undergo medical examinations to check they are fit to play. If this reveals previously undetected injuries, it can affect the size of the transfer fee.

More…

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Chapron, R. (2019). Model for professionals’ sports, it could be a dream, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Chapron-model-for-professional-sports-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Romain Chapron

Paris, France

 

 

 

Romain Chapron is a 23 year old French student, currently pursuing a Master of Science degree in Project and Programme Management and Business Development at Skema Business School.

After graduating at the university catholic of Lille, Romain joined the French Business School SKEMA. At the beginning of 2017, he did an internship in a start-up called Synbud as a Business Developer. This innovative company consists of a search engine working the same way as Google but specialized in travels. This experience was a way for him to confirm his interest in Project Management and innovation.

He has excellent problem-solving skills and is an effective team member with a strong ability to work in a team. Overall, Romain’s energy, his remarkable ability to learn and to catch new key accounts will make him an excellent collaborator with strong leadership.

As a student of Project Management, he has gotten the certifications of AgilePM and Prince 2 Foundation, which proves he is qualified to be a project team member.

You can contact him at: [email protected]

 

[1] This information comes from: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zin%C3%A9dine_Zidane

[2] Matthew Smith, 2018, the original text is available at: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-5357087/PSG-star-Neymar-earns-double-Mbappe-Cavanis-wages.html

[3] The original definition is available at: http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

[4] The original definition is available at: http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

 

 

Does outsourcing of PMO Functions improve Organizational Performance?

Qualitative study evidence from a case study in South Africa

 

SECOND EDITION

By Waffa Karkukly, PhD

Ontario, Canada

 



Abstract

This paper presents a qualitative case study, part of larger study that includes a quantitative study as well to investigate and analyze: first, the reasons and impact of outsourcing PMO functions namely (project delivery, project manager development, project methodology and tools, project portfolio management) for organizational performance, and second, the role of governance and standards in outsourcing and performance relationship.  The research is done through multiple case studies representing different industries and geographic locations.  The case presented in this paper is conducted in the mining industry in South Africa. The results indicate that outsourcing of PMO functions have contributed to improved performance.

Introduction

Although there is substantial literature on the topic of outsourcing and project management, the PMO attracts limited attention.  Similarly outsourcing of project management office functions has received no attention in the literature; therefore, there is a practical and theoretical motivation to study outsourcing PMO functions especially in tough economical times were organizations seek not only cost savings, but maximizing performance.

Over the decade, outsourcing has received increasing research attention in response to the increased demand on outsourcing as means for organization to compete and be effective in today’s market challenges. (Mclvor, 2008).

One reason for creating a PMO may be to guarantee consistency of approach across projects. The PMO establishes project management methods, defines and implements processes and procedures, provides project structure, and deploys supporting systems and tools, as well as provides project manager development and training (Bates, 1999).

Literature Review Summary

Outsourcing today became an important practice in organizations with many organizations looking ways to leverage external capabilities.  Outsourcing started in manufacturing for cost reduction and soon moved into other vital organizational functions such as Finance, payroll, tax, HR, call centers, and services oriented.  The model shift and the enhanced capabilities of the outsourcing firms have allowed smaller organizations to step up to the “big” organization level and performance simply by taking advantage of the outsourcing model and having access to the expertise and talent that large companies have. (Brown and Wilson, 2005).

Outsourcing can be defined in simple terms to describe a situation where one organization gives work to other firms, which can execute this work more efficiently, usually for lower costs, and whose capabilities complement or supplement their own. (Kancharla 2007, p.59)

Current outsourcing Industry

Today, the outsourcing market is more solid than ever before, with many companies reaping the benefits of outsourcing, and many outsourcing companies having developed further skills and enhanced their services to accommodate the rising challenge; hence, it is no longer manpower source only to finish particular tasks, it is more of partnership and alignment between the outsourcing company and their outsourcing provider (Dominguez, 2006).

The increasing occurrence of outsourcing has led to it being considered central to the strategic development of many organizations.  Outsourcing is increasingly being employed to achieve performance improvements across the entire business. For example, one particular growth area has been the externalization of Information Technology (IT) with a recent report showing companies outsourcing 38% of their IT functions to external providers (Mclvor, 2005)

The firms that have higher outsourcing success take the time to do their due diligence and to build a business model for outsourcing. Successful outsourcing engagements also require organizations that don’t allow outsourcing a broken process or function. (Dominguez, 2006).

Outsourcing for Performance

Outsourcing provides a potential path to price reductions and increased flexibility, allowing firms to convert fixed costs into variable expenses, and increase their economies of scope. Studies indicate that short term price savings continues to be a predominant reason for both offshore and domestic outsourcing (Ellram et al., 2007).  A key element of using outsourcing as a source of competitive advantage is the management of suppliers. Accessing the capabilities of suppliers offers organizations the opportunity to measure and improve their own performance. (Mclvor, 2005)

In summary, the outsourcing trend may have started for cost reduction and access to specialized skill sets in specific industries, most popular IT, HR, Hospitality.   While many organization functions have been open to outsourcing, project management functions have not yet been outsourced as other functions have been, such as IT for example.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally prepared while the author was a PhD candidate at SKEMA Business School in France and published in PM World Today in June 2010. It is republished here with the author’s permission.

How to cite this paper: Karkukly, W. (2010). Does outsourcing of PMO Functions improve Organizational Performance? Qualitative study evidence from a case study in South Africa; PM World Today, June 2010; republished as a Second Edition in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I, January 2019. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Karkukly-outsourcing-pmo-functions-case-study.pdf

 



About the Author


Waffa Karkukly, PhD

Ontario, Canada

 

 


Waffa Karkukly
is currently the President and Managing Director for the www.globalpmosolutions.ca. During her career, she has been involved in managing technology and project management offices, as well as being a strategist and change agent transforming organizations through alignment between strategy and operation and delivering through projects, programs and portfolios.  Waffa has helped organization improve their IT and / or Project management practices through building standards and proven solutions that improved the delivery process of an organization.  Waffa is an active PMI member and a frequent speaker and panelist at the various PMI events. Waffa has a BSC in Information Systems from DePaul University and an MIT from Northwestern University in the United States, and a PhD from SKEMA School of Business in France. She is a certified project management professional (PMP) and Agile Certified Professional (ACP) by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), as well as a Change Management Practitioner (CMP).  Waffa is dedicated to improving the understanding and standards of project management practices, especially in the Value proposition of building and sustaining successful PMOs. Waffa can be reached at [email protected]

 

 

Vision India 2025

Will the Elephant Dance?

 

SECOND EDITION

By Raju Rao

Chennai, India

 



Abstract

Many futuristic vision documents have been published in India at the country or state levels and by various agencies. The most well-known of them is India Vision 2020. Translating the vision into reality is a real challenge considering the complexity, issues and size of the nation.

How can project management as a practice help in achieving this vision? This aspect has been explored earlier by the author who resulted in papers, presentations at conferences and books. The objective of this paper is to review the status of application of project management for achieving India Vision 2020 and going beyond, looking at the year 2025.It will be a critical gap analysis of achievements so far in project management field in India vis-a-vis the goal. The framework for analysis will be the reports of the Boston Consulting Group, books by Prof Abdul Kalam & Prof Y S Rajan and other research material on the subject. Key factors that will be explored will include complexity, scaling-up, organizational project management etc. Current initiatives like Make in India, (Pradhan Mantri Dhan Jan Yojana (PMDJY), Swachh Bharat Abhiyan and various other programs in the Power / Infrastructure sector will be used as a basis for evaluation.

The analysis will focus on assessing current capabilities in project management in India and the steps that we need to take to reach the goal as a nation in 2025.

Keywords: India and its future, India Vision 2025

India Vision 2020 /2025

Various initiatives have been taken to generate vision documents for the year 2020 and beyond. These exercises have started around early 2000 and are still continuing. A synopsis of some of them is mentioned below.

One way to address the process of creating a vision is to consider alternative scenarios which WEF/ CII did so in their report in 2010. (8)

  • Bolly World is a story of how initial economic success becomes unsustainable, and domestic social and demographic pressures soon trigger an economic reversal.
  • Pahale India (“India First”) describes how a widely shared vision for India’s future aligns national aspirations and creates common goals.
  • Atakta Bharat (“India getting stuck”), the global economy slows, offering few benefits to India, while within India there is little and uneven development.

A high-level strategic group along with Boston Consulting Group and AIMA / CII in 2005 (2) identified three areas for action as those that will have the highest priority and will have the most impact.

  • Marketing India
  • Educating and Training the Indian Workforce
  • Connecting India (Telecom, IT, airports)

More…

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the PMI India National Project Management Conference in Mumbai, India in 2016 and included in the conference proceedings.  It is republished here with the author’s permission.

How to cite this paper: Rao, R. (2016). Vision India 2025 – Will the Elephant Dance? Second Editions; PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January). Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Rao-Vision-India-2015-Will-the-Elephant-Dance.pdf

 



About the Author


Raju Rao

Chennai, India

 

 

 

Raju Rao, PMP, SCPM, OPM3 Certified Professional, is a social entrepreneur and a project management evangelist. He is the Founder of the Forum for Food Recovery and Xtraplus Solutions, a PM consulting and training company based in Chennai, India. Mr Rao has a B.Tech degree in Chemical Engineering from the National Institute of Technology,Trichy,India; an Advanced PM certificate from Stanford University; and a certificate from IIM Calcutta. He has more than 40 years’ experience in engineering, process and project management and has been an active member of PMI for several years. He has held leadership positions in standards development, developing systems for awards governance, been a jury and has reviewed and mentored speakers for global congresses.Raju has been a President of South India section of AACE International.

Mr Rao has been a visiting and adjunct faculty for engineering and business schools in India. Raju is a member of Toastmasters International and has mentored speakers on behalf of PMI for the North American Global Congress held in 2018. He has presented numerous papers in global congresses and is the co-author of two books – Project Management Circa 2025 published by PMI and Organizational Project Management published by Management Concepts, USA. He has been an International Correspondent for PM World Journal. He is also involved in writing fiction and has recently authored a novelette ‘Triumph at Last’.

Raju Rao lives in Chennai, India and can be contacted at www.xtraplus.in or [email protected]

 

 

SITProMP

A Simplistic Approach towards Managing IT Projects

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Monjur Ahmed, Arthur Maria do Valle and Guss Wilkinson

Waikato Institute of Technology (Wintec)

Hamilton, New Zealand

 



Abstract

Simplistic IT Project Management Practice (SITProMP) is a generic framework towards IT Project Management or ITPM. ITPM is somewhat different than Project Management in other fields. There exists several principles, methodologies and approaches for managing projects. SITProMP considers existing approaches towards PM and presents a simplistic principle-based framework for ITPM. SITProMP offers agility and proposes to manage IT projects through any suitable methodology, tools or approaches towards PM that may fit in. SITProMP complements all existing approaches and principles for ITPM; and can encapsulate all existing tools and technologies for ITPM. Though primary focus of SITProMP is on IT projects, it can be adapted to projects in any other fields, and thus customizable. The foundation for SITProMP is the existing knowledge bases in PM.

Keywords: IT Project, IT Project Management, Project Management, Project Management Principle.

Introduction

Project Management (PM) needs solid planned approach to maximise the probability of project success; as failure in IT projects largely are management related (Schmidt, Lyytinen, Keil & Cule, 1996). Projects are unique and there are several factors that must be planned to manage a project. PM has been given great deal of thought and research. Several tools, methodologies, principles and frameworks are available for PM. Summer (1999) states the PM methodology as a critical success factor. To the best of our knowledge, adequate research does not exist to find out the impact of using simplistic or complex approach towards PM and its subsequent impact on project success do.

To follow any specific framework or methodology, it is important that all the members of a project team should become familiar with the framework or methodology. It is a reality that people move around organisations, and people leave one to join another. The training to learn any PM framework or methodology incurs some overheads as they are not related to the projects themselves. Besides, when people switch to another job, if the organisation they join uses a different framework or methodology, they need to re-educate themselves to cope with the new job. This may not only be inconvenient for an employee but may also be an indirect contributing factor towards lower employee morale that does not essentially originating from any work environment; but rather from an overall context of the job marketplace and industry. A simple principle-based framework that does not require extensive training or rely on any of the existing tools for PM may help to overcome this issue. Besides, if a framework exists on which only a project manager is required to have expertise on and releases the necessity of extensive training for the rest of a project team; it might help a project team to focus more on the project activities instead of caring about the bits and pieces of the framework they are following. This is the motivation behind proposing SITProMP.

The rest of the paper is organised as follows: Existing approaches towards PM are discussed and analysed in Literature Review. The section SITProMP illustrates the framework presented in this paper. We discuss possible and planned further research in Future Developments section.

Literature Review

There are several structured approaches towards project management, either in the form of methodology, framework or principle. Each approach comes with its own standards, procedures and jargons. IT projects are distinct in that, technologies play an important role in IT projects (Orlikowski & Lacono, 2001). Unlike projects in all other fields, IT projects can be accomplished by a team of geographically dispersed people (Maznevski & Chudoba, 2008). Martinic, Fertalj and Kalpic (2012) argue that existing PM methodologies are not entirely suitable for IT projects involving virtual team (i.e. a geographically dispersed project team).

Some of the leading PM methodology of frameworks are PMBOK, PRINCE2 and CMMI. PMBOK is a widely accepted standard in PM which has 42 processes. All these processes are organised in five process groups (Fitsilis, 2007; Rdiouat, Nakabi, Kahtani & Semma, 2012). PRINCE2, which is a process-based approach towards PM, is structured around principles, themes and processes. It has seven principles, seven themes and seven processes (TSO, 2018). CMMI provides a PM framework for engineering projects. It comes with 22 process areas (Rdiouat et al. 2012).

More…

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How to cite this paper: Ahmed, M; Valle, A.M.d.; Wilkiinson, G. (2019). SITProMP: A Simplistic Approach towards Managing IT Projects; PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Ahmed-Valle-Wilkinson-SITProMP.pdf

 



About the Authors


Monjur Ahmed

Hamilton, New Zealand

 

 

 

Monjur Ahmed is a Lecturer at Centre for Information Technology (CFIT), Waikato Institute of Technology (Wintec), New Zealand. He holds BSc (Hons) in Computing and Information Systems from London Metropolitan University, UK; MS in Telecommunications from University of Information Technology & Sciences, Bangladesh; MSc in Electronics and Communications Engineering from University of Greenwich, UK; and PhD from Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. His doctoral research was on a distributed and decentralised security model for Cloud Computing. Monjur is an active researcher. His research interests are in IT/IS security focusing on both technological and human aspects, mainly in contemporary computing approaches (e.g. Cloud and Decentralised Computing, IoT, and Big Data). Monjur has over 10 years of teaching experience in New Zealand, United Kingdom, China and Bangladesh. He has also facilitated several workshops globally. Monjur can be contacted at [email protected]

 


Arthur Valle

New Zealand

 

 

 

Arthur Maria do Valle is a Senior Academic Staff Member in the Centre for Information Technology (CFIT) at Waikato Institute of Technology (Wintec), where he is also the IT Research Leader. Arthur has a PhD in Production and System Engineering from Pontifical Catholic University of Parana (PUCPR) in Brazil. As his thesis, he developed a method for applying Process Mining techniques in software process assessments. Arthur has industry and academic background in topics such as Lean Six Sigma; Continuous Improvement; Business Process Management; Software Development; Quality Management; Operations Management; Performance Measurement, Project Management; Service Management and Strategy. As a former senior IT consultant for the last 18 years, Arthur had been involved in 15+ successful CMMI-based improvement programs in Brazil and abroad. Arthur can be contacted at [email protected]

 


Guss Wilkinson

New Zealand

 

 

 

 Gustav (Guss) Wilkinson is a Chartered IT Professional with 18-years’ experience in management, governance, business analysis and project management within the utilities, health and education sectors. Originally from Stockholm, Sweden, Guss started his career as an Optometrist but re-educated on moving to New Zealand in the end of 1996, gaining a PhD in Management systems. Guss can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

 

January 2019 UK Project Management Round Up

Good News, BREXIT, Professionalism in the UK PM, Project Management Standards

 

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 



INTRODUCTION

I had hoped that much of BREXIT would be behind us by now but it seems that, like many commentators, I was fooled by the vote possibilities.  More of this shortly.  The main topic this month is the state of project management professionalisation in UK.  There is not much to report on major projects over the holiday period and this is, in fact, good news so I will say a few words on the topic.

GOOD NEWS

Most of UK is back at work today, after the Christmas and New Year holiday.  Weather has been kind, holiday traffic has flowed despite the much anticipated “chaos” where long term road works were not lifted and although there was the odd local problem, most of us managed pretty well, thank you.  Similarly, I have not yet heard of any significant issues the nation’s railway system, although we are not out of the danger period for a few more days.  This all goes to show that we can have confidence in the project management teams scheduling complex engineering work on road and rail systems.

One area where we did experience major delay was due to entirely unexpected issues.  This is not a significant project issue but does indicate that the role of the planner spreads into unexpected zones.  Just before Christmas, the UK’s second largest airport was shut down because of the presence of unathorised Drones.  The incident ran for 3 days and has nothing to do with any projects; what it does show is that the unexpected is lurking everywhere and the use of risk analysis techniques can help manage difficult situations.  It is a pity they were not used on this occasion.

BREXIT

Like most people in UK, I fully expected our Parliament to have voted on the proposed plan for the UK exit from the European Community.  So I was surprised, and disappointed that the Government killed the vote, shifting it to this month.  Some will see this as simply delaying the inevitable rejection of the heads of terms and a return to political crisis.  As I write this report, I note that the European Union has again rejected any possibility of re-negotiation of terms.  More follows next month, if you can bear it!

PROFESSIONALISM IN UK PM

Many readers will know that the Association for Project Management set out to achieve the award of a Royal Charter.  Investigations and consultations began in 2002, work was progressed under two Chairmen and a formal submission made that resulted in the award of the Charter in 2016.  Since then, a great deal of behind the scenes work has taken place to get in place the mechanisms to support the revised individual qualification system, set out the ground rules for the Register of Chartered Project Professionals and a large number of other underpinning structure.

The first fruits of all this work was the release of the first List of Chartered Members in the summer of 2018.  Just under 300 Chartered Project Professionals (ChPP) had qualified and many more are on the road to formal professional recognition.  The personal requirements and application process can be seen here https://www.apm.org.uk/chartered-standard/

Other APM activities in 2018 include a new corporate partner programme with new corporate events and planned future leaders forums.  The new marketing campaign has further raised APM’s profile and is set to continue into 2019.

Considerable progress has been made in the educational field where APM has developed a new MOOC (massive open online course) with the Open University and has extended its academic outreach programme.  As far as qualification are concerned, the new Project Management Degree Apprenticeship launched successfully and APM’s new suite of individual qualifications has been aligned with IPMA’s 4 level qualification.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 

How to cite this report: Shepherd, M. (2019).  January 2019 UK Project Management Roundup, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj68-Jan2019-Shepherd-UK-Regional-Report.pdf

 



About the Author


Miles Shepherd

Salisbury, UK

 

 

 


Miles Shepherd
is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World Journal in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair and a Fellow of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently a Director for PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and is immediate past Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

January 2019 PM Update from Spain

Interview with Elisabeth Matt and Ana Briseño, PMI Madrid Chapter Volunteer Leaders

 

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent

Madrid, Spain

 


 

PMI Madrid Chapter – the importance of volunteering

At the end of the month of November took place the PMI Madrid Chapter’s annual Conference, which also celebrated its 15th anniversary of existence. The most important for me, as a project management practitioner and volunteer over the years, was the recognition for the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter volunteers.

This year’s event was something special, because the Organization and presentation was run by volunteers who are let see, and therefore we want to bring to this space Elisabeth Matt and Ana Briseño, who were responsible for several weeks of the planning and control of all matters relating to the Congress.

Susana (S) Welcome

Elisabeth (E) Hi all,

Ana (A) Hello Susana, a salute to all those who read this interview

S We’d like to know a bit more about you professionally?

E I am a lawyer’s training and work of office manager at a telecommunications company, whose main objective is the submarine optical fiber and now we are starting with the ground-laying.

Too I am Director of consulting and projects, and work as a consultant, implementing and providing coaching in practice mainly focusing in the area of project management and PMOs; I also give training on the different processes of PMBOK, for certification PMP and soft skills for the PMs.

S Elisabeth you’re a lawyer, but are you certified or have specific training in Project Management? Increasingly also in less technical careers such as law seeks to acquire knowledge of project management, but until now it was less common.

E At the moment I am not certified but I have it on my to-do list. A couple of years ago I was standing work, and wanted to return to study, to learn new things and read about project management and their areas of reach. I did a master’s degree in Project Management, I signed the VRMS (Virtual Relationship Management system) from PMI to continue to learn and am now a mentor to launch me to fly alone. Project Management is also revolutionizing the world of law and is a train that we cannot pass.

Ana, you are working on training services. Would you say that currently is there a growing interest in learning and developing soft skills?

A yes, there is a lot of interest, and it has been growing up, mainly to adopt agile methodologies, where I think these skills are more relevant. Not because they are not necessary for the traditional ones, but there is more interaction working with self-managed teams. I think that this type of skills is not only necessary for the PM but for all team members.

S Did you have participated previously at any PMI Congress, or at any other Association as volunteers?

E it is the first time I have worked as a PMI volunteer but I’m sure it will not be the last one.

A yes, I had participated previously at other events as a volunteer, either for professional and personal interests.

S Why to be a PMI volunteer? Was there any particular reason that would push you to make that decision?

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 

How to cite this report:  Bucero, A. (2019). Title, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January). Available online at: https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-Jan2019-Bucero-Regional-Report-Spain-English.pdf

 



About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Madrid, Spain

 

 



Alfonso Bucero
, MSc, CPS, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and then nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Now he is a member of the PMIEF Engagement Committee. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 32 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010, the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011 and the PMI Eric Jenett Excellence Award on October 28th, 2017.

Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for January 2019

 

Updates about Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail project

 

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 


 

INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and some key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with 4000 individual and over 600 organizational members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project Days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. Please navigate to www.pry.fi/en, https://www.oppia.fi/events/3pmo/?lang=en and www.projektipaivat.fi for further information on PMAF and its main events.

 

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland organizes an annual conference in the spring. In 2019 the conference takes place on May 23rd, with an overarching theme “Inspire”. Please navigate to www.pmifinland.org and www.conference.pmifinland.org for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its main events.

 

OLKILUOTO 3

The 1 600 MW Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, originally contracted to be built by consortium comprising Areva and Siemens for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto, Finland, will be connected to the Finnish national power grid in October 2019, and will commence commercial power generation in January 2020. The previous plan was for the unit to start commercial operations in September 2019, however, the unexpected challenges encountered during the final testing procedures forced the commissioning to be postponed up until January 2020.

The delivery of Olkiluoto 3 power plant has been subject to a substantial number of challenges. In March 2018 an agreement was reached between TVO and Areva regarding the overruns in project budget and time schedule. According to TVO, Areva has agreed to compensate 450 M€ assuming the power plant is fully operational by the end of 2019. If the plant is not fully operational at that time, Areva will compensate a further 400 M€. As part of the agreement, both contractual parties have agreed to dispend any further judicial acts.

Once completed, Olkiluoto 3 will be the largest nuclear power plant in the world. TVO has been understandably disappointed about the fact that the plant is well over 100 % over original budget and 10 years behind the original time schedule.

The contract for building the Olkiluoto 3 power plant was signed in 2003 for 3 000 M€, and construction began in 2005, targeting completion in June 2009. Due to numerous challenges during the planning and construction phases, the target date has been pushed forward several times, finally to January 2020 – nearly eleven years in total. The delays have pushed the total cost up to 8 500 M€.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 

How to cite this report: Vaskimo, J. (2019). Finland Project Management Roundup for January 2019, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue I (January).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/pmwj78-jan2019-Vaskimo-Finland-Project-Management-Roundup-report.pdf

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

 

Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/