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How to Kill a Project Before it Kills You

and Survive to Tell it

 

SECOND EDITION

By Edgardo Suáre

Air Liquide

Houston, Texas, USA

 



Abstract

What happens when a project is raised out of very good reasons and intentions, but the timeline puts it in the midst of other major efforts that would come at the same time?

Are you as a project manager obliged to just run the project as directed? Or do you have the obligation to stop it if you see the risks to be high? Or at least, do you have the obligation to bring up the risks and let others decide?

What exactly is your obligation and how do you carry it out?

We will present a real case of one such project, one that had very good reasons to run and could provide great benefit, it had a deadline to complete (still several months away at the time of the discussions) and given other efforts and projects in the portfolio, it could have resulted in a major body of work at a very high risk that could derail not only this project but the others in the portfolio for the year.

We will present and describe details of the problem project and surrounding context (what other projects and events were in the horizon), how this project was getting coordinated and worked, and the reasons why it was believed to be creating high risks.

We will then describe what actions were taken to best determine if risks were really present, provide quantitative and qualitative data and raise awareness, and ultimately the specific action/s used to help define recommend a direction and a decision to continue or not, and the alternatives provided.

Keywords: project management, project risk, project portfolio, manager duties, manager responsibility, corporate culture

JEL code: M150, M140


Introduction

This paper describes a practical and real life case. It is however anchored in the PMBoK methodology and practical project management practice best practices as well as taking into account the cultural and financial aspects of the organization various stakeholders across various countries and continents.

The case involves a project started to migrate from a data centre into another from the same provider, which was initiated with considerable delay and which at a later point was used to “piggyback” a much larger project to consolidate data centres.

Many of the assumptions initially taken were proven to be incorrect and/or in conflict with the deadlines and timelines in discussion. A major issue was that the lack of consideration of the portfolio of projects and other potential events for the following months and year.

In the opinion of the enterprise architect, the risk of such a project (the consolidation of data centres) was too large to undertake and thus he communicated same to the hub CIO for further discussion and to raise it to a higher level.

Documentation as to the risks and costs, as well as a more sensible alternative were prepared and presented and ultimately, the consolidation project was hold for another time and only the original data centre migration was approved.

Some projects look great in paper, and a more formalized analysis with factual data can result in an entire different outlook.

This paper attempts to describe the dilemma of a PM as to whether he/she blindly runs a project or brings up the risks to stop it before it causes harm to the organization carrying it. With a smaller project, the PM would have a lower level of difficulty in steering to the right direction, the high stakes and visibility on the project we are presenting defines a different dynamic altogether.

We will present and discuss such a case inclusive to the details surrounding the state of affairs within the organization and considerations leading to the decision to hold…

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Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the most recent Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States at the University of Latvia in Riga in April 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers

How to cite this paper: Suárez, E. T. (2018). How to Kill a Project Before it Kills You, and Survive to Tell it; Proceedings of the 7th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia, April 2018; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue IX – September.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Suarez-how-to-kill-a-project-before-it-kills-you.pdf

 



About the Author


Edgardo Suárez

Houston, TX, USA

 

 

 

Edgardo Suárez has been since 2013 the Chief IT Architect Americas with Air Liquide based in Houston USA. Before and from 2003 to 2013 was Sr. Enterprise Architect with Sysco Foods in Houston USA. Prior to that had several technical and strategic roles in various other organizations.

He has more than 25 years of international experience in business transformations, information systems, process automation, process re-engineering and strategic planning, more than 15 years’ experience in supply chain and project management as well as enterprise architecture in various organizations in the US and South America.

Some of his international speaking invitations are: PMI Global Conference, South America 2009 to 2016, ICEX Intellectual Capital Exchange, USA – 2010 and 2015; SAP Sapphire, USA – 2012; Oil and Gas SAG Symposium, Germany – 2013; EAC-Enterprise Architecture Conference Europe, UK – 2015;  10th ECISM-European Conference in Information System Management, Portugal – 2016; 7th International Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic Countries, Latvia – 2018

Mr Suárez can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

The Business of Portfolio Management 4

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The Business of Portfolio Management: Boosting Organizational Value Through Portfolio Management          
Author:  Iain Fraser Dip PPC, PMP, MoP, P3M3, PMI Fellow, Fellow PMINZ
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price:   $44.95
Format:  Hard Cover, 166 pages
Publication Date:   2017
ISBN: 9781628253726
Reviewer: Kimberly S. Varner, PMP
Review Date:   August 2018

 



Introduction

Managing your organization’s multi-million dollar project takes a lot of time, talent, and resources to succeed, but what does it take to ensure you have a high-functioning company that understands its value? If you lead or work for an organization that is stagnant or not thriving fiscally, The Business of Portfolio Management: Boosting Organizational Value Through Portfolio Management, is an excellent primer for you. Author Iain Fraser, a 30-year business veteran, shares his knowledge on the complex, but courageous and attainable steps you can take to cultivate a more sustainable organization portfolio.

So, what is a portfolio and what is portfolio management? A portfolio is a collection of programs of work, projects, and other work group together to facilitate effective management of that work to meet strategic business objectives. The content of each portfolio may not necessarily be interdependent or directly related. The purpose of portfolio management is to make sure programs and projects support the organization’s strategic objectives and goals.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The Business of Portfolio Management: Boosting Organizational Value Through Portfolio Management is a 166-page book packed with insights, processes, case studies, and strong recommendations on how best to increase value to your organization’s portfolio.

The front of the publication includes background on the book’s reference material, buy-in from key experts, and details on Iain Fraser’s expertise. The “Acknowledgements” section informs you of the reference materials and methodologies used to write the book, as well as the organizations and subject matter experts who supported the development of this publication. “About the Author” will reassure you Fraser is a knowledgeable business owner and consultant, who is an expert on the complex phases, levels, and intricacies of business management. Then, David L. Pells, managing editor of PM World Journal penned the “Foreword.” Pells emphasizes the critical need for strong portfolio management, the timeliness of what he describes as this “executive guide to implementing effective portfolio management,” and endorses Fraser’s ability to craft this handy resource. In the “Introduction” Fraser informs readers that he wrote the book to help readers use powerful value-driven portfolio management to link strategy and implementation.  He also includes a brief synopsis on each section.

The book is comprised of four sections, each with a preceding quote to set the tone. For example, Section 1 – Organizational Woes and Wishes, which addresses the importance of embracing change and new ways of working to sustain success, kicks off with a Winston Churchill quote: “Continuous effort –not strength or intelligence – is the key to unlocking our potential.” The additional sections, which are each approximately 30-40 pages, are: Section 2 – Portfolio Management: A Way of Doing Business, Section 3: Using Program and Project Management to Deliver Change and Realize Benefits, and Section 4 – Supporting Functions: Time for Change!

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About the Reviewer


Kimberly S. Varner

Maryland, USA

 

 

Kim Varner has more than 23 years of writing, public relations, marketing, event, and project management experience—as well as deep experience designing and conducting outreach to underserved populations. Over the course of her career, she has developed communications plans and content for clients across the health, education, safety, technology, medical, sports, and entertainment industries.

Kim earned her Master of Arts in journalism from the University of Maryland at College Park, and previously earned a Bachelor of Arts in mass media arts from Hampton University. Kim obtained her Project Management Professional (PMP) ® Certification in March 2018.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Bridging the PM Competency Gap

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Bridging The PM Competency Gap: A dynamic Approach to Improving Capability an Project Success
Author:  Loredana Abramo, PMP & Rich Maltzan, PMP
Publisher:  J. Ross Publications
List Price:  $37.95
Format:  hard cover, 294 pages
Publication Date:   July 2017       
ISBN: 978-1-60427-140-9
Reviewer: Joseph Stein, PMP
Review Date: July 2018

 



Introduction

This book proposes options for PMO driven development plans to ensure project success by promoting personal and professional growth within the company’s body of Project Managers.  It’s the PMO’s role within an organization to establish tools, methods and aides for project model consistency, but tools alone can’t guaranty success. The authors of this book promotes the concept that project success is a by-product of technical understanding of PM related tools and techniques, leadership and strategic management of goal alignment.

Project manager’s level of competency is all too often equal to the challenges they encounter in their project environments, owing to lessons learned on the job.  With the rise of project complexities, it’s incumbent on the PMO to provide their PM team with the training and expertise to meet greater challenges.  Since not all project managers convey the same traits and experience levels, the challenge is to recognize individuals own unique needs or “competency gap”.

The writer clarifies many desirable PM competencies found useful to support organizational initiatives, build strong cohesive teams that communicate well and perform efficiently.  The author recognizes the practical concerns that face all projects which if left unchecked can erode the effectiveness of the project delivery.  The reader is introduced to a large verity of evaluation tools and techniques available to help PM’s recognize their own operating methods and how to leverage PM tools available and increased awareness of human behavior to their best advantage.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book develops the concept of project management competencies and how to recognize, understand and overcome gaps in competency.  The “gap” in project management competency impedes our ability to manage successful project implementations.  This book describes analysis tools and models for PM talent and competency evaluation, and development training possibilities to tailor competency development programs to best fit the requirement of the audience.

This book examines PM competency factors that have a positive influence on project teams and satisfy stake-holder goals and objectives.  A comprehensive review of widely regarding self-assessment tools and feedback techniques are reviewed for practical measures across the PM talent scale for leadership, technical and strategic traits.  Baseline measurements are used to leverage strengths and augment weaker inclinations.  The product of self-assessments tools lead to recognition of competency gaps.  The authors interviewed 36 leading Project Management experts for their observation and advice of what competencies factors they find most importance and the warning signs and outcomes if missing.

Highlights

This book covers problematic areas of project management concerns and makes compelling arguments for the need to help the PM achieve maturing levels of competency.  Assessment techniques are reviewed for their approaches to help identify levels of competency and provide insight for competency gap identification.

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About the Reviewer


Joseph Stein, BS, PMP

Dallas TX, USA

 

 

 

Joseph Stein is a PMP Certified, IT Technical Manager with CVS who holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Arizona State University.  Mr. Stein has over 30 years in the technical field with expertise that includes UNIX System Administration, Oracle Database Administration, Programming and Computer application development over a wide range of industries including Manufacturing, Telecommunications and Health services.  Mr. Stein has been PMP certified since 2016 and plays an active role in the project management process bridging enterprise information technologies.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

How to get Executives to Act

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    How to get Executives to Act for Project Success: Building a Strong Mutual Partnership
Author:  Michael O’Brochta
Publisher:  Zozer, Inc.
List Price:   $22.50
Format:  Soft cover
Publication Date:   February 2018
ISBN: 978-1981283439
Reviewer: Kimberly Scott, PMP
Review Date: July 2018

 



Introduction

Michael O’Brochta is passionate about Project Management.  He has been a PMP for over 30 years and has held senior positions at the CIA and served as the Chair of the Ethics Member Advisory Group at the PMI Corporate level and has written papers for a wide range of project management topics.

How to get Executives to Act for Project Success is a great go-to book that every Project Manager (and Stakeholder) should have on their desk.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is nicely and succinctly broken down into 6 chapters that build from Examining the Problem to (doing) What it Takes (to get things done).   Each Chapter gives a “Problem Story” using the character(s) George or Georgette as the Project Manager that are meant to be relatable to the Project Manager.

If you want a book that’s a quick guide on how to handle challenges with your Executive or Stakeholders, this is a great book. The examples used are on point and relatable.

Highlights

O’Brochta provides good solutions for the typical problems Project Managers face when working with executives. For example, how to respond to an executive when they are asking you do more with less resources.

He also reminds the reader/PM that it’s not unusual for executives to have a lack of basic understanding of project management; hence the premise of the book, and therefore the PM’s should be prepared for this knowledge gap and respond accordingly.

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About the Reviewer


Kimberly Scott

Texas, USA

 

 

Kimberly Scott is a fairly new PMP (as of 12/2016) and her projects have been based in the Mortgage industry; she enjoys system conversion and working with the end user to ensure project success.  Kimberly has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Texas at Dallas.  She’s a member of PMI, PMI Dallas and Dallas Toastmasters.

Kimberly can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

PgMP® Exam Test Preparation

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: PgMP® Exam Test Preparation: Test Questions, Practice Tests, and Simulated Exams
Author: Ginger Levin, PhD, PMP, PgMP
Publisher:  CRC Press – Taylor & Francis Group
List Price:   $69.95
Format:  Soft cover, 360 pages
Publication Date: May 2018
ISBN: 978-1-138-57979-8
Reviewer:  Masood Said, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP
Review Date:   August 2018

 


 
Introduction

This book is about the PgMP® certification exam preparation. It has been written for candidates who are interested in appearing for the PgMP® certification exam.  It has practice questions which can help candidates in preparing for the Project Management Professional (PgMP®) exam.

The questions in the book reflect the changes that have been made to the PMI’s Standard for Project Management, Fourth Edition (2017).

The book has a total of 520 test questions which includes two practice tests of 170 questions each.  The questions have been arranged by sections covering all the knowledge area domains of the PMI’s Standard for Project Management, Fourth Edition (2017).

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book has been divided into 13 Sections as follows:

Section 1 – Program Strategy Alignment
Section 2 – Initiating the Program/Program Formulation
Section 3 – Planning the Program
Section 4 – Executing the Program/Program Delivery
Section 5 – Controlling/Program Performance Monitoring and Controlling
Section 6 – Closing the Project
Section 7 – Program Benefits Management
Section 8 – Program Stakeholder Engagement
Section 9 – Program Governance
Section 10 – Practice Test 1
Section 11 – Practice Test 2
Section 12 – Appendix: Study Matrix
Section 13 – References

Sections 1 through 9 contain 20 multi-choice sample questions each related to a specific subject domain as listed above.  These 20 questions are followed by an answer sheet on which the candidate can mark his or her choice of the correct answer.

This is followed by an Answer Key, which give the correct answer to each question, explains the rationale behind the selection of the correct answer.  This is very helpful in understanding the logic behind the correct answer.

Sections 10 and 11 contain two practice tests of 170 multi-choice questions each.  The candidates are required to complete each practice tests in 4 hours.  These tests are followed by an answer sheet, on which the candidate can mark his or her choice of the correct answer and an Answer Key, which explains the rationale behind the selection of the correct answer which is very helpful in understanding the logic behind correct answer.

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About the Reviewer


Masood Said, PMP

Lahore, Pakistan

 

 

 

Engr. Masood Said, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, BS.C (Mech. Engr.; MS-IT; EMBA-HR Mngt.) is a Mechanical Engineer with over 40 years of Project Management Experience. He has worked in Pakistan and the Middle East on various Oil and Gas projects. He has been a member of PMI since 2002.  Presently he is a trainer for PMP®; PMI-RMP®; PMI-ACP® certification courses. He also advises companies on optimization and improvement in processes.  Based in Lahore, Pakistan, he also travels to Dallas, Texas on a frequent basis.

Email: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Managing Project Competence

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Managing Project Competence: The Lemon and the Loop
Author:  Rolf Medina
Series:  Best Practices and Advances in Program Management
Series Editor: Ginger Levin, PhD
Publisher: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group
List Price:  UKP 55.99 / US$ 89.95
Format: Hard cover, 170 pages
Publication Date:   2018    
ISBN: 978-1-4987-8438-2
Reviewer:     Ralf Müller, DBA, MBA, PMP
Review Date:   July 2018

 



Introduction

Authored by Dr Rolf Medina, who is a boundary spanner working both as independent consultant and in academia, this book makes a highly welcome difference to the wealth of practitioner-oriented books in the field of management.

The difference lies in balancing both the generality of the wide range of existing research literature on the subject with the particularity of real-life cases experienced by the author, obtained in his many years of consulting in and for organizations of various sizes and industries.  Through this, the book allows leveraging research findings of general nature, stemming from hundreds, if not thousands of companies in published studies, with the situational specifics of real-life situations in organizations, written with a sense of ‘usability’ that allows readers to apply the book’s subjects directly onto their organizational reality for operational implementation. This makes the book an outstanding reading for those who look forward to ‘learn’ new insights, instead of just being entertained by the success stories of a single author or well-known name, as done in most of the popular ‘airport bookshop’ type of management readings.

“Managing Project Competence: The lemon and the loop” is a compelling and powerful contribution to the field. Written by someone who “is passionate about people’s growth”, the book builds on the author’s many years of experience in consulting for large organizations like IKEA or Sony in various aspects of management and competence development, combined with his academic research in organizational behavior and innovation, his doctoral work at SKEMA Business school in France, and his visiting faculty work at Umeå University, Sweden.

In a book like this, readers typically look forward to be guided by new insights that can be implemented into their corporate reality. For these readers, Medina’s book will not disappoint.

The book starts with an in-depth introduction into the different dimensions of knowledge and fits them into a tangible ‘lemon’ model which includes performance related, as well as knowledge renewal related aspects, under special consideration of context, culture and time. This lays the foundation for Chapter 2, which goes on to explain how to manage competences in an organizational context. For that Medina develops a process, which he terms the ‘competence loop’, and deepens the understanding of this process by introducing the mechanisms that make this process work and describing how they relate to the social and organizational reality in corporations.

In chapter 3 he bridges from knowledge intensity in organizations to projects as arenas for learning. Through a thorough review of existing theoretical perspectives, such as the project-based versus project-oriented organization, he develops a granulate picture of the context contingency of the various characteristics of knowledge in organizations. This is backed-up by three case study organizations with nine embedded cases, which underscore and explain the different contextual influences that impact the similarities and differences in managing competences in different organizations.

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About the Reviewer


Ralf Müller, DBA, MBA, PMP

Oslo, Norway

 

 

Dr Ralf Müller is Professor of Project Management, Department of Leadership and Organizational Behavior, BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo, Norway, as well as adjunct and visiting professor at several other institutions worldwide. He lectures and researches in leadership, governance of projects, organizational project management, and research methods. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Project Management Journal and author or co-author of more than 230 academic publications. Among the many awards he has received is the 2016 PMI Fellow of the Institute Award, the 2015 PMI Research Achievement Award (a life-time achievement award), and the 2012 IPMA Research Award, which he received together with Drs. Monique Aubry and Brian Hobbs.

Before joining academia, Dr Müller spent 30 years in industry consulting with large enterprises and governments in more than 50 different countries for their project management and governance. He also held related line management positions, such as Worldwide Director of Project Management at NCR Corporation.

Professor Müller can be contacted at [email protected]

http://www.pm-concepts.com

 

 

The Relationship

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    The Relationship Between Knowledge Transfer, Team Learning and Project Success in the Information Technology Field
Author:  Dixie D. O’Connell Overton, PhD
Publisher:  Xlibris
List Price: $19.64
Format:  Soft bound, 183 pages
Publication Date: 2/24/2018        
ISBN: 9781543483536
Reviewer: Govindasamy Manavazhahan       
Review Date: June/July 2018

 



Introduction

The birth of this book happened based on the research work done by the author Dixie during her Ph.D. dissertation and load of documents generated during her studies. Dixie sets the stage for the book in a pretty good way by explaining the problem or thesis as the introduction at the beginning, so that the reader can have a clear idea of what she is presenting up to as correlation between two different part of Information Technology field, namely Knowledge Transfer, Team Learning and Project Success.

Up until now, in the Project Management there is an understanding that for a project to be success there are six constraints considered as important viz., schedule, cost, scope, quality, benefits and risks. However, Dixie is explaining in this book that the in-depth knowledge of the project team also considerably helps the project to achieve the expected success on-time or early within-budget and lower. To support her argument, she presents many studies done by her and other researchers. In my opinion, she did a very good job on her argument.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book had been very well structured in five chapters as

  1. Introduction
  2. Literature Review
  3. Methodology
  4. Results
  5. Implications & Recommendations

Each chapter is again divided into sections each having its own heading. Dixie had explained in each chapter and section with the details that are relevant to the topic and presents many quotes from other researchers.

For example, in the introduction while explaining the problem statement, she quotes Cerpa and Verner (2009) reported as that projects fail for the same reasons they did 30 years ago, however ways to increase project success had been suggested.Three of the top 10 factors identified by Hastie and Wojewoda (2015) that made IT Projects more successful include individual knowledge, knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer (Page 1).

Similar way, in Chapter 2, while talking the supportive theories and concepts, Dixie talked about Situational Learning theory which can be applied in project management because the practices of the discipline are experiential (2013) and quoted Jagdev & Mathur who believe that Situational Learning theory could be leveraged in project management practice to improve both project-learning and cross-project learning, the mediating variables used in her study (Page 51).

In my opinion, the book is very well organized and the details are presented in a logical and structured way that makes it easy for the reader to comprehend.

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About the Reviewer


Govindasamy Manavazhahan

Texas, USA

 

 

Govindasamy Manavazhahan is working as Staff Program Manager with more than 10 years of experience in project management, managing medium to large size projects / products with many cross-functional teams.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Raise Your Employee Engagement Score

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Raise Your Employee Engagement Score
Author:  Richard P. Finnegan
Publisher:  American Management Association
List Price:   US$14.95
Format:  Paperback, Kindle, Audiobook, Overdrive
Publication Date:   2018    
ISBN: 978-0814438626
Reviewer:     TereLyn E. Hepple, MS, PMP, PSM
Review Date:   July 2018

 



Introduction

Employee engagement is a business metric of the extent to which, Finnegan writes, “employees are fully committed each day to help their organizations succeed.” Organizations with the top employee engagement scores see improved turnover (65%), safety (48%), quality (41%), attendance (37%), profitability (22%), productivity, (21%) and customer ratings (10%), according to Gallup polls.

However, Gallup also reports that employee engagement has remained flat in the United States for 15 years. Finnegan tells us that engagement programs don’t work by themselves. Instead, it’s up to frontline managers to raise employee engagement.

Structure

After presenting the challenge of engaging employees, managers are encouraged to rate themselves on their ability to promote employee engagement.

In the remaining chapters, Finnegan discusses how to:

  • use referral recruiting to attract great talent
  • interview to ensure commitment
  • conduct “stay interviews” to build trust and provide coaching opportunities
  • resolve common issues that come up in “stay interviews”
  • manage performance
  • leverage engagement programs
  • establish engagement goals and tactics
  • lead supervisors to better engagement
  • measure quarterly

Highlights

Herb Kelleher, co-founder of Southwest Airlines, said “You don’t hire for skills. You hire for attitude.” Finnegan’s book reflects this philosophy by focusing first on providing managers with concrete advice on how to attract and hire the people who are most likely to be engaged.

Recruits who are hired after being referred by engaged employees work harder and stay longer (page 18), so it behooves every manager to set team goals for bringing in top talent, through friends and professional networks, social media and conferences. Most referral programs are quiet disbursements of referral bonuses, but Finnegan suggests that you visibly celebrate successful referrals, perhaps with an event involving presentation of a bigger-than-life-size check.

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About the Reviewer


TereLyn Hepple

Texas, USA

 

 

TereLyn Hepple, MS, PMP, PSM has 25 years of experience in eCommerce, eMarketing, and eLearning in cross-functional project management and analyst roles in telecommunications, business products, printing, and education. She recently helped OSP International update the PM PrepCast, PM Exam Simulator, and CAPM Exam Simulator to align with the 6th Edition PMBOK® Guide, and volunteers with the PMI Dallas Chapter as Web Director.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Agile Approaches

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Agile Approaches on Large Projects in Large Organizations
Author:  Brian Hobbs and Yvan Petit
Publisher:  PMI
List Price:   $24.95
Format:  Soft cover, 133 pages
Publication Date:   2017
ISBN: 978-1-62825-175-3
Reviewer:     Anita Goldshine, PMP
Review Date:   August 2018

 



Introduction

Agile is known to work well for small software development projects, but what challenges do organizations encounter when trying to apply agile methods to large, multi-team projects? And how does the context of large, complex organizations affect the adaptation and adoption of agile approaches? These are the primary questions the researchers explored through case studies and surveys, and a thorough technical analysis of the data.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book starts with a good Executive Summary followed by seven chapters. The first two chapters provide the background of the research study and a thorough literature review with emphasis on scaling agile.

Next the authors describe the methodology they followed for conducting the case studies and the survey and collecting and analyzing the data. The case studies encompassed nine projects in three organizations spanning both commercial and public sectors. The resulting data and detailed analysis is presented in Chapter 4.

The subsequent chapters interpret the data and raise questions and issues for further study.

Highlights

Through their thorough collection and analysis of data, the authors were able to identify several common elements among the organizations, such as the common use of Scrum and pilot projects, front-end activities, and handling of scope definition and product detail. But they also noted there were at least as many significant areas of variation as there were similarities. These included widely varying implementation strategies, the extent of front-end planning, participants’ roles, knowledge of agile and extent to which agile approaches are established, and even the use of the term “sprint zero”.

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About the Reviewer


Anita Goldshine

Maryland, USA

 

 

 

Anita Goldshine is a project manager for a cybersecurity consulting firm in the nation’s capital. She is a certified PMP and has over 30 years’ experience in the information industry, including software development and business process reengineering on both small and large-scale systems and processes. Her background includes technical writing and business analysis. She is a member of the Silver Spring and Montgomery County chapters of PMI.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Evolutionary Learning in Strategy-Project Systems

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    EVOLUTIONARY LEARNING in STRATEGY-PROJECT SYSTEMS
Authors:  Paul Gardiner, Adil Eltigani, Terence Williams, Richard Kirkham, Lixiong Ou,  Antonio Calabrese, Jonas Soderlund.
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price:   $34.95 USA
Format:  Paperback, 274 pages.
Publication Date:   2018    
ISBN: 978-1-62825-484-6
Reviewer: Jorge Galvan, PMP
Review Date: July, 2018

 



Introduction

This book is an international research project sponsored by the PMI. The research was first envisioned during an event organized by an oil and gas company in United Arab Emirates where one of the authors of the book was invited as a speaker to help the company to learn how to do projects better.

The research takes on the challenge to explore and understand how learning takes place in project-based organizations. Such organizations are chosen to be of different size and project-based maturity as well as located in different countries with different cultures.

The authors try to find out how learning and knowledge is acquired and used during projects and how they can lead to “Evolutionary Learning” in those enterprises, authors call for an integration of traditional project management with other disciplines of an organization especially strategic management. With this in mind the authors focus this research on the learning evolution within what they call strategy-project systems (project management and strategic management) in an organization and how this evolutionary Learning together with existing organizational capabilities contributes to a sustained growth of the organization by adding value by creating new capabilities.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The structure of the book is very formal as of any research document. It starts with a forward, where a former Chief Knowledge Officer at NASA gives some insights about how knowledge and learning takes place in NASA and calls for a more direct link between theory and practice. NASA’s most successful knowledge-sharing strategy is by the use of forums where people share stories and conversations so in order to be able to accomplish this the CKO states that there must be a suitable landscape where the learning, knowledge and the sharing of them can flow smoothly, such landscape must have full leadership support as well as a flexible governance framework

Chapter 1 is the introduction where the authors tell us about how the research started and what motivated it. Here they search for ways to understand the mechanisms by which evolutionary learning takes place in strategy-project systems and how it contributes towards a sustainable competitive advantage of an organization.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Jorge Galvan, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Jorge Galvan has extensive experience in the telecom industry working as a software, hardware and infrastructure Engineer for both Core and Radio systems. He has a bachelor’s degree in Telecommunications and Electronics Engineering with a minor in Control. He has over 10 years of experience working with projects in different parts of the world and performing different roles such as project team member or technical engineer, as well as project coordinator and SME.

Extensive experience includes different phases of software development projects from feasibility to testing and deployment. Jorge is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter and obtained his PMP certification from PMI in July 2016. He can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Project Procurement3

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Project Procurement: A Real-World Guide to Procurement Skills
Author:  Ajay Bhargove
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price:   $24.95
Format: Soft cover, 118 pages
Publication Date: Feb 2018
ISBN: 978-1-62825-468-6
Reviewer: Cassandra de Souza
Review Date: August 2018

 



Introduction

Although procurement is a major part of project management, many project managers have a limited knowledge and understanding of the key terms and aspects of this area besides what is required in the PMBOK. This book provides a broad overview of procurement terms and terminology allowing project managers to get a better grasp of the relevance and skills required from procurement professionals while also identifying or recognizing areas in which they can better utilize their procurement team to reduce costs and improve on project delivery in terms of time.

However, the title is a bit misleading in that it doesn’t always provide real world examples which could build procurement skills in the different areas discussed though this could be strengthened by adding such examples to subsequent editions.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The table of contents very clearly outlines the structure of the book and diligently follows the standard procurement cycle. Where the book structure deviates from the procurement cycle is the inclusion of chapters 8, 10 and 11 on How Finance Views Procurement Savings, Financial Risks Analysis and Incoterms. It seemed a little odd not to include the Incoterms chapter in between the chapters on Contracts and Negotiation, given that the selection of which Incoterms to use would be a key part of any negotiations.

The inclusion of the chapters on How Finance Views Procurement Savings and Financial Risk Analysis provides a solid foundation for how procurement can more intimately be correlated to other aspects of project management than might otherwise be understood by non-procurement professionals. These are helpful at placing procurement more centrally within the overall planning and risk management of project management because it includes discussions of what to be aware of when selecting and considering supplier and vendor choices as well as buyer organizations. These chapters also make the case for integrating project teams early on in project planning because the knowledge and expertise of financial analysts and risk management professionals who can work with procurement professionals would be highly beneficial to the project organization. These combined teams could look at possible intrinsic and extrinsic factors that may be at play for potential suppliers or vendors, identify what types of hedging might be necessary for currency fluctuations, or even understand what benefits the procurement team can bring to the profit margin and therefore allow the sales team to pitch a lower bidding price for a project.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Cassandra de Souza

Maryland, USA

 

 

Cassandra de Souza is an independent consultant working in international development, with a focus on international health projects for the past 15 years. A recent newcomer to the Project Management Professional certification, Cassandra has successfully designed and managed multiple projects valued from US$500,000 to $100 million on health systems strengthening, HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, reproductive health, tuberculosis and pharmaceutical regulatory harmonization. Cassandra holds 2 Masters degrees from The George Washington University, in Business Administration and International Affairs.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Fairtrade Standards for Contracts in Production Projects

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Sarah Asfaha

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

At present, huge inequalities persist between the industrialised countries and those in the process of becoming one, and also within the same national community. Indeed, by continually seeking maximum profit, the global economic market keeps on increasing them, and the gap between rich and poor continues to widen. This system contributes to major problems that undermine our society: indecent wages, deplorable working conditions, violation of the fundamental rights of people, pollution of the planet and poor quality of products. In order to fight against this situation, it is essential to mobilise to change it. Promoting Fairtrade can be an interesting solution, which many have decided to adopt.

Keywords: Fairtrade, Ethical, standards, sustainability, social, economic, environmental development, producer, requirements, criteria

INTRODUCTION

According to a study published in 2015 by the Faitrade Organisation, The market of Fairtrade has 1,226 producers organisations worldwide, which represents more than 5,9 billion of sales, extended in over 125 countries.

The ethical aspect has an increasing importance in the 21st century’s society. The mentalities are evolving. We are no longer just looking for profit. Other elements take precedence. We now want to establish a model of life based on an economy more respectful of the environment and individuals. Trade represents a significant challenge. In fact, traditional commercial practices are becoming an issue as regards producers’ income and living conditions. It was urgent to find a solution and to respond to social problems that arose. In particular, by changing the standards of contracts governing business practices around the world.

Engaged people mobilized to create an organisation setting new standards: Fairtrade. Then, in recent years, Fairtrade is booming. In 2009, the Fairtrade Labelling Organizations International (FLO), along with the World Fair Trade Organization, adopted the Fair Trade Principles Charter. This charter finally gives credibility and international visibility to Fairtrade. The charter then provides an official definition of Fairtrade, shares the vision and the values of this concept and also incorporates the basic principles of Fairtrade.

Fairtrade is an alternative to the dominant world trade. By relying on shorter and more transparent commercial channels, it allows producers to live decently from their work and to be actors in their development model. Ultimately, Fairtrade is the pillar of an economy that respects economic, social, cultural and environmental rights.

Although standards must regulate Fairtrade to facilitate contracts between producers and buyers, they appear as a solution to our new social problems, providing an ethical and sustainable response.

In this paper we are going to see:

–           How has the arrival of the Fairtrade standards impacted commercial contracts?

–           What are the requirements related to trading practices?

–           What are the mandatory and necessary standards in  Fairtrade contract?

–           In which market the impact of the Fairtrade Standard is more relevant?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

[1] How to cite this paper: Asfaha, S. (2018). Fairtrade Standards for Contracts in Production Projects, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Asfaha-Fairtrade-Standards-for-Contracts-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Sarah ASFAHA

Paris, France

 

 

 

Sarah Asfaha is a student at SKEMA Business School. She is getting specialised in Project & Programme Management & Business Development and she is going to do two internships to gain some experiences. She previously worked as commercial & first level control Assistant at BRED, one of the largest regional banks in France. This experience provided her the ability to communicate easily in a complex environment and mostly to monitor and analyse the risks that the banking sector facing regularly. She graduated from Lille University with a bachelor’s degree in Business Management.

Sarah lives in Paris and can be contacted at: [email protected] or [email protected]

 

 

Comparison of “the terms of use”

between an American and a French video sharing website (YouTube/ Dailymotion)

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Elise Barruet

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

Nowadays, we can notice that consumption patterns are constantly evolving whether it is products or services. The new generations thanks to new technologies have allowed the appearance of new online tools in the early 2000s such as online video platforms. These platforms have now become an integral part of the Internet, allow users to create content but also to relieve information such as traditional media like but also prove that a real change in our consumption habits is happening. The emergence of these new services is a real challenge because it was necessary to adapt and create new forms of contract allowing the proper use of these tools.

This document aims to understand the content of those contracts agreed between the platforms and the users but also to study them and identify their possible flaws (in the owner and user view). For that I will analyze and compare the terms of use of two of the biggest video sharing websites: YouTube and Dailymotion. We can expect to see emerge from this paper the differences between the American and the French platform and to see how the rights of the user are respected and how the owners protect themselves in their contracts.

This paper will help the user to understand the limits of those platforms, understand their rights and duties on them and perhaps underline some flaws in their terms of use.

Keywords:  New technologies, contractors, terms of use, privacy, intellectual property, video sharing websites, clauses and flaws.

INTRODUCTION

Since the early 2000’s, the world is experiencing a massive technological evolution which results in the evolution of our modes of consumption and habits. New tools have emerged, our modes of communication have evolved and today these technologies have become integral parts of our lives.

New generations no longer use the internet in the same manner as before, they communicate in a totally new way, instantly and with new platforms. These platforms and new social networks allow them to share and exchange information in a revolutionary way and are categorically opposed to so-called traditional media such as TV or print media.

One of these new tools is the online video platforms that appeared in the early 2000s and are part of the evolution of the internet to a collaborative, accessible and intuitive space. They reflect the dematerialization of information and entertainment, free access to infinite content and the massive consumption of images. They allow users to create and make available content for free and visible to all other users of the service.

According to some data analysis and researches from Statista, we can see that the demand of online video is growing rapidly, for example about 86% of the viewers watch online video in USA. Video sharing has become one of the most utilized way of communication between people and as the demand grows, the service proposed are increasing and so need to be framed.

Step 1: Problem definition

Because of this expansion of new services, it was necessary to study, understand and create new supports to frame these services. Businesses have had to find a way for users to enjoy services in complete security and peace of mind, to protect content creators, and to protect themselves from potential issues. An agreement was created and passed between the platforms and the users when they create their user account. This agreement is also commonly called “Terms of Use” and must be accepted by the user to use his account and upload videos.

These platforms first emerged in the United States as the most used platform today: YouTube, but soon arrived in France with the creation of Dailymotion (the first platform for French video sharing). But today, despite their expansion, these services are increasingly criticized because for some people they do not protect enough creators, for others they prevent them from creating any type of content or criticize their algorithm. In view of these recent complaints, it would be interesting to study, understand these two giants and see what their own conditions of use are and the differences between these two.

Therefore, after this analysis we will be able to answer these questions:

  • Are the “conditions of use” a contract?
  • What are the differences between the “terms of use” of a French and American video sharing platform?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Barruet, E. (2018). Comparison of “the terms of use” between an American and a French video sharing website (YouTube/ Dailymotion), PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Barruet-comparing-american-and-french-video-sharing-websites-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Elise Barruet

Paris, French

 

 

 

Elise Barruet is a French student graduated from NEOMA Business school with a “BSc in internal business” and is currently enrolled in the “MSc 2 Project and Program Management and Business Development” at SKEMA Business School.

This master’s degree will allow her to gather the two directions that she want to give to her career: project management and the international (especially Asia). Thanks to her studies at NEOMA, she had the opportunity to go in Asia several times, the first time in Hanoi, Vietnam, for a one-year university exchange and a second time in Bangkok, Thailand, for a 6 months internship.

She has had the opportunity to work in large companies such as BNP Paribas, Cetelem and Allianz bank during several seasonal professional experiences but also in smaller companies such as Asiajet during several internships.

She is now certain that she will work abroad, especially in Asia and become Business Development Manager or Project Manager. Being a very curious person, she does not want to focus on a specific business sector, but to be versatile in order to have a global overview.

Elise can be contacted at  [email protected] and [email protected]

 

 

Managing Sustainability into Contracts

Conditions of CSI, AIA, FIDIC and EJCDC

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Mohamed Boudiaf

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

Nowadays, sustainability is a key issue in all aspects of our life. Unfortunately, it is a topic, which is not enough considered as an important matter as humans tend to look at the short term over the long-term. This paper is developed to analyze the issue and use the Additive Weighting technique  to compare different standard forms such as the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), American Institute of Architects (AIA), the International Federation of Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) and Engineers Joint Contract Documents Committee (EJCDC). By using the additive weighting technique, we are going to prove which documents have the best clauses regarding the management of sustainability into contracts.

Keywords: Contractors, Sustainable development, Collaboration, Outcomes, Communication, Limits

INTRODUCTION

Nowadays, the question of sustainability is a very important topic in which every one of us should be concerned and involved with. Indeed, our humanity is probably facing its biggest challenge as many environmental issues have been rising in the last decades. It is also one of the most complicated topics to work on as a considerable amount of people; energy and large-scale coordination need to be acquired.

Sustainability is defined as the process of not being harmful to the environment by keeping it safe for the present and for the future generations.

Climate change is a worrying thing. Atmospheric CO2 levels are not falling and politicians meet a lot of difficulties in finding concrete solutions to improve the situation. Global warming is the result of the lack of precaution of all of us and the figures are alarming. According to a study made by the COP 21, “the temperature of the earth will soon become 5.8 degrees higher at the end of the century and the amount of carbon dioxide in 1800 was 31% less than the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere today.”

  1. Problem definition

Not everyone is fully involved or cares about fundamental questions about the evolution of our environment and many studies have shown that we will be in a critical situation in a few years if we do not make serious efforts towards the preservation of the environment. That is why building sustainability into contracts can make people change their habits thanks to the rules that the contractors will set. Therefore, people will be more aware of the matters that occur today and hopefully care more about environmental issues in the future. Many research studies on how to improve sustainability thanks to contracts and integrate sustainability into those have been conducted and this is what we are going to observe through our analysis.

Finally, the aim of this paper is to analyze how the sustainability, with the comparison of different organization standards such as CSI, AIA, FIDIC, and EJCDC is included in the contracts.

Considering this, we will be able to answer the question:

Which sustainability clauses in the AIA, CSI, FIDIC, EJCDC support the most sustainability?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Boudiaf, M. (2018). Managing Sustainability into Contracts – Conditions of CSI, AIA, FIDIC and EJCDC, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Boudiaf-managing-sustainability-in-contracts-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Mohamed Boudiaf

Paris, France

 

 

Mohamed Boudiaf is a Msc student at SKEMA Business School, majoring in Project Programme Management and Business Development (PPMBD) and who is 22 years old. He graduated from Nice Sophia Antipolis University, France and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics. He has both economics and project management education background. He loves change and flexibility, as he has lived in many continents in his life (Africa, Europe and Asia). Now, he is well equipped with the knowledge of project management and is ready to be a real Project Manager in the future. Today he lives in Paris, France and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

Take independent consultant contract in project management

to the next level

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Gregoire Chaintron

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

Independent consultant contractor in project management can struggle sometimes to have a good prospect client conversion rate. One of the key elements for improvement is contract management. Contract management can be an important barrier to overcome with clients and a challenge for contractors. Choosing the most suitable contract takes work and analysis to have the best possible outcomes. The purpose of our research is to find ways and criteria to enhance contract management efficiency for independent contractor. Through our researches and analyses, we will also use the Multi-Attribute Decision Making which can be also referred as MADM. We will process with the dominance methodology to analyse various subjective criteria. We used and underlined the most important criteria for an independent contractor agreement to come up with some results when comparing different contracts according to how good they are. We saw that some criteria are really important for the independent contractor success. We finally observed that contract design and criteria selection is really important. It has a big impact on independent consultant contractor success by improving flexibility, clarity and long-term relationships.

Keywords: Transparency, ongoing process, right scope, flexibility, standardized model, scalability, clarity, simplicity, contract renewal, Fidelity, conversion rate, efficiency

INTRODUCTION

You can’t do business with a man who does not know the meaning of a contract. You can’t do business with a firm who swears they’ll do one thing one day and does just the opposite the next. You can’t do business with a company who takes your goods on a cash basis and then pays you off in bum harmonicas. » Stephen Vincent Benet

Contract management can be an important barrier when doing business. As an independent consultant in project management, how can we face this challenge?

Companies are dealing every day with more and more projects, change and complexity. They often do not know how to conduct them efficiently because employees maybe do not have the skills, formation or methods to do so.

These companies often need help from external consultant to help them face this issue. The objectives of these companies are to get support and train their employees across the project.

When a company is going to ask for support in project management, there are going to call for a third external party. These parties will send their value proposition and compete to sign contracts. A project brings change across time and can be hard to scope with clarity. This is challenging for consultants when proposing contracts because they have to balance the company interest and their own interests. They need to compete with other parties. They also need to provide transparency in their contracts without jeopardizing the project in the long-run.

According to all these challenges, it is hard for independent consultant to have many good prospects whom will turn also into clients. One of the barrier is often the contract which can be too complicate, too long or simply not adapted to the scope of the needs.

The goal is to focus on how to overcome the barriers of contract’s complexity for all parties. To Enhance the numbers of clients and the conversions rate thanks to more clarity in the contracts, standardization and transparency. Focus on how to save time to all parties, bring flexibility with a better process flow through a better contract for independent.

Through this research, to summarize, this paper has been undertaken to answer the following questions:

  • What should be the main criteria of the contract for an independent consultant in project management
  • The methods to have a good conversion rate, long term contract and contract renewal

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Chaintron, G. (2018). Take independent consultant contract in project management to the next level, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Chaintron-take-independent-contract-to-next-level.pdf

 



About the Author


Gregoire Chaintron

Paris, France

 

 

Gregoire Chaintron is a French author living in Paris. He is a project management practitioner, agile and Prince 2 accredited. He has specialized over the last years in business management, project management and business development strategy. Gregoire gained academic knowledge through a bachelor in economics, a master in International Business and another Msc in project management and business development. He ran an international career working for years in England and America.

In England, he worked for the AAK Company, which is the world’s leading producer of high value-added specialty vegetable fats. Gregoire worked there as a project manager and business development manager. He met different actors of the local industrial scene and visited shops to assess new business potential and to plan strategic 
developments. He analyzed sales data by 
segments, products 
and conducted different market studies with teams. His main role was to manage a project on how to penetrate the French bakery market.

He decided to continue his career with a new challenge in Los Angeles, California. He worked there during one year for Accelerated Intelligence Inc which is a startup company specializing in brain and health supplements.

He managed international teams to develop new products in order to gain new markets. He spent during these years most of his time doing project management, control and strategic planning. Gregoire Chaintron is particularly involved in business intelligence, negotiation with prospects and marketing campaigns.

Having a strong interest for independent consultants working in project management, he conducted various researches to complement his expertise of the domain. Rich with experiences, he is publishing his last article entitled “Take independent consultant contract in project management to the next level”

Gregoire can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

A Deeper Understanding of the European Funds’ Call

by the NGO’s Perspective

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Giuseppe Gagliardi

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

NGO and civil society organisations are a natural target group eligible for a vast part of EU funding, as they are involved in many areas covered by EU policies on a non-profit basis, a precondition for receiving funding from EU coffers. This paper was developed with the main goal of identify some of the focal points required by EU commission and by going thought them compare some of the most important EU grants. With the use of analytical tools as the Theory of Constraints and the MADM method it was possible to define a partial framework of some interests for all the non-governmental bodies which would like to address the own project to the EU funds.

The results presented were successful mostly for one of the four funds studied, which has answered in a comprehensive way to the milestones’ analysis. On the basis of this result, it was so possible to present a list of consideration and “best practices” appropriate for all the beneficiaries of the Horizon2020 fund.

Keywords: NGO, European Union, Public Funds, Grant Management, Horizon2020, EaSI, Europen Social Funds, Eurostars, Single funding, Multi-participants, Current Reality Tree

INTRODUCTION

In a political environment which is becoming increasingly hostile to the civic action, the European Union, with its supranational nature on political as well as economical themes, needs to confirm the important roles played by Non-governmental Organization and increase its financial support for their work. That was stated during the last plenary meeting of the EESC (European Economic Social Committee).

This confirm the remarkable role that NGOs are gaining on the continental scene regarding the development and realization of democracy and human rights and of the equally contribution of NGOs to cultural life and social well-being of democratic societies. These multiple and different organizations operate in the optic of the Europe 2020 strategy; which is the EU’s agenda for growth and jobs for the current decade. [2] Unfortunately the public awareness regarding their accountability, approach and performance, not necessarily follows the importance given by governmental bodies.

This paper may be seen as an attempt to bring into focus how NGOs operate and sustain themselves on the basis of European Community regulations. This breakdown laid the foundations to understand how the organizations acquire their registration to operate and access to public funding. The basics for seeking grants and other funding, represent the lifeblood of voluntary self-governing bodies established to pursue non-profit making objectives. They are a natural target group eligible for a part EU funding, as they are involved in many areas covered by EU policies on a non-profit basis, a necessary condition for receiving funding from the Union. [3]

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Gagliardi, G. (2018). A Deeper Understanding of the European Funds’ Call by the NGO’s Perspective, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Gagliardi-deeper-understanding-of-european-funds-call-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Giuseppe Gagliardi

Paris, France

 

 

 

Giuseppe Gagliardi is currently enrolled in MSc Project and Programme Management and Business Development provided by Skema Business School. His previous education presents a bachelor degree in Economics from Università di Roma Tor Vergata. From January 2018 he will be enrolled in MS Green Policy by Kaist College of Business in Seoul. This supplementary specialization is addressed to acquire necessary expertise to cope with climate change and energy shortage challenges; which associated with the professional certifications achieved in Skema will prepare the author to face global businesses on international projects. For the past few years, he has gained experience in different sectors as the duty free and travel retail industry (DFWC) and on television development projects (Sky Arte).

Giuseppe Gagliardi can be contacted at [email protected] or via Linkedin at https://www.linkedin.com/in/giuseppe-gagliardi-5a3592122/

 

 

Exploring the necessity of prompt payments for companies

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Justine Renier

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

Late payment remains one of the biggest issues for companies. In 2016, a research shows that 60% of businesses must wait 60 days for being paid and nearly half (47%) say some invoices require 90 days to be honoured. This problem is source of exasperation and sometimes a real pain for companies. It is time for businesses to act and encourage prompt payment. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to examine the causes of delayed payment, appraise the effect of this issue and find alternatives to solve it. The Multi-Attribute Decision Making tool, composed of non-compensatory and compensatory method, was employed to compare the alternatives and define the ranking order of the most suitable solutions. The result is that Payment period terms, Interest charges, and debt recovery are essential to avoid delays in payment and in a lower level the use of early discount payment.

Keywords: prompt payment act, required payment date, recovery debt, interest charge, cash flow, discount

INTRODUCTION

Late payment constitutes a real scourge in the business world. It represents one of the causes of business failure especially for small businesses. Late payment is defined as a debt service that arrived after the date of the payment was due or after a grace period for the payment has passed. In the United-Kingdom, late payments of small-and-medium sized represented £44.6 billion in October 2017. The problem is that delayed payments lead to cash flow issues. In fact, trade body R3 discovered in 2016 that late payment for goods or services was a main reason in 23% of corporate insolvencies. Besides, it involves a lot of time and money for corporate to pursue those who don’t pay. According to Bacs Payment Schemes Limited, the total bill of small business in England for chasing represents £2.16 billion. Moreover, the most regrettable thing is that 74% of firms consider that late payment is a reality of corporate life to deal with and it will never change.

This issue is not only the case of England, it affects most of the world. Other members of the European Union and America have to cope with the problem of the on-time payment. Atradius insurance company made a survey in the United-States, Canada, Mexico and Brazil in 2015 and revealed that 20% of the value of their Business-to-Business awaiting payments is more than 90 days past deadline. What is more, the late payment disturbs more than the direct suppliers whose is affected by the lack of cash flow. Indeed, this issue spreads to the supply chain increasing the risk for the buyer and degrading the local and global economy. Conversely, rapid payments help to develop firm’s purchasing power and production. It allows the company to save money by avoiding costly chasings. It facilitates also the relationships between suppliers and customers. On the whole governments, laws and corporates have to combat the culture of late payment in order to obtain some business and economic benefits.

This is why the purpose of this paper is to:

  • Understand the root causes of late or delayed payment
  • Assess what the impact of this is, especially on small businesses
  • Identify solutions to this problem

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Renier, J. (2018). Exploring the necessity of prompt payments for companies, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Renier-the-necessity-of-prompt-payments-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Justine Renier

Lille, France

 

 

 

Justine Renier is a Master 2 student in SKEMA Business School pursuing the specialization “Project Program Management and Business Development. She studied in ESDHEM which is bachelor degree in economy and a preparation for Business School examination before integrating the Programme Grande Ecole in SKEMA. She had some professional experiences in the procurement, accountability and project management areas. She lives in France, and can be contacted at [email protected] or www.linkedin.com/in/justine-rénier.

 

 

Alternative dispute resolution

in the contract field in the wine industry

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Augustin Weiss-Maurin

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 


 
ABSTRACT

A recent trend in business is to settle contract disputes by other alternative ways, by other means than going to court. Then, it could appear interesting to understand why? What are these alternatives and which ones are the most efficient. For an easier reading, we are going to focus in this paper only on the contract dispute in the wine area. To do so, we find out five different alternatives methods of settlement among the most used extra-judicial ways of contract issues solving. After a brief description of each one, we compared these fives ways regarding six relevant criteria specific to the wine area. This deep and close analysis allows us to affirm that the rent a judge program is the most efficient way to solve a contract dispute arisen in the wine industry.

Key words: Mediation, Rent-a-Judge program, Arbitration, Summary jury trial, Negotiation, Quality, Unfair Clause, Unpredictable

INTRODUCTION

Problem recognition, definition and evaluation

In all the steps of the wine industry, as in all the industry, the final objective will be to sell. It could to sell grape, wine, bottle, services or knowledge. We currently live in a world where all our interactions are governed by a whole set of rules, laws and treaties. If you want to buy or sell something you will need a well-made contract and moreover it will be compulsory to respect what you accepted by signing this contract. It happens that one of the contractors does not respect his commitments. Indeed, in the wine business this kind of conflicts arises frequently since the results of your work in this field is not really predictable. In fact, all depends of the whim of Mother Nature. Thus it’s hard to establish, for instance, a relevant price per kilogram for the grape since the quality of it depends of the weather, the rain, quality of soil, sun shining… and not only of the kind of work furnished. That’s why, by custom, the “Force Majeure” case is rarely used.

In case of disagreement the first way to settle the problem for the other party of the contract is to go straight to the judicial court. However, these last decades and even maybe these last centuries the reputation and the public image has taken a bigger and bigger importance in the wine industry. Thus, often, in case of failure of the contracts obligations the contractors prefer a more discreet way to settle their conflicts. Instead of a public judicial case they will prefer other solutions.

These one are often cheaper, could be confidential (not on all fields as we will see) and quicker Moreover these solutions has produced by real expert of this field instead of judges who does not really have, sometimes, a deep knowledge of the case they work on. Furthermore a really interesting point is that the parties can choose the applicable law for the settlement of their contract, there is an infinity of choices possible, it could be a substantive law, a procedural law or a choice of conflicts of laws. The most common solutions of out of court dispute settlement are: Mediation, arbitration, negotiation, rent a judge program or summary jury trial.

Our aim in this paper will be to answer the following question:

What are the advantages and the drawbacks of the extra judicial settlement methods and a description of these different uses from the wine industry point of view. And, the most important which one of these alternatives is the most interesting?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Weiss-Maurin, A. (2018). Alternative dispute resolution in the contract field in the wine industry, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue IX – September. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Weiss-Maurin-alternative-dispute-resolution-in-wine-industry-student-paper.pdf

 



About the Author


Augustin Weiss-Maurin

Lille, France

 

 

 

Augustin Weiss-Maurin is currently an Msc student in Project and Program Development and Business Development in Skema business school, Lille, France. He starts his academic career by a bachelor in law in the University of Burgundy, Dijon, France and the university Charles, Prague, Czech Republic. After an academic semester in management in Fundaçao dom Cabral, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, he is now working on a master in sciences in Skema business school in the aim of working as a project manager in the wine business.

 

 

Increase Resource Capacity without Hiring

 

SECOND EDITION

By Chris Vandersluis

HMS Software

Montreal, Canada

 



Introduction

Good project management practices can make the most out of available resources but lack of sufficient resources is a universal challenge. Collaboration at the project tracking and timesheet level between project personnel and human resources personnel can generate resource capacity you didn’t know you had. Using a timesheet to categorize non-project work opens a source of data that can be used to free up staff from tasks that are not productive and thus increase project resource capacity.

The Project Constraint Triangle

Project planners live with a well-known triangle of constraints.  For any project, the scope, duration and resources can change but each one will affect the other.   Want to do a set scope of work in less time?  Think about adding resources.  Need to do that scope of work with fewer resources, think about it taking a longer period of time.  Have both resources and deadline reduced?  Expect that the complete scope won’t get accomplished.

The classic response to these constraints has been:

  • If you are constrained by resources, hire sub-contractors to resolve that constraint.
    (This is less likely to be acceptable when the work is highly technical making it difficult for sub-contractors to get up to speed quickly or during a period when the economy is challenged.)
  • Reduce the amount of work so the existing resources can complete it within the deadline.
    (This is quite unlikely in a global economy where competitors exist not just from around the corner but from all over the world.)
  • Work slower so the existing work can be done by the existing staff but be delivered much later.
    (When there are many competitors with inexpensive labor, missing deadlines can be a short path to disaster.)

There are ways to be more effective of course.  Project Managers specialize in exactly these techniques. Over the last 30 years, project management techniques have been promoted and taught to the point that they are now mainstream learning.  There are numerous graduate programs in project management at top universities around the world and the term “project manager” is no longer characterized by a grizzled veteran dangling from an exposed I-beam at the top of a skyscraper in mid-construction.  Project managers are now more likely to be thought of as many other mid-level managers within the organization.

Aside from specialized project management training, we find project management in mainstream business courses, IT courses, management classes and more.  All of this has made an impact.  It’s now quite common to walk into a business environment and find that many project management techniques and processes have been adopted.  A challenged economy helps this by providing even more incentive for organizations to do more with less.  Even where project management processes are less formal, we find that projects often run fairly efficiently.  In more sophisticated organizations, attention has turned to project portfolio management (PPM) to try to extend project efficiencies to even before the project becomes active and to give tools to management to identify those projects which will provide the best return on investment.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in May 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

How to cite this paper: Vandersluis, C. (2018). Increase Resource Capacity without Hiring; presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, Richardson, Texas, USA in May 2018; published in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue IX – September. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Vandersluis-increase-resource-capacity-without-hiring.pdf

 



About the Author


Chris Vandersluis

Montreal, Canada

 

 

 

Chris Vandersluis is the president of HMS Software based in Montreal.  HMS Software has been a leading provider of project management and enterprise timesheet systems and services since 1984. HMS Software’s TimeControl is recognized around the world as the most flexible project-oriented timesheet system.

Mr. Vandersluis has a degree in economics from McGill University and over 30 years’ experience implementing enterprise timesheet and project management systems.  Mr. Vandersluis spent five years on Microsoft’s Enterprise Project Management Partner Advisory Council and has worked with Oracle-Primavera and Deltek on their project management systems.

Mr. Vandersluis’ has been published in a number of publications including Fortune Magazine, PMNetwork magazine, Microsoft’s TechNet and is the author of the popular project management blog EPMGuidance.com.

Mr. Vandersluis has taught Advanced Project Management at Montreal’s McGill University and has been a member of PMI since 1986.

Mr. Vandersluis can be reached at: [email protected]

 

 

 

Taming the Tsunami

Governance Strategies for Project Portfolio Management

 

SECOND EDITION

Susan Hostetter and Sherri Norris

United States Census Bureau

Washington, DC USA

 


 

 

Executive Summary

The U.S. Census Bureau has made project portfolio management a priority for its programs over the past five years. The best known program at the Census Bureau is the population census that is conducted every ten years, but there are other large program areas at Census, such as IT investment, survey methods research, and economic and demographic survey areas, that manage hundreds of projects within their portfolios. Each area has a unique set of programs, projects, investments, stakeholder and oversight obligations and each faces a tsunami of project information produced by its portfolio of projects. For example, the 10-year Census is a $15 billion program with a high volume of technical projects and investments that face extensive internal and external oversight, the IT area has the responsibility of managing IT investments without direct funding for IT purchases, and the economic and demographic areas have hundreds of small survey programs with a multitude of funding sources and customers.

To manage these different portfolio situations, each area has developed governance strategies to handle the management demands of their project portfolios. This paper and presentation will profile project portfolio management challenges common to all organizations and provide governance strategies from the Census Bureau that will help other organizations to tame their tsunami of project information and ensure that their leaders have the right information for decision making. We will cover governance strategies that successfully gain and maintain traction and discuss why they work.

Introduction

What do we mean by “Taming the Tsunami?” Every organization has a mission and a vision either stated explicitly or implicitly and the projects and activities within the organization that are for the mission and vision, intentionally or unintentionally. These projects and activities are the moving parts of the organization and each requires attention and maintenance to run smoothly. Leadership’s job is to guide, direct and manage those parts through information, a constant flow of information, a literal tsunami of information.

A leader can be overwhelmed by the information or a leader can implement governance structures and strategies to “tame the tsunami” of information. Project portfolio management is a collection of processes and methods to select, direct and manage the tsunami of project information that competes daily for leadership attention. It is a governance structure that will collect, channel and control all project information within a portfolio so that leadership can make data-driven decisions about the organization’s activities to achieve mission goals and outcomes and strategic goals for future vision. This is what we mean by “Taming the Tsunami,” it is a deliberate leadership process to drive decision making for strategic mission and vision outcomes through the use of project information.

Why Project Portfolio Management?

Why would an organization invest time and resources into portfolio management? We talked to program managers involved in portfolio management at the Census Bureau and our conversations uncovered the challenges and business impact that would lead them to implement portfolio management. We have characterized them into the following statements:

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in May 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

How to cite this paper: Hostetter, S. and Norris, S. (2018). Taming the Tsunami: Governance Strategies for Project Portfolio Management; presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, Richardson, Texas, USA in May 2018; published in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue IX – September. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pmwj74-Sep2018-Hostetter-Norris-Taming-the-Tsunami.pdf

 



About the Authors


Susan Hostetter

Texas and Washington, DC, USA

 

 

Susan Hostetter, PMP, is a Project Manager at the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington, DC, USA. As a data analyst and project management professional, she has been instrumental in standing up and improving PMO processes for risk management, project management, portfolio management, schedule management, cost management, performance management and strategic planning. Her papers have been published in the PM World Journal and she has presented project management topics at PMI chapter events and at the University of Maryland’s and University of Texas at Dallas’ PM Symposiums. She has a Master’s Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University, a Master’s Degree in Management with Project Management emphasis from University of Maryland’s University College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, with a minor in Economics, from Mary Baldwin College. Susan can be contacted at [email protected]

 


Sherri Norris

Washington, DC, USA

 

 

Sherri Norris is a project management and statistical professional with over twenty years of public policy, project management and operations experience. Ms. Norris has coordinated and implemented schedule, requirements, performance management, and governance processes for survey and Census Programs. She has a Public Policy Master’s Degree in Justice: Law and Society from American University, a Master’s Certificate in Program Management from George Washington University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from University of Delaware. Sherri can be reached at [email protected]

 

[1] This paper is released to inform interested parties of ongoing operations and to encourage discussion of work in progress. Any views expressed on operational issues are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Census Bureau.