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The Leader Habit

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    The Leader Habit: Master the Skills You Need to Lead in Just Minutes A Day
Author:  Martin Lanik
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   $25.00
Format:  Hardcover, 256 pages
Publication Date:   April 2018
ISBN: 978-0814439340
Reviewer: Montrae C. Jemison
Review Date: May 2018

 



Introduction

Everyone has an aspect of themselves that makes them a leader and a leader whom wants to be more influential with a lasting impact. Therefore, we seek self-awareness through self-development or leadership training. The Leader Habit is a structured guide for creating new habits utilizing the Leader Habit formula. The book is broken down into four parts:

  • How It Works
  • Build Your Leadership Skills
  • Exercises That Develop Your Skills
  • Encourage New Skills In Others

“Whether you consciously realize it or not, you are constantly responding to cues around you with numerous well practiced habitual responses. Habits save you mental effort and allow you to achieve more at work and in life.”

Overview of Book’s Structure

The Leader Habit uses a lot of examples and stories at the beginning, which were very interesting, yet I found slowed me getting to the “meat’ of discovering the formula. There are 22 core leadership skills that the author and his team used to develop the Leader Habit Formula. They are categorized by either getting things done or focusing on people.

The author also wants the reader to discover their personality traits out of six choices in order to assist with developing the micro-behaviors to whichever of the 22 Core leadership skills you have chosen to use with the formula.

The Leader Habit formula wants you to practice a new habit for only 5-minutes a day to help those of us that procrastinate and need a quick way to sustain something new.

Highlights

The Leader Habit capitalizes on the 22 core leadership skills and your personality traits. When it comes to ‘getting things done’ and ‘focusing on people,’ a leadership skill category is given. Each category contains 3-5 leadership skills that are defined and then an explanation as to why the skill is important, next are telltale signs that you need to improve the skill and the personality traits that are aligned with the skill. The 5-minute leader habit exercises follow the category.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Montrae Jemison

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Montrae Jemison is a Military Veteran. She is tenacious, energetic, and a global traveler. She has spent the last 10 years of her career as an Instructor and Training and Development Coordinator in the healthcare sector. She is currently pursuing a graduate degree in Cybersecurity.

She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Patterns of Strategy

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Patterns of Strategy
Author:  Patrick Hoverstadt, Lucy Loh
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price:  $41.95
Format:  Soft cover, 406 pages
Publication Date:  March 3, 2017
ISBN:  978-1138242678
Reviewer:  Dr. Charles Y. Chen, PMP
Review Date:  June 2018

 

 


 
Introduction

Patterns of Strategy offers a framework that helps one understand the forces acting on an organization’s strategic relationships, from competitors to partners and from the regulator to the marketplace itself. While traditional approaches, such as the famous Porter’s Five Forces, require organizations to assess the environment around them, the authors observe that they have ignored the dynamic nature of the relationships. The authors of Patterns of Strategy offer a system-level view in developing strategy, where the strategy influences the nature of each relationship over time, leading the changing relationships to influence the strategy and an organization’s strategic fit.

In addition, Patterns of Strategy offers 80 common patterns of strategy in a recipe book fashion together with detailed descriptions and examples of the steps required to achieve that strategy. Leaders and strategists can use this toolkit to understand the relationship of their business and their strategy to the actors around it, and then adapt or readjust the strategy as necessary.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Patterns of Strategy is divided into four parts. The authors use Part One to lay out a set of arguments on why conventional strategy fails and how the Patterns of Strategy approach addresses these shortcomings. Part Two introduces the building blocks that the authors use to assess the current strategic situation and then to design strategic maneuvers to improve the organization’s strategic position. Part Three is a catalog of 80 strategies. Each strategy contains detailed description and examples on the steps required to achieve the strategy and the metrics to assess performance. Part Four guides the reader through how to build a strategy using the methods presented in Part Three. In order words, Part Four provides a strategist the steps of strategy creation and then process to manage it.

When one picks up this book, it is tempting to jump straight to Part Three. I certainly was. However, I recommend against it. Reading Parts One and Two is a necessary prerequisite to understanding the fullness of the insights and advice in Parts Three and Four.

Highlights

Patterns of Strategy examines a fundamental issue affecting all organizations, “Why do most strategies fail? Patrick Hoverstadt and Lucy Loh shine a light on the gaps in conventional strategic thinking. Based on the authors’ collective experience, they see conventional strategy as nothing more than a mental construct. They contrast this with what strategy actually is, which happens in real life and includes the actions and reactions of other actors; these actions ought to forces the organization to check to see if the other actors have reacted in the way that was expected.

Specifically, the authors differentiate the Patterns of Strategy approach from the conventional ones with the following six differentiators.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Dr. Charles Y. Chen

Texas, USA

 

 

 

 

Dr. Charles Y. Chen has had the privilege of leading teams of engineers and scientists to transform ideas into viable products. His career began at Northrop Grumman, initially as a systems engineer and then as a program manager, he led matrixed teams of engineers to innovate, mature, and produce new electronic sensor technologies and algorithms. Energetics Incorporated introduced Charlie to the world of management consulting. Initially as a director then as the Chief Strategy Officer, he led teams to help clients transition ideas developed in the laboratory to the marketplace, overcoming the so-called valley of death. At Hover Energy, Dr. Chen led the key activities to build a new wind turbine designed for the urban environment.

Dr. Chen received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University. He received his Executive Education from University of Chicago Booth School of Business. As a PMP, he looks forward to leading his next team to achieve the impossible.

Email address: [email protected].
https://www.linkedin.com/in/charlesychenphd/

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

The Business of Portfolio Management 2

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  The Business of Portfolio Management: Boosting Organizational Value Through Portfolio Management
Author:  Iain Fraser
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, INC. (PMI®)
List Price:   $44.95
Format:  Hard Cover, 166 pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN: 978-1-62825-372-6
Reviewer: Dirk D. Huck, MBA, PMP
Review Date: May 2018

 



Introduction

This book is an easy read for anyone who wants to learn more about portfolio management and how to implement it in an organization.  Mr. Fraser provides an organization with a how-to guide so they will be able to strategically align their programs and projects with their organizational goals.  This goes beyond the “I have a project let’s get it done” mode of thinking.  It is written not only for project, program, and portfolio managers but also senior executives that oversee major companies.  This guide will provide a new paradigm to senior leadership to form strategic portfolios from their current programs and projects.  This guide is for those individuals that are ready to make the next step in portfolio management.

Portfolio management will effectively and efficiently change a business by cutting out duplication of effort in business capital operations and expenditures.  Return on investment will be evident quickly if the tenets of Mr. Fraser’s book are followed by the senior leadership.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Mr. Fraser presents his “key insights to adopting a new approach to portfolio managements that boosts organizational strategy” through a structured approach broken into four sections.  Section one walks through some of the typical woes and wishes of an organization and then takes us on a ride to a new perspective and what an organization needs to do to make a paradigm switch.

The second section covers Mr. Fraser’s portfolio management: a way of doing business.  Most of the section describes the different processes involved in portfolio management and how it has changed over the years to the present where a company now has options to consider in how they make it work for their strategic objectives.  Previous consensus seemed to make portfolio management a catch all for all programs and projects no matter where they fell.  This guide attempts to show a path to structuring portfolio management in a way that will meet the strategic operational needs of a company by combining like programs and projects into a coherent portfolio that will save time and money.  Section three discusses how to use program and project management to deliver change and realize benefits.  How to manage the projects and programs by monitoring them using the right tools and techniques as well as how to present the metrics in reporting the results throughout the life of the projects.

In his last section he describes how each area can support the change in an organization from the CEO through the chain-of-command to the lowest levels of project management.  He divides out the responsibility and expertise involved at each level to ensure operations and financial benefits are aligned to make sure all aspects of portfolio management are successful.

Highlights

The second section is especially insightful describing the benefits of using portfolio management to enable a company to strategically align their projects and programs into a viable portfolio.  Mr. Fraser provides insight on how to consolidate programs and projects competing for the same resources.  Primarily pointing out where like projects can be combined to reduce costs and/or time.  Many times, the same resources are needed for different projects that are not necessarily on the same schedule and the result is that personnel will be doing the exact same thing for two different projects a few days or weeks apart.  Strategic operational portfolio management may be able to recognize competing resources performing the same function and reduce the total costs by having them completed at the same time by the same personnel.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Dirk Huck

San Antonio, TX, USA

 

 

 


MBA, – Master of Business Administration, Averett College
B.A. – Bachelor of Arts, Computer Science, Indiana University at Bloomington
A.A.S – Associate in Applied Science, Data Processing, Community College of the Air Force

Dirk Huck, PMP, MBA retired from the USAF in 2003 with over 23 years of active duty in the Security and Communications career fields.  He obtained his PMP in 2005 and has over twenty-five years of project management experience in the communications and IT field supporting a wide range of programs.   While assigned to the Warrior Preparation Center in Europe he managed 25 civilian, contractor and military personnel as chief of the computer operations center supporting NATO, US, and Allied computer wargaming throughout the European Theater of Operations.

During an assignment to the Pentagon he was part of an engineering team to develop a solution for the Secretary of the Army to protect the Pentagon’s network from international hacking attempts.  His assignment to the Defense Information Systems Agency allowed him to plan and implement a multi-million dollar project improving the capability of the Defense Switched Network that ensured its survivability during 9/11.  Since retiring from the Air Force, he primarily managed projects related to the Defense Health Agency where he managed the implementation of a worldwide community of interest network allowing access to all military and dependent electronic health records by military treatment personnel.  The current program he is involved with is assisting the engineering effort to migrate all medical treatment facilities from the services networks to a joint network hosted and maintained by the Defense Health Agency.

Dirk is an adjunct professor with Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Worldwide Campus.  He has taught an Introduction to Project Management course using an interactive online solution to both classrooms and individuals.

During his leisure time, he enjoys playing competitive racquetball and has competed at the highest levels.  He is married and has three children and seven grandchildren.

Email address:  [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

 

Business of Portfolio Management 3

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    The Business of Portfolio Management: Boosting Organizational Value through Portfolio Management
Author:  Iain Fraser
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price:   $44.95
Format:  Hard cover          , 166 pages
Publication Date:   2017
ISBN: 978-1-62825-372-6
Reviewer:  Leigh MacPherson
Review Date:   May 2018

 



Introduction

The Business of Portfolio Management by Iain Fraser discusses how to boost Organizational Value through Portfolio Management.  This book discusses the need to do more than just strategic planning when managing a Portfolio.   The book goes into detail on what good Portfolio Management entails.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Section 1 – “Organizational Woes and Wishes”

1-1 “Staying in Business Versus Getting Ahead”
1-2 “Driving Value and Becoming Aligned”
1-3 “Organizational Maturity”
1-4 “Organizational Structure and Design”
1-5 “Organizational P3M Governance”
1-6 “Organizational Maturity Models”
1-7 “The 3 Ps to Success”
1-8 “The Modern Lean Organization”
1-9 “Talent Management”
1-10 “Organizational Risk”

Section 2 – “Portfolio Management:  A Way of Doing Business”

2-1 “The Rise of Portfolio Management”
2-2 “High-Level View of Portfolio Management”
2-3 “Portfolio and Portfolio Management Explained”
2-4 “Organizational Context of Portfolio Management”
2-5 “Comparison of Portfolios, Programs of Work, and Projects”
2-6 “Interactions and Benefits of Portfolio Management”
2-7 “Introduction to Benefits Management”
2-8 “Portfolio Management Success Factors”
2-9 “Portfolio Management Process Overview”
2-10 “Portfolio Management Process Groups”
2-11 “Portfolio Management Tools and Techniques”
2-12 “Portfolio Management Metrics and Reporting”

Section 3 – “Using Program and Project Management to Deliver Change and Realize Benefits”

3-1 “Program Management Explained”
3-2 “A Program Life Cycle”
3-3 “Differences Between Program and Project Life Cycles”
3-4 “Program Management Performance Domains”
3-5 “Program of Work Breakdown”
3-6 “Capturing Value (Benefits Realization)”
3-7 “Program Management Process Groups”
3-8 “Program Management Tools and Techniques”
3-9 “Program Management Metrics and Reporting”
3-10 “Project Management Commentary”

Section 4 – “Supporting Functions:  Time for Change!”

4-1 “Leadership in Organizations”
4-2 “Leadership Role Focus”
4-3 “Influencing for Change”
4-4 “Portfolio Management Office”
4-5 “Portfolio Manager’s Responsibility and Expertise”
4-6 “Program Manager’s Responsibility and Expertise”
4-7 “Qualifications and Credentials Options”
4-8 “Ongoing Improvement”
4-9 “On Finance, Information Technology, Human Resources and Legal”

Highlights

Iain Fraser has found a way to manage portfolios using Value Management.  While strategic planning is still a primary component it is only one of five components necessary when managing using Value Management.  The five components of Value Management are:  Value Strategy, Value Planning, Value Engineering, Value Delivery, and Value Capture.  Using Value Management, along with other strategic approaches, helps to ensure the maximum value is achieved whether the investment be an operational or capital expenditure.

The book also discusses tools and techniques for Portfolio Management.  For example, an investment complexity tool is provided for assessing the complexity of an investment.  In addition, a prioritization and selection tool is provided to help gather useful information when analyzing both operational (opex) and capital (capex) investments.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Leigh MacPherson

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Leigh MacPherson has been a Proposal and Program Manager in defense and electronics industries for many years with experience on both Electro-Optic and Radar programs.  In addition, Leigh has prior experience as Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) Earned Value surveillance team member (evaluating and training programs in both the US and UK).  Leigh graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor of Science in Ag Economics and later studied accounting.  In addition, Leigh also studied at Austin Community College and received a degree in Computer Information Technology, graduating with honors (Phi Theta Kappa).

Email address:  [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

 

Attributes of Project-Friendly Enterprises

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Attributes of Project-Friendly Enterprises
Author:  Virral S. Anatatmula, Parviz F. Rad
Publisher:  Business Expert Press (BEP)
List Price:  $34.95
Format:  Soft cover, 192 pages
Publication Date:   2016
ISBN:  9781631572142
Reviewer:     Kimberly Brown, PMP
Review Date:   May 2018

 

 



Introduction

 Very in-depth description of how project management performance plays a very large part of being selected for an external project and also provided suggestions on how to perform better by continuously improving enterprise processes. The comparison the Sophisticated Organization versus Unsophisticated when describing the components and attributes of the project management activities of the enterprise stand out as a testimony for Project Management Success. The explanation of Project Proposal and Portfolio, cutting it short to What Why and How, were really efficient in helping to understand their theory.   It clearly identifies how sophisticated enterprises are aware of the foundation for successful deliverables in all Project Management activities. They describe the Project Management activities from Project Proposal thru Planning and Implementation.  Highlighting the important points in each activity and its significance to the enterprise, while also providing advice on how to operate a PMO more efficiently with each activity.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Chapters 2 thru 6 walk the reader through discussion of the various Attributes of the Project Friendly Enterprises and provide input on the difference between them:

Project Management – providing written description of the expected performance of the team in regards to the project tasks.  Introducing the PMO as the governing body for project management teams.  They create the culture that supports discipline and successful project management practices.

Proposal attributes provides an overview of different proposal types then walks the reader thru the proposal development steps and the different ways a proposal can be prioritized explaining the difference between internally and externally funded projects.

Portfolio Management is a task force of project management professionals that will assist the enterprise in identifying the most valuable projects to boost business and assure that all funded projects align with the strategic direction of the enterprise by prioritizing the projects that have the most impact on the organization. The formalized models, used to prioritize, contain indices which help characterize the enterprise strategic objectives:  cost considerations, schedule, scope, etc.

Team Attributes – resources: people, equipment, tools and materials.  People are the most important resource of a project, portfolio or a proposal. The role assignment and responsibilities assigned to each role are the prescription for success, assuming that a project-friendly infrastructure and a supportive work environment are part of that prescription.  Team charter, Communication and reporting, conflict management all are part of the team behavior which will ultimately determine the success of any project.  This chapter then describes the steps or activities that can be taken to create a successful project team.

Enterprise Attributes – the greatest asset is organizational project management process maturity where the success of portfolios, programs, proposals or projects is predictable and repeatable.  The chapter takes the reader thru a management maturity exercise that incorporates all of the knowledge areas to help the organization identify the measure of success, will provide a road map for developing an expanded library of practices and will help to establish formalized project management practices.

Highlights

Each chapter contains graphs and charts which help the reader understand the chapter’s goals.  Every chapter is followed by a case study.  Along with the case study, they have included a formal Assessment Instrument that is virtually a checklist of items to be considered before or during the different phases of a project.  This checklist is extensive and although most readers would not realize it, the extent of experience contained in the Assessment Instrument could be invaluable when applied in real world application.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Kimberly Brown

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Kim Brown has been a Progam/Project Manager for over 30 years in the same industry.  She achieved her PMP certification in 2013 which has led to endles opportunities.  Kim lives in North Texas and is a member of the PMI Dallas Chapter.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

9 Habits of Project Leaders 3

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    9 Habits of Project Leaders: Experience and Data Driven Practical Advice in Project Execution
Author:  Arun Singhal and Puja Bhatt
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price:   $12.95
Format:  65 pages, soft cover, spiral
Publication Date:  2017     
ISBN: 978-1-62825-179-1
Reviewer:     Lisa Brooks, PMP
Review Date:   June 2018

 



Introduction

Most business professionals at some point in their studies or careers have been introduced to Stephen Covey’s The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People as the habits to embrace to be successful.  This book introduces habits that should be considered the standard for project management professionals to incorporate into their everyday work.  These habits pave the way for a project win through enabling the team, organizational success and customer satisfaction.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is a transportable paper copy bound with binding spine.  It allows for quick reference of the key points while not taking up too much space on a desk or in a handbag.  The spine allows for ease of flipping through the pages or holding your place while studying the key points offered throughout the text.

As with the physical characteristics of the book, the text is also well organized to line up with each habit being a separate chapter allowing for quick reference.  The book opens with an introduction, guiding the reader through the intended purpose, who the intended target audience is and what the authors hope the readers’ gain from the book.  The book concludes with how each habit directly lines up with the Knowledge Areas contained within the PMBOK ® Guide.

Highlights

The book outlines nine habits, identified through research and practical experience, project management professionals can introduce into their practice as well as their organization to lead towards what the authors identify as “win-win-win.”   The nine habits guide the project manager to shift towards a project leader while also enabling the team members and other key stakeholders to fully engage in project success.  Within the text, each habit is identified and explained and then followed up with an example of a project when the habit was not fully adopted.  Further elaboration of the habit is then explained and then followed with an example of a project that was successful with the habit being embraced.

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About the Reviewer


Lisa Brooks, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 

Lisa Brooks, PMP is currently an IT Project Manager within the U.S. Department of Defense.  She has over 18 years of experience in IT and recently made the shift to managing projects.   She has a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Social Work from Texas State University.  Lisa is a member of the Project Management Institute, Alamo PMI Chapter.

 

Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Digital Resilience 2

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?
Author:  Ray A Rothrock
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   US$29.95
Format:  Hardcover, 256 pages
Publication Date:   2018 
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3924-1
Reviewer:     Jennifer Arroyo, PMP
Review Date:   May 2018

 

 


 
Introduction

The new reality of cyber security is that cyberattacks are an imminent threat to all digital networks. How serious is the threat?  We learn about all manner of cyberattacks daily from the news, from work, and from social media. On May 23, 2018 CNBC News reported – “Cisco’s Talos cyber intelligence unit said it has high confidence that the Russian government is behind the campaign, … The hacking software shares code with malware used in previous cyberattacks that the U.S. government has attributed to Moscow.”

Rothrock began the book by telling the story of 2013 attack against Target. 70 million customers became victims. Next came Equifax in 2017. Twice as many victims, 145.5 million Americans, were affected. The author provided insights gained from the attacks and utilized extensive cyber security related information to create frame works and action plans to enhance business’s resilience against cyberattacks.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The detailed key features delivered by this book in each chapter include:

Chapter 1 Intensively Networked

– Why Resilience is the Only Rational Cybersecurity Choice?

Chapter 2 Hard to Break

– Resilience: A winning Strategy in a Losing War

Chapter 3 The Nature of Networks

– Knowledge: The First Step Toward Digital Resilience

Chapter 4 Digitally Bound

– Getting the C-Suite and Board Up to Speed on Digital Resilience

Chapter 5 Portrait and Landscape

– Achieving Resilience in Our Fragile Digital Environment

Chapter 6 The Measure of Resilience

– Assessing and Improving Your Digital Resilience

Chapter 7 Resilient Response

– Making Resilience a Whole-Business, Whole-Nation, Whole-World Issue

Chapter 8 Achieving Digital Resilience

– A Top-Down Guide

 Highlights

Warren Buffett said recently that he sees cyberattacks as “the number one problem with mankind”.

Cyberattacks are becoming increasingly complex and malicious in scale.  Every entity links to the vast network of cyber world must have digital resiliency to survive.

In this non-technical book for business leaders, management and anyone interested in learning more about cyber risks, Ray Rothrock explains why digital resiliency is the key to survival for everyone digitally connected. The book is packed with high-profile real life cyberattacks in recent years and Rothrock’s takes on what went wrong and how to identify and operate a cyber security program effectively and cost-effectively.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Jennifer Arroyo, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Jennifer Arroyo, MBA, PMP, Realtor®received her M.B.A. degree in Marketing from State University of New York at Albany.  Jennifer joined PMI’s Dallas Chapter in 2015.

Ms. Arroyo has more than 10 years of project management experience in the Multi-unit retail business, Multi-unit residential investment, and Financial Services industries. She works as an Associate Broker, affiliated with Keller Williams Realty, specialized in Residential | Commercial & Investment entrepreneurship PPM in Dallas TX.  With her diverse international and industry-specific PM leadership experiences, Ms. Arroyo is passionate about helping entrepreneurs and business clients achieve branding goals and ROI Growth.

Keller Williams, the world’s largest real estate franchise by agent count, had the most firms on the REAL trends 500, according to the annual ranking and reporting published by REAL Trends, Inc.  Founded in 1983, it grew from a single office in Austin to approximately 700 offices and as of Nov. 2016 with over 150,000 associates worldwide. It’s an Inc.5000 company and has been recognized as one of the highest rated real estate companies by numerous publications, including Entrepreneur Magazine and Forbes.  The franchise, collectively, handled more than $178 billion in sales, up 27%, and 645,000 transactions, up 21% over year 2016.

Jennifer volunteered and served as supporting Book Review Coordinator of the professional development and social media marketing initiative. She also facilitates the Early Childhood Bilingual gogosmartmom e-Learning program designed for Homeschooling Moms originating in Taiwan, Republic of China.

Contact Jennifer Arroyo via [email protected]  or 972.372.4043

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

 

Digital Resilience

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?
Author: Ray A. Rothrock
Publisher:  American Management Association
List Price:   $29.95
Format: Hard cover, 256 pages
Publication Date: 2018      
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3924-1
Reviewer: Kevin D. Martin, PMP, PMI-ACP, SAFe SA,
Review Date: May 2018

 

 



Introduction

The subtitle grasped my attention, “Is your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?”  With the speed of change and the lack of international laws to detect and prosecute the criminals, my mind quickly responded, “I doubt it?”

This title addresses the rise in cybercrimes and every business, large and small are at risk.  It helps law abiding business people peek inside the minds and tactics of international criminals to understand the threats, identify the weakness and effectively respond, no matter what it takes.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This 2018 publication is hot off the presses with valuable insights and is written in a very easily accessible manner for the average business professional.

Organized into eight chapters, the author opens with why digital security is not enough and then introduces the concept of digital resiliency, as the only real answer for the rapid changing future of a highly networked world and cyber-competition.  Along the way, each chapter contains Action Items, for the reader to assess and a Key Takeaway at the end of each chapter, which I found very useful to bring the message down to a personal level, much more valuable that simply a concept.

Highlights

Filled with quotes and case studies from history, the reader can easily begin to project the possible futures they may face.  “When you invent the ship, you also invent the shipwreck,’ a quote from Paul Virilio, emphasized the challenge of connectivity, as both the power and vulnerability in networks.  This book peels back the “black-box” mystery of connected networks to reveal the inherent instability of the internet and the possibility of creating digital resilience on node at a time.

Highlights: What I liked!

Ripped from today’s headlines, this book takes the reader on a fantastic journey of networking, hacking, exposing hidden risks and encouraging the reader to become the Paul Revere for their organization’s digital space.  Extolling the need to promote and lead the need for digital resiliency, while there is still time, before the organization is the latest headline and trust is lost, never to be regained.

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About the Reviewer


Kevin D. Martin, PMP, PMI-ACP

San Antonio, Texas, USA

 

 

 

 

Kevin D. Martin, PMP, PMI-ACP brings successful leadership, strategic & design thinking in project/program/portfolio practices in Information Technology, Call Center Operations and Project Management disciplines.  Actively involved in the vision & growth of this global award-winning Alamo PMI chapter, his focus is building and leading high performing teams to achieve business value and sustainable success.  His talents have benefited numerous Fortune 100 companies in the Oil and Gas, Banking, and Financial Services industries, in addition to various sports, volunteer and community service organizations.

Kevin is a graduate of St. Mary’s University – Bachelor of Applied Sciences and a holds a Master of Business Administration M.B.A.- Finance from St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas.  He is a graduate of the University of Virginia’s Darden Executive Education Program and the Leadership Development Program (LDP) at The Center for Creative Leadership.

Mr. Martin is a member of the faculty at the University of Texas – San Antonio, with a focus on project management and agile business practices to develop future leaders for delivering organizational and business value through innovation and continuous learning.

As a thought leadership expert and international speaker in high demand, he enjoys the variety and challenges at every scale of complexity and business development.  You can connect with him on social media, to find him facilitating teams, through mentoring or discussing timely topics over food and drink with other friends and colleagues.

Kevin, nicknamed “KMart,” is an avid reader, consuming 25-38 titles annually.  He is co-author of “Swimming in the Deep End,” a collection of his life-long experiences, while leading high performing teams to deliver amazing results.  His personal motto is “Dream Big, Work Hard and Give Back” and his passion and energy are nearly boundless.  Kevin is employed by USAA, and currently serving as the USAA Enterprise Practice Lead for Project Management & an Agile Coach, leading large multi-million-dollar investments, using Scrum, Kanban and SAFe practices.  He is on faculty for University of Texas – San Antonio and the UTSA Center for Professional Educational Excellence, delivering courses for executives, doctoral, graduate and undergraduate students.

A long-time resident of San Antonio, Kevin is a voracious business & leadership reader and leader in community and civic organizations. He is a devoted husband to his wife of 38 years – Cheryl, and they are blessed with three adult children, Jennifer, Matthew and Allison, all of them are leaders in their chosen professions.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Agile Project Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Title:  Agile Project Management for Business Transformation Success
Author:  Paul Paquette and Milan Frankl
Publisher:  Business Expert Press, LLC
List Price: $34.95
Format:  Soft cover
Publication Date:  2016
ISBN:  13:978-1-63157-323-1
Reviewer:  Charlotte A. McKenzie, CPLP®, PMI-ACP, PSM, ITILv3
Review Date:  April 2018

 

 



I
ntroduction

I have been an Agilest from as far back as I can remember; however, I did not realize I was one until May 2013 when I heard my first presentation on the Agile mindset. Adapting to Agile was natural because I inherently practiced the tenets of Agile/Scrum. I also recognized the high failure rate of the Waterfall methodology through reading the Standish Group’s Annual Chaos Report which I often referenced in the Project Management courses I taught at the university level and as a volunteer instructor for a local non-profit organization. I studied the traditional project management approach while attending a course at Villanova University.  I believed there was a better way.

I became certified as a Scrum Master in July 2013 through Scrum.org when I earned my PSM, Professional Scrum Master, certification. In 2018 I earned the PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Professional) credential.  I plan to earn the PMI-PBA, Professional in Business Analysis, certification in 2018. I mention these credentials because these statements support the fact that this book was like “preaching to the choir”. I wholeheartedly endorse the author’s positions.

Most importantly, reading this book was an enjoyable learning experience. As an educator, continuous learning is an integral part of my value system. I gained additional perspectives on the business value of the umbrella of Agile solutions. Agile can be applied to a wide range of projects, not just software development and not just the PMO organization.

Overview of the Book’s Structure

This eleven-chapter book is well organized. Looking at the book through my instructional designer lens, the general to specific organizational style leverages reader retention and is the preferred style for adult readers. The book assumes the reader has limited knowledge of Agile. In chapters one through three the authors provide a solid Agile foundation by presenting a detailed description of Agile concepts with comparisons to traditional Waterfall Project Management. In these initial chapters, the authors include detailed descriptions of corporate transformation projects. Armed with the information from the first through three chapters, the reader is better equipped to explore the practical aspects of corporate transformation projects covered in chapters four through ten.

Chapter four focuses on one of the vital success factors for any project: Communications within teams, as well as communications outside of the team. The chapter details are astounding. Chapter five embraces the importance of teamwork. Next, chapter six discusses the Agile approach in terms of the enterprise.  How does Agile impact enterprise-wide governance? In chapter seven Agile processes are highlighted and contrasted with traditional Waterfall methods, however, some Kanban processes were not covered. Chapter eight deals with the limitations of the traditional approach of gathering project requirements upfront as well as the inadequate traditional feedback loops. As the authors state, over reliance on predictive planning is the Achilles heel of the Waterfall approach. Chapter nine discusses the major elements in organizational alignment where Agile has a direct impact.

The author makes two direct position statements upfront: 1.  Agile addresses the limitations of the traditional project management methods, and 2. Agile has significant advantages in the most important organizational alignment factor, customer satisfaction. Chapter ten outlines Agile resource optimization which is an important enterprise-wide consideration. The last chapter summarizes the key points from the previous ten chapters.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Charlotte McKenzie

Washington, DC, USA

 

 

Charlotte A. McKenzie, CPLP®, PMI-ACP, PSM, ITILv3 is a Technical Trainer, Instructional Designer, Agile Project Manager and Online Professor. She lives and works in the Washington D.C. Metro Area in the United States. Charlotte can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Responsible Leadership in Projects

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Responsible Leadership in Projects: Insights Into Ethical Decision Making
Authors:        Nicholas Clarke, Alessia D’Amato, Malcolm Higgs, Ramesh Vahidi
Publisher:     PMI
List Price:     $24.95
Format:  Paperback, 150 pages
Publication Date:   Feb 1, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-62825-476-1
Reviewer: John Poulos, PMP
Review Date:   May 2018

 



Introduction

 The authors – Nicholas Clarke, Alessia D’Amato, Malcolm Higgs and Ramesh Vahidi, professors and researchers in human resource management, organizational behavior and project management – present the results of a PMI-funded research study focused on responsible leadership and ethical decision making.

As sustainability and an interconnected business world are growing concerns of leaders, the need for corporate social responsibility and the ethical practice of project management are drawing increasing attention. These factors underpin the concept of responsible leadership. The authors note the paucity of empirical research in this area, and are seeking to contribute to the understanding of ethical decision making and how it can better inform the development of project managers. This qualitative study explores the ethical issues faced by project managers as they interact with team members and stakeholders – and how ethical decision making occurs – in the context of four individual projects undertaken in a major insurance company in the UK.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Chapters 1-2 provide an introduction, background and context for the research effort.

Chapters 3-5 provide a review of the literature on the foundational concepts of Responsible Leadership, Ethics in Project Management and Ethical Decision Making.

Chapter 6 describes the design of the research project and the approach followed to analyze the resulting data.

Chapter 7 details the findings within each of four project case studies that form the basis for research findings and insights.

Chapter 8 discusses findings and analysis of the four case studies in the context of ethics and responsible leadership.

Chapter 9 summarizes key findings and conclusions, and outlines contributions to both study and practice.

Highlights

The need for responsible leadership and ethical decision making is widely recognized in the corporate world as well as the project management community. To illustrate, the authors cite a poll conducted in Europe and the US that found that between 65% and 81% of adults considered the behavior of their business leaders unethical or irresponsible.

The authors present the results and insights obtained from a qualitative study that examined over a 12 month period four particular projects conducted at a major UK insurance company. The research looked into how project members engage in ethical decision making. The projects and their associated ethical dilemmas were as follows:

More…

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About the Reviewer


John Poulos, PMP

Chile / USA

 

 

 

 John Poulos has over thirty years of experience providing guidance on the effective use of information technology while delivering business-driven, technology-based solutions to a wide range of private and public sector organizations. In his current position as Senior Director of Infrastructure, Cloud and Security at NTT DATA Services, he manages strategic projects for NTT DATA/ICS leadership. In addition, he delivers infrastructure and IT strategy consulting services to corporate and government clients.

He is currently leading a global project to migrate 30,000 employees of a company recently acquired by NTT DATA from their original end-user computing environment to the standard NTT DATA PC image and SW configuration. In prior positions, John provided IT consulting services across various industries and geographical regions. He managed complex projects for clients in private enterprise, higher education and government. John holds E.E. and Engineering Management degrees from Southern Methodist University, MIT, and The George Washington University.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

9 Habits of Project Leaders 2

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: 9 Habits of Project Leaders: Experience and Data-driven Practical Advice in Project Execution
Author:  Arun Singhal, Puja Bhatt
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Incorporated
List Price:   $12.95/10.35
Format:  Spiral Binder; 65 pages
Publication Date:   2017
ISBN: 978-1-62825-179-1
Reviewer: Adriane Rivers, CAPM, PMP  
Review Date: May 2018

 

 



Introduction

9 Habits of Project Leaders is a quick guide for practitioners of project management at all levels seeking to transform from project managers to project leaders. The book defines habits and how adopting them can help the reader achieve professional goals. The authors, Arun Singhal and Puja Bhatt, have a combined total of 34 years’ experience in project execution. They wrote this book because they saw the need for books with knowledge about the habits or traits needed to be a project leader.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into 11 chapters that progressively guide the reader through steps on becoming effective and strong project leaders. Each habit directly relates to multiple knowledge areas found in the fifth edition of the PMBOK guide.

Starting with the first habit that focuses on taking ownership of the project to the final habit that encourages setting up a system to recognize and reward individual and group contributions, the book provides habits that are easily adoptable. The book ends with a summary of all 9 habits and how the authors compiled data for publication.

Highlights

9 Habits of Project Leaders reminds practitioners that one of the main functions of project leaders is to communicate effectively with stakeholders, sponsors and management. Another reminder for project leaders is to focus on each project’s contribution to the company’s business value or strategic plan. Ultimately, all habits featured in this book assist in the development of strong project leaders.

The book focuses on habits ranging from taking ownership of a project, to enabling team decision making, suggestions for recognizing contributions, and how to communicate by documenting and sharing key data.

Highlights: What I liked!

I liked how the book provided real-world examples which made the material more relatable. I also liked how the authors added charts, statistics and references to knowledge areas from the PMBOK guide. I read 9 Habits of Project Leaders while working on my current project and it gave me courage to put several habits into action.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Adriane Rivers

Maryland, USA

 

 

Adriane Rivers is a PMP certified Technology Project Manager with a global healthcare company. With a background in accounting, telecommunications and project management she has been successful at defining and guiding implementation of best practices, processes, and tools to drive productivity. Her career includes over 15 years with Matria Healthcare, Alere Health and Optum. Adriane is a member of the Project Management Institute Baltimore and Silver Spring, MD Chapters, and acquired her PMP certification January 2018.

She can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Agile Project Management for Business

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Agile Project Management for Business Transformation Success
Author:  Paul Paquette and Milan Frankl
Publisher:  Business Expert Press
List Price:  $34.95
Format:  Softcover, 119 pages
Publication Date:  2016     
ISBN: 13:978-1-63157-323-1
Reviewer: Sani L. Venkatesan, PMP
Review Date: May 2018

 

 



Introduction

The authors intended this book “to provide project management office (PMO) executives practical information to promote enterprise Agile for business value compatibility within their organization. The primary benefit of this book is to promote a sense of common and collaboration between project delivery and the organization.”

However, it seems that sections of the book have a great start and miss the mark of the final conclusion of how to promote and use at the enterprise level. The book also mentions “lean principles” (pg.49) only discussing the CMMI and without going into detail about what these are and how they are used in the Business Transformation process. Additionally, the book is written more from a technological vantage point where there would be benefits of using Agile more frequently.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into chapters starting with concepts moving into change management, background, and communication along with teamwork functionality of Agile. It isn’t until chapter 7 that historical value and processes are introduced.

The book also discusses the use of Agile in Market Leadership, Organizational Alignment and Support, Resource Optimization. The ultimate goal of the addition of these tools is to promote enhanced communication, teamwork, collaboration, and organizational change with transparency among teams.

Highlights

The book leverages and reviews several of Agile “roots”, with the one exception of Toyota Lean Manufacturing. Each of these processes are reviewed with examples of how they can be used in an Agile project and in some cases how they can work together if needed. (Chart not listed in the book).

Continuing forward through the book the advantages and disadvantages are used as examples in how each will impact completing projects: internally, externally (getting to market quicker), and the differences in communications needed. Each example provides a fair assessment of challenges and opportunities when using Waterfall or Agile. The Waterfall components of the table below were included in the book (Table 3.1; pg.29), while the Agile components needed to be gleaned from the text.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Sani L. Venkatesan

Texas, USA

 

 

Sani L. Venkatesan is an MBA, PMP, and CLMBBSS. She has utilized her skills in multiple industries to assist companies in overcoming challenges in areas of mergers & acquisitions, implementations, project & process management. She currently lives in Dallas, Texas.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Implementing Change in Organizations

A Manager’s Guide

 

SECOND EDITION

By Robert Youker
(Formerly of the World Bank Institute)

Maryland, USA

 



Introduction

Workers in organizations are often faced with the problem of introducing change to procedures that may impact the status quo.  Some simple changes result in strong resistance, causing additional problems for management.  Other changes are usually accepted as worthwhile improvements.  The purpose of this paper is to define why some changes are resisted, while others are accepted, and to describe how managers can use procedures that may result in substantially higher rate of acceptance of proposed changes.  This will include a model for analyzing ways to improve the methods for introducing change in a given situation.

Although the change can be of any type, this article will focus on changes in administrative systems.  Examples of administrative systems would include the installation of a formal system of analysis of capital investments, using the discounted cash flow technique for calculating the return on investment; or the introduction of a system of development project planning and control based on the critical path method of network diagramming (CPM/PERT).  Both types of new administrative systems would require changes in the way some of the organization’s personnel carry out their daily work.

The history of the introduction of administrative system changes is replete with failures.  Some new systems were never implemented, while others had model initial success but then died out over time.  For example, a study by Davis [3] indicated that only 55% of the major construction firms in the USA were effectively using CPM.  A study of corporate models in management science indicated that only 3% had been implemented [12]. Each reader, I am sure, can think of several examples of systems that have been developed and not fully implemented.

More…

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally published in the Project Management Quarterly in March 1983.  It is republished here with the author’s permission.

How to cite this paper: Youker, R. (1983). Implementing Change in Organizations (A Manager’s Guide); Project Management Quarterly, March 1983, p. 34-40; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue VII – July. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Youker-Implementing-Change-in-Organizations-PMQ-March-1983.pdf



About the Author


Robert Youker

World Bank (retired)

 

 

 

 

 Robert (Bob) Youker is an independent trainer and consultant in Project Management with more than forty years of experience in the field.  He is retired from the World Bank where he developed and presented six week project management training courses for the managers of major projects in many different countries. He served as the technical author for the bank on the Instructors Resource Kit on CD ROM for a five week training course on Managing the Implementation of Development Projects.  He has written and presented more than a dozen papers at the Project Management Institute and the International Project Management Association (Europe) conferences many of which have been reprinted in the Project Management Institute publications and the International Journal of Project Management (UK).

Mr. Youker is a graduate of Colgate University, the Harvard Business School and studied for a doctorate in behavioral science at George Washington University.  His project management experience includes new product development at Xerox Corporation and project management consulting for many companies as President of Planalog Management Systems from 1968 to 1975.  He has taught in Project Management Courses for AMA, AMR, AED, ILI, ILO, UCLA, University of Wisconsin, George Washington University, the Asian Development Bank and many other organizations. He developed and presented the first Project Management courses in Pakistan, Turkey, China and Africa for the World Bank.

A few years ago Mr. Youker conducted Project Management training in Amman, Jordan financed by the European Union for 75 high level civil servants from Iraq who implemented the first four World Bank projects in Iraq. He is a former Director of PMI, IPMA and asapm, the USA member organization of IPMA. Most recently he has been consulting for the US Government Millennium Challenge Corporation on project management training in Africa.  Bob can be contacted at [email protected]

To see more works by Bob Youker, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/robert-bob-youker/

 

 

Digital Transformation

through Product and Project Innovation Management

 

SECOND EDITION

By Curt Raschke

Richardson, Texas, USA

 



Technology Transformation and Innovation

The phrase “Digital Transformation” has become so ubiquitous in so many different contexts that the only commonality seems to be its use as a marketing concept to sell computer hardware, software and / or consulting services. It seems to have become an all-purpose generic “transformation” encompassing “agile transformation,” “cloud transformation,” “IoT transformation,” “big data transformation,” “as a service transformation,” “mobile application transformation,” “business intelligence transformation,” “process automation transformation,” “DevOps transformation,” etc.

The multitude of white papers, presentations, advertisements, webinars and blogs on the subject generally assert that through the proper mix of digital technologies and capabilities, companies can “transform” their business models, business processes, organizational structures, employee engagement, customer experience, etc. This literature also, unfortunately, generally fails to give much actionable direction on how to accomplish these desired goals. So how, then, can a company or organization decide how and when to utilize the many available digital tools to significantly grow its business and / or improve internal customer satisfaction?

Fortunately, while many digital technologies are indeed new, technology driven “transformations” are not, and provide useful “lessons learned” that can be applied to the question of how to best exploit the newest digital technologies. Examples of such “transforming” technologies in the last 200 years include steam, electricity, telegraphy, telephony, internal combustion, radio, powered flight, photography, television, computers, and the internet; each of which “transformed” businesses and eventually society.

While each of these transformational technologies were very different, in every case, the actual transformations occurred through the innovative products (goods and services) enabled by the technology that delivered services not previously available. The first lesson learned, then, is that all technology transformations actually occur not directly through the technology but through the use of products (goods and services) enabled by the technology, and the transformational value is through the service experience provided. The second lesson learned is that transformational products are very innovative either in how the product is used or in how the service is delivered; that is, transformation and innovation are inextricably linked.

Digital (Product) Transformation

Based on the history of these previous technology transformations, a simplified explanation of digital transformation might be along the lines of: Creation and widespread usage of innovative software enabled products that provide valuable, previously unavailable services to a broad range of customers and end users. Looking at digital transformation in terms of software enabled products and services makes it easier for businesses to choose which digital tools to invest in and estimate how their business models, organizational structures, employee engagement, etc. will have to change to accommodate the new products. This approach also allows a company to leverage the extensive body of knowledge on product development and product lifecycle management to achieve its specific goals.

The first question a company should ask, then, when contemplating digital “transformation”, is not what digital technologies it should embrace, but rather what customer base does it want to serve and what needs or desires do the customers and end users have that are not presently met by existing products? Once the first question is answered, the second question is to ask specifically which technologies should be developed or acquired to enable goods and services that satisfy the unmet customer and end user needs and for which the customer is willing to pay enough to generate adequate financial return.

Too often, when companies contemplate digital transformation by focusing primarily on technology options, rather than the customer and end user needs, they inevitably end up using the technology to lower costs, respond to competitive products, or extend existing product lines; all of which may make good business sense but are hardly transformational. No, meaningful business transformation requires the deployment of transformational products that are both significantly innovative in how the goods and services are used or delivered and provide significantly greater value than existing products. Such product innovation, in turn, drives changes to business processes, organizational structures, employee skill sets, etc., with the degree of change determined by the degree of innovation needed.

The third lesson learned, then, is that innovative products by themselves are necessary but not sufficient. The innovation must be carefully identified and managed so that the product enabled by the innovation provides significant value to both the vendor and the customer; the customer must be willing to pay enough for the product to generate adequate financial return on investment for the vendor. As will be discussed, this innovation management has both a product dimension and a project dimension.

More…

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in May 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

How to cite this paper: Raschke, C. (2018).  Digital Transformation through Produce and Project Innovation Management; 12th UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, Richardson, TX, USA, May 2018; PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue VII – July. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Raschke-digital-transformation-utd-conference-paper.pdf



About the Author


Curt Raschke, PhD

Texas, USA

 

 



Curt Raschke
is a product development thought leader, innovative project manager and business process change agent helping global high technology companies adapt their products, projects and processes to changing market opportunities. He also teaches an Executive MBA course on “Effective New Product Introduction” at the UT Dallas Center for Intelligent Supply Networks on using innovative product introductions as the basis for sustainable competitive advantage. Curt founded the UT Dallas Applied Project Management Forum in 2004 and served as Chair of the Project Management Institute’s New Product Development Specific Interest Group for five years. He has a Ph.D. in Solid State Physics with PMP and Lean Six Sigma certifications. He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Agile Quantitative Risk Management

 

SECOND EDITION

By Susan Parente

S3 Technologies, LLC

New York and Washington, DC, USA

 



ABSTRACT

In today’s world of fast paced technology and continually changing requirements and project scope, the need for Agile Project Management has greatly increased. This calls us to ask, how do standard critical project management methodologies like Risk Management fit into Agile Practices.

What is Agile Risk Management and when does it make sense to use it? How does Quantitative Risk Analysis relate to Agile and how it is incorporated into Agile Practices, will be evaluated? Recommendations for implementing Agile Risk Management will be provided along with best practices and how organizations are applying this into practice.

The nuances of how risk management is incorporated into agile practices are what generate project success. When requirements and environmental conditions are in flux, our ability to anticipate risk and plan for it, is critical to managing projects with agility.

OVERVIEW

The objectives of this paper on Agile Quantitative Risk Analysis are to explain what Agile risk management is, discuss risk analysis for Agile and provide recommendations for implementing Agile quantitative risk management. Lastly, the objective of this paper is to present risk as an opportunity to successful Agile project management!

With Agile project management replacing traditional project management in many organization and on many projects, it is important to understand how quantitative risk management is done in Agile projects.

WHAT IS AGILE?

In discussing Agile risk management, it is important to first clarify what we mean by Agile. Agile is a set of principles that guide teams and guide product development. It is a culture shift not a particular methodology or framework, but it consists of a number of methodologies and frameworks. Agile is a great solution for some types of projects but may not be the best solution for all projects. Agile entails open communication between teams, stakeholders, and customers. Agile is different from traditional project management in a number of ways, which will be detailed below.

Agile guidance consists of the Agile Manifesto and its 12 Principles, see the site www.agilemanifesto.org for the 4 values of Agile and its 12 Principles. Although Scrum is the most common framework of Agile, it is not by far the only framework. There are also other aspects of a project that make it an Agile project, versus a traditional project. These may include one or more of the following: rolling wave planning, iterative or incremental delivery, rapid and flexible response to change, and/ or open communication. Examples of Agile methodologies or frameworks include: Scrum, XP (eXtreme Programming), Lean and Test-driven Development (TDD), Kanban, and many others.

Why should you use Agile principles and practices for project management? Agile principles and practices are used to manage change, improve communication, reduce cost, increase efficiency, provide value to customers and stakeholders, and decrease project risk. One should consider an Agile approach when 1 or more of the following conditions are present:

  • Uncertainty (particularly in requirements and changing conditions)
  • Complexity (in content, integration, stakeholder management, or solution)
  • Innovation (new technology, content, or system)
  • Urgent (high priority or short timeline)

COMPARING TRADITIONAL TO AGILE

The triple constraint (time, cost, and scope) operates differently in traditional project management and Agile project management. Often quality is show in the middle of this triangle and Risk may be show as a cloud around the triangle, or in the background, as it is shown in figure 1 below.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 5th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

How to cite this paper: Parente, I. S. (2018). Agile Quantitative Risk Analysis, presented at the 5th Annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium, College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2018; published in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue VII – July.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Parente-agile-quantitative-risk-analysis-umd-paper.pdf



About the Author


Susan Parente

Washington, DC/ New York, USA

 

 

 

Susan Parente, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, PSM I, CSM, CSPO, CISSP, CRISC, RESILIA, ITIL, MS Eng. Mgmt. is a principal consultant at her company, S3 Technologies, LLC. She is a project engineer, consultant, speaker, author, and mentor who leads large complex IT software implementation projects, and the establishment of Enterprise PMOs. She has 19+ years’ experience leading software and business development projects in the private and public sectors, including a decade of experience implementing IT projects for the DoD and other federal government agencies. Ms. Parente is also an Associate Professor at Post University in CT. She has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Rochester in NY and has a MS in Engineering Management from George Washington University in DC. She also has a number of certifications, most of which she teaches and she is a CMMI and ISO 9001 Practitioner.

Ms. Parente is a Principal Consultant at S3 Technologies, LLC. Her company’s focuses on revitalizing projects through the use of risk management and implementing Agile practices. S3 Technologies does this by teaming with clients, stakeholders and vendors and using risk management and project agility to deliver project successes. Ms. Parente trains and mentors project managers in the areas of project management, agile project management, and risk management. She has developed a methodology which she uses to implement risk management programs for both small and large clients and is currently completing her manuscript for a book on implementing risk management.

Susan can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Susan Parente, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/susan-parente/

 

 

Applying 1970 Waterfall Lessons Learned

Within Today’s Agile Development Process

 

SECOND EDITION

Johnny D. Morgan, PhD

Washington, DC, USA

 



ABSTRACT

While working for TRW in 1970, Dr. Winston Royce published an IEEE paper that described the waterfall development process.  In his paper he stated “I believe in the concept but the implementation described is risky and invites failure.”   He then “presents five additional features that must be added to this basic approach to eliminate most of the development risks.”   This paper reviews these five additional features recommended in 1970 and describes how they are incorporated into today’s agile development process to reduce agile project development risks.

Key Words: Agile, architecture, design, Manifesto for Agile Software Development, project management, software development, waterfall, Winston Royce

This paper is based on empirical observations, current literature, and engineering and project management experiences.

INTRODUCTION

Since the publishing of the Manifesto for Agile Software Development in 2001, many books and journal articles have been published that first characterizes the waterfall software development process and then identifies process steps that attempt to separate and uniquely characterize agile development practices as different and better.   In many cases, each of these publications either references or directly draws the basic waterfall development process shown in Figure 1 and then attempts to make a comparison of historical project management concepts and agile project management concepts.  For example, one publication states:

“In the historical approach, which locks the requirements and delivers the product all in one go, the result is all or nothing.  We either succeed completely or fail absolutely.  The stakes are high because everything hinges on work that happens at the end…of the final phase of the cycle, which includes integration and customer testing…In the testing phase of a waterfall project, the customers get to see their long-awaited product.  By that time, the investment and effort have been huge, and the risk of failure is high.  Finding defects among all completed project requirements is like looking for a weed in a cornfield…The following list summarizes the major aspects of the waterfall approach to project management:

  • The team must know all requirements up front to estimate time, budgets, team members and resources…
  • The customer and stakeholders may not be available to answer questions during the development period, because they may assume that they provided all the information during the requirements-gathering and design phases…
  • The team needs to resist the addition of new requirements or document them as change orders, which adds more work to the project and extends the schedule and budget…
  • Full and complete customer feedback is not possible until the end of the project when all functionality is complete.” (Layton and Ostermiller 2017)

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 5th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

How to cite this paper: Morgan, J. D. (2018). Applying 1970 Waterfall Lessons Learned Within Today’s Agile Development Process; presented at the 5th Annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium, College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2018; published in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue VII – July.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Morgan-applying-1970-waterfall-lessons-umd-paper.pdf



About the Author


Johnny D. Morgan, PhD

General Dynamics Information Technology
Washington, DC, USA

 




Dr. Johnny Morgan
has 38 years of systems engineering and project management experience.  While serving in the United States Navy and then employed with IBM, Lockheed Martin and currently General Dynamics, he has assisted numerous Department of Defense and Intelligence Community customers in the management and execution of their information technology portfolios.   Supplementing his experience, he has received a Bachelor’s degree in Computer and Information Sciences from the University of Florida, a Master’s degree in Systems Management from the University of Southern California, and a Doctorate degree in System Engineering from the George Washington University.   Dr. Morgan has also earned numerous industry certifications including the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Professional and the International Council on Systems Engineering Expert System Engineering Professional certifications.

Dr. Morgan can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Innovation Ecosystem Management

Leadership in Project Management and Business

 

SECOND EDITION

By Darrel G. Hubbard, PE, President & CEO
D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC
California, USA

and

Peter W. Rogers, CEO
P17 Group LLC and Senior Consultant
The Experience Praxis Group, Inc.
Georgia, USA

 



INTRODUCTION

Innovation, within business and project management, is strategically positioned ideas implemented to create business value and benefits for the enterprise. A significant difference exists between the concepts of innovation and creativity. Creativity, in a business context, is the ideation process of forming and relating ideas. But ideas are useless unless implemented. Therefore, it is not how many ideas a company has, but how many ideas are transformed into reality. That requires innovation, which is the process of turning an idea into a producible, marketable, and valuable form. Innovation in business and project management is about practical creativity, which is about making a new idea useful.

Why is innovation so important today in the management of businesses and the management of projects? Quite simply because innovation—incremental, disruptive, and transformational—fuels and sustains business growth. It is the force that assists an enterprise in adapting and staying alive. Transformational digital innovation has moved the world marketplace and industries out of the Third Industrial Revolution into the Fourth Industrial Revolution of digital disruption.

The Third Industrial Revolution, known as the Information Age, is considered the time-period from about 1970 to the year 2000. That era shepherded in the proliferation of computer-chips, the introduction of the personal computers, the beginnings of automation technologies, and the ability to technologically transfer information quickly. This revolutionized operations almost everywhere from manufacturing, to management, mass media, health, governmental institutions, and entertainment.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution, the era of Digital Transformation commonly called “Industry 4.0,” arrived with the advent of the 21st century. Klaus Schwab, in his 2016 book, The Fourth Industrial Revolution[40], has opined that digitalization, emerging technologies, and broad-based-innovation will revolutionize everything. He noted that “major technological changes are on the brink of fueling momentous change throughout the world.”

Industry 4.0 refers to the current trend of extensive automation and data exchange in manufacturing, production, and services. The oncoming Digital Transformation being driven by Industry 4.0 isn’t something evolutionary: it’s revolutionary. It includes a wide range of current and future business related functionality, such as: cyber-physical systems; Internet of Things; Internet of Robotic Things; Internet of Systems; Location of Things; cloud computing; cognitive technologies and computing; predictive analytics; device interoperability; information transparency; decentralized decision-making; artificial intelligence; consumer software applications; smart manufacturing; ubiquitous mobile supercomputing; intelligent robots; self-driving cars; neuro-technological brain enhancements; genetic editing; technological convergence; integration of operational technology with information technology; combining big data and materials science; bi-directional assistance between humans and machines; software-defined infrastructure; converged infrastructures; DevOps; and Blockchain.

By applying and embedding smart and connected technology, Industry 4.0 is transforming enterprises, economies, jobs, and even society. It is characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, societal, and biological spheres. It is creating digital enterprises that are both interconnected and capable of more informed decision-making and that can communicate, analyze, and use data to drive intelligent actions within our physical world. Industry 4.0 is driving the integration of digital and physical technologies across all areas of business, society, production, mobility, and communications. It represents broad and pervasive industrial, business, and societal shifts that must be dealt with comprehensively, if enterprises are to survive as a minimum and hopefully thrive. All revolutions are disruptive. Industry 4.0 is no exception by portending tremendous opportunity for new products and services, better ways to serve customers, new types of jobs, and wholly new business models. It has the potential to fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, speed, and complexity, the transformations will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before.

Scope, systems impact, and velocity are three reasons why today’s innovation driven transformations represent not merely a prolongation of the Third Industrial Revolution but rather the arrival of a distinct Fourth. The speed of current breakthroughs has no historical precedent. When compared with the three previous industrial revolutions, Industry 4.0 is evolving at an exponential rather than a linear pace. Moreover, it is disrupting almost every industry in every country. And the breadth and depth of these changes foreshadow the transformation of entire systems of production, management, governmental operations, enterprise governance, line-organizations, and whole enterprises. No public or private enterprise will be immune. Resistance is futile. Enterprises that ignore it will end up befuddled in bankruptcy court.

Major disruptions are happening in multiple industries, and no enterprise is too big to have the proverbial rug pulled out from under it.  It used to be about the big eating the small; now the fast annihilate the slow. An IDC report “FutureScape: Worldwide CIO Agenda 2016 Predictions[23]” emphasized that, “One-third of the top 20 firms in industry segments will be disrupted by new competitors within five years,” and that it’s a matter of “transform or perish.” Innovation in the marketplace is fast and sustained. Today, companies such as Amazon, Apple, Google, Microsoft, Uber, Facebook, eBay, Tesla, Netflix, RedHat, Walmart, and Mayo Clinic are disrupting their markets with innovative approaches within their business arenas.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in May 2018.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

How to cite this paper: Hubbard, D. G. & Rogers, P. W. (2018). Innovation Ecosystem Management Leadership in Project Management and Business; presented at the 12th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, Richardson, Texas, USA in May 2018; published in the PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue VII – July. Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Hubbard-Rogers-innovation-ecosystem-management-leadership.pdf



About the Authors


Darrel G. Hubbard, P.E.

California, USA

 

 

 

Darrel Hubbard is President of D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC providing executive consulting and assessment services. He has over 50 years of experience in consulting, line management, and technical positions. He has served as a corporate executive officer; managed information technology, proposal, accounting, and project management organizations; managed the due diligence processes for numerous mergers and acquisitions; was a program manager on engineering projects; was a project manager on commercial projects; and a designated “key person” under government contracts. He has also held executive positions in, and was professionally licensed in, the securities and insurance industries.

He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their enterprise’s strategic business and tactical objectives. He provides analysis of their management structures, business processes, general business operations, and project and business management capabilities, while supplying specific recommendations on business, methodology, toolset, and process improvements. Mr. Hubbard also assists companies, as an out-side third party, with the intricacies of the due diligence process in their merger and acquisition activities. He also supports companies in the managerial development and establishment of Organizational Project Management (OPM) and their Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) and provides work­shops and seminars focusing on the business management aspects of the project management discipline.

Mr. Hubbard holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics with a minor in chemistry from Minnesota State University at Moorhead. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Control Systems in California. Mr. Hubbard joined the Project Management Institute (PMI) in 1978 (#3662), is a charter member of the PMI San Diego Chapter, and was deputy project manager for the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition ANSI Standard by PMI. He was the Exhibitor Chairperson for the 1993 PMI North American Congress/Seminar/Symposium, is a published author of many articles, a presenter at many PMI Congresses and other Project Management Symposiums, a keynote speaker, and a guest speaker at PMI and IIBA Chapter meetings. Darrel is also a Life-Member of the International Society of Automation (ISA).

He is a contributing author to The AMA Handbook of Project Management, AMACOM, 1993 and The ABCs of DPC: A Primer on Design-Procurement-Construction for the Project Manager, PMI, 1997. He is the co-author with Dennis L. Bolles of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007; revised and retitled in paperback, The Power of Enterprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014; A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – PBMconcepts, MI, 2012; and A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – PBMconcepts, MI, 2016.

Darrel can be contacted at [email protected] and on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/DarrelGHubbard. Visit the PBMconcepts website at www.PBMconcepts.com for information about current and future book projects.

 


Peter W. Rogers

Georgia, USA

 

 



Peter
Rogers is CEO of P17 Group LLC, and Senior Innovation Consultant at The Experience Praxis Group, Inc. He has over 40 years of experience in consulting, training, and executive management. He has served on boards of directors; and as head of an enterprise PMO; master facilitator; master trainer; master scheduler; lead consultant; portfolio, program, and project manager; adjunct professor and guest lecturer at Florida International University and several other colleges and universities; and speaker. Peter has founded and launched four of his own successful companies, and contributed to the startup and success of several other companies, including one that went public on NASDAQ.

Peter works with CEOs, top teams, other leaders, and managers in the space between strategy development and implementation to assure that organizations have the optimal structure, culture, and project/work delivery systems to achieve their goals and strategies. He assists with organizational restructuring and shifting culture to include a ‘culture of innovation’, and innovative and growth mindsets. He has provided these services to many Fortune 500 companies, including Microsoft, Starbucks, Chevron, Hewlett Packard, Boeing, PACCAR, Weyerhaeuser, Abbott, and others.

Peter holds a bachelor’s degree in biological oceanography, and masters’ degrees in economics and marine policy, all from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. He joined the Project Management Institute (PMI) in 1985 and was a work stream lead as a member of the core team of PMI’s Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3) project. He is a published author of several articles, a presenter at various project management symposiums, a keynote speaker, and a guest speaker at various functions. He has recently spoken at conferences in Dallas, Singapore, Shanghai, Prague, Noosa, and other locations on topics ranging from business agility and Agile, managing culture, managing innovation, to influencing, presenting, and emotional intelligence.

He is co-author of Project Management Made Simple and Effective, Dog Ear Publishing, IN, 2016, and contributing author to Business Innovation Results: How to Avoid 5 Innovation Traps the Doom Bottom-Line Results, Dog Ear Publishing, IN, 2017; Turn Great Ideas into Reality: Develop and Present a Winning Business Case, Dog Ear Publishing, IN, 2011; and Passing the PMI Scheduling Professional (PMI-SP) (c) Certification Exam the First Time, Dog Ear Publishing, IN, 2017.

Peter can be contacted at [email protected] and [email protected], and on

LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/peter-rogers-982a7214/

 

 

All the Contract Clauses Existing

to Protect Owners and Contractors from Event Cancellations

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Sacha Lefils

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Event management is a very big challenge as the risk of cancellation is omnipresent. Event planners have to be very careful with this risk in order to protect themselves from non-payment and excessive cancellation. This paper aims to answer the following statement: what are the best options for event planners to protect themselves from any cancellation. The solution lies in contract clauses. As many contract clauses exist, we use several methods to compare and analyse all the clauses existing to help event planners to choose the best contract clause to be protected from cancellation impacts or avoid cancellation itself.

This analysis highlight that the best clauses are the cancellation clause, the termination clause and the achievement clause.

Key words: Valid Cancellation, Event Management, Payment Schedule, Responsibilities, Force Majeure, Indemnification, Termination clause

INTRODUCTION

Event management has always been a big challenge for project managers on account of all the risks opposed to the good proceedings of an event. Indeed, events do not always go as project managers planned. This is the reason why sometimes, events have to be cancelled or rescheduled. Everybody has ever faced a cancellation of an event, meeting or even of an accommodation. This is a big issue to know who is responsible for any damage caused by it, who is going to pay for it and what could the victims do with it.

In order to avoid all those questions, project managers should use contracts properly. Indeed, with good contracts, project managers can define clearly the responsibilities in case of a cancellation from the event planner, but also from the client and guests.

To study the use of contracts in event planning, it is mandatory to analyse existing contracts and event planners’ testimonies, including points of view. But it is also very interesting to examine some research literatures done by professors in event management, because cancellation seems to be one of the biggest issues according to them.

The scope of this research paper is all the information related to event cancellation, contract clauses, cancellation indemnification, force majeure, and responsibilities in case of cancellation from the owner, but also from the contractor of the project.

Through this paper, the following subjects will be considered. First, the cancellation of an event is analysed. Indeed, the conditions of a valid cancellation and in which case an event planner or a client can cancel an event. Then, the indemnification in case of any cancellation. Who has to pay for any cancellation? Another subject of research is the contract clauses that exist about event cancellation. The way of cancelling an event is also a big part of the research, because to reduce negative impact, it is mandatory to respect steps required to cancel an event.

For event planners, the cancellation of an event can cause the loss of the whole due payment. This paper aims to collect and develop all the information about cancellation with a view to helping and advising all project managers who would like to cancel an event and protect themselves. The cancellation can be from the project manager’s suppliers (a renter of chairs or reception hall), from the client (the owner of the contract) or event from the project manager himself. To be well protected, contractors must use some specific clauses, which will be explained in the following paper.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Lefils, S. (2018). All the Contract Clauses Existing to Protect Owners and Contractors from Event Cancellations, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue VII – July.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Lefils-contract-clauses-to-protect-owners-and-contactors.pdf



About the Author


Sacha Lefils

Lille, France

 

 

 

Sacha LEFILS is a student in SKEMA Business School.  Born in Lille in 1994, he studied in Lille and entered SKEMA Business School in 2013 to start the Grande École Program. During the beginning of his SKEMA life, he entered a humanitarian association called “Bout du Monde” as the Vice-President. And then, he created an association – with SKEMA friends – of more than 80 members called “Humanitarian Organization Promoting Equity”. In this association, he was responsible for fund-raising, and was managing a team of 30 students with the view to raising 30 000€ for the purpose of the association.

He is now a student in MSc Project & Programme Management and Business Development in this school in the campus of Lille. During this master, he is studying mainly project management and attending the following courses: portfolio management, leadership skills, sustainability, global project management and international contract management.

He has some accreditation such as: Green Project Management certification; Agile certification; Prince2 certification.

Sacha can be contacted at [email protected].

 

How to Integrate Claims in Public Private Partnerships

Indian International Airports

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Yashwanth Mula

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are increasing daily in most developing nations such as India, for bringing innovation with proper expertise to deliver services or products. However, the inefficiency in PPP projects occasionally is because of several reasons which mainly arise due to the claims made without prior commitment of the contracting parties. The motto of this paper is by using Multi-Attribute Decision Making analysis and in that with additive weighing technique to determine which is the best alternative method to ensure that the claims are properly integrated in PPPs.  Based on the analysis, contracting parties should understand well a concession contract model and adopt it. Also, considered in it, with a detailed planning and allowing appropriate change order requests as soon as possible.

Key words: Claims, PPP, Construction, Concession, Agreement, Contract, Greenfield, India.

INTRODUCTION

A PPP or 3P is Public-Private-Partnership, which is defined in many ways, generally, it can be referred to as a contractual arrangement between a public-sector entity and a private sector organisation, ensuring that skills, risks and assets are shared together for the provision of products and/or services. There are several types of contracts in PPP such as Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT), Design-Build-Finance-Operate-Maintenance (DBFOM), Concession and few more etc.[1]

There are many issues causing failures in PPP contraction projects in India. Issues, such as the implementation of improper contract models like Concession, BOT, DBFOM, Management etc, inflated traffic projections, corruption, land acquisition, red tape, lack of safety clearances on time.[2] These can result in a compounded issue like improper risk transfer between the parties which create controversies that could delay or stall the overall process and delivery of the intended services. Such issues can be minimised by understanding the requirements, the socio-economic benefits of the intended service and by initially considering that the appropriate contract models are well interpreted and selected by the respective contracting parties. In addition, clear-cut claims of both the parties must be negotiated initially, which can reduce the controversies towards the later stages of the project.

For mega-infrastructure projects, claims made in accordance to their own obligations will often cause controversies between parties. Therefore, “How can Claims help contracting parties perform efficiently in PPP projects”. So, in this case, considering that claims can be an efficient way to ensure both parties face minimum or no issues, is mainly by taking into account that, the additional clauses of claims which are beneficial for either parties are evaluated and then to be incorporated, considering the reasons particularly for arise of claims issues such as, delay in payments, force majeure, schedule delays, liquidated damages, disputes, change order and proposal requests etc.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Mula, Y. (2018). How to Integrate Claims in Public Private Partnerships: Indian International Airports, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue VII – July.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Mula-integrate-claims-in-public-private-partnerships.pdf



About the Author


Yashwanth Mula

Lille, France

 

 

 

Yashwant Mula is an MSc student in SKEMA Business School, Masters in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). He graduated from National Institute of Technology-Calicut, India and holds a Bachelor’s in Technology degree in Civil Engineering. In 2016, he worked at Sri Vatsa Engineers, a local construction company, as assistant site engineer in Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. He has both project management and civil engineering education and background. He currently lives in Lille, France and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

[1] See Yong Hee Kong (2007). Different models on PPP  https://ppiaf.org/sites/ppiaf.org/files/documents/toolkits/Cross-Border-Infrastructure-Toolkit/Cross-Border%20Compilation%20ver%2029%20Jan%2007/Session%204%20-%20Private%20Sector%20Participation/Private%20Sector_02%20Diferent%20Models%20of%20PPP%20-%2029%20Jan%2007.pdf 

[2] Arindum Chaudhuri (2013). Why the public-private partnership model has failed in India http://www.thesundayindian.com/en/story/why-the-public-private-partnership-model-has-failed-in-india/46608/

 

 

The importance of contract execution management

in project management

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Yang Xu

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

The modern enterprise’s economic contacts and the determination of all kinds of relations are mainly carried out through contracts. As one of the important contents of the modern enterprise management system, contract management is one of the important factors to realize the successful operation and management of enterprises. Contract management is an important part of project management. Project contract management is an important guarantee to ensure the smooth implementation of construction projects. It is also an important means to ensure the legitimate interests of the project implementation.

Key words: Contract Management; Enterprise Project Management; Importance; Execution; risk identification, Management of risk

INTRODUCTION

In a world of business were contract are the most important proof that we can have, the contract execution management in a project is important. The implementation of contract management helps to improve business development, reduce investment in business costs, and improve an important way of business economic benefits.

When we talked about the contract execution management in enterprise project management we can mainly follow two aspects to consider: On the one hand, the production and operation can be successfully merged with the market organically so that the competitiveness and resilience of the enterprise in the market can be enhanced; on the other hand, the contractual execution management can enable the enterprise to maintain its own rights while performing its functions so as to ensure the economic efficiency of enterprises.

Therefore, contract execution management occupies an absolute position in project management. Systematically elaborating on its characteristics and importance possesses the significance of the times and science.

The role of contract management in the project can be subdivided into: helping company to establish and improve the concept of the legal system and the using of legal means to safeguard their legitimate rights and interests; Promote the level of their own management to improve and create business benefits; Clarify the business and Employee rights and obligations; contract management can effectively reduce risk and ensure equity; it can also improve efficiency and quality.

However, in today’s society, many companies or engineering projects lack a contract management system. And it can cause issues very important for the company: For example, the lack of dynamic management of the contract; the contract is not standardized, the terms are too simple; the concept of contract law is weak, etc.

This paper mainly analyses the importance of contract execution management in project management, analyzes the specific content of contract execution management and its focus in different stages, and then emphasizes that contract execution management is the top priority of project management.

From this analysis this paper will help answer the following question:

1   How to Identify Contract Defects and Risks in Projects?

2   How to effectively implement the contract management can reduce or avoid the risk?

3 Correctly identify the Strengths; Weaknesses; Opportunities; Threats of contract management in project.

 

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

 Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Xu, Y. (2018). The importance of contract execution management in project management, PM World Journal, Volume VII, Issue VII – July.  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmwj72-Jul2018-Xu-importance-of-contract-execution-management-student-paper.pdf



About the Author


Yang Xu

Paris, France

 

 

 

 

Yang Xu is an MSc student in SKEMA Business School, majoring in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). He graduated from la Rochelle business school (sup de co) and obtained a Bachelor’s degree in commercial management. He had worked in urban construction in China and now has his own business in Paris. He lives in Paris, France now and can be contacted at [email protected].

Yang chose SKEMA Business School because first it started out to be more suitable. The second was because there are more international students and internationalization in the school. The school atmosphere was very good. At the same time, the school rankings were not bad, still in progress.

He has been in France for 5 years. He says “the French people are good and bad. This is certain. French elegance, Paris, the temperament of those ladies, make you think that is the classic interpretation. However, in some small cities, some French people are still quite arrogant. They have some prejudice against China. This was something I did not expect before I came to France. They all say that French people are romantic, but they will always deny that because their romance is not deliberate, but into life, just as visiting the park, they often see Grandma and Grandpa hand in hand, watching in the years of quiet.

Skema helped me a lot, and after two years of classes in Skema I learned a lot about business theory, which made me yearn more for the coming life.”