SPONSORS

SPONSORS

2017 Brazil’s PM Maturity Research Results

 

REPORT

By Darci Prado, Russell Archibald, Manuel Carvalho, Warlei Oliveira and Lara Romano

Brazil and Mexico

 



The results of the 2017 Brazil PM Maturity Research are now available online at www.maturityresearch.com. This research has been conducted in Brazil since 2005 by Russell Archibald and Darci Prado, with support of several volunteers. In 2017 we had a total of 301 participants involving 6,260 projects. The overall results obtained are:

MATURITY

Maturity: 2.59 (scale from 1 to 5)


RESULTS INDICATORS

Success Index:

  • Total Success: 52%
  • Partial Success: 34%
  • Failure: 14%

Average Delay: 24%

Average Cost overrun: 14%

Average Scope Execution: 74%


AVERAGE PROJECTS PORTFOLIO COMPOSITION:

Average number of projects: 21

Average duration of each project: 12 months


Among the information presented, some are fundamental to organizations that wish to improve their performance: high performance organizations have almost twice as much total success compared to low performance organizations (see chart below).

And, especially, high performance organizations have a failure rate almost 11 times lower than low performance organizations. So, a strategy that looks at the high performance will allow huge benefits.  Going from a low performance to a high-performance level an organization increases the success rate (or decreases the failure rate). This high performance permit to achieve benefits and reduce overruns and delays, easier and more frequently. Failure rates are equal to more costs, fewer benefits and less clients and stakeholders satisfaction.

Here Brazilian organizations (which answer or not this research), whose indicators pointed to a low performance (56% of the sample), have a significant opportunity to improve their results.

More…

To access full research details, click here

 



About the Authors



Darci Prado, PhD

 

 

Darci Prado, PhD, is a Partner-Consultant at FALCONI Consultores de Resultado. Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from UFMG, postgraduate degree in Economic Engineering from FDC and PhD from UNICAMP. He participated in the establishment of the PMI chapter in Minas Gerais and Paraná, and was a Board member of PMI-MG between1998-2002. He was the president of IPMA-BH Club between 2006 and 2008. Darci is author of 10 project management books. Contact: [email protected]

To see other works by this Darci Prado, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darci-prado-phd/

 



Russell D. Archibald

 

 



Russell D. Archibald
, PhD (Hon), MScME, BSME, PMP, Fellow PMI and Honorary Fellow APM/IPMA, held engineering and executive positions in the USA, France, Mexico and Venezuela. Since 1982 he has consulted to companies, agencies and development banks in 16 countries on 4 continents. He is co-author of Leading and Managing Innovation, 2013, and author of Managing High-Technology Programs and Projects, 3rd Edition 2003, Web site: www.russarchibald.com

To see other works by Russ Archibald, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/russell-d-archibald/

 


Warlei Oliveira

 

 


Warlei Agnelo de Oliveira,
MsC, is currently Commercial Operations Analyst at Gasmig – Cia. de Gas de Minas Gerais. In recent years he has served as advisor to the Department of Transport and Public Works of Minas Gerais State and Manager of the “Belo Horizonte Metrô” Project. Graduated in Civil Engineering with MBA in Project Management by FGV and Master in Administration. He holds the ILL Orange Belt certification and is currently professor of Engineering Courses at UNA University Center in Belo Horizonte. Email: [email protected]

 



Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

 

 


Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto
is Professor at Fundação Dom Cabral and Consultant in the areas of Project Management and Process Management. He holds a MSc degree in Administration from CEPEAD – UFMG and is PMP. He is specialist in Economic Engineering (INEA / EEUFMG) and Financial Administration (FJP) and graduated in Mechanical Engineering (UFMG). He has 49 years of market experience, 43 of which in Projects. He has participated or directed more than 400 large and medium-sized projects in private and state-owned companies and public agencies.

To see other works by Manuel, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/manuel-carvalho-da-silva-neto/

 



Lara Mendonça Romano

 


Lara Mendonça Romano
is a Consultant at FALCONI Consultores de Resultado. Bachelor degree in Food Engineering from UFLA, postgraduate degree in Project Management, holds a MBA degree in Business Management from IETEC and specialization in Finance by INSPER. She is PMP certified and takes part of many projects at public sector and private organizations from different areas at FALCONI Consultores de Resultado.

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for April 2018

Updates on Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Finland Centennial; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail project

 

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 



INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 individual and 200 organizational members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project Days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. This year the #PMO is taking place on June 12th 2018 in Tampere. Please navigate to www.pry.fi/en , https://www.oppia.fi/events/3pmo/?lang=en , and www.projektipaivat.fi for further information on PMAF and its main events.

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland has a tradition of organizing an annual conference in the spring. This year the conference will take place on May 17th, in Otaniemi, Espoo, with an overarching theme “Grow!”. Please navigate to www.pmifinland.org and www.conference.pmifinland.org for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its main events.

OLKILUOTO 3

The 1 600 MW Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, originally contracted to be built by consortium comprising of Areva and Siemens for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto, is in the final stages of completion. TVO announced in mid-March, that an agreement has been reached between TVO and Areva. According to TVO, Areva has agreed to compensate 450 M€ if the power plant is fully operational by the end of the year 2019. If the plant is not fully operational by the end of 2019, Areva will compensate a further 400 M€. Following the agreement, both contractual parties have agreed to dispend any further judicial acts.

Once completed – ten years behind original time schedule and over 5 500 M€ over budget – Olkiluoto 3 will be the largest nuclear power plant in the world. TVO has been understandably disappointed about the fact that the plant is well over 100 % over original budget and 10 years behind the original time schedule.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

The Importance of Having Both Sequential/Linear Thinking Skills

AND Non-Linear Creativity/Innovative/Out-of-the-Box Thinking Skills

Which One Are You?

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Michael Marshall, PhD

Georgia, USA

 



Definition of Linear Sequential Thinking:

‘The process in which thoughts are put into order of priority concerning the issue at hand and viewed individually as to their merits and demerits.  This enables the individual to make the right decision’.

‘A process of thought following known step-by-step progression where a response to a step must be elicited before another step is taken.  Things are put in order in a straight line.’

This applies to successfully completing tasks, objectives and goals in a timely manner, both personally and in business.

Management, leadership and those in project management who are well trained and skilled will utilize ‘Fish Bone Charts’ to guide them with projects, objectives and goals.

This is simply a diagram of a fish skeleton with a tail that is the start of a project or objective with a start date and a head for the successful completion with a date.  The skeleton ribs are the detailed tasks in priority sequence needing to be completed with a date and names of individuals responsible for them.

This is an important tool to successfully manage and complete projects, objectives and goals in a timely manner.

Individuals with these skills and expertise can apply them to business to their own personal life.

BUT in actuality it is best to have well balanced skills and thinking in both ‘Linear Sequential Thinking’ and ‘Non Linear Thinking with Creativity, Innovativeness, Out of the Box Thinking’:

More…

To read entire article, click here

 



About the Author


Michael Marshall, PhD

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 

 

Michael Marshall has over 30 years of business experience to senior leadership levels in many markets and industries, national and global, with responsibilities in sales management, marketing and business development along with a PhD in business before teaching internationally at university level (China, Korea, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia).

Prior to this he had a psychology and behavioral health background with educational degrees in such and working in behavioral health as a professional counselor and therapist learning what affects and influences people positively and negatively and what motivates.

Michael continually seeks out knowledge with additional education, trainings, research and experience to keep on the leading edge of business effectiveness and business development.

He has over 35 international publishing’s on many business and business development subjects.

As Michael Marshall often comments; ‘Business Development is like a large beautiful polished diamond with many facets.  When holding the diamond up to the sunlight and turning it slowly, the diamond looks different with different colors reflecting on the many angles and facets.’

Michael is a ‘life time learner’.  He is available to assist globally/internationally.

His website of www.AskTheBusinessDoctor.com over the last 10 years has had over ¾ million readership.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

The importance of assessing quality of Artworks

in Art Gallery’s contract

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Louison Marguerite

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Although artworks have been traded all around the world for decades and represent a huge market, the notion of quality linked to the process and the criteria evaluation is often under estimated and neglected. Indeed, the contracts often do not precisely describe the investment, other than monetary, that the Art Galleries should show during the project to ensure its success.

It will be ideally necessary to add more quality measurements in the existing agreements or directly news clauses within contracts that are can be adapted for improving the assessment of quality of artworks and of the process, which can be considerate as a part of the artwork itself.

This paper aims to analyse different alternatives found using a multi-attributes decision analysis method. From the various suggestions, one of the options seems to be the best solution for assessing quality. The communication and the implementation of clear milestones between owners and contractors clearly established quality assurance criteria are a significant success factor within a project. Indeed, if both owners and contractors are responsible for establishing quality control measures and maintaining quality assurance within the entire process in the project and agree upon quality control milestones, this may result with a better project execution, reduction of the complaints between the parties, increase the communication efficiency and reduce tension.

Key words: Quality assurance, product quality, quality process, quality criteria, artworks

INTRODUCTION

With 2016 auctions that total $ 12.45 billion with 675,500 lots sold + 11% of lots sold in the West (USA + 24%, UK + 27%), Arts markets represent a huge place for trade exchanges worldwide, also, to secure all the parties involved in these exchanges, there is an important need for contract agreements. Moreover, regarding the countries, the different new art movements and the social evolution of the common perception of artworks new standards and contracts has to be determined. For instance, last year The England Arts councils decided to impose new quantitative measures of arts quality and redefined all its quality assessments basis, such a decision underlines the need for some parties to improve the existing basis to protect their investments and works. That’s why here I will try to understand the mechanisms used to evaluate quality of artworks.

“Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction and skilfully execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives,” noticed William A. Foster. To give a general definition, quality refers to a standardized attribute which permits one to describe something or someone. In artworks, value does not only depend on the singular and subjective appreciation of each; on the contrary, they have quality criterions that can be noted and quantified in order to give real value to these works: materials used, techniques apprehended, renown of the artist, and so on.  The Painter Balance, realized by Piles in 1708, enumerated the 4 main principles to reach the level of quality expected for the product. That Balance is still used today but has evolved regarding the novelties in artworks.

However, the standards may vary regarding countries and institutions: The Culture Minister define some rules that will have a huge impact on the institutional market, while the Merchant market might have different expectations and appreciations. Here we will focus on the Merchant market and more specifically on the Art galleries’ contract.

By making the present study my objectives are to underline the importance of quality in Art Gallery contracts as a mean to evaluate the value of the artwork but as well to secure the payment and to promote new artists. My focus will be on quality process, assurance and on the quality of the product delivered. How does a poor-quality process affect a product even if the primary material’s quality is high? Is a good process being enough to reach the product quality? Finally, this paper seeks to answer to: How to be sure that the expected product quality and quality process will be delivered?

In this paper, we will make a comparison between Art Galleries’ contracts and some baseline documents such as Public Art Guideline and Criteria, CSI Manual, CD ROM. The objective of this paper is to find Art gallery’s contracts strength and opportunities as well as weaknesses and threats to try to give recommendations to improve the quality aspects in contract’s and provide beneficial outcomes.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Louison Marguerite

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 

 

Louison Marguerite was born in Caen, a little city located in Normandy, France. An active child that loved to read comics and invented games to play with her little brother, she learned piano and practiced Taekwondo, a Korean martial art, for five years. During weekends her parents took her to many Art exhibitions, which is why, artworks are a centre of interest. She completed her studies in Caen before moving to Lille and integrating at Skema Business School.

Currently, she is a student following an MS in Project and Program Management and Business Development at SKEMA Business School.  In the High School Program, at Lille, she chose to follow that master mostly because she liked the idea that each project she might work on would be unique and because of the time limited aspect of projects. She was lucky enough to travel a lot during her studies thanks to a semester abroad and a gap year, especially in Asia (China, South Korea, Laos and so on). That enabled her to accumulate experience as community manager and CRM and increased her interest in discovering other cultures and traveling worldwide. Fond of culture and history, she plans to work in foreign countries to discover new approaches and developed my personal adaptation skills few years after my graduation.

Aware that hard work gets results, she is energetic and diligent. Naturally curious of everything, Louison loves learning and considers that being positive in life is one of the keys for doors to open. Her ambition is to make every day worth living, whether it manifests itself at work or through passions.

 

 

Companies and ethic/sustainability aspects

through Corporate Social Responsibility

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Marie Dasque

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

As big companies have been facing many issues on ethic or sustainability aspects that put them into embarrassing positions with their stakeholders, corporate social responsibility (CSR) gets more and more attention with companies are government legislation.

The purpose of this work is to analyze if those regulation works effectively and if in this way sustainability performance has raised or not, and what can companies do according to the result.

In this paper, we have used a comparison method about the alternatives we proposed to face weaknesses in CSR in contracts.

The main findings of this analysis showed us that the bets alternatives for the companies would be to get a sustainable procurement response.

This represents such efforts but many solutions remain and companies can have the all control on it and could benefit from many tools.

Key words: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Social contractuel clauses (SCC), Social engagement, Environmental engagement, Contracts’ regulation and laws, Ethical requirements

INTRODUCTION

Apple, in its 2017 CSR report is writing: “Apple Inc. is committed to protecting the environment, health, and safety of our employees, customers and the global communities where we operate”.

Nowadays, we witness an increase of awareness of CSR in countries and companies, an approach that evaluates and takes care of the social and environmental impact of business practices. Companies and government with laws to discourage unethical behavior have both evolved in a positive way to reverse the trend. The improvement of CSR strategies related to Project Management brings many changes in contracting’ scope for a company. In fact, contracts correspond to the objectives of a project, the way stakeholders will manage it, what they are obliged to do and what is forbidden. Then, as far as CSR is progressing, contracts are evolving too, with more ethical and sustainable clauses than before. To make progress on it, companies and governments mention new topics such as Ethical requirements, Sustainability contractual clauses (SCC), promotion of social and environmental standards etc. However, despite these positive changes, many issues remained on adapting sustainable and ethical ideas in global and constantly changing market and businesses. To survive in a very competitive world, companies need to provide projects (products or services) with the highest quality, in the shortest time and at lower price. Then, that “law” sometimes led companies to act in an unethical and unsustainable way when contracting.

For example, bid shopping might be in practice coming from the contractor to get the best price and the subcontractor to get the contract might use bid peddling. Even if regulations occurred to stop those business fashions, they still remain used. Another example would be regulations in countries: To get more benefits, and win time avoiding administrative issues in their own countries, companies often outsource with business ‘partners abroad for cheaper labor, where the subcontractor might not have the same contract regulations as in his country.

This is one of the biggest problems in sustainability clauses in CSR. In fact, disparity remains between countries. While states (developing countries most of the time) are more and more introducing CSR and with ethical and sustainable values in their government policies, companies do not have the possibility to ensure the same regulations when contracting with a foreign partner.

Then as Apple includes employer safety in its CSR clauses, labor workforce is working in inhumane conditions in manufactures abroad.

According to these problems recognition, the question is how can companies improve their ethics and sustainability aspects through CSR clauses in contracts?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Marie Dasque

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 


Marie Dasque
is a French student in her last year before being graduating from the programme Master of Science in “Project and programme management and Business development” provided at Skema Business School (France). This program is also providing AGILE and PRINCE2 certification opportunities. Marie now has more than one year of experience in project management that she experienced during internships in different fields: Car industry, banking, and public administration (Schedule, cost, organisation and transformation, event planning, contract strategy, etc.). Marie can be contacted at: [email protected]

 

 

Landlord-Tenant Disputes

Towards the End of Court Litigation through Alternatives

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Chloé Barroso

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



The rental housing market is one of the most flourishing shaped by continued growth in demand generating an increase in number of landlord and tenant conflicts by 20% in 2016, most of them can be resolved out of Court to save time and money according to Residential Tenancies Boards. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the alternatives to judicial proceedings to prevent and handle conflicts, from pre-contract signing action to options once the lease agreement is signed. These substitutes have been compared by using Multi-Attribute Decision Making and ranked from the most appropriate to the least relevant alternative. The main findings of this paper are that appropriate clauses, mediation, arbitration and adjudication are alternatives resolving disputes meet more or less well both parties’ expectations. Based on compensatory and non-compensatory models, appropriate clauses alternative is the most effective way for both landlord and tenant to prevent conflicts since it is the first step in the rental process.

Key words: Landlord/tenant disputes, lease agreement, causes of disputes, contract terms, rights and responsibilities, alternatives, court litigation

INTRODUCTION

As a lease agreement is a contract and a legal arrangement by which both the landlord and the tenant are legally committed to respect the various clauses and terms, we might think this could prevent and resolve conflicts that may occur. However, the number of conflicts continues to increase, especially the court proceedings by 25% in 2015 according to a study conducted by ANIL (the National Agency for Housing Information).

Most of the time, the complainants automatically initiate legal proceedings to solve the dispute. However, most of these court actions often result in unnecessary expense and waste of time for both sides and could have been avoided. Mentalities must change, court proceedings should not be seen as the only recourse anymore in case of conflict

Both the landlord and the tenant must use alternatives before hiring a lawyer. In fact, several alternatives exist, as effective and successful as lawsuits, being more beneficial for the parties especially in terms of cost and time. Among these substitutes, a well drafted lease agreement, mediation, adjudication and arbitration must be considered first and we will demonstrated why.

The objective of this paper is to:

  • explore how a lease agreement can be used to avoid disputes between landlords and tenants, and
  • analyze the possible legal alternatives to Court litigation for handling conflicts and defending the interests of both the landlord and the tenant.

METHODOLOGY

  1. Feasible Alternatives & attributes

To achieve this objective, this paper will deliver a generalized approach mainly based on lease agreement between the landlord and the tenant, without any intervention from a real estate agency and taking into consideration rental agreements established under State law. This paper will suggest actions to help avoid litigations and handle disputes by suggesting tips to make a rental agreement even better.

The feasible alternatives to handle conflicts are:

  • Appropriate clauses
  • Mediation
  • Arbitration
  • Adjudication

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Chloé Barroso

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 

 

Chloé Barroso, a student in MSc Project and Programme Management & Business Development at Skema Business School Lille, having passed Agile PM certification and obtained a two-year university degree in technology in Civil Engineering at University of Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, she has a junior experience in project management as site supervisor assistant for the construction of a high school, she oversaw price and deadline negotiation with subcontractors, follow-up work. Chloé has an experience in Business Development through business prospection and in Event Organization through the participation and organization in a trade show (called Salon Sud Agro-Industrie). She has worked for Toulouse Métropole Habitat, the Housing Agency, as a branch manager responsible for building maintenance, the viewings of properties and handling tenant complaints. Chloé can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

Is the FIFA World Cup Organization

affected by Owner Financing?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Léo Peigna

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Since the Qatar bribery accusations, the FIFA Organization has lost in legitimacy and is constantly tackled by both journalists and international regulation comities. The objective of this paper work is to show that not everything is over for the FIFA organization and that some solutions exist to make FIFA great again. To do this, articles helped to underline the ongoing problems inherent to the organization but also understand how the situation degraded itself. Then, after reading and analyzing the articles, a summary was made, and so were links established. Last but not least, ideas and solutions had to be debated and settled precisely. Finally, in order to enhance the thoughts, data had to be found and analyzed. As a solution, opening the organization and bidding process to more people and instituting more details seems to be a viable solution. The organization nowadays remains troubled with bribery and corruption, and leading to a more arbitrary organization would re-brand the FIFA.

Key Words: Owner Financing, World Cup, Corruption, Local Impact, International Impact, Overall Benefits, FIFA

INTRODUCTION

Historically, major international events were hosted by the most powerful countries in the world. These powerful countries were chosen and elected by the 22 FIFA Member Associates, and were to respect some specific rules. These rules can easily be found on the FIFA website, but when it comes to specifics, it is harder to find the detail. Indeed, the archives of the Bidding Processes for the previous FIFA World Cups are impossible to find. There must be a reason for this, and this reason must be that there has been a change of governance and new challenges were to be overcome. Looking at the World Cups of the late 90’s and beginning of the 21st century, one can easily see that the hosting countries were mostly Economically Developed Countries (France, USA, South Korea/Japan, Germany) but nowadays the hosting countries are no longer selected for their economic situation, but seem to be selected for their political and economic influence. Both politics and economy go together and influence one another. This can be seen with the recent accusations against the FIFA for having accepted money coming from rich families in order to facilitate the acceptance of the Bidding Processes to be a host for the World Cup. That is why this topic is an important topic: to what extent does the corruption and Owner Financing affect the soccer universe, and more specifically the 2022 Qatar World Cup?

Hosting a huge event such as a World Cup should be very valuable for the host country. Indeed, not only does it bring many tourists, which brings more income to the state thanks to taxation, but it is also the opportunity for the hosting country to show to what extent the country is becoming a global modern country, and mostly shows its greatness and ability to organize a global event to the world. Nowadays, the countries which are able to host such events see their candidature darkened because of corruption. This is a very recent topic since the Qatar World Cup supposed to be held in 2022 is the most notorious of all. Indeed, the FIFA scandal which occurred in 2015 saw the FBI accuse the Government of Qatar for Bribery and State Corruption.

The point of this document is to show how Owner Financing can influence decisions, impact a country from its politics to its economy. We will try to see the consequences of Owner financing in the 2022 World Cup in Qatar on a political level, on a local level, and on an economical level. The objective of this paper is to try finding a solution so that the FIFA World Cup Institution never suffers from scandals again, and why not access a “participative” model rather than a “democratic” model.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Léo Peigna

Junior Project Manager
Lille, France

 

 

Léo Peigna is currently a Masters Student at SKEMA Business School on the Lille Campus. This student paper has been produced with the means of getting it published with the PM World Journal, and is part of a key module named “The International Contracts” under the direct supervision of Doctor Paul Giammalvo, the Course Director, and Professor Paul Gardiner, the Program Director. Léo comes from Costa Rica, where he was born in 1995, and has been living in France since the age of 5. At first, he lived in Biarritz, then moved to Bordeaux in order to attend International Classes.  He obtained his Economic Baccalaureate in 2013 with honors. By 2015, after attending 2 years of Preparatory Classes, he was able to enter SKEMA Business School. Previously, he has served as a Project Manager during an entire year running as Vice-President of the Sports Student Office at SKEMA Business School, and also had a 6 month internship in Paris in 2017 as Junior Project Manager. He is a certified AgilePm Practitioner. Contact him on: [email protected] or [email protected].

 

 

Contracts for Professional Sports

Making sure you are going to get enough

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Louis Roland

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

“Why could I not become a professional soccer player?” How many kids, how many students or teenagers have already thought of that? It is the dream of plenty of people who are passionate about their sport and already live for it. Especially when you hear about the top players’ salaries. “Let’s become a professional player and earn a living doing what I love to do: playing soccer”. Unfortunately, it is not as easy as it seems. Those top players represent the emerged part of the iceberg. Sports players who failed to be professional are much more plentiful. That is why making from your passion your own job is a tough career path. However, if you keep on working hard and you take the right decisions, it could be one the most lucrative job on earth. Neymar is currently earning the amount of 1 € per second, only with his salary (which doesn’t cover his sponsorship compensation and rewards). But people forget one thing. He is one of the best guys in his job! We are used to comparing us (and our wages) to them and to say, “he is paid too much, just to kick a ball around”. But Neymar is not a common guy, he is one of the best soccer players in the world and he is valuable.

Key words: Compensation, Contracts, Sports, Professional, Payment, Amateur

INTRODUCTION

Professional sports contracts are quite similar than contracts in everyday life. Athletes are compensated for their services against a payment. We can differentiate 3 professional sports contracts. The professional services contracts, the endorsement contracts and the appearance contracts.

You are going to be introduced to how to deal with contracts if you want to start a professional career. We will discuss more particularly the compensation part of the contracts. This part is important to handle for 2 reasons. Firstly, it will formalize the way you will earn money. And then, this is one of the only parts of a professional contract which can differ from your teammates.

Step 1 – PROBLEMS / OPPORTUNITIES / OBJECTIVES

  • What are the different Professional Sports Contracts?
  • How can you earn a living by signing a Professional Sports Contract?
  • How to be sure to earn enough when moving amateur to professional?

METHODOLOGY

Step 2 – FEASIBLE ALTERNATIVES

The aim is to assure athletes that they understand the relevance of alternatives:

  1. The professional services contract
  2. The endorsement contract
  3. The appearance contract

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Louis Roland

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 

 

Louis Roland is a 5th-year student at ITEEM Centrale Lille. This engineering school has the particularity to give a triple competence to their students: engineer, manager, entrepreneur. Louis comes from Champagne-Ardennes area. He was born from a farmer father and a teacher mother in Reims. He used to play tennis and football since his early childhood and still plays and loves sports in general. Louis carried out his scholarship in Vouziers and Reims where he passed a scientific bachelor degree with honor in the Pensionnat du Sacré Coeur, a “Lasallian” establishment. He then chose to do ITEEM Centrale Lille to get a very wide profile as engineer-manager-entrepreneur. During his studies, he seized the opportunity to spend 8 months in Bangalore, India. He achieved an internship as a software developer there. A few months later, after having tasted an international experience he decides to catch up with his girlfriend in Australia. He lived with her in Sydney for 2 months. He found a job as a dishwasher in an ice-cream shop. Finally, he came back to France, to complete his final year in ITEEM Centrale Lille. Meanwhile, he decided to pass a Master in Project management at Skema where he wrote the article “Contracts for professional sports, making sure to get enough”.

Louis can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

Best practices for data privacy clause in Saas Agreements

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Amélie Tonneau

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

The explosion of IT leaks and cyber-security attacks have risen the concerns from governments and Software-as-a-service (Saas customers’ which currently feel unsafe regarding the processing and the protection of the data they share and give access to their Saas suppliers. The objective of this report is to understand the different requirements from the current and new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation regarding the matter of data privacy. This paper is based on a qualitative study using a multi-attribute decision-making and fishbone methods, websites and articles analysis.

Even though the legislation is changing, many medium-sized companies are yet not aware of these requirements they should comply with. Bear in mind that the new requirements will be mandatory to comply with on May 2018. This will lower Saas providers’ flexibility in terms of processing but increase Saas customers’ protection.

The different alternatives or requirements from both regulation will be analysed and therefore show you that a mix of requirements are necessary to draft the best data privacy clause for your next Saas agreements and to protect your customers.

Key words: Software-as-a-Service (Saas), data privacy, IT security, legislation, confidentiality

INTRODUCTION

In a fast global changing environment, the Software-as-a-Service (Saas) industry is currently booming, expecting to reach $112.8 billion by 2019. Considered as a precise software distribution model, Saas providers use a third-party to host their applications on the Cloud, making their applications directly available to users over the Internet. With a significant decrease in cloud third-party prices, more and more small businesses are nowadays using Saas in order to boost sales and productivity.

While many Saas companies use collected data from their customers to help their growth, which might be very sensitive data, Saas agreements need to provide precise Data Privacy clauses. These data privacy clauses cover the requirements and obligations from the provider regarding data collection and their means for keeping their customers’ data secure. Unfortunately, current trends have shown that Saas providers are currently failing in keeping customers aware of their rights regarding the confidentiality of their own data. In this difficult context, choosing the right provider by evaluating risks should become a common practice from a customer point of view if Saas agreements don’t improve transparency. Before signing-up with Cloud computing services, companies and/or individuals will have now to think if the data they are giving up is confidential and to which extend.

In a context where IT security and cyber-attacks are consequently increasing, drafting Saas Agreements & their Data privacy clauses might be a challenge for small businesses. In a changing legal environment in the EU, what should a data privacy clause contains? What are the advantages of the new GDPR regulation?

In the following you will be able to understand the current trends about Data Privacy clauses in within the Saas industry. Then, we will raise the question of legal requirements and the new legislation in the European Union that will come into effect in May 2018. Finally, we will recommend you the best Data privacy clause for your business.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Amélie Tonneau

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 

 

Amélie Tonneau is a Master’s degree student at Skema Business School (Paris), Msc Project and Programme Management and Business Development (PPMBD). She joined Skema in 2014 in Lille and through those years developed her knowledge about different fields as Marketing, Law, Finance, Business development before stepping into project management. She had the opportunity to work in Spain, Belgium, and The Netherlands but also lived in Taiwan for a year. Passionate with Tech trends and start-ups’ innovative ideas, she developed her professional experiences through different experiences in Sales and Marketing in Software as a Service (Saas) companies.

 

 

Finding location for a coffee shop

to combine physical and technological accessibility

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Manon Wambre

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

In the French Flanders, a new demand of accessibility is developing and globally coffee shops are becoming an institution. The idea is to combine both elements to anticipate trends to settle in an increasingly dynamic market.

This paper is driven by two factors: proving to coffee shop entrepreneurs that location hugely matters and showing that accessibility offers full of opportunities to differentiate.
The best location for a coffee shop to combine physical and technical accessibility is Cassel, a small city in the French Flanders where the rent is not expensive and the demand is increasing. 
This means that the best location for the coffee shop is not always in big cities. In fact, it shows to entrepreneurs that even if the market of large cities seems very attractive, obstacles such as the cost often occur.

Key words: Site location, Accessibility, Infrastructure, Digital, Legal rules, Bikes

INTRODUCTION

“An outlet can have quality offerings, excellent personnel, (…) but fail because it is not conveniently located.” Coffee shops’ most determining success criteria is: position of the site. The following analyze is mainly motivated by a personal will to open an independent coffee shop myself in a French city of at least twenty thousand inhabitants.

However, from an accessibility and technological point of view, the site location is facing two issues. The first difficulty lays on the reluctance from neighbors and city hall due to noise pollution, waves from the internet, the probable need of an off-record contract and so on. Local and legal documentations can become constraints if contracts and clauses are not transparent or not deeply analyzed. As Darren Buckner (2015) explains it, the location of your coffee shop will determine all your possibilities in terms of developing and designing your coffee shop as planned in your strategy. The second obstacle is to ensure the location would be accessible to the increasingly trendy way of access by walk and by bikes. (traditional and electrical ones) This paper aims to bring awareness to my potential future project but also cross knowledge between business and technicity, which could be useful for people who want to discover one of the two fields through an innovative process. A purpose is also to have a more detailed view on building permits or other documentations when being independent, out of the franchising process.

Currently, in France, an increasing number of cities are rethinking the roads by transforming them into pedestrian areas and urging people not to use their car. With initiatives such as Gobee Bike, premium of 20% for the purchase of an electrical bike, … a movement of technology need and new transportation means is spreading. Coffee shops location should consider adapting the infrastructure for a better access to both technology and transportation. Indeed, as this paper would focus on coffee shops that can offer people a place to work and discuss, technological requirements such as free reliable WIFI (For instance at least 20 mbps), electric sockets or desks adapted to electronic devices are unavoidable

The idea of this paper is to show how to choose the right location enabling to design and build adequate facilities for pedestrians and bike users inside and outside the coffee shop. Finally, the overall strategy is to focus on legal constraints, new consumers’ habits and adaptation.

Thus, this paper aims to find answers to the following questions:

  • Firstly, what are the best choice criteria to select the right location for an optimized adaptation design?
  • Secondly, what type of city offers the best accessibility or opportunities of accessibility?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Manon Wambre

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 


Manon Wambre
is a French student in Project and Programme Management & Business Development at Skema Business School.  After passing her high school diploma and continuing her studies through two years of preparatory classes, she spent her first year in Skema Lille discovering all the faces of management.  Then, she began her work experience as a saleswoman, these three months taught her a lot about customer loyalty, merchandising and team work.

She chose to begin her first semester of Master degree studying in Oxford Brookes University. Her level of English is nearly fluent now and she mainly learned about marketing communication and business strategy. Next, with five months of a first experience in project management for a central purchasing in Brussels for the company “L’Agence pour le Non-Marchand”, she now has a global vision of project management: creating a project from scratch, defining a business model and strategies, planning, leading a team, estimating a budget, communicating. She was the coordinator of the project in a team of seven interns and developed her sense of responsibility. This internship confirmed her to choose project management as a specialty. That is why Manon is currently preparing her MSc thesis.

During this master degree, she plans to make a one year placement to develop her knowledge in project management and to apply the theory learned in AgilePM, Prince2 and Green Project Management.  This year, she was highly involved as a project manager of a student event organized with PMI France Chapter. Within a team of five students and mentored by one teacher and one member of PMI, she had the opportunity to organize an afternoon seminar and she learned a lot about logistics and leadership.

Manon is particularly interested in the relationships between entrepreneurial skills and project management competencies. She is mainly attracted by innovative projects of small and medium firms.  Manon can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Alternate Dispute Resolution in China

Research on ADR for the Construction of Harmonious Arbitration System in China

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Huiru Wang

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

China is in a period of social transition. The litigation cases encountered in the process of rule by law have exponentially increased. Problems such as excessive pressure on judicial resources and exorbitant judicial costs have the same background as the ADR system in the West. Therefore, China can try to cite this method to see that fit the purpose of the construction of harmonious arbitration system or not. This article mainly through Multi-Attribute Decision Analysis and Compensatory Decision Rules means to compare three feasible alternatives to resolve disputes in China. According to the final data, it shows that mediation is a more appropriate alternative. The ADR is in line with China’s national conditions. Also, the rapid development and achievement of ADR have also had a significant impact on China’s legal concept.

Key words: Alternate dispute resolution (ADR), Innovation research, Advantages,  Arbitration System, Development, Mediation, Litigation, Arbitration

INTRODUCTION

The Alternate dispute resolution originated in the 1960s in the United States, because of the high cost and bureaucratic procedure, the parties and the lawyers realised that legal disputes through litigation became increasingly expensive, time-consuming and uncritical. At the same time, the courts were faced with “litigation explosion”, but also human and financial difficulties were unsustainable. People were looking for a simple, cheaper way to get the things done, so the ADR became a natural choice.

The ADR is a dispute resolution process and technique that allows the two parties in dispute to reach a consensus without litigation.  It’s a collective term that includes many ways in which both parties can settle disputes, with or without the help of a third party.

With the development of socio-economic globalisation, due to the differences in political, economic, cultural and legal systems in different countries, parties are increasingly turning to ADR for non-litigation proceedings in case of disputes, which made the ADR flourish in the 1970s. The success of the ADR was recognised and supported by the United States federal government in 1930.

The social benefits of ADR in the United States have led to the development of global ADR, as well as in China, who have so accepted this new method. ADR is an open and developing system that has high adaptability to the handling of new types of civil disputes. However, since China is different from Western capitalist countries and China is a socialist country, as we know, the different systems will produce various problems and different solutions, it’s important to see the arbitration system in China to go in this analysis.

To summarise, what this research has been designed to address are the following questions:

  1. Which dispute resolutions fit the purpose of ADR?
  2. Does this method accord with China’s harmonious arbitration system?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Huiru Wang

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Huiru Wang
is an MSc student in SKEMA Business School, majoring in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). She graduated from Groupe Sup de Co La Rochelle Business School and holds a Bachelor’s high-quality diploma in commerce and management operations. She has attended four internships in different types of companies: Sephora in France, Rose Rouge in France, Dong Ya in Chine. She also has background knowledge about international business. She lives in Paris, France now, and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

The Mitigation Rule and Impacts of Overdue Payments

in International Business

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Xiyuan Wu

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Globalization has entered a new phase, in which the entire world is inextricably linked. Countless transnational trade is carried out every day, while numerous contracts are signed every day. However, trade frictions and trade disputes may cause various problems because buyers and sellers are in different countries, and may eventually damage the interests of one or both parties. An essential factor which prevents the capabilities of contractors is irregular and delays in payment.

Usually, if the buyer does not pay on time, it may also affect the seller’s capital chain and even change the contractual relationship. Moreover, there may be additional fines and interest charges. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to explore the impacts of overdue payment and analyze how to protect the rights and avoid this kind of situations happen through the contract. And the article will explain the issue and use Dominance method to compare different standards, including The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods(CISG), Engineers Joint Contract Documents Committee(EJCDC), Consensus Docs and American Institute of Architects(AIA). At the meantime suggest, and the ideal solution will be given at the end of the article.

Key words: Late Payment, Compensation, Remedies, Financial Costs, Risks, Automatic Avoidance, Milestone Payment

INTRODUCTION

From hundreds or thousands of years ago till today, contractual relations are ubiquitous. The contract is an agreement concluded after the parties reached the deal by regular consultation, stipulating the obligations that must be fulfilled and the rights they should enjoy. Especially in the cross-border trade, CISG-compliant contracts are the basis for formal cooperation and the guarantee of rights. However, even under contractual constraints, there will still be various kinds of default or yet breach of contract, which may be caused by the buyer or the seller or even both parties. In fact, one of the most critical factors is overdue payment. According to the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) Article 71, “Damages for breach of contract by one party consist of a sum equal to the loss, including loss of profit, suffered by the other party as a consequence of the breach.”

Generally speaking, that overdue payment will lead a catastrophic effect on businesses for both buyer and contractor, especially for the buyer that the subsequent impact like has limited or even no cash reserves to rely on. While, for companies that are paid based on invoicing for given products or services, late payments are strapped to happen.

Casually regarding the receivables as “better late than never” could mean life or death to the trade. Because the two sides regularly negotiate deferred payment will affect the entire project process, for example, if the buyer does not pay or payment delay, the seller to ensure normal business activities and loans will bring additional costs. There are several reasons may cause the late payments. It could be as simple as someone forgets the payment date or the manager/accountant is not here when their approval is required to sign off on the invoice. More complicated reasons can be a puzzle, which includes any uncontrollable element or even a shift in direction for the overall system of what you are apart.

Therefore, the purpose of the research and analysis in this paper is to develop and answer the following questions in FIDIC, AIA, EJCDC, Consensus Docs and CISG:

  • The impact of overdue payment on both parties
  • How to handle or avoid the possible risks
  • Primarily how to prevent the late payment in international trade
  • And to analyze some of the provisions of the contract is how to regulate or constrain such behavior.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected]



About the Author


Xiyuan Wu

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 


Xiyuan Wu
, MSC student in SKEMA Business School, major in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). He graduated from SKEMA Business School and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. As a business student, he worked in an American company Cannes Concierge, in an international project team and implemented multiple international congresses, which including Cannes Film Festival, Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, MIPCOM, etc. His current research interests include the Project Management in China, the Banking system in China and he is currently completing a research paper about payments in international business.

He lives in Lille, France now and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Investment Centric Project Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Investment Centric Project Management: Advanced Strategies for Developing and Executing Successful Capital Projects
Author:  Steven Keays
Publisher:  J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $57.00
Format:  Hardback, 419 pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN: 978-1-60427-142-3
Reviewer: Benjamin K. Diamond
Review Date: March 2018

 



The most critical thing I can say about Investment Centric Project Management by Steven Keays is that it’s “good and original” – however the parts that are good are not original, and the parts that are original are not good.

The author wants to build a case that 65% of $500M+ projects are failing because they are placing the ‘constraint trifecta’ ahead of valunomics. He calls his solution to this dilemma the Profitability Performing Asset (PPA) philosophy. The basis of PPA-based management is to give greater weight to the total cost of ownership and future revenue streams. Much of his premise seems to be another perspective of the principles of agile techniques (“advance all work incrementally”) and mind set which are already adopted in the 6th Edition of the PMBOK.

Furthermore, I question whether the problems identified are often a straw man for the strategic and operational-alignment challenge of Program and Portfolio Managers. Keays maintains that “a project is the development of a profitability performing asset”, “to transform the initial concept into a revenue stream”. In the world of capital projects, I don’t believe anyone would argue with that aspirational goal – thus my critical opening assessment: ‘good but not original’. That project management must be proactive rather than reactive journalism (p. 39) is both obvious and elusive. The unknown-unknown challenges which characterize a complex system and interfere with every endeavor is the art and unique value of project management. I don’t question Steven Keays’ successful experience, I would have enjoyed to see more case studies and facts to appreciate his perspective.

While the originality and unique contribution of PPA as a solution to successful project management are best left debated, Steven Keays culls from an impressive amount of experience to provide broad treatment of almost every other dimension of project management from the strategic to the tactical. His broad treatment of topics benefits any reader who is also a professional PM practitioner. Additionally, Keays is a gifted author with a knack for coining neologism’s which expand the lexicon and paradigm approach of project management.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Benjamin K. Diamond

San Antonio, Texas, USA

 



Benjamin (Ben) K. Diamond
is a 2007 honors graduate of the United States Military Academy and a ten-year veteran of the US Army with a deployment to Iraq from 2008-09 and overseas tours in Germany and Korea. His Army career culminated as the Program Manager for US Army Corps of Engineers initiatives supporting Army operations throughout the Caribbean, Central American, and South America. He is now actively seeking a career in Project/Program Management. Ben has PMI certifications and extensive experience in Project, Program, Agile, and Risk Management and holds a Master’s Degree from the University of Missouri Science & Technology in Engineering Management.

[email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

 

Rethinking Innovation and Design For Emerging Markets

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Rethinking Innovation and Design For Emerging Markets: Inside the Renault Kwid Project
Authors:  Christophe Midler, Bernard Jullien, Yannick Lung
Publisher: Auerbach Publications / CRC Press
List Price:  $59.95
Format: Hard cover, 164 pages
Publication Date: May 2017
ISBN: 9781138037205
Reviewer: Dr. Charles Y. Chen, PMP
Review Date: March 2018

 



Introduction

It is every entrepreneur’s dream and company’s desire to invent and develop a new product that will not only transform our lives but create an extremely lucrative revenue stream. Traditionally, the innovation method focuses on sophisticated products, usually incorporating new technologies to achieve cutting-edge performance to meet the expectations of the high-end market users of the first world countries.

But what about the developing countries?

In this book, Rethinking Innovation and Design for Emerging Markets, the authors have put together an engaging narrative of the creation process of a new automobile by the Renault-Nissan Alliance, the Kwid. The Kwid is an automobile specifically designed to meet the needs of the Indian user and overcome the challenges of the Indian market. The authors provide incisive insight and analysis into the management philosophy, organizational structure within the Renault-Nissan Alliance, and design pathways necessary to develop the Kwid, which has the potential to disrupt the entry-level automobile market in India while establishing a competitive advantage for other emerging markets in developing countries

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book, an English translation of Innover à l’envers – Repenser la stratégie et la conception dans un monde frugal, is organized in two parts. The book begins with the history of the Kwid project, from its inception through the design process to its scale-up and deployment in the Indian market. It is written in narrative form.

Part two of the book takes an analytical view of the Kwid project from three points of view. First, the authors characterize “fractal innovation” and “frugal innovation” and their accompanying design processes. This is followed by a discussion of how a low-end strategy focused on emerging markets could be established and deployed in firms that are accustomed to serving first-world markets. The authors conclude this section with an analysis of how this reverse innovation strategy could be deployed in a large multinational organization.

Highlights

The conventional innovation strategy we see in industrialized countries first focus on the needs of the wealthiest areas (top of the pyramid) before trickling down to users in emerging or developing countries [1]. The alternative approach is reverse innovation, where the focus is on the customers at “bottom of the pyramid.” The product design revolves around the specific needs of the customers in these emerging markets and is more likely to be produced locally [2], bringing a new balance of cost-scope-quality in product development. However, it is with this reverse innovation approach that provides a company a competitive position for high growth markets of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, and China).

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Dr. Charles Y. Chen

Texas, USA

 

 

Dr. Charles Y. Chen has had the privilege of leading teams of engineers and scientists to transform ideas into viable products. His career began at Northrop Grumman, initially as a systems engineer and then as a program manager, he led matrixed teams of engineers to innovate, mature, and produce new electronic sensor technologies and algorithms. Energetics Incorporated introduced Charlie to the world of management consulting. Initially as a director then as the Chief Strategy Officer, he led teams to help clients transition ideas developed in the laboratory to the marketplace, overcoming the so-called valley of death. As Executive Vice President of Engineering at Hover Energy, Dr. Chen is leading and coordinating key activities to scale-up a new wind turbine designed for the urban environment.

Dr. Chen got his B.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University. He received his Executive Education from University of Chicago Booth School of Business. As a PMP, he looks forward to leading teams to achieve the impossible.

Email address:

[email protected]
https://www.linkedin.com/in/charlesychenphd/

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

How to Get Executives to Act For Success

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: How to Get Executives to Act For Success
Author:  Michael O’Brochta, PMI-ACP, PMP
Publisher:  Zozer, Inc
List Price: $22.50
Format:  Paperback
Publication Date: Feb 2018
ISBN: 978-1981283439
Reviewer: Alice Chiang, PMP, PSM I, M.B.A.
Review Date:   March 2018

 



Introduction

Pointing out a popular question that many project managers have had: how to get support from executives for making a project success? Mr. O’Brochta understands this challenge is inevitable to happen when managing a project. He summarizes his experiences from doing project management and his studies from reading related materials into this book.

This book is not only for project managers, but also for executives who pursue projects and careers to have desired results. It states suggestions and explains reasons for suggestions that are all surrounding the concerns that most readers care about.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Six chapters, starting from introducing what challenges have happened during the author’s experience. Next, disclosure of the problem, define project managers’ goals, address expectations for project success decades ago to current.

Chapter three outlines actions that executives are expected to have. Next chapter analyzes barriers to getting project managers and executives to work together by different aspects: limitation of roles, different viewpoints and project management knowledge, and status of organization.

Chapter five lists eight steps that the author suggests project managers can take. The final chapter addresses the reality from taking actions. The progress of getting executives to act for project success would be incremental and cumulative. In addition, the author mentions the influence of willpower and delayed gratification. In the last part of this chapter, the author speaks his appreciation and other suggestions to readers.

The design of six chapters applies project management standard: define requirements, identify facts, plan what to do, what resources the plans would take. When reading this book following the order of chapters, you will experience the project management style of the author.

Highlights

Mr. O’Brochta mentions specific keywords in each chapter: reinforces mutual relationships. With positive mutual relationships between key stakeholders, your project can process more smoothly. most everywhere, and in any role, having good relationships with people can trigger tasks to move more easily and more quickly. This book reveals this reality; no matter if you like it or not, that is a fact.

As time changes, the definition of a project success expanded. Sponsors are expecting more good results. It turns out, how to achieve project success is becoming more complicated and difficult. By taking suggested project manager steps, practice over and over again, revising the style of managing projects by reviewing results and feedbacks, you will be able to set up a standard, have more confidence to handle projects.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Alice Chiang, PMP

Taiwan and USA





Alice Chiang
is a long-life student of project management. Having an M.B.A. and a Bachelor degree in Information Management, she also holds PMP (Project Management Professional) and PSM I (Professional Scrum Master) certifications. She has 8 years of experience with managing projects in software service for business operations, data management, and project management consulting. Alice enjoys working with teams to deliver satisfied software products to customers.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Bridging the PM Competency Gap

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Bridging the PM Competency Gap: A Dynamic Approach to Improving Capability and Project Success
Author: Loredana Abramo, PMP and Rich Maltzman, PMP
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price: $37.95
Format: Hardcover, 294 pages
Publication Date: 2017      
ISBN: 9781604271409
Reviewer: B. K. Gamble, PMP
Review Date: March 2018

 



Introduction

Bridging the PM Competency Gap provides a structured approach and practical steps on how to close the competency gap within organizations regardless of their size. Abramo and Maltzman provide several strategic approaches on how to build a sustainable, continuous learning environment.

The two authors have a wealth of experience between them. Their approach to bridging the PM competency gap is thorough, detailed, and very organized. Each chapter provides many helpful tools to illustrate their main points. The strategic approaches that are provided in the book are thoughtful and insightful as each recommendation considers the scaleability options for small to large organizations.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book covers its content in nine chapters. The first chapter provides a definition of what comprises the PM competency and introduces the “The Gap” problem statement. What is it that keeps Project Managers from achieving excellence? A competency gap! The authors define PM Competency as “the ability to successful and efficiently manage projects with a combination of technical, leadership, strategic, and business management expertise.” In discussing the PM competency gap, Abramo and Maltzman reviewed the key areas of the PMI Talent Triangle: Technical, Leadership, and Strategic and Business Management. Leadership was noted as being the most important skill for long-term success. As projects become more complex, strong project leadership skills are even more important to ensure strategic value is delivered to the organization.

In the remaining chapters, Abramo and Maltzman share several strategic approaches and tools that can be used to establish a continuous learning environment for different organization sizes. The book’s final chapter provides feedback from 36 experts regarding the PM competency gap and their recommendations on how address it. Four appendices are also provided for additional reference.

Highlights

It is important to spend adequate time upfront developing the overall strategic approach. Senior leadership’s support is needed to endorse the importance of project management as a discipline. It was noted that while you also need strong support from the middle management level to make competence building an ongoing, active contributor to project success, project managers also need to be aware of their own needs and take responsibility for their own development.

Before you go too far down the path in understanding the PM competency gap in your organization, you must first observe and evaluate your project management staff. There are generational differences in the workplace – age matters! Project Managers tend to reflect the populations from which they are drawn. Different generations do not learn in the same way and are not motivated by the same things. Understanding the mix of Project Managers in your organization’s community is important as you strategize on how to build a continuous learning organization.

When addressing which tools are needed for the competency gap there are many options regarding training. However, one size does not fit all situations. Some of the options highlighted include: Formal Training, Knowledge Transfer, and Mentoring Programs.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


B. K. Gamble, MBA, PMP

Kerrville, TX, USA

 



B. K. Gamble
is currently the HR Training and Development Manager for a non-profit operating foundation in the Texas Hill Country and is a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI Alamo Chapter). B.K’s career was focused in the Information Technology arena for over 35 years but she jumped on the Project Management bandwagon 15 years ago.

B. K. has a B.S. in Computer Science, a M.B.A. in Information Systems, and has held the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification since 2001. She has varied interests but considers herself to be a “life-long” learner and seeks opportunities to improve herself by learning new skills and serving others.

Email address: www.linkedin.com/in/bkgamble


Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

 

Breakthrough Project Portfolio Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Breakthrough Project Portfolio Management: Achieving the Next Level of Capability and Optimization
Author:  Murali Kulathumani, MBA, CSM
Publisher:  J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $59.95
Format: Hard Cover 339 Pages
Publication Date:   2018
ISBN13: 978-1-60427-149-2
Reviewer: David Kressin PMP
Review Date:   March 2018

 



Introduction

Breakthrough Portfolio Management is one of the first real “How To” books for creating, monitoring and managing a portfolio process that I have ever read.  This book goes beyond other similar product, project, program and portfolio reference books to physically lay out the steps to take to implement and build a successful portfolio and yourself as a successful Portfolio Manager.

Like all books dealing with business processes it starts out slowly defining and laying out all of the of concepts that a Portfolio Manager may need to know and understand.  Then it provides the tool (mEVM) for successfully monitoring the performance of a portfolio. Finally, it provides proven tactical and strategic processes and step needed to startup, monitor and maintain a successful portfolio.  If you read this book because it is your first portfolio process as a Portfolio Manager or because it is your 100th and simply want to know more, this book will provide what you need.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is laid out in 4 parts:  Defining the essential components of a Portfolio process, Understanding and applying the mEVM to portfolio management, Implementation and startup processes and ongoing monitoring and support of a Portfolio process. Within these parts each has several chapters explain the concepts and proving the essentials for us to successful creating and maintaining a portfolio process on our own.  It not only tells you how to build and maintain a portfolio but it provides proven steps and FAQs that empower you to feel as though you can do it because you have experienced all the aspects of Portfolio Management before.

Highlights

I was once told that a mark that separates a great employee, manager, consultant, etc. from a good one is that they care.  They care about the people that they work with and the projects that they work on.  They show you in the way they approach and do their work.  I see that caring attitude in the pages of this book.  Kulathumani does not just provide global concepts or pencil in a few bullet points on implementing and managing a portfolio process. He actually provides detailed descriptions on how to start up the process and how to manage it once stated.  He even takes it a step further and providing a chapter on real world gotcha’s and question and answers on how to either avoid or resolve common issues.

I cannot praise Kulathumani enough for dedicating a large section of his book on the definition and utilization of what he believes to be the best performance monitoring tool available for ensuring successful performance monitoring and management of a portfolio…

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


David Kressin, PMP

Texas, USA




David Kressin
, PMP is a senior program manager in the retail and wholesale logistics industry specializing in improving warehouse strategic and tactical operations, labor and systems efficiencies. I have worked for over 35 years managing resource efficiency improvements and logistics, transportation, warehouse management software implementations in the retail and wholesale warehousing environments.  My concentration is in the high volume grocery, food and drug industries.  I have successfully planned, implemented, and managed several strategic projects to improve warehouse and logistics efficiencies around the world.  For the past 20 years I have been working as an independent consultant.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Responsible Leadership in Projects

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Responsible Leadership in Projects: Insights Into Ethical Decision Making
Author:  Clarke, D’Amato, Higgs & Vahidi
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price:  $24.95
Format:  Soft cover, 150 pages
Publication Date:   2018    
ISBN: 978-1-62825-476-1
Reviewer: Shawn Waghorn
Review Date:   March 2018

 



Introduction

A snapshot look into how those who serve as project leaders can use their experience to respond to ethic problems within the project world. Team members and stakeholders often do not realize how their behavior affects the project and those affected by the project. The authors conducted a 12-month study to learn about inter-relationships among conflict, ethical issues and decision making as they observed an organization transform a massive transformational change in the United Kingdom.

The authors conducted interviews with several members of the project team to include the project manager, the project sponsor and several subject matter experts as they worked through the change process within this organization. This study is fascinating as it takes us through a yearlong observation and learning experience with the project team as they struggle to make decisions on how to reduce the employee population as the company transitions into a new business model

Overview of Book’s Structure

This 150 page book is broken down into 13 chapters. It starts by taking a quick look at previous research done on similar subjects to establish a basis for comparison. It also starts by describing the organizational culture, which in this case was “paternalistic” and “caring”. The book is laid out nicely as it takes the reader through the study in a way that is easy to follow and logical as it flows from introduction to conclusion

The authors clearly establish enablers and constraints as they observe the selected organization for a year. The interviews with subject matter experts provide practical and relatable experiences for almost any project manager. The authors clearly describe the dilemma they observed as the project team in the United Kingdom struggled to make ethical and responsible decisions throughout the course of a year.

Highlights

The business transformation required potentially major changes, such as laying off employees or offering the employees a new job in a different area. The company wanted to change the business model and work towards making a profit, which required a study to decide where efficiencies could be made. One area in particular was cutting out insurance sales people who could offer discounts on life insurance policies, a clear reason why the company was not making a profit. Insurance sales people were allowed to offer incentives to customers who had been using this firm for multiples years.

The major highlight of this book is the exclusive interviews with project team members as they face daily struggles to make decisions. The interviews take a harsh look at how project team members, who were made up of employees from within the company looking to downsize, felt about making life-changing decisions to lay off employees.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Shawn Waghorn

San Antonio, Texas, USA




Shawn Waghorn
is a recently retired Air Force member with 10+ years of project management experience. Currently Shawn works as a Program Manager within the Department of Defense, working on web-based applications to improve customer (military members) ability to quickly locate personal information, such as new assignment information, retirement eligibility, personal data for promotion boards and information regarding personal finances.

 

Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Practioner’s Guide to Program Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    The Practioner’s Guide to Program Management
Author:  Irene Didinsky, MBP, PMP
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price:  $39.95
Format:  Paperback, 235 pages
Publication Date:   May 2017      
ISBN: 978-1-62825-368-9
Reviewer: Melissa Zahn, PMP
Review Date:   March 2018

 



Introduction

“A Practitioner’s Guide to Program Management” by Irene Didinsky is meant to be used as a desktop manual in the day-to-day work of practicing Program Managers.  Irene states that she recognized that there weren’t many books published on program management so she set out to create a standard approach and user manual on the topic.  This book is published by PMI and she aligns the concepts with PMI’s The Standard for Program Management published in 2006.

This book goes into detail about how to manage a program throughout the program’s life cycle and even has detailed tips for setting up a program, managing and reporting on the program status using Microsoft Project.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book contains an Executive Summary, 11 chapters and a glossary of terms and is 235 pages in length.  Chapters 1 and 2 cover the history of program management, compares project versus program management, and defines what makes a successful Program Manager.  Chapters 3 – 7 introduce the program management concepts of strategy alignment, benefits realization, stakeholder engagement, program governance, and the program life cycle.  Chapters 8 (Program Management Infrastructure) and 9 (Effective Program Management) are very detailed chapters and are meant to be used as the practioner’s guide portion of the book.  Chapters 10 and 11 are the Future of Program Management and Program Management Community of Practice.  Chapter 11 discusses the value of participating in an existing Program Management Community of Practice and if one doesn’t exist in your area, it explains how to set up and start a Community of Practice in your organization.

Highlights

The two highlights for me were in Chapter 2.  The first is when Irene introduced the concept of the program management continuum, which is referenced from the book, Program Management for Improved Business Results by James M. Waddell and Russ J. Martinelli.  She explains that there are two types of organizations, project-oriented and program-oriented and then there are levels of proficiency within these two types and based on where your organization is on the continuum can determine the true benefits derived by program management.

The second highlight is when she introduced the program proficiency framework which included an illustration of this concept and breaks down the proficiency needed for a Program Manager into three categories: program leadership, program operational management, and interpersonal skills.  Each of these categories is further divided into specific skills needed by the program manager.  The program proficiency framework is described in an easy-to-understand format and illustrated with several diagrams and tables.  When I was reading this portion of the book, I highlighted several skills and think that I can write a great job description for a program management role in my organization.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Melissa Zahn, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 

Melissa Zahn, PMP is a Marketing Technology Architect in the Financial Services industry.  She has spent the last 18 months as a Program Manager managing a name change program for her organization.  Melissa was certified as a PMP in January 2005 and has been an active member of the Alamo PMI organization ever since.  She has worked in the Financial Services industry for 30 years and has experience in program and project management, software implementation projects, and IT management.  She has a track record for successfully implementing large cross-functional projects.

Email address:  www.linkedin.com/in/melissa-zahn-aba8a712


Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

March 2018 UK Project Management Round Up

Brexit, The Battle for GKN, Professional News and Salisbury

 

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 



INTRODUCTION

Well, as our friends say, we live in interesting times.  As winter creeps slowly into Spring, the news has been dominated by three themes.  First, the seeming ever-present BREXIT looms over us, then we have just had a knock-down, drag out fight for control of a major engineering contractor and to cap it all, we have had a major incident in my home city.  While all this has been happening, the PM associations have been active – so there is something for everyone this month.

BREXIT

At the end of March, the 29th to be precise, BREXIT is exactly one year away.  We are told that negotiations are progressing well, and even the BBC seems to swallow that.  So we can all be happy that someone knows what the result is likely to mean even if they are not letting the rest of us know.

The Infrastructure Projects Authority have issued a report (NAO 24 Nov 17) on how they are supporting the Government major projects portfolio and stated that there are no new projects to implement EU Exit on the GMPP, but the Authority has identified that EU Exit will affect at least 10 existing projects.”  The report then explains how IPA supports early planning of EU Exit projects.  IPA is adapting its approach to assurance to meet the specific challenges of EU Exit and supporting project and programme management capability.  It closes with an assessment of the impact of EU Exit on the Authority’s organisation and resources.

This gives a clear indication that the Government’s major projects are well aware of the potential problems, but many will be concerned with the lack a formal Exit Project.  According to the Times, Lord Adonis claimed that industry infrastructure in the form of power stations, landing capacity at airports, and high speed broad band availability all indicate a failure of Ministerial planning and strategy in hos evidence  to the House of Commons Business Select Committee  Personally, I’m more concerned that there is no BREXIT Programme as that seems to me that there is no co-ordination across the whole of Government or indeed any notion that industry more broadly needs some support.  We just have to hope that the APM briefings are on point.

Some will also ask, what will there to be to report this time next year when the Great Escape has happened – although will be a two year transition period.

THE BATTLE FOR GKN

GKN is an engineering conglomerate with annual sales of around £10 billion employing more than 60,000 staff world-wide and has 160 operating plants in 33 countries so it is an important player in the UK economy.  With the weak £ and GKN’s sluggish performance in recent years, a battle to take over the company was not unexpected.  The take over battle began last year with several bidders in the running but resistance was effective at first, but events moved quickly.

In February GKN announced a transformation plan that was expected to be part funded by the sale of its highly profitable powder metallurgy business, reputedly worth £2 billion with the rest going into the Pension Fund.  By this stage, Melrose was offering about £7.4 billion and 57% of the enlarged firm which GKN said was the equivalent of buying them on the cheap and using GKN’s money to do it!  Needless to say Melrose attached the GKN sell off plan.  Experts noted that any sale would need to make a major contribution to the pension fund which as a £1.1 billion deficit.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Miles Shepherd

Salisbury, UK

 

 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World Journal in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair and a Fellow of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently a Director for PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and is immediate past Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/