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Welcome to the March 2018 PMWJ

From a Different Angle: Competitive Projects, Winning, Not Losing and… Welcome to another edition of the PM World Journal

 

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the March 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 68th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 37 original articles, papers and other works by 40 different authors in 15 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, as another political season gets underway in the United States and other countries (and as Democracies and Democratic institutions seem to be under attack in so many places), I have been thinking about the role of project management in politics.  Or more correctly, in political campaigns!  Aren’t political campaigns projects, with concrete end goals, schedules, budgets, stakeholders and many other characteristics of projects? I started thinking about the contribution that professional project management might make to the campaign of someone running for political office, at the local, state or national level.  I discussed it with my wife, how might I help our favorite candidate for US senate this year?

Then I realized that the opposition candidate’s political campaign might well be using their own expert project management resources, and how all candidates for political office either win or lose elections.  That led to thoughts about project management in sports and other competitive industries and situations, including in many businesses.  There is much written and discussed these days about project successes and failures; how do those discussions relate to projects in politics and sports where there are so many losers.  Are those projects failures?  It occurred to me that it’s not so straightforward and perhaps there are different ways to think about all of this.  So here goes.

Political Campaigns as Projects and Programs

At first glance, a political campaign looks like a classic project, with beginning and end, scope of work, schedule, budget, resources, risks, contracting and procurement requirements and many leadership, stakeholder and team building issues.  Classic project planning and management techniques would seem applicable, with agility also required in today’s fast paced environment.  On closer examination though, we can see some unusual and complicating factors.  For example, a majority of the project (campaign) team members will be temporary participants, with many external resources and volunteers.  In addition, the campaign management (project/program) team will need knowledge and experience that many project managers may not readily have – fund raising, legal and regulatory knowledge, leading/coordinating volunteers, experience with other political campaigns, political and economic knowledge, governance and policy knowledge, marketing and social networking experience, etc.  That said, it still looks like a project, at least for campaigns for local elections.

On political campaigns for statewide or national offices, things get more complex in a hurry. Larger campaigns take more of everything – more people, more money, more knowledge and experience, and usually much more time. A campaign for a state-wide election will more closely resemble a program, with multiple projects related to volunteers, ICT, marketing, events (both physical and on media), financing (events, campaigns, other), stakeholders (events, communications, analysis), research (issues, stakeholders, voting trends, opinion polls, opposition and competitive research).  Voter registration issues will be more important, along with campaign-related regulations, laws, policies or issues.

Campaigns for national office are major programs, with sub-programs, portfolios of projects and multiple project teams.  In the United States and most other countries, a national campaign requires ballot registration in every voting district or state, office and volunteer mobilization in every state (50-100 in the USA), massive fund-raising initiatives, multiple multi-media marketing projects, multiple research projects, information and knowledge about a wide range of issues.  And national campaigns take a long time, often over several years. If a candidate is proposing significant policy change, then the program will resemble an organizational change program and may require changes in the conditions or environment surrounding the campaign itself.  For example, laws and regulations may need to change independent of the campaign itself; public opinion might need to be influenced; impact on other factors may need to be considered, planned for or incorporated into the campaign.

While politicians and campaign managers could well benefit significantly from deeper project management knowledge, that is nowhere near enough…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

The Evolution of Programme Management

Towards Governance of Industry 4.0 Organisations

 

FEATURED PAPER

Dr Pieter Steyn and  Elzabe Zovitsky

Cranefield College

Pretoria and Western Cape, South Africa

 


 

  1. Introduction

Steyn and Semolic (2017, March) aver that the Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0) is characterised by increasing digitisation and interconnection of products, value chains and business models. Competitiveness no longer depends solely on optimisation of own resources, but total inter-organisational value chain innovativeness and supportive partner technologies, products, services and systems. With the aid of partners, organisations are co-creating innovative inter-organisational value and supply chains that operate in a local, regional and international collaborative business ecosystem.

The complexity of today’s technologies, artificial intelligence, mass data, robotics and internet of things calls for specialisation and sustainable collaboration among organisations. Consequently, organisational design, development and governance have entered a challenging new phase. This inevitably requires strategic transformation and change of Industry 4.0 organisations and demands the introduction of new horisontal supply and value chain business models. Virtual value chains shape organisations into strategic, collaborative, value-driven entities where non-core activities are performed by carefully selected partners.

A competitive edge is gained by collaboratively performing strategic activities more effectively and efficiently. This approach demands exceptional governance, supported by transformational leadership excellence and a systemic knowledge of applied programme management. Effective and efficient cross-functional and inter-organisational programme management of projects and programmes in virtual networks is a critical enabling competency for the Industry 4.0 economy. The advantages of programme management have become profoundly important in the Fourth Industrial Revolution economy.

In research done towards a Master’s degree at Cranefield College, Zovitsky (2014) avers that by 1990 organisations already realised that competitiveness had become the driving force to win customer orders in project work. Competitiveness entails developing a business model that embeds sound project management methodologies and techniques. Organisations realised that competency in project management constituted a primary input in planning and executing strategy with the ultimate purpose of creating sustainable competitive advantage. This required strong leadership initiative and support, and a firm belief that project management contributed to the bottom line of the organisation.

Rothwell (1994) identified that during the 1970’s and 1980’s organisations reoriented research and development (R&D) management to consolidate, readjust costing and shorten the path between knowledge and new technologies. Moreover, they started utilising matrix organisational structures. This ultimately led to incorporating project, programme and portfolio management into R&D management thinking. The focus was transferred from the product to the entire business system. Planning, production and product marketing were integrated into the entire process that enhanced systems, flexible innovation processes and networking models with customers and suppliers. This development was the forerunner of what is experienced today where leaders in the Industry 4.0 economy learning organisations focus on collaboration and the creation of virtual networks of partners to be more effective and efficient.

From the year 2000 project management maturity models and mechanisms assisted organisations to achieve rapid performance improvement. Several integrating mechanisms such as creating a formal hierarchy; standardising organisational policies and procedures; and introducing cross-functional teams emerged. These mechanisms were the forerunners of cross-functional project and programme-managed value chain structures utilised in modern day learning organisations.

  1. Early Period Literature

Stretton (2009:3) argues that the terminologies ‘programme’ and ‘project’ have been used interchangeably since the 1960s and particularly in the US Department of Defence and NASA. There was no definite distinction between the usage of ‘programmes’ and ‘projects’ at that time, and large projects were often described as programmes. According to Weaver (2007), the Manhattan initiative to create the atomic bomb in the 1940s was probably the first programme, while since the 1950s numerous programmes crystallised in the US military. Milosevic et al (2007) mention that the Japanese implemented quality improvement programmes long before the United States. Quality project and programme management developed in the United States only in the early 1980s due to a dearth in America of quality management practices, which led to difficulties in competing nationally and internationally.

The 1970s was the period during which the focus moved to project control with the development of computer-based management systems capable of integrating cost, time, and quality. Before that (the 1950s and 1960s) the emphasis was on the time span of projects and ways of reducing it.  The result was that many organisations introduced integrated management systems in the early 1980s, but most of them still failed to deliver successful projects with regard to cost, time, and quality.  According to Harpham (2003 [a]), this resulted in organisations looking for project managers who could manage in a matrix system with minimum “given” authority. The result was that organisations started paying increasingly more attention to the skills of project managers, inter-alia, leadership, motivation and team-building…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Authors


Prof Dr Pieter Steyn

Founder, Director, Principal
Cranefield College of Project and Programme Management
Pretoria & Western Cape, South Africa

 


Dr
Pieter Steyn is Founder and Principal of Cranefield College of Project and Programme Management, a South African Council on Higher Education / Department of Education accredited and registered Private Higher Education Institution. The Institution offers an Advanced Certificate, Advanced Diploma, Postgraduate Diploma, Master’s degree, and PhD in project and programme-based leadership and management. Professor Steyn holds the degrees BSc (Eng), MBA, and PhD in management, and is a registered Professional Engineer.

He was formerly professor in the Department of Management, University of South Africa and Pretoria University Business School. He founded the Production Management Institute of South Africa, and in 1979 pioneered Project Management as a university subject at the post-graduate level at the University of South Africa.

Dr Steyn founded consulting engineering firm Steyn & Van Rensburg (SVR). Projects by SVR include First National Bank Head Office (Bank City), Standard Bank Head Office, Mandela Square Shopping Centre (in Johannesburg) as also, Game City- and The Wheel Shopping Centres (in Durban). He, inter alia, chaired the Commission of Enquiry into the Swaziland Civil Service; and acted as Programme Manager for the Strategic Transformation of the Gauteng Government’s Welfare Department and Corporate Core.

Pieter co-authored the “International Handbook of Production and Operations Management,” (Cassell, London, 1989, ed. Ray Wild) and is the author of many articles and papers on leadership and management. He is a member of the Association of Business Leadership, Industrial Engineering Institute, Engineering Association of South Africa, and Project Management South Africa (PMSA); and a former member of the Research Management Board of IPMA. He serves on the Editorial Board of the PM World Journal. Pieter is also Director of the De Doornkraal Wine Estate in Riversdale, Western Cape.

Professor Steyn can be contacted at [email protected]. For information about Cranefield College, visit www.cranefield.ac.za.

 

 
Elzabe Zovitsky

Cranefield College of Project and Programme Management
Pretoria & Western Cape, South Africa




Elzabe Zovitsky
holds a B A Degree (Anthropology) from the University of Pretoria and a Master’s Degree in Programme Management from Cranefield College.

She is Head of the Principal’s office at Cranefield College, where her duties include project and programme management research and administering Cranefield’s specialised and short course programmes.

Before joining Cranefield College in 2006, she was actively engaged in managing anthropology and genealogy projects.  These projects ranged from solving tribal succession disputes in KwaZulu Natal to systemising the genealogies of the Zulu tribes.

 

 

 

Qualitative study of online hotel booking systems


STUDENT PAPER

By Caroline Henry

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

The explosion of online booking systems has completely changed the direct channel and contractual relationship between hotels and customers. From now on users have the choice of several distribution channels to book a hotel room. The objective is to study those different online booking systems and identify the best alternative from a customer’s point of view. This paper is based on a qualitative study using a multi-attribute decision-making and fishbone methods, websites and articles analysis.

Third party websites have completely taken control of online booking systems to the detriment of hotel websites. Indeed, most customers are seeking several offers on a single website in order to find the best quality-price ratio with as little wasted time as possible. Even though the use of online booking systems seems very convenient at first sight, many studies show how risky those contracts can be for customers.

Once benefits and dis-benefits of online booking systems will be compared and analysed, the study will conclude on the importance for customers to use a direct channel and book their room on hotel websites.

Key words: Online Booking Systems, Hotel industry, Independent Websites, Distribution channels, Reliability of alternatives

INTRODUCTION

According to the Statistics Portal 2017 survey, 88% of Americans 78% of French book their hotel using Internet.1  The first question that can be raised is the validity of this type of contract. Do online hotel bookings constitute contracts? Three aspects must be taken into consideration:

–        An offer

–        An acceptance

–        A consideration

The hotel offers the availability of its rooms to customers at specific dates. This later has the choice to accept the offer or to turn down on it. The lawyer Mark Pestronk announces “a reservation is a binding contract consisting of mutual promises: the hotel agrees to provide the accommodation at the quoted rate, and the client agrees to pay.2

Consideration is the exchange of value on both sides. The customer ensures he will occupy a room and pay for it. Hotels make sure the room is available for the customer at specific dates. Consideration comes along with the payment or a deposit. It can take different forms such as money or promise.  By sharing credit card information, the customer “promises” payment. If customers do not provide any information, there is no consideration. Once all conditions are fulfilled, acceptance is close. Online bookings definitely constitute a contract.

Hotels use the Internet to increase their visibility and attract customers. In a world where competition is increasingly tougher, different channels have been created to catch customers’ attention and gain market shares. Online booking systems have complicated the direct contractual relationship between customers and hotels and can constitute risky contracts.  By risk, it must be understood the “probability or threat of damage, injury, liability, loss, or any other negative occurrence that is caused by external or internal vulnerabilities, and that may be avoided through pre-emptive action.”3

To summarize, this paper seeks to answer the following questions:

  • What are the different channels to book a hotel room online?
  • What are the risks for customers to book their hotel on independent websites?
  • What is the most efficient alternative for them?

More…

To read entire paper (with footnotes and references), click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Caroline Henry

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Caroline Henry
is a student at Skema Business School (Paris), Msc Project and Programme Management and Business Development (PPMBD). She joined Skema in 2014 and through those years she has enhanced her knowledge in terms of finance, marketing, management and others before deciding to focus on project management. She also had the opportunity to develop her professional experiences through different long-term internships. Her last work experience was a six months internship in Airbus (Blagnac) as a project manager officer in the Sales and Contracts Department. Learning about the basics on project management in the company helped her to decide her orientation in the PPMBD Msc and complete her knowledge.

 

Don’t be fooled by Overbooking practices


STUDENT PAPER

By Marguerite Grivet

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Around 42,000 aircrafts take off and land every day around the world and with 2,5 million daily passengers, airlines represent a huge market that appear really volatile since it’s deregulation in 1978.  This paper aims to identify the obligations that airlines still have. It will especially document the overbooking practice with the purpose of demonstrating how airlines policies may influence the passengers’ choices.  By using the Multi Attribute Decision Making method with a compensatory model we’ll be able to rank some airlines accordingly.  It should help people to understand their rights over airlines practices and show how some airlines can meet better expectations considering the overbooking.

Key words:  Overbooking, Contractual Rights, Obligations, Deregulation, Liquidated damages, Breach of Contract

INTRODUCTION

Would you buy a flight ticket if you were not 100% sure you will have a seat on the plane?

Probably not!  But that’s what actually people agree on when booking a flight.

If they happened to be unluckily denied boarding they would be facing one of the most used but legal commercial practices among airlines, which is the Overbooking.

Overbooking happens when airlines sell more tickets than the actual number of people they can accommodate.

With this practice airlines are responding to the problem of “no-shows” (people who reserved seat but didn’t board), they started facing in the 1940’s with the expansion of their service. By 1950 the practice had become widely spread as well as the complaints about it, leading to the Federal Aviation Act of regulation in 1958, which allowed the US Federal Government to “oversee and regulate the safety in the airline industry”. But later in 1978, the deregulation of the airline industry was enacted in order to make it enter a free market enabling a “great increase in the number of flights and a decrease in fares”.

If we now look at the first semester of 2017, considering 12 US airlines, the number of passengers that were removed involuntary from flights was 17,330. We may think it represents only 0.52 per 10 000 passengers but it still exists.

Booking a flight departing from City A to go to City B equals to planning a travel between two specific airports on a certain day and on a defined period of time. According to these characteristics, this is a project. In order to do that you purchase a flight ticket from an airline offering you a transportation service at a certain price. Accepting this offer passengers and airlines agree on a contract. Here we’ll talk about a contract of Carriage.

But sticking to the definition of a contract, overbooking appears as a breach of contract from the airline side if we consider it failed to perform your transportation.

That’s why I decided to focus my researches on the existing airlines booking policies and some published articles about Overbooking that question this practice. Through my paper I’ll compare the contractual rights from both sides, airlines and passengers, with the facts.

To summarize, this paper will analyze official documents and articles to answer the following questions:

How can passengers legally respond to this practice?

What are the airlines obligations over it?

Are there better options when choosing your airline?

More…

To read entire paper (with footnotes and references), click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Marguerite Grivet

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Marguerite Grivet
is a MSc student at Skema Business School. In 2016, as part of her Master’s degree program, she studied one semester at the Faculty of commerce of Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Back in France she worked for Dassault Systèmes in their Corporate Events Department. Currently following the specialization of Project and Programme Management and Business Development at Skema Paris Campus, she’ll graduate in 2018 after an exchange semester at La Catolica of Lisbon to study Economics and Management.  She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Management of conflicts between Facebook community users


STUDENT PAPER

By Florian Dalino

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Composed of more than 2 billion members worldwide, Facebook must be prepared to solve disputes between its users. From the amicable statement to the arbitration, resolution processes may vary but must ensure efficiency. Mandatory acceptation of Terms and Conditions makes all users concerned by these resolution processes, which are not fully described, reason why an analysis and comparison should be done to understand how they work and their viability. To ensure that, the report focusses on the four resolution processes’ analysis of the network. An understanding through testing, comparing and ranking these methods to have a clear vision of each. The author’s analysis highlights the pertinence of a precise process which ensures the better way to solve a conflict between users, with the possibility of an amicable solution or a Facebook’s arbitration. Through its internal resolution processes, the famous social network found several ways to be fully adapted to its users’ needs and solve their disputes. Although an unequal pertinence depending the method chosen, users will always have the means to find an adapted solution.

Key words: conflict, dispute, issue, claim, resolution

INTRODUCTION

Founded in 2004, Facebook is a social network allowing interaction through 2 billion users worldwide. Publication of articles, pictures, videos, information sharing, private and public messages made the website one of the most used in the world. It’s a new way to communicate, inform, maintain and develop virtual relations with others.

According to the network’s unique principle and Terms and Conditions agreed to each account creation, the user manages his own actions on the website, is responsible for the linked consequences through the network’s community. Years after years, Facebook became more than a social network, it became a virtual life with social interactions and community belonging’s feeling. Although the management of our own actions and their consequences, it’s difficult to have the control on other members’ actions, behaviors and decisions, according to the free-expression principle of the network. The problem is this one: members actions can have negative repercussions which lead to disputes to solve. Conflicts which can emerge from Facebook interactions may take several forms (Provocation, humiliation, bullying, threats) through diverse ways of communication (Pictures, Messages, Articles, Videos…). In order to struggle against it, how does Facebook allow the management of Disputes/Conflicts between Facebook members of its community and is this method ensuring viability?

Some criticisms appear with the Facebook’s approach of conflicts, like the lack of involvement of the company or any mediator to lead the conflict’s resolution. Although the conscious of risks which can occur, the Network bases principally its approach on a user-to-user arrangement, as specified on its terms and conditions, which doesn’t directly involve the company and can raise the question of the process’ credibility and viability.

How does the system exactly work? How can both parties have agreement on the resolution? What if one party refuses an agreement? The involvement’s degree of Facebook seems unclear according to Terms and Conditions but has to be understood by all user. Facebook is recent and its solution to mitigate conflicts is too. This situation raises the question of its performance analysis through time and the efficiency of the method.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Florian DALINO

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Florian Dalino
is a 23 years old French MSc student in Skema Business School Paris, major Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD).  He is a former student of North Carolina State University in the USA and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Management in 2015.  He had the opportunity to live several professional experiences through internships in France, United Kingdom and the United States.

His professional background is particularly business development oriented with three years of experiences in this sector, including a year as Business Development Manager in Digital Transformation market. He had the opportunity to manage teams, build complete business strategies, negotiate partnerships and bring companies the means to develop their activities and their performances in a “Uberization” context. Many activities allowed him to use theoretical methods learned during his studies.

Several experiences as project manager allowed him to develop an appreciation for this activity and confirmed his ambition to continue on this way. For this reason, h decided to choose a specialization in Project Management and integrated Skema Business School in September 2016. Since this time, he has personally invested in many projects with multicultural teams to create innovative concepts, develop companies’ performance.  He has successfully passed Prince2 and AgilePM certification exams.

From January 2018 and for 6 months, he is developing his professional experiences in the entertainment sector, as Brand Strategy Manager, in France. At the end of his Master’s degree, he plans to continue working in this market which he is passionate about with the ambition to evolve inside it, in France or a foreign country.

Florian is an optimistic person, always looking for opportunities to take part in new adventures, from a personal and a professional point of view. He is particularly motivated by new challenges and always ready to perform.   Florian can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

How sport sponsors must protect their brand

  when right holder goes rogue

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Elliot Butruille

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Sport is becoming one of the most sensitive markets for sponsoring. Even that the amount of money generated by sport is going bigger and bigger, it is today very risky for the sponsor to start a sponsoring relationship. Indeed, with the advent of social network, athletes are the center of the attention and every move are looked at and analyzed by the public. In this context, it is very important for the sponsor to secure his own interest in a sponsoring relationship to keep control of his brand image.

By using the “Multi Attribute Decision Making”, this paper will develop the solutions for the sponsor to protect his brand in the event of right holder behaviour that harms brand image.

The author will demonstrate in this paper that from the different perspective selected: the confidential arbitration and the public excuses are the best solution for a sponsor to protect his interests from the right holder and the public.

Key words: Sponsor, Sponsorship, Contract, Sport, Exclusivity, Brand representation, Moral clause

INTRODUCTION

The world market of sport sponsorship is often estimated at more than 60 billion dollars, and in the next 5 years it should increase more and more according to big sport world events coming… This market can be seen as an amazing opportunity to make business, but actually it is a really sensitive to deal with it.

If sponsor thinks that building a sponsoring partnership is only about writing a standard legal contract and discussing money, they will probably fail to secure their interests…

The reason for it, is that a sponsoring includes two high powered stakeholder: the sponsor who own the money and want to promote his brand and the right holder who own a strong brand image and want to value it at maximum. Together they have to find the most suitable agreement to convince the third and major stakeholder: the fans or customers… This last stakeholder must never be underestimated because it has a huge impact. Whether you are a powerful sponsor or an influent right holder, you are always taking a risk because you are dealing with image and perception of your fan or customers.

Everyone remember the French Football Team “strike” in 2010 for the South Africa Football World Cup which cost 4.5 million euro to the “Fédération Francaise de Football” (French Football Organization) to refund sponsors. Lance Armstrong losing all of his sponsors in the next twelve hours after his confession about doping… Or more recently the Liverpool FC fans, who signed a petition against a new sponsor (Tibet Water Resources Limited) which they accuse of unethical behavior in Tibet.

Sponsoring is definitely a powerful weapon of communication, but all weapons are double-edged. At a time where “buzz” and social network are building or destroying reputation, it is compulsory to manage carefully your sponsoring relationship.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Elliot Butruille

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 


Elliot BUTRUILLE is a French fifth year engineering student specialized in Transport System and Logistics in Centrale Lille. Simultaneously, he is following a Master’s degree in Project Management and Business Development in SKEMA Lille. He already performed successful experience in India by managing the implementation of the e-commerce reverse logistic of a sport company named Decathlon (€10 billions of turnover).

This dual competence will let him manage technical projects by providing a technical expertise from his engineering master degree and management skills provided by his business master degree. Passionate about sport he is interested in the challenge between business and sport and especially the sponsoring relationship.

He is looking forward for a challenging internship in project management or consulting services in supply chain and logistics starting in April 2017.

Elliot can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

The intellectual property

within the Kickstarter funding method

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Quentin Blanchard

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Currently working on an engineering oriented project with some friends, we need to figure out what is the best way to protect our idea. The funding method we have in mind is quite dangerous for the intellectual property. It is the crowdfunding. So, the aim of this paper is to determine the best protection or a crowdfunding solution.

The method use for this analysis is the comparison of several criteria from different solution to determine which one is the most appropriated (The force field analysis).

The main finding of this study is that it depends of the kind of work you want to protect. If it is about an author work (song, painting, dance, paper, etc.), the copyright appears as the best solution. But if it is not the case (engineering design or process, etc.), the patent is the way to protect your idea.

For our project (engineering oriented) the best fit is the patent. It will permit to protect ours designs and process we developed during the project development time.

Key words: Intellectual Property, Crowdfunding, Patent, Dispute, Terms of use,  Backer

INTRODUCTION

In 2015, a start-up called KAZbrella presented its project on the crowd founding platform Kickstarter. Their concept was a patented reverse folding umbrella. A short time later, another similar umbrella strangely appeared. This “copie” has been realised under the name “Suprella”. This strange causality hides something more interesting, Suprella is a website detained by Hirams Trade GmbH, a German company known for that kind of machinations. Nowadays, this kind of problem is growing rapidly. The Crowdfunding platform Kickstarter defines itself as a platform with the purpose to link entrepreneurs (and their ideas) and backers, and it does not want to take part in that sort of problem.

In a project, intellectual property can be a real success factor. For the product development project, this is most of the time a key element. Entrepreneurship has now new ways to find the funds required to develop their ideas. Crowdfunding is one of them. The results can be quite impressive. For instance, (eg: Kodama, 3D printer reached their fund raise target in 6 minutes). But the protection of the idea or the design is not part of the deal you sign with Kickstarter. Usually, the intellectual property – perceived as a specific idea, process or design – is protected by patents. But patents are expensive and hard to write when the idea is just at a starting phase. Does any system exist to protect your idea when you share it on Kickstarter except the last ones?

When a project is presented on the platform and the idea is stolen, who are the stakeholders involved in the dispute? Kickstarter has defended its position since its creation with the following baseline: “Kickstarter is not linked to the project in any case and does not want to be part of any dispute”. The disputes about intellectual property are included. But what are the real implications of Kickstarter about it? How do they defend themselves inside their contracts? The document used for this analysis is the “Kickstarter terms of use”.

We will provide answers to the following questions:

–        Is there any protection for intellectual property inside the Kickstarter terms of use?

–        What are the potential risks about sharing your idea on such a platform without any protection?

–        Does any way exist to reduce those risks and what is the cost of the solutions?

For a project which chooses to finance itself by this method, the intellectual property appears as a key success factor which requires attention. Not being able to manage this issue could lead to a total failure of such a project.

More…

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Quentin Blanchard

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 

 

Quentin Blanchard is currently finishing his Master’s degree at SKEMA business school in Project & Programme Management and Business Development.  He has a strong academic interest in the alternatives solutions to finance a project (Crowdfunding, backing, micro loan, etc.). In addition of this, he also spends a lot of time studying the different project management methods and the application of those latest ones in projects. About professional experiences, he is working on a project related to agronomy and the food industry. He started work in the petroleum industry and moved then to the agronomic industry. He works closely today in the bakery industry to develop the market and products. He also has some expertise in 3D printing.

Quentin is not only defined by professional experiences. He has several hobbies, including horse riding, scuba diving, surfing and playing guitar. He loves to travel the world (Congo, Angola, Thailand, EAU, etc.) and discover new fields.

 

Building Sustainability into Contracts

Change and Dispute Management in Construction

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Guilhem Hervé

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Sustainability is at the heart of many discussions nowadays, as human activities are subject to evolution in order to reduce negative impacts over our resources and leave to next generations a sane planet and society. Sustainability encompasses many topics as it is a global vision. Therefore, this paper is developed to analyze and identify the best practices and methods to foster sustainability through dispute management and change, with a focus on the construction area, subject to many disputes. In this context, the author will compare the different existing methods for dispute resolution and identify state of the art practices to build sustainability into contracts. Based on this analysis, the author recommends the use of the combination of mediation and arbitration as the best method and suggests a number of key practices. These practices highlight the importance of a proactive approach in contract management.

Key words: Sustainability, Change, Dispute, Resolution, Construction, Contracts

INTRODUCTION

With the objective to reduce the negative impacts of human activities over our resources, sustainable development imposed itself as unavoidable in every business. As a global strategy, it should be introduced in every part of a business in order to maximize sustainability, which makes it a key part to integrate into contracts. Indeed, in order to integrate sustainability into an organization or a business, the agreement of parties is an essential step to manage. Building sustainability into contracts could thus have an important positive impact for businesses and society in general. We consider here sustainability as the ability to last and continue indefinitely by causing no damage to the resources of the project.

Construction is one of the areas most impacted by this change while having to manage contracts in every project. Construction companies, having an important impact on environment, are now widely integrating sustainable practices into their processes in order to align with the need of our society and to communicate their will to contribute to the necessary change mankind needs to undertake. Nevertheless, contracts issues are widespread and statistics show that the number of disputes is not decreasing and tend to be a recurrent issue in nowadays contract management for construction, which is jeopardizing contracts efficiency and sustainability. A better management of disputes could enable contractors to avoid time and money consuming disputes, resulting in positive impacts on the business.

In this paper, we will focus especially on the dispute management in construction contracts and aim to identify the best existing practices in order to build sustainability into contracts. In this perspective, we will compare the various methods of dispute management in different sources of contract content and bring into light the best practices for a sustainable contract. The result should encompass a number of good practices that will help contractors introduce or develop sustainability in contracts while improving dispute management in a more sustainable way.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Guilhem Hervé

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 


Guilhem Hervé
is a MSc student in SKEMA Business School, majoring in Project and Programme Management and Business Development (PPMBD). He is also studying engineering in the Graduate Engineering School Centrale Lille in a Masters program, majorimg in Strategy and Management of Organizations. In 2017, he worked for Thales, a French multinational company designing electrical systems for aerospace, defense and security as enterprise architect assistant in Velizy, France.

He is highly motivated by environmental and sustainable issues. He lives in Lille, France now, and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

AGILE Projects and internal contracts

 A contradiction?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Athenais Regnier

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

The Agile Manifesto was published in 2001, setting up principles and values of a new project management methodology, opposed to traditional waterfall approaches and ideal for IT development projects: Agile. But this new methodology questions traditional service contracts.

This paper introduces a new way of realising internal contracts in order to fit Agile projects.

Different techniques will be proposed, analysed and compared: such as inverting the fixed and estimated parts of golden triangle          or including checkpoints and exit points in the contract.

We will see that the most efficient way of bringing flexibility to a contract is to base it on a flexible and mutually shared vision of the customer-supplier relationship.

Key words: Agile, Contract, IT projects, SLA, Internal contracts, Software development, SCRUM

INTRODUCTION

The Agile approach was born because of a simple observation: in most cases, at the beginning of a software development project, the customer does not and cannot know what the final deliverable will be like. It was necessary to find a way for the customer’s needs to evolve along with the project, and to facilitate the interaction between the customer and the development team.

The Agile approach is more and more popular: in a study consisting of a survey on 601 software developers and IT professionals, “two-thirds described their company as either pure agile or leaning towards agile” (Jeremiah, J. (2016). Agile vs. waterfall: survey shows agile is now the norm. Retrieved from https://techbeacon.com/survey-agile-new-norm). This trend applies for both external and internal projects as Agile projects have proven to increase software quality and customer satisfaction.

Indeed, many companies in need of constantly increased performance ask their internal IT departments to adopt the Agile frameworks, the most widely used being Scrum and Kanban. But most of these departments are also asked to use internal contracts such as SLAs – service-levels agreements. The aim of these contracts is to make sure that both the supplier and the customer, seen as businesses within a business, agree on:

  • a deliverable (product or service)
  • a payment, for example by distributing a portion of the organization’s budget
  • a start date and a duration
  • accountabilities

However, the core principles of Agile methods are to prioritize customer satisfaction by early and continuous delivery of valuable software (working software is delivered frequently – weeks rather than months – and reviewed by the customer for improvement) and welcome changing requirements, even in late development. As a consequence, neither the customer nor the developer knows exactly what the final deliverable is when the contract has to be signed. Following this observation, buyers and jurists gathered and started coming up with solutions, and Agile development contracts started to emerge. But in reality, these contracts are not innovative legally speaking: they intend to adjust, in a formal way, the flexibility required for product requirements evolution. So, logically, it isn’t the contract itself which is “Agile”, but the customer-supplier relationship in fact is.

So how can we establish a contract without knowing what will be delivered? Isn’t it the core objective of a contract?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Athenais Regnier

SKEMA Business School
Lille, Fance

 

 

Athenais Regnier is a 21-years-old French graduate student preparing two diplomas: a 5-year degree at engineering school Centrale Lille and a Master of Science of Project and Programme Management and Business Development (PPMBD) at Skema Business School. She belongs to the ITEEM department of Centrale Lille, where engineering, management and entrepreneurship are combined to train future managers with a solid technical background as well as an innovative, adaptable and ingenious spirit. This spirit is consolidated by 17 months of internship experience throughout the 5 years of education.

Specialised in information systems architecture and processes optimisation, she has previous experience mainly in web development and IT project management. She has lived for 9 months in Auckland (New-Zealand) where she worked as a project management intern in local company Kiwise Digital. Responsible for the development of a WordPress e-commerce website, her main missions were to import data from Excel spreadsheet and WooCommerce plugin (CSV Import Suite), optimise processes in the project especially data-entry, train new team members and report to the client.

Class delegate during her entire post-graduate education, Athenais has also been involved in several school projects including an innovation award-winning project in 2014 consisting of presenting an innovation for a radio-controlled car after realising a complete technical and market analysis. Her third-year project was to redefine school-companies relationship in her region of Nord-Pas-de-Calais and, as part of this project, her team organised an event with 50 professionals and about the same number of students where each team member managed a facilitated workshop to lead participants in innovating on the subject.

Athenais has a passion for horse-riding, she has participated in jumping and equestrian vaulting competitions for many years. She has been a junior champion of France of team vaulting in 2007, at the age of 11 years old.  She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Cheating and Video Games

What repercussions on contracts?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Augustin de la Gorgue de Rosny

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

This paper explores how cheating in videogames can impact the Terms of Use agreement signed off by the gamer when he plays the videogame. Furthermore, this paper provides some recommendations concerning the way to manage dispute in this kind of contract, and how the video-game company should resolve conflicts with cheaters. Some contract baselines are analyzed, in order to define which of them can bring the most useful tools to manage disputes and conflicts from a video-game company perspective. The Guild of Project Controls Compendium and Reference (CaR) is the one to provide the best practices regarding how to manage disputes and contract violations. Consequently, video-game companies should apply the recommendations  of CaR by putting in place an escalation process to manage disputes and always prioritizing direct negotiation than legal actions.

Key words: Video Games, Contract violation, Terms of Use, Cheating, Copyright Infringement

INTRODUCTION

“No treaty is ever an impediment to a cheat” as Sophocles said. In modern societies, people are required to sign a large number of contracts during their lifetime. They manifest themselves in a multitude of different occasions (subscribe to a phone service, rent a house, insure material and immaterial goods, use a computer software, etc.). In this research paper, we are going to focus particularly in the contracts that bind players to video game publishers.

Paraphrasing Sophocles, we can affirm that a contract is never a sufficient obstacle to prevent cheating. Indeed, it happens that gamers engage in cheating when they play video games. Cheating is characterized by the voluntary attitude of derogating from one or more rules to enjoy any benefits. However, gamers are increasingly required to accept a Terms of Use agreement (TOU) before playing their game. A TOU is a contractual document that aims to regulate the interactions between the provider of a service and its users. This type of contract is common on websites, but also on contemporary video games. Can cheating on video games be considered as a contract violation of TOU from the gamer against the publisher? To answer this question, we are going to consider the term “contract violation”. Cheating practices will also be analyzed, to determine if some of them can be likened to contract violations on the player’s side. In case of proven contract violation, we will see what can be the consequences on the “cheater”. Specific examples will serve as illustrations to support the different points of the analysis. This paper has been designed to answer the following research questions:

–        1) What are the main obligations of the gamer regarding a Terms of Use agreement?

–        2) Can cheating in video games lead to contract violation?

–        3) What can happen to gamers if they commit a contract violation by cheating?

More…

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Augustin de Rosny

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 


Augustin de Rosny
is a French 23 years-old Project Management Student, who is from Skema Business School. He studied one year in the United States two years ago, and made a gap year as a Project Manager in a French start-up last academic year. As a student, he chooses the “Project and Program Management & Business Development” master of science to specialize himself in Project Management. He is interested in the video-game industry since he played Age of Empire and Halo when he was young. He is involved since 20124 in Halo.fr, a French structure which provide news, a forum and much more for all Halo French fans, as an administrator. His missions are to manage the moderators, the forum community and projects to improve the forum.

Augustin can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Measuring Contract Performance Using Earned Value Management


STUDENT PAPER

By Sichun Yang

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Contract management plays a vital role in a successful project. Majority projects closed out of scheduled date, budget, or efforts, which results in a huge loss of the organization. In this case, contract management is extensively studied by authority institutions. However, measuring the contract performance is often overlooked, since when they carrying a project, they also push the team member to work harder to meet the requirement, and when a project close successfully, the organizations will allocate another project as soon as possible. They often ignore ‘lessons learned’, in which measuring contract performance could be helpful to increase the working efficiency and effect. Even if a project failed, to measure the contract performance would support them to achieve the goal, because disputes in the contract are the roots of project failure. Regarding this, the author will highlight this problem, and give a thorough analysis of this problem and provide a practical tool to measure the contract performance. After that, the organization will be able to define an accurate scope, and monitor the contract performance in response to the contingency.

Key words: Control, Measure, Performance, Scope, Cost, Schedule, Resources, Activities

INTRODUCTION

Earned Value Performance Management (EVPM) is a method to measure the cost and schedule performance through an entire project lifecycle. It gives the project team opportunities to be visible to the cost and schedule issues, which is to be specific, to predict the delivery time and the actual cost comparing to the schedule and the contract, in order to reduce uncertainty, and support contract-making process, etc. From the Agile perspective, ‘time and cost are fixed’, because if the deliverable date and the actual cost beyond the planned cost, it would result in a consequential risk to the success of the project or even damage the whole organization, such as bankruptcy. Since EVPM has been firstly introduced by U.S Air Force in 1966, this approach is widely used by the project-oriented companies, as time and cost are vital variables to a successful project, specifically in contract management and cost management.

Contract management is one of the pillars to ensure the success of the project, as most organizations know; however, the measurement of contract performance in contract management is often overlooked. So as to the research on contract performance. Although there are many research results about contract strategy, management, etc., there are rare papers about measuring contract performance. There is a statistic indicating that 70% of the projects are over budget and behind schedule, and 52% of all projects finish at 189% of their initial budget. Regarding this, the author catches this opportunity by developing an innovative way to achieve measuring contract performance, by applying Earned Value Performance Management.

The use of EVPM in contract measurement can indeed benefit the contractor and the whole organization, such as making more accurate budgets and schedules at different stages in the contract. In this case, the author will highlight this problem, and give solution by applying the EVPM approach for measuring contract performance to improve the contract management in a project.

To conclude, the objective of this report is to identify six aspects regarding EVPM in the contract measurement, which is what, why, who, when, where, and how to improve the performance of contract management and then measure the three main types of contracts which are generally used by organizations. The author will analysis these aspects orderly, review the benefits as well as the challenges, and assess the outcomes the article will bring to the public.

More…

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Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Sichun Yang

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Sichun YANG
is a MSC student in SKEMA business school, majoring in Program Project Management and Business Development. He is certified as Prince2 practicer, and AGILE practice. In 2014, he created his own company ‘XiaoNeisong technology’. In 2015, he had an internship in RICOH as Project manager assistance. In 2017, he worked in a consulting company Millward Brown, KANTAR, chaxarging in IHG, La Vache qui rit, etc. He was highly recommended by the project manager, as a coordinator, executor, and planner.

He lives in Paris now, and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

New opportunity of Arbitration

  for multinational companies in China

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Siying Yao

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

As there is more and more international business in China, a dispute is inevitable to happen because of unfamiliar with local law and culture. It is important to choose an appropriate dispute resolution. With the absence of right resolution, there would lead to big cost, wasting time and even, breaking the business relationship. So far, many companies solve the dispute through arbitration. Nevertheless, it is inefficient to a certain extent. This paper answers why inefficient arbitration is in China. With the application of the MADM method, it suggests an alternative solution of mediation-arbitration hybrids which ultimate the efficiency of arbitration, ensuring the fairness and maintaining the business relationship. This recommendation considers the benefit of both parties.

Key words: ADR, dispute in China, multinational business dispute, arbitration, hybrids resolution, opportunity>

  1. INTRODUCTION

Over the past few years, China has been one of the fastest developing countries. It has a great impact on the economics of all countries around the world. Plus, with the announcement of “The Belt and Road initiative” recently, there will be more and more business opportunity in China. However, when a foreign company does business in China, it is inevitable to meet dispute problems because of the unfamiliar of country laws and cultural awareness. According to the Arcadis global construction disputes report, we knew that dispute issues were increasing globally on both the cost of time and money. If a dispute takes a long time and is costly to solve, it is not efficient for business development neither benefit.

There is four main type of Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) in China: negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and litigation. If taking consideration of time, cost, fairness, relationship and privacy, each ADR presents different advantages according to various cases. However, as international companies need more concern about power balance, relationship and privacy aspects. In these points, arbitration shows its advantage. It has formal procedures that can keep the privacy of parties but less time and cost than litigation. It successfully maintains the business relationship with the participation of third parties. Mediation seems appropriate as well, but its informal procedures may lead a power imbalance between parties. Therefore, most of the international companies prefer to use arbitration.

Although arbitration is a quite good choice and is widely used, it still takes a longer time to solve disputes than mediation and negotiation. Even, in some cases, it may be too complicated to do reasonably. From a business benefit perspective of both parties, it is important to know which is a better way to solve dispute issue and which mechanism is more efficient and benefits for both parties.

To summarize, this paper has been undertaken to answer the following question,

1)     The reasons for why arbitration is inefficient;

2)     The new opportunities for arbitration to improve efficiency

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director, at [email protected]



About the Author


Siying Yao

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Siying YAO
is a MSc student of SKEMA business school in Paris. She studies Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD) as major. She has bachelor degree from INSEEC business school, Paris, major in marketing. She has been in France for 4 years and she speaks Chinese, English and French. During the MSc study, she obtained PRINCE2 foundation certificate in project management and Agile PM foundation certificate. She had internship experience both in China and France. She is a proactive and social person. Please feel free to contact her via email: [email protected]

 

 

Leading the Unleadable


BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas and Other Difficult People        
Author:  Alan Willett
Publisher: American Management Association
List Price:   $17.95
Format: Soft Back; 225 pages
Publication Date:  2017     
ISBN: 9780814437606
Reviewer: Dyane Johnson Holt, PMP
Review Date:   February 2018

 



Introduction

Leading and managing people is my area of expertise as a senior level Human Capital Management leader. I was intrigued by “Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas, and Other Difficult People” as a seeker of solutions to best leverage research and industry insights to design and execute business driven HR programs. Alan Willett’s book is an outstanding demonstration of how to improve behaviors in the workplace without losing sight of the mission or the people who support the mission. Alan’s brilliant transforming processes will help drive you to great management of problem people. The book is broken down into 4 parts that hold a wealth of simple, yet deep dives into management excellence: The Call to Exceptional Leadership; The Leader in Action: Spotting Trouble, Dealing with Trouble; The Leader in Action: Preventing Trouble; and Leading Leaders.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Leading the Unleadable is a well written and structured how to guide. As a consultant, Alan wrote the book from his experiences having participated on either side of the maverick, cynic, slacker or diva role. Many examples are included in the book that captivate the readers interest. He gently walks you through real life situations and engaging conversations. Each chapter of the book is packed full of workable methods, steps and or keys leading to actionable outcomes and culminates with “Reflection Points”.

Alan is experienced in leadership development and organizational-culture change. He holds a wealth of knowledge allowing the reader to gain broad insight from his experiences to expand their leadership capabilities. For me as a leader, I hold Alan’s book in high regard as a ready resource of actionable intelligence as I not only lead and manage people but also share the wealth of knowledge gained from the reading.

Highlights

Whatever you lead it is all about people. Understanding that leadership is larger than a troublesome employee is critical to successful leading. Leading is about you as an exceptional leader having the right mindset and making a choice to lead.  It is about the mission of the organization and the effectiveness of the people who are under leadership. Leveraging research, industry insight and best practice is critical to driving successful results in business programs.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Dyane Johnson Holt

Washington, D.C. USA

 

 

Dyane Holt, SPHR, SHRM-SCP, PMP is a senior Human Capital Management leader with over 20+ years’ experience bringing value to organizations through strategic management of HR practices and programs. Her industry focus is government contracting, not-for-profits, and professional employer organizations. Dyane has served in the capacity of Vice President, Human Resources, Executive Strategic HR Business Partner, program manager and trusted advisor to executive leaders. Dyane is classified as an HR guru amongst her cohorts. With her understanding of business drivers, she has successfully worked with business leaders of a highly cyclical businesses.  Included in her contributions are proposal, program and contract management and the strategic management of Human Capital.

Born and raised in the USA, Dyane is a native Washingtonian. Dyane is passionate about giving back to her areas of expertise and she believes in the development of people and the advancement of business missions.

She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

9 Habits of Project Leaders (PMI)


BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   9 Habits of Project Leaders: Experience and Data-Driven Practical Advice in Project Execution
Author: Arun Singhal and Puja Bhatt
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price:   $12.95
Format:  Spiral-Bound 7×4.5 in Book
Publication Date:   2017
ISBN: LCCN2017005884
Reviewer:     Heron Gonzalez Jr., PMP
Review Date:   February 2018

 



Introduction

Project Management is a dynamic and challenging profession that demands the creation of unique results in fast paced and demanding environments. To be successful, a project manager needs to develop and then consistently apply a broad set of skills. To grow in the profession, project managers need to sharpen their skills with each new project. The “9 Habits of Project Leaders” by Singhal and Bhatt, is an excellent tool for a busy project manager to have in her tool box. It clearly, insightfully summarizes nine key success ingredients that practitioners need in order to successfully launch and grow their project management career.

Overview of Book’s Structure

“9 Habits of Project Leaders” is two books in one. It is first a project management leadership resource that is meant to be read from cover to cover to learn about key practices and thought patterns of successful project managers.

The book is also a handy reference book that is formatted be carried in a brief case or backpack, or kept in a convenient location in a workspace for periodic review and reference. The book’s spiral bound pages make the book easy to open and close and so encourage its use as a frequently used reference book.

The book’s layout is also intended to facilitate convenient use. After a helpful Preface, the book is laid out in Eleven chapters which cover each of the 9 Habits (Chapters 1-9), a discussion of the alignment of the habits with PMBOK Knowledge areas (Chapter 10) and a Summary and Conclusion (Chapter 11). The nine chapters covering the success habits should be viewed as an integrated model, but each chapter can stand alone based on its content’s insight for a particular reader. The chapter on alignment (Chapter 10) contains an excellent chart which helps to cross-reference the 9 Habits to the PMBOK Guide’s Knowledge Areas.

Finally, two helpful Appendices provide the reader with information about the author’s experience (Appendix A) and their Data Collection and Analysis Methodology (Appendix B).  Appendix B was a key element of the book for me. It drove to the heart of what it means to be a project manager. It shows that the book is based on real world, proven project experience, just like a successful project.

Highlights

Singhal and Bhatt admit that there is “nothing particularly revolutionary about the nine habits,” but as a reader and admirer of Steven Covey’s “7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” I thought the same about Covey’s extraordinarily insightful book before I read it and applied it to my life. Books of this kind present what appear to be simple ideas in a way that are incisive and eminently useful.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Heron Gonzalez, Jr., PMP

San Antonio, TX, USA

 




Heron Gonzalez, Jr
is currently a Business Process Outsourcing Sr. Migration Manager and a member of the Project Management Institute. His professional experience also includes Program/Project Management, Business Process Engineering, Information Security, Human Resources, Organizational Planning/Design, Change Management and Operations Integration.

Heron has a B.A. and an M.B.A., and has obtained the Project Management Professional (PMP), Certified Outsourcing Professional (COP), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) professional designations.

 

Editor’s note:  Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the Alamo PMI Chapter in San Antonio, Texas. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  PMI members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.   

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Agile Approaches on Large Projects


BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:     Agile Approaches on Large Projects in Large Organizations
Author:  Brian Hobbs and Yvan Petit
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price:   $24.95
Format:  soft cover, 133 pages
Publication Date:  2017
ISBN: 978-1-62825-175-3
Reviewer:     Vickie Carvajal, PMP
Review Date:   February 2018

 



Introduction

In this book, the authors’ focus was to evaluate how Agile approaches are used in large projects in large organizations.

The authors provide a summary of how Agile methodolgies and approaches have evolved and are used in software development projects. Their primary focus of the book is to determine the success of Agile when used outside of small noncritical in-house software development projects executed by colocated teams.  They also included information regarding how the Project Management role has evolved due to Agile.

The research documented in the book primarily focused on answering a couple of questions:

  • At the project Level – What challenges are encountred when applying agile methods to large multiteam software projects  and what practices have been developed to alleviate these challenges?
  • At the organizational level – How does the context of large, complex organizations affect the adaptation and adoption of agile appproaches and vice versa?

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book was structured in 7 chapters:

Chapter 1 – Introduction
Chapter 2 – Literature Review
Chapter 3 – Methodology
Chapter 4 – Results
Chapter 5 – Discussion
Chapter 6 – Conclusion
Chapter 7 – Future Research

Within each chapter, the authors provide information supporting their focus for that chapter. There are 133 pages in the book.  Chapter 1 is 3 pages long, Chapter 2 is 14 pages long, Chapter 3 is 9 pages long, Chapter 4 is 47 pages long, Chapter 5 is 5 pages long, Chapter 6 is 1 page long and Chapter 7 is 2 pages long. Also included were the following sections at the end of the book. Acknowledgments (1 page long), References (9 pages long), Appendix – Research Survey (33 pages long), About the Authors (1 page long).

Highlights

Chapter 1: Introduction

In Chapter 1, the authors provide a background on Agile methodolgies and it’s place  in today’s project management environment.  They provide information found in existing literature and areas where there has been minimal focus, therefore putting into perspective the focus of the research documented in the book.  They provide an introduction to the research included in the book and highlight that the focus is on the projects and the organizational context in which the projects are executed.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Vickie Carvajal, PMP

North Texas, USA

 


Vickie Carvajal
, PMP has more than 20 years of experience working in application services and consulting. She has provided project management for a variety of clients in various industries and countries. Vickie has a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Angelo State University and a Master’s degree in Business Administration from Southwest Texas State University.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

Mastering Organizational Change Management


BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Mastering Organizational Change Management
Author:  Barbara A. Davis
Publisher:  J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $59.95
Format:  Hardcover, 6×9, 264 pages
Publication Date:   May 2017
ISBN: 978-1-60427-141-6
Reviewer: Michael Morris
Review Date:   February 2018

 



Introduction

Few things in life challenge us more than change. While each of us feel as if we would readily embrace a change for the better, the more cynical nature tends to view change as a threat to our stable lives. Heraclitus is often quoted as stating that “…the only thing that is constant is change…”, and in the corporate world of today nothing could be more accurate.

This book approaches change management in a very human, and personal manner. The author consistently weaves the thought processes behind our natural tendency to resist change into a fabric of methodologies designed to assist those of us challenged with planning, championing, and assisting in the implementation of change within organizations. Regardless of the scope of the change, or the organization in which that change is undertaken, she reminds us that change must always be approached both from a top-down approach as mandated by senior management initiatives, as well as from a grassroots approach, to ensure that the changes are not merely tolerated, but embraced.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The general structure of the book leads the reader into the subject in a way that is both informative, and logical even if the reader is unaware of the finer points of change management. As the author states repeatedly throughout the book, all lasting change must start and end with the individual. As such, the first portion of the book addresses the various barriers to change that a change agent is likely to encounter. Underscoring the need for successful change to have a grassroots level of participation, she leads us through the various barriers to change, both internal and external.

The text then covers the various reasons that organizations undertake changes, and the importance of understanding the language of change. Key to this language is the importance of both listening to understand, and speaking to be understood. The author then breaks down the process of change itself, which has both internal and external components. The internal components address how individuals change themselves, how they prepare for change, and how they seek to incorporate change into their altered role within the organization. On the other hand, the external components speak to the various ways in which the organization changes people, how to engage individuals in the change, ways to build confidence while transferring the requisite knowledge surrounding and supporting the change, and the need for positive reinforcement and governance.

Foundational to every change effort is the need to gain a deep understanding of both the business itself, including the ecosystem in which it operates, the business model utilized, key relationships both inward and outward facing, and the organizations’ culture. Of equal importance is understanding the people, processes, technology, and goals involved in the change effort, as well as who will be impacted by the change. Upon the completion of a needs assessment, as well as an impact assessment, of the affected individuals, the effort can be planned appropriately.

The book then covers four Organizational Change Management approaches, and delves into the particulars of each one. These include ADKAR (Awareness, Desire, Knowledge, Ability, and Reinforcement), the eight step Kotter method, IIEMO (Inform, Involve, Evolve, Maintain, and Observe), and AIDA (Attention, Interest, Desire, and Action). In order to make the selected approach effective, various techniques are discussed which enable, support, and reinforce the efforts surrounding the selected change approach.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Michael Morris

North Texas, USA

 




Michael Morris
has over 15 years of experience in all facets of Project Management, covering software, firmware, and hardware products for the high-end consumer market. His extensive experience with both waterfall and agile methodologies of various flavors, allows him to mold his approach to various challenges to fit the needs of the project, and the composition of the teams bringing the effort to a successful conclusion. He currently holds PMP, PMI-ACP, and CSM certifications, and lives in central Texas with his wife Bertie, and son Aiden. He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

9 Habits of Project Leaders


BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  9 Habits of Project Leaders: Experience and Data-Driven Practical Advice in Project Execution      
Author:  Arun Singhal and Puja Bhatt
Publisher:  Project Management Institute Inc.
List Price: $12.95
Format:  Soft Cover, spiral bound, 65 pages
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978-1-62825-179-1
Reviewer: Edward Raibick, PMP
Review Date: February / 2018

 



Introduction

The book titled 9 Habits of Project LeadersExperience and Data-Driven Practical Advice in Project Execution is a pocket guide published through PMI by Arun Singhal and Puja Bhatt. The book discusses transforming 9 key behaviors into habits for successful project management results. These habits were determined by interviewing over 50 senior project managers, directors, and core team members who were responsible for executing technically complex projects around the world.

Overview of Book’s Structure

  • Chapter 1 discusses project ownership
  • Chapter 2 reviews enabling core team members to make decisions
  • Chapter 3 discusses effective project meetings
  • Chapter 4 covers project planning.
  • Chapter 5 discusses executing to the plan
  • Chapter 6 covers communication and documentation
  • Chapter 7 reviews status reporting on your project
  • Chapter 8 discusses project milestone celebration.
  • Chapter 9 introduces setting up a project recognition system
  • Chapter 10 aligns to PMBOK guide’s knowledge areas
  • Chapter 11 Summary and conclusion

Highlights

9 Habits of Project Leaders is a handy guide for any project manager providing the core habits needed to effectively lead and deliver on projects. This book is not meant to be an exhaustive book of analysis, management styles and theories. Instead it serves as a useful pocket reference tool providing advise to keep you focused throughout the lifecycle of your project.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Edward Raibick, PMP

North Texas, USA

 


Edward Raibick, PMP
is a Security Project Management consultant with extensive experience software engineering, managerial and IT Project Management experience. Edward holds a Master’s degree in Information Technology with a concentration in Internet and IT security, a Bachelor’s degree in Information Technology and an Associate in Specialized Technology degree in Electronics. His career includes over 10 years with the IBM Corporation and over 15 years with Texas Instruments. Edward is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter, having acquired his PMP certification in 2011.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

The Essentials of Managing Programmes

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The Essentials of Managing Programmes        
Author:  John Bartlett, BA Hon. FRGS, Hon. FAPM, CPM, ALCM, LLCM
Publisher:  Routledge
List Price:   $ 50.95
Format:  Paperback, 102 pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN: 978-1-138-28829-4
Reviewer: Marta Santos, PhD
Review Date: February 2018

 


Introduction

The Essentials of Managing Programmes revolves around the decisions, benefits, and distinctions between  program and project management. John Bartlett, the author of this and several other books/articles covering change, risk, and quality devotes this volume to further clarify the approaches and techniques to successful implementation of programs.

Overview of Book’s Structure

A good portion of this book is dedicated to helping the reader distinguish the uses and purposes of projects and programs, as well as its benefits and exceptions. Several tables and illustrations allow for easy visualization of concepts and process flow. The examples are attention grabbers, as they include the very well-known Year 2000 problem besides other high profile UK programs.

Highlights

In the author’s opinion, these are some of the key characteristics of a programme:

  • Allows for breakdown of a business strategy into smaller components
  • Tolerates variation in the business strategy interpretation
  • Longer duration than projects
  • Strategic nature – Supports the strategic objective of an organization
  • Focus – A business strategy
  • Designed for scope change
  • Ideal for monitoring benefits achievement
  • Should be designed for change
  • Complex and multidisciplinary
  • Ideal for innovative undertakings
  • Change can be implemented as strategic programs
  • More adaptable to an organization’s culture

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Marta Santos, PhD,
CAPM, LSSGB

Texas, USA

 


Marta Santos
currently serves on a global Cybersecurity Transformation Program as a Project Coordinator – IT Security. She previously served on a global IT Infrastructure Refresh Project after transitioning from a productive career in the Life Sciences as a Research Scientist and author on major scientific journals. She is looking forward to growing in and contributing to the Project Management profession. This is her third book review for the PM World Journal.

A naturalized American from Brazil, Marta currently lives in the Dallas area.

Email address: www.linkedin.com/in/martabsantos 

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for March 2018

Updates on Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail project

 

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 



INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 individual and 200 organizational members.

Project Management Association Finland turned 40 years at end of January, and organized a gala dinner to celebrate the occasion. The gala dinner program comprised musical performances, presentations, celebratory speeches, and a four-course culinary dinner by Chef Hans Välimäki, one of the best-known Finnish contemporary chefs. During the event the Honorary Fellows of Project Management Association Finland got together for a group photograph.

In the photograph: The Honorary Fellows of Project Management Association Finland (from left to right): Mr Matti Ahvenharju, Mr Jyry Louhisto, Professor Dr Kalle Kähkönen, Mr Pekka Mäkelä, Mr Juhani Silvasti, Mr Veikko Välilä, Mr Esa Koskelainen, and Mr Risto Pelin. Mr Tom Taylor, the first International Honorary Member of PMAF, is missing from the photograph (photo courtesy PMAF)

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project Days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. Last year the Project Days conference took place on 31.10. – 1.11.2017 in the Helsinki Expo and Convention Centre. Please navigate to www.3pmo.fi , www.projektipaivat.fi and www.pry.fi/en for further information on PMAF and its main events.

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland has a tradition of organizing an annual conference in the spring. This year the conference will take place on May 17th, in Otaniemi, Espoo, with an overarching theme “Grow!”. Please navigate to www.pmifinland.org and www.conference.pmifinland.org for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its main events.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 


Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

March 2018 Report from Italy

The People of Project Management in Italy; The Istituto Italiano di Project Management (ISIPM)

 

By Massimo Pirozzi

International Correspondent

Rome, Italy

 



INTRODUCTION

This first Regional Report includes an overview about the people of Project Management in Italy, which has been derived from the analysis of the relevant certifications, and, in its second part, a description of the major Italian Association of Project Management, the “Istituto Italiano di Project Management” (Italian Institute of Project Management, ISIPM for short) by its President, Enrico Mastrofini.

THE PEOPLE OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN ITALY: AN OVERVIEW

The major Project Management Associations that operate in Italy are the Italian independent Istituto Italiano di Project Management (Italian Institute of Project Management, ISIPM for short), the International Project Management Institute, which is structured in three Chapters (PMI Northern Italy Chapter, PMI Central Italy Chapter, PMI Southern Italy Chapter), and the International Project Management Association (IPMA), through its Member Association IPMA Italy. Each of these three organizations offers its own certification path in Project management, both at Basic and Advanced Levels: it can be interesting to notice that, in all Europe, in terms of Advanced Certifications, ISIPM, together with the largest National Association, the British APM – Association for Project Management, are the only National Project Management Associations that provide a “National Certification Path”, just as much as, in terms of National Basic Certifications, only the German GPM – Deutsche Gesellschaft für Projektmanagement, and the Austrian PMA – Projekt Management Austria, are in addition to the above two Associations.

The total number of Project Management certifications, including both basic and advanced, that have been issued in Italy by the three above-mentioned organizations until 31 December 2017, is more than 18000¹: about 48% of these certifications have been released by ISIPM, 42% by PMI, and 10% by IPMA, respectively. From the historical point of view, we can assume that Project Management, in Italy, started twenty years ago: in fact, first PMI certifications were in 1998, while IPMA and ISIPM certifications started in 2001 and 2008, respectively. In Italy, we are witnessing a steadily increasing positive trend in the dissemination of Project Management discipline, which follows a somewhat slow start: in fact, almost 2/3 of total PM certifications have been issued in the last five years, and about 17% in 2017 only; in this last year, ISIPM released about 63% of certificates, PMI 31%, and IPMA 5%, respectively. Basic Certifications (ISIPM-Base, IPMA D, and CAPM) represent about the 55% of the total, while Advanced Certifications (PMP, IPMA A-B-C, ISIPM-Av) represent about the 45%, but the two contexts are actually very different.

The framework of Basic Certifications, which, in Italy, are more than 10000, is dominated by the ISIPM–Base Certification, which represents about 85% of the total, versus about the 10% of IPMA D, and the 5% of PMI’s CAPM: last year percentages were about 90%, 4%, and 6%, respectively. One of the main reasons of the success of ISIPM–Base Certification is that it is very well acknowledged, and it is considered beneficial, also outside the project manager community, in particular by students, and by professionals of different sectors (e.g. small entrepreneurs, consultants, business development and marketing specialists, accountants, doctors, dentists, lawyers, criminologists, principals, officials in cultural heritage, etc.) who do not necessarily want to proceed towards an advanced certification, but who do consider both project management a useful support to their work, and ISIPM-Base Certification a good reference for themselves.

On the other hand, the framework of Advanced Certifications, which, in Italy, are more than 8000, is dominated by the PMI’s PMP Certification, which represents about 86% of the total, versus about the 11% of IPMA A-B-C, and the 3% of the recent ISIPM-Av (Av stands for “Avanzata”, which means “advanced” in Italian): last year percentages were about 79%, 8%, and 13%, respectively. It is then remarkable that national ISIPM–Av Certification, although it was born less than three years ago, already gained a very good position, and it has a still increasing trend.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Italiano)

 



About the Author


Massimo Pirozzi

Rome, Italy




Massimo Pirozzi, 
MSc cum laude, Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Principal Consultant, Project Manager, and Educator. He is a Member and the Secretary of the Executive Board, a Member of the Scientific Committee, and an accredited Master Teacher, of the Istituto Italiano di Project Management (Italian Institute of Project Management). He is certified as a Professional Project Manager, as an Information Security Management Systems Lead Auditor, and as an International Mediator. He is a Researcher, a Lecturer, and an Author about Stakeholder Identification and Management, Relationship Management, Complex Projects Management, and Project Management X.0.

Massimo has a wide experience in managing large and complex projects in national and international contexts, and in managing relations with public and private organizations, including multinational companies, small and medium-sized enterprises, research institutes, and non-profit organizations. He worked successfully in several sectors, including Defense, Security, Health, Education, Cultural Heritage, Transport, Gaming, and Services to Citizens. He was also, for many years, a Top Manager in ICT Industry, and an Adjunct Professor in Organizational Psychology. He is registered as an Expert of the European Commission, and as an Expert of the Italian Public Administrations.

Massimo Pirozzi serves as an international Correspondent in Italy for the PM World Journal. He can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by Massimo Pirozzi, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/massimo-pirozzi/