SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Can Project Management Dispute Resolution Methods

be Used to Resolve Disputes in the Esports Live Streaming Industry?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Guohao Su

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

The esports industry is thriving in the last couple of years. Esports live streaming is also becoming well known and popular, especially among young people. However, cheating by live streamers is a tough and unavoidable problem that leads to contract disputes between the live streamer and the live streaming platform. This paper aims to find the most efficient alternative to resolve these disputes. To do so, we list six different alternative methods in the project management dispute resolution level. Combing with certain criteria, we select prevention as the best alternative after deeply analysing these six ways. We also provide with tools for live streaming platforms to monitor the result of the alternative in the end.

Keywords: Video games, Contract disputes, Cheating, Esports, Sports, Live streaming, Live streamers, Competition.

INTRODUCTION

The path for professional esports gamers was not flat. My dad’s colleague’s son decided to chase his esports dream 12 years ago and was supported by no one. Different from sports like football or basketball, video game players were not accepted at that time. Fortunately, from dim small rooms to gorgeous stadiums, esports is widely accepted by people today and esports players are finally treated as real sports athletes. The esports have be counted as a demonstration sport in Jakarta Palembang 2018 Asian Games.

2017: League of Legends Worlds season 7 finals in Olympic Stadium of Beijing in China[1]
2018: League of Legends finals in Jakarta Palembang 2018 Asian Games.[2]

Thanks to the development of video games industry, esports live streaming platform like Twitch becomes extremely popular among young people. The live streaming attracts a huge number of viewers and wields a lot of influence.

Table: Top 10 Most Watched Twitch Streamers of the Week, June 04 – June 10, 2018[3]

Ninja 5.6M
Shroud 2.2M
Tsm_myth 1.7M
dakotaz 1.2M
timthetatman 1.1M
Summit1g 1.1M
lirik 1.0M
imaqtpie 987.8K
B0aty 950.4K
sodapoppin 772.1K

This chart shows the influence of live streaming and the importance of the subject of this paper. The cheating behavior by esports streamers can cause adverse impacts. Cheating will absolutely ruin not only the steamer’s reputation but also the image of the live streaming platform. The live streaming platform might be no longer interested in signing contracts with the streamer or penalizing the streamer due to the decreasing of viewers. At this moment, the contract disputes could happen between the live streaming platform and the streamer.

In this paper, we will mainly focus on analyzing the contract violations of cheating by esports streamers and finding resolutions to manage the contract disputes and reduce bad public influence.

Feasible alternatives and analyzing methods are the tools needed for this research. The term of use or term of service is the contract signed between players and game companies. The partner contract is the agreement between live streamers and live streaming platform. A term of use/ partner contract is a contractual document that aims to regulate the interactions between the game/ live streaming service provider and its users.  These contracts are also needed for this paper.

‘The planning, scheduling, and controlling of project activities to achieve performance, cost, and time objectives, for a given scope of work, while using resources efficiently and effectively.’ [4] Project management is defined according to brochure by Management Concepts Inc. 1999. We consider that the development of a live streamer’s personal channel as a long-term project. The controlling of the cheating behavior is obviously included in the process of project management. We are going to have a look at how this definition works as selection of criteria in the next part of paper called ‘METHODOLOGY’ to help us analyze the outcomes of feasible alternatives.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].

How to cite this paper: Su, G. (2018). Can Project Management Dispute Resolution Methods be Used to Resolve Disputes in the Esports Live Streaming Industry? PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue XII (December).  Available online at https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/pmwj77-Dec2018-Su-dispute-resolution-in-esports-live-streaming-industry.pdf



About the Author


Guohao Su

Paris, France

 

 

Highly motivated to be a successful project manager in the future, Guohao Su is currently an MSC student in Project and Program management in SKEMA business school, Paris, France. He graduated from South Paris University and holds a Bachelor’s degree in international business. He has worked for BAOBATEX, a clothes creation and design company, as commercial management assistant in Paris, France. He likes working in multicultural environment and participating in projects. His dream is working in a big international company and challenging complex projects.

Guohao lives in Paris, France and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

[1] RACHEL KASER. (October 17, 2018). Yes, esports are big enough to fill an Olympic stadium — can we shut up about that now? from https://thenextweb.com/gaming/2017/11/03/esports-fill-olympic-stadium/

[2] 17173 News (August 30, 2018). 亚运会LOL决赛你可能没有注意到的细节:RNG队员的王子复仇记. from http://news.17173.com/content/08302018/115900865_all.shtml

[3] The Esports observer. (June 10, 2018). Top 10 Most Watched Twitch Streamers of the Week, June 04 – June 10, 2018 from https://esportsobserver.com/top-10-streamers-june-04-june-10-2018/

[4] Definition of Project management from brochure by Management Concepts Inc. 1999 Retrieved October 17, 2018, from http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/PMG_P16.htm

 

 

Breakthrough Project Portfolio Management 3

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Breakthrough Project Portfolio Management:  Achieving the Next Level of Capability and Optimization
Author:  Murali Kulathumani, MBA, CSM
Publisher:  J. Ross Publishing
List Price:  $59.95 MSRP
Format:  Hardcover,
Publication Date:   2018    
ISBN: 978-1-60427-149-2
Reviewer: Justin Tuley
Review Date: October 2018

 



Introduction

The book titled Breakthrough Project Portfolio Management: Achieving the Next Level of Capability and Optimization is focused on providing a roadmap for new and current project portfolio managers who are looking for more objective ways to measure project statuses as well as an opportunity to streamline planning and governance processes.  The book details this goal through practical examples, best practices, and a focus on continual improvement throughout each step in the portfolio management process.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is broken down into 4 parts.

Part I: Key Components of a Portfolio Process (Ch. 1 – Ch. 7)

Chapter 1 focuses on what a highly effective and mature portfolio of projects looks like.

Chapter 2 goes over setting up a process on how to vet and queue projects to be added to the portfolio

Chapter 3 takes the previous chapter and shows what best practices create an effective annual portfolio planning cycle.

Chapter 4 dives into how the portfolio should be funded within the annual cycle.

Chapter 5 goes over the drawbacks of current methods of project performance monitoring.  Focus is on the Red / Yellow / Green status and its limitations and briefly talks about modified Earned Value Management (mEVM)

Chapter 6 The author makes the case for portfolio managers to review their portfolios the same way you would with a financial portfolio. The author lists pitfalls on why managers don’t rebalance their project portfolios like they should.

Chapter 7 focuses on portfolio benefit realization.  This goes into detail regarding the hard and soft benefits associated with a well-run portfolio.

Part 2: mEVM

Chapter 8 is a brief introduction to mEVM and some of the history of how the method came to be.  Picks up where chapter 5 left off and anchors it for the rest of Part 2.

Chapter 9 goes over what the artifacts associated with mEVM should be.  Lots of examples using Excel.  Technical chapter.

Chapter 10 is a deep dive into aggregating mEVM data and includes lots of examples of Excel templates and layouts. Technical chapter.

Chapter 11 is about matching mEVM to strategic goals and ensuring that projects are aligned to those business strategies.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Justin Tuley

North Texas, USA

 

 

 

Justin Tuley has experience in program and project management.  Justin holds a Bachelor’s degree in Religious Studies and a MBA with a focus on project management.  His career includes 2 years in the IT industry and 5 years in the non-profit education sector with IDEA Public Schools.  Justin is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter and obtained his CAPM certification in 2017. Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

A Holistic Approach to Lessons Learned 3

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: A Holistic Approach to Lessons Learned: How Organizations Can Benefit from Their Own Knowledge      
Author:  Moria Levy
Publisher:  CRC Press – Taylor & Francis Group – Auerbach
List Price: $59.95
Format:  Hardcover, 145 pages
Publication Date: January 2018
ISBN: 978-1-138-56476-3
Reviewer: Manjeeta Sitaula, PMP
Review Date: October 2018

 



Introduction

This book provides invaluable information on incorporating & implementing lessons learned which is often overlooked in many organizations due to various reasons. The author, Moria Levy emphasizes that, for our lessons to yield better operations and improved performance, the knowledge must be transformed into action. Lessons learned must be accessible and embedded in the organization so that it is hard to repeat mistakes.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The content of the book is divided into five parts with various chapters within each part and subheadings within the chapters. The five parts flow seamlessly into the other.

  • Part I starts with the ‘need, importance and types of knowledge/information that can be used as lessons’;
  • Part II discusses the ‘what, who and how to debrief and the debriefing techniques’;
  • Part III elaborates on ‘how to manage the knowledge that has been created’;
  • Part IV focuses on requesting prior knowledge before implementing any new actions;
  • Part V discusses implementation of the life-cycle model of lessons and summarizes debriefing techniques.

Highlights

The first half of the book discusses sources of new knowledge namely debriefing, quality-based processes and experience. Debriefing is described as a natural process, however, in organizations there can be resistance to implement it due to fear of exposing failures/mistakes and possible blame game. The author reviews debriefing techniques such as Action After Review (AAR) and Multi Case Learning (MCL) and also notes that the organization can develop their own processes that yield constructive results by focusing on the future and lessons that can be learned. Quality based processes such as Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA), Gemba walks and quality audits help to develop the sources of knowledge and provide recommendations for improvements. Experience is another source of new knowledge which is gained through work or everyday life actions.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Manjeeta Sitaula

Texas, USA

 

 

Manjeeta Sitaula is a Civil Engineer by profession and has been certified as a PMP since 2013.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

 

PMI-PBA Exam Study Guide

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: PMI-PBA Exam Practice Test and Study Guide
Author: Brian Williamson
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price: $69.95
Format: 402 pages, hardcover
Publication Date: 2018
ISBN: 978-1-138-05447-9
Reviewer: Lawrence Reid, PMP, CSM 
Review Date: Oct 2018

 



Introduction

PMI-PBA Exam Practice Test and Study Guide by Brian Williamson is a book to prepare a candidate to successfully pass the PMI-PBA exam the first time. It cannot be used alone. This guide is aligned with other PMI publications including: Business Analysis for Practitioners: A Practice Guide, Requirements Management: A Practice Guide, and the PMI-PBA Examination Outline. This guide also references the Project Management Book of Knowledge.

Who Might Benefit from the Book?

PMI-PBA Exam Practice Test and Study Guide will benefit anyone preparing for the PMI-PBA exam.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The chapters of PMI-PBA Exam Practice Test and Study Guide are organized to walk the reader through the process of a 65-Day Study Plan.

  • Chapter 1 Introduction
  • Chapter 2 Needs Assessment
  • Chapter 3 Planning
  • Chapter 4 Analysis
  • Chapter 5 Traceability and Monitoring
  • Chapter 6 Evaluation
  • Chapter 7 About PMI and the PMI-PBA Credential
  • Chapter 8 Preparing for the Exam
  • Chapter 9 Ready, Set… Exam Success
  • 200-Question Practice Exam

Highlights

Chapters 2 through 6 start with study hints for that topic, chapter exercises, and conclude with 20 topic specific practice questions. An informative answer key details why each potential answer is correct or not. Chapters 2 through 4 also include memory games to help with retention.

Recommended Steps to Follow

I would start with chapter 7, About PMI and the PMI-PBA Credential. It explains the “Why” of the exam and the eligibility requirements. The preface also recommends reviewing the technique for predicting your overall exam score in Section 8.2.9.1 on page 190 before attempting your first domain quiz.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


About the Reviewer


Lawrence Reid, PMP, CSM

Bedford, Texas

 

 

 Mr. Reid is a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) specialist with extensive experience in business analysis, project management, implementation, customization, and integration for companies in the aerospace, financial services, manufacturing, and medical industries. Lawrence has a Bachelor’s degree in Finance and has obtained the Project Management Professional (PMP) and Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) certifications. He is a member of the Dallas and the Fort Worth chapters of the Project Management Institute (PMI).

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

December 2018 PM Update from Spain

Annual Congress of Project Management: Project management and new technologies

 

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent

Madrid, Spain

 


PMI Madrid Chapter – Madrid, November 15, 2018

On November 15 it had place the ANNUAL EVENT of the PMI Madrid Chapter, which also celebrated its 15th anniversary of existence.

Evis Rosales, as chapter president, was responsible for the opening of the event. In her message, she shared the evolution and genesis of the “PMI Madrid Spain Chapter”, giving recognition to all the people who have collaborated to the development of the chapter over the past fifteen years, in its different participations, and who have made of this chapter, one that has highest number of volunteers as well as workshops and initiatives worldwide.

This year, we analyze the impact that new technologies, such as Blockchain, IoT, Big Data, among others, as well as innovation and the agile methodologies in project management. It was a busy day, 8 lectures and a panel discussion held to close the event with great conclusions.

We count with the participation of the Group of volunteers of “Toastmasters”, with Mario Villarejo as master of ceremonies, as well as Agustín Millán and Joaquín Azcárraga, and other volunteers who volunteered to participate in the event, nymph Muñoz, Zigor Lizuaín and Pedro Balsa, as presenters of the speakers. These presentations were made from a point of view more personal and not so formal, which helped to have lively introductions and generate a good dynamic in Congress.

Rafael Gerardo Weisz was the first of the speakers that the presentation “A change of perspective to understand the why of new technologies” and through various, video demonstrations, helped us to highlight new challenges and opportunities that are organizations face, and how these new technologies will help solve them.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 

How to cite this report:  Bucero, A. (2018). Title, PM World Journal, Vol. VII, Issue XII (December). Available online at: https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/pmwj77-Dec2018-Bucero-Regional-Report-Spain-English.pdf



About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Madrid, Spain

 

 

 


Alfonso Bucero
, MSc, CPS, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and then nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Now he is a member of the PMIEF Engagement Committee. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 32 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010, the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011 and the PMI Eric Jenett Excellence Award on October 28th, 2017.

Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Welcome to the December 2017 PMWJ

The First Annual PMWJ Editor’s Choice Awards, and… Welcome to the December edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the December 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 65th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 33 original articles, papers and other works by 36 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, we are announcing the first annual PMWJ Editor’s Choice Awards, a selection of top papers and articles published in this journal during 2017. Over the last 12 months we have published 340 original works in the PMWJ, including 75 featured papers and 83 articles (series, advisories, commentaries). All of the works we publish are seriously written; some are by authors for whom English is a second language so occasionally contain grammatical mistakes.  All of our authors are well-educated and serious professionals.  Many of the works are outstanding and deserve to be read multiple times.  A few are absolutely fantastic, clarifying important topics, simplifying issues or breaking entirely new ground.

In the spirit of celebrating the end of another good year, I wanted to showcase some of the papers and articles that I really liked and want others to read again (or for the first time if you are new to this publication.)  The papers were selected from among ‘featured papers” only, even though we have published excellent student papers and second editions.  The PMWJ featured papers each month are original works.  The articles noted below were also original works, shorter in nature but enlightening and useful to program and project managers worldwide.  The authors of these papers and articles deserve recognition.  These are my choices, totally subjective. If you have time, please go read their works once more.

            2017 Editor Choice – Featured Papers

The following papers have been selected to receive the 2017 PM World Journal Editor’s Choice Award.  They are not ranked; they are however my favorite top seven.

Gender Issues in Project Planning and Management, by Ujeyo Margaret Stella (Busitema University), Kisige Abdu (Al-Mustaf Islamic College), Nabunya Kulthum (Makerere University), and Prof Peter Neema-Abooki (Makerere University), Kampala, Uganda (June 2017) – one of the most important papers we published this year, the authors take gender equality to an entirely new level.  Gender equality is not only a project management issue, but should be considered in project requirements and design as well as project outcomes, benefits and impacts.  If you are female, you will never forget reading this paper.

Deliberate and emergent strategies and origins of projects, by Alan Stretton, Sydney, Australia (November 2017) – Alan Stretton’s monthly contributions are all worth reading and rereading, many addressing topics of critical importance to both practicing project managers, executives and researchers.  His decades of experience drive his selection of topics; his vast knowledge and active research continue to spur new perspectives and understanding. This favorite is one of his most recent.  In this paper, Alan distills decades of theories and papers on strategic planning to a simple spectrum, a perspective that should help everyone more clearly understand where both strategies and projects come from and how programs and projects should link to strategy. This is a great paper.

Complexity in Large Engineering and Construction Programs, by Bob Prieto, Florida, USA (November 2017) – Also the latest paper that we have published by Bob Prieto, one of the world’s most experienced and respected experts on very large engineering and construction programs and projects. Yes, complexity seems to be a common theme and topic of discussion everywhere. In this paper, Bob removes our blinders regarding just how massive the complexity issue is on large programs.  His discussion of “perturbations” is enlightening.  If you think you know a lot about risk and complexity, I suggest you read this paper to learn even more.

Voluntary Usage of Earned Value Management on Projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, by Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo, Warri, Nigeria (August 2017) – As Lucky stated in his opening sentence of this landmark paper, “Given the compelling array of benefits that can be derived from the application of earned value management (EVM), it is of great concern that this methodology is not practiced as much as it should be in modern day project management practice in Sub-Saharan Africa.”  His message: “.. the potential lurking in the conscientious application of EVM in curbing corruption and curtailing Illicit Financial Flows (IFFs) and capital flight in sub-Saharan Africa cannot be overlooked..”  Since I started my career nearly 40 years ago in the EVM field, I love this paper.

Collaboratism: A Solution to Declining Globalisation and Rising Protectionism, by Prof Dr Pieter Steyn, South Africa and Dr Brane Semolic, Slovenia (March 2017) – The authors take on some global naysayers about globalization and technology, pointing to a different collaborative model for planning and managing international programs and projects.  I liked the discussion of big picture issues, global themes, future trends.  Collaboration is a proven approach to reducing risks; it has many other benefits as the authors point out.

Increasing Business Agility through Organizational Restructuring and Transformation, by Badri N. Srinivasan and Chandan Lal Patary, Bangalore, India (September 2017) – In this excellent paper, the authors attack one of the most current and important topics in modern organizational change – how to increase organizational agility.  They state “In today’s VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) world, every organization has to reorient itself on account of the changing business landscape… Organizations must explore opportunities to minimize waste, reduce handovers, improve transparency, reduce bureaucracy, and empower people.” Based on their experience at Societe Generale, the authors explain the issues and provide a model for achieving real organizational agility.

Framework for Creating a Building Information Modelling Environment in Architectural, Engineering and Construction Firms and Projects, by Oluseye Olugboyega, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (June 2017) – Many organizations now recognize the value of BIM, but how is it successfully implemented?  In this detailed and well organized paper, Oluseye describes the requirements and issues associated with creating a BIM framework including: BIM authoring software technologies, BIM hardware, BIM contents library, BIM standards and BIM platform. Well researched and with links to important resources, this is a good primer for any organization anywhere in the world that is planning to implement BIM technology.  If you are working on a project in the built environment, read this paper; BIM is now also an important resource for project planning, project controls and project management on all large construction projects.

2017 Editor’s Choice – Articles

The following seven articles have been selected for the 2017 PM World Journal Editor’s Choice Award.  They are not ranked; they are all among my favorites this year.

What did Taylor ever do for us? Scientific and humane management reconsidered, By Prof. Darren Dalcher, University of Hertfordshire, UK (April 2017) – Darren takes on Frederick Taylor, one of the founders of ‘scientific management’ and long considered responsible for some of the first scheduling techniques for both projects and operations.  One of my favorite passages in this article: “Many organisational psychologists despair of Taylor’s legacy. In his endeavour to maximise manual efficiency, Taylor abandoned the nuances and strengths of human nature and capability, displaying psychological illiteracy. Indeed, a key criticism of Taylor’s approach was that he treated people as machines.”  For some great history and historical perspective, this article is a classic.  Everyone in the project management profession should read it, especially those in leadership positions. (Frankly, all of Darren’s articles are worth rereading; he continues to contribute thought-provoking articles on a monthly basis).

Are Projects and Project Managers Fragile, Robust or Anti-Fragile? By Prof Tony Bendell, Nottingham, UK (June 2017) – Do we as individuals and organizations break under the weight of risks realized, project problems and complexity, or do we learn, grow and become more resilient? Based on his book ‘Building Anti-Fragile Organizations’ published by Gower in June 2014, Prof Bendell examines the shortcomings of conventional risk analysis, the impact of Black Swans, and the strategic, cultural, process and people requirements for the development of systems and organisations that get stronger from being stressed.  This was a great Advances in Project Management series article facilitated by Darren Dalcher.

Improve Your Diversity Intelligence: Identify your Blind Spots, by Paul Pelletier, Vancouver, BC, Canada (January 2017) – Paul may be better known for his great writing and speaking about bullying in the workplace, but his diversity article is a classic.  His Diversity Iceberg illustration is memorable; his message is clear.  We are all different, with different experiences, capabilities and characteristics.  The best leaders embrace diversity as a strength on teams.  This article helps us all find our blind spots in order to become better leaders.

On the Road to Project Society – A Swedish Story, by Torbjörn Wenell, Eskil Ekstedt and Rolf A. Lundin, Stockholm, Sweden (January 2017) – The first article in the series on Managing and Working in Project Society describes many of the topics in their award winning book of the same title.  They describe “the ‘projectification’ process in this country essentially building on his experiences starting in the 60’s with how international industrial companies in Sweden (like Volvo, Saab and Ericsson) developed and increasingly became supported by advanced projects to the present time when we have seen a diffusion of projects and project thinking to all parts of society today.”  It’s a fascinating, entertaining and enlightening article.

Managing Programme Benefits, by Andrew Hudson, UK (February 2017) – Another Advances in Project Management article coordinated by Prof Darren Dalcher, this long article provides an excellent primer on benefits realization management (BRM). Quoting Andrew: “There is no other purpose in doing a programme than to deliver value and realize benefits. This is the true measure of a programme’s success…. This article explains how being more effective at managing programme benefits can accelerate performance improvement and better enable organizations to achieve their strategic objectives. It explains common benefits management practices and explores reasons for programme benefit success and failure.” If you want to learn more about BRM, read this article based on Andrew’s chapter in the Gower Handbook of Program Management.

Crisis in Your Customer Project? Try Benefit Engineering, by Oliver Lehmann, Munich, Germany (October 2017) – The 3rd article in Oliver’s PMWJ series on Project Business Management, this article looks at benefits management from a whole new perspective.  Per the introduction, “A traditional approach to resolve monetary problems in customer projects is ‘Cost engineering’. This article describes an alternative solution named ‘Benefit engineering’, which can be more effective and leaves a customer with increased happiness, while the contractor’s problems are resolved.”  This is another great article about benefits management, from a practical perspective; reading this article may not only help save your project but your relationship with your customer.

Managing Strategic Initiatives, by Terry Cooke-Davies, PhD, UK (July, 2017) – Another Advances in Project Management series article, this article captures some of the research and insights that Terry has been providing in the programme and project management field for several decades.  Focusing on four “strands of thinking”, he points us to smart processes focused on the delivery of value, engaged people, flexible navigation of inevitable complexity and capable and knowledgeable leadership.  Simple, not so much! But necessary to stop the cycle of project failures.  Read this article!

Thank you to all 2017 Authors

We published many very good works this year.  I want to thank all of our authors and encourage them, and you, to keep the articles and papers coming.  Send your original works to me at [email protected]  To see all works in previous editions of the PMWJ, go to https://pmworldlibrary.net/pmworld-journal-archives/

Now – This month in the Journal

This edition of the PMWJ is full of good works from around the world, agreat way to end the year.  We begin with five featured papers. Dr. Pavel Barsegyan has contribute the first of several papers on the topic of “Elements of the Mathematical Theory of Human Systems”.  His paper is over my head; for management scientists, the equations and logic should be new and fascinating.  Alan Stretton is back with an extension of his paper from last month on strategic planning, this one titled “An organizational strategic framework, and project and other contributions to achieving strategic objectives.”  Alan is expanding our understanding of how, when and why projects are created.  Martin Smit in South Africa has contributed a paper on a related topic titled “Development of a project portfolio management model for executing organisational strategies: a normative case study.”  The two remaining papers discuss earned value analysis and critical factors hindering success on projects in Nigeria and the Sahel region of Africa. Featured papers are serious works that contribute to the global PM body of knowledge, so please give them a look and a possible reading.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Dispute resolution methods comparison toward Aircraft contracts

STUDENT PAPER

By Laura Faivre

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

The aircraft industry is a very complex business because its products required a high expertise and heavy technologies. This complexity causes disputes between the parties which most of the time makes the contracts to fail. Thus, the aim of this paper is to identify and to compare the different dispute resolution methods thanks to the Additive Weighting Technique. This Multi-Attribute Decision Making method enables the author to find out which is the most suitable dispute method resolution. Indeed, at the end of the paper the author suggest the use of the Negotiation method to best resolve the disputes in Aircraft contracts. By applying that particular method Aircraft contractors will be able to resolve the disputes without damaging the relations between parties meanwhile saving time and money (compare to the other methods).

Key Words: Contract, dispute, resolution, process, aircraft industry

INTRODUCTION

In less than 5 years the Aircraft market is forecasted to increase till 209 billion of dollars. Even if the aircraft industry is very profitable it’s a complex business as well. This complexity weakens the Aircraft contracts and most of the contracts failures are due to disputes between the parties. In the major cases, these disputes arise because of a poor scope definition of the project. The causes of the disputes are several like: aircraft crash, payments, cultural issues, unprofessional procedures, insufficient durability, missing part of work, delayed delivery… However, there are an amount of process and tools to resolve those contracts disputes. Indeed there is: mediation, arbitration, adjudication, court action, meetings…

In this paper I’m going to review what are the different alternatives to disputes resolution according to those references: EJCDC, CSI Manual Practice,  Fidic, Consensus Docs and AIA. I will develop the outcomes of each alternative and compare them thanks to some criteria. Finally, I will be able to select which is the best alternative to resolve disputes in Aircraft contracts.

Disputes in Aircraft contracts can damage the relationship between different parties and can also threaten the meet of requirements as well as affect negatively the quality of the output and its time delivery. That’s why the recommendations that I will make at the end of my paper is a good opportunity for Aircraft contractors to avoid losing time and money using disputes resolution methods that don’t work for their industry.

In this paper I will answer these questions:

  1. What are the different methods that could be used to resolve disputes in Aircraft contracts
  2. What is the most suitable dispute process in this particular industry and why?

METHODOLOGY

In order to answer the problem of this paper I used several methods of the Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM) because most of the attribute are subjective so it’s a good way to quantify them. Therefore, I chose to use a Disjunctive Reasoning Technique (from the non-compensatory model). Moreover, I used a Relative Weighting Technique and an Additive Weighting Technique (from the compensatory model).

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].




About the Author


Laura Faivre

Paris, France

 

 

Laura Faivre is a SKEMA Business School’s student from the Msc Project & Programme & Business Development (PPMBD) program in Paris at La Défense. She graduated from a 2 years technical degree in Marketing in 2015 from the University of Amiens. In January 2018 she will do 6 months internship in transversal project management at the Headquarter of La Société Générale (a bank). She is currently living in France and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

The Sales Process from a Project Manager’s Perspective

STUDENT PAPER

By Jonas Fieux Bencze

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

This case study was done within the framework of the class “International Project Contract”, under Doctor Paul D Giammalvo’s oversight for the Master “Programme and Project Management and Business Development” of Skema Business School.

Its aim is to analyse the sales process, the lifecycle of the product (start, production and end) under the control of the sales management. The core base of such a study here was the role of the sales manager-ment during the entire process.

There are different approaches to a proper sales management, which is quite ironic as theory and practice are two distinct things here. On one hand, it’s quite hard to understand how far management influences the process, on the other hand it is quite interesting to see how far it has a direct impact on the risks that may be posed by such a process.

Key Words: Project Requirements / Production / Delivery / Responsibility / Logistic / Sales Management

INTRODUCTION

As keynote sales speaker Mark Hunter has explained, “It’s not about having the right opportunities. It’s about handling the opportunities right.” Even the least performant companies do have opportunities which they must handle right in order to move on. This example pretty much underlines how far the sales process is a complicated task and how far various actors of the company may deal with it.

The sales process may be (prior to the organization and structure of a company) the central part of a firm. It implies the purchase of goods and services so that it can be embedded to the company’s schemes. But this procedure can’t simply be seen as a mere acquisition, it also implies a purchase order which is the the formal and legal side of the transaction. In fact, beforehand there must be a precise definition of how the good or service is going to be fabricated, when it is going to be delivered and how it will be installed. This actually underlines the worries of the CSO of a company: they try to erase as many shadow points as possible in order to ensure the projects proper delivery.

Furthermore, this sales process is hiding who actually pulls the strings: the sales manager. For a correct sales process there needs to be a proper sales management. The main objective isn’t getting rid of guessing points but rather being able to set the priorities of the process so that counterparts and other actors can understand the thorny issues they have to be meticulous with. Also, through a proper sales management, company’s employees know what part they are clearly assigned to. Thanks to that and general meetings, the sales manager can have a frequent comeback of its co-workers, thus enhancing a good synergy and a good progress of the different procedures.

To put it simply, there are three sore points that need to be closely looked at by the manager:

  1. A proper definition of the thorny issues through a clear purchase order.
  2. A prioritization of the different tasks thanks to an efficient sales management.
  3. Good communication and feedback in order to enhance the company’s performance.

As a result, this initial study of the subject leads to the following problematic:

To which extant does the project manager have an impact on the sales management process? How far does he have the control on the project delivery?

Feasible alternatives

  1. Precisely define the needs and identify sore points
  2. Establish a solution meaning the right approach to the problems
  3. Set up an agenda and a program for the team that states clearly roles and duties
  4. Enhance teamwork, emphasizing frequent feedback to keep a clear overview

Development of the outcomes

1) Precisely define the needs and identify sore points

Even though in theory sales management follows clear rules, the practice is way vaguer on this point. In fact, many decisions depend on a concrete situation and can’t accept a pre-established protocol. Taking care of the sales management mustn’t be confused with having a rather supportive role (like coaching) in a team. Thus, defining the needs has to be seen as the process of properly defining the thorny issues that may undermine the whole project. Thus, by knowing precisely what issues the team may come across, the project won’t be endangered and they keep a clear overview on budget and prices. By using this method, managers keep in mind future problems and adapt to it on long term.

2) Establish a solution meaning the right approach to the problems

This methodology provides comfort and serenity to the team. Through a very simple analyse of the solution, the sales management follows a rather ‘classic’ process, meaning: representatives meet with the manager, quickly analyse the situation and directly offer potential solutions. In a rather unsophisticated comparison, this method can be seen as a “Realpolitik”. It is a move forward and adapt to the situation analysis: whether problems are known or not, they will be taken care of at a given time.

3) Set up an agenda and a program for the team that states clearly the roles and duties

This a very strict and rigorous method. No sore points are left without precise analysis: be it budget, time management or even team coaching. Everything has to be closely managed and known. By doing this, managers make sure to keep a complete control of things so that nothing will ever be a bother. Through those mechanism, the team moves on in a rather confident way as they believe they won’t have to face any sort of thorny issues.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Jonas Fieux Bencze

France and Germany




Jonas Fieux Bencze
, is a curious and eager to discover new horizons student. Currently doing his M2, he is about to finish his 3-year program in project management and business development. He possesses a French and German background and has experienced life in both countries. These origins are the roots for his will to discover new people.

He was lucky enough to experience and be part of the world of work. Those experiences and origins mainly explains his interest in Project Management. Yet he wants to go further and has already increased new opportunities. His desire to try to explain the complex world of management can also be explained by his German sense of organization and his French creativity that he likes to apply to the further knowledge he would like to acquire so that he can build great things in his future workplace.

 

 

How an Effective Contract and its Enforcement

Could Have Prevented the Challenger Disaster

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Nana Kwabena Osei

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Over the years, a lot of investigations and research have been conducted to better understand and highlight the causes of the Challenger Disaster in order to improve space programs as well as put in place measures to prevent such disasters. Extensive rational has been offered as the root cause of the disaster led by NASA as well as independent investigative committees such as the Rogers Commission and the Committee on Science and Technology House of Representatives of the 99th Congress of the United States. The main cause has been rooted in the failure of the primary O-ring on the right Solid Rocket Booster Motor which was as a result of a fundamental faulty design. Other causes have been linked to the poor risk management practices and flaws in the decision-making processes at NASA at the time. However, available reports on the incident have failed to investigate contractual failures during the program, between NASA and their prime-contractors, to address the importance of contracts and their effective management in the success of projects and programs.

This paper utilizes a multi-attribute decision making tool to compare effective contract signing and enforcement with different solutions as recommended by the Rogers Commission, and to determine which of the solutions eliminates the problem through the application of root cause analysis. Based on the results, the paper suggests an effective contract, its enforcement and compliance to all details could have been the key to the prevention of the Challenger Disaster and loss of its crew members.

Key Words: Challenger Disaster, Space Shuttle, NASA, Space Exploration, Project Contract Failure, Decision-making, Root Cause Analysis, Dispute Resolution.

INTRODUCTION

In the 1970’s, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was tasked with developing a manned reusable space vehicle for transporting crew and cargo to and from space called the space shuttle.  North American Rockwell was selected on July 26, 1972 to construct the shuttle whiles Morton Thiokol was awarded a $710 million contract to design and build the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) in 1974.

The SRBs are key elements in the operation of a space shuttle as it provides the shuttle with the required thrust to overcome the earth’s gravitational force to reach orbit.

Morton Thiokol’s design was an up-scaled version of the Titan Missile which had been successfully used in previous years with the only major difference being the addition of a secondary O-ring. The O-rings prevented the pressurized combustion gasses from the boosters from escaping by forming an airtight seal. The O-rings were assigned a “Criticality 1”, meaning their failure during launch will result in the destruction of the Orbiter, However, later tests will indicate a potential compromise in design as the O-rings which were designated malfunctioned especially at low temperatures.

Figure 1 Challenger Disaster (Source: www.history.com)

6 days of delay as a result of bad weather conditions and technical issues, the Challenger space shuttle was finally launched on 28th January, 1986, from Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Despite several attempts by engineers from Morton Thiokol to boycott the launch insisting that certain components especially the rubber O-rings that sealed the joints of the shuttle’s solid rocket boosters were vulnerable to failure at low temperatures, the shuttle was given go ahead for launch by NASA managers.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Nana Kwabena OSEI

Lille, France




Nana Kwabena Osei
is a Master of Science in Project Management and Business Development candidate at SKEMA Business School, France. He holds a BSc in Petroleum Engineering from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana, with 4 years’ experience in supply chain processes, engineering as well as health and safety practices working in the Oil and Gas industry with Schlumberger Seaco Inc. He has great passion for the project management domain and believes the concept of project performance optimization and its effective integration with engineering principles is the recipe for sustainable success and growth in today’s dynamic and uncertain business environment. He is a certified AgilePM®, PRINCE2® and Green Project Manager who has in the course of his studies been involved in various projects aimed at value creation and improvement of the lives of people in the developing world. Travel is his biggest educator and is fascinated by Space Travel & Exploration.

Contact him on: [email protected] or www.linkedin.com/in/nana-kwabena-osei-92b86654 .

 

 

AFTER 2017

International Project Management Institute (UPYE) in 2017; Turkish Professional Project Managers Institute (TPYME) (Project Management Update from Istanbul)

REPORT

By İpek Sahra Özgüler

International Correspondent

Istanbul, Turkey

 


INTERNATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (UPYE) in 2017

At the end of 2016, International Project Management Institute (UPYE) organized 6th Project Management Summit together with Bogazici University. Project management processes, ERP in construction, BIM implementation, the effects of Industry 4.0 revolution on construction industry and the contractual issues were discussed by professionals and academicians in the Summit.

UPYE elected its new Chairman and Board in 2017, and Dr. Levent Sumer became the new Chairman of UPYE. Dr.Levent Sumer attended to Real Estate in Emerging Markets: Turkey Case panel at Oxford University Said Business School together with Dr. Andrew Baum, the Chair of Oxford University Real Estate Program and Dr. Emre Camlibel, the Chairman of Re-Pie Real Estate Portfolio Management Company in March 2017. Dr. Levent Sumer was also one of the speakers at Bogazici University 2nd Construction Economy Summit organized by Bogazici University Center for Applied Research in Finance in October 2017. Dr. Sumer also made a presentation about the new investment and financing model he developed at Bogazici University in Global Participation Finance Summit in November 2017. UPYE is planning to extend its organizations in 2018, mostly focusing on universities and professional affiliates.

TURKISH PROFESSIONAL PROJECT MANAGERS’ INSTITUTE (TPYME)

TPYME (www.tpyme.com) was founded in 2010 as occupational solidarity platform. It is also a program running under NORM, Association for Training and Consultancy (www.norm.org.tr).

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


İpek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

 


İpek Sahra Özgüler
graduated from the Istanbul University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. As a project manager, she has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She  became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014.

She has managed a variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), insurance (Euler Hermes), audit (Deloitte), telecommunication, ICT and aviation sectors and gained broader insights. In addition, she has worked as international correspondent for the PM World Journal since 2014.

İpek is based in Isanbul and can be contacted at [email protected].  Her portfolio is published at the http://ipeksahra.strikingly.com/.

To see other works by İpek Sahra Özgüler, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

 

Succeeding with Senior Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Succeeding with Senior Management: Getting the Right Support at the Right Time for Your Project
Author:  G. Michael Campbell, PMP
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   $24.95
Format: Soft Cover, 224 Pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN: 9780814438527
Reviewer:     David Kressin, PMP
Review Date: 10/2017

 



Introduction

Communication within an enterprise is a given with any project.  As the project get larger and more complex the requirements to use all of the communication tools available to a manager are integral.  Yet, this is something that is expected of managers and never taught.  Campbell has taken a strong swing at organizing the framework of communication referenced in the PMBOK and making it understandable.  More, Campbell enhances this by providing a deep dive into the processes for properly utilizing Senior Management to ensure a project’s success.  Campbell has created a communication guide that I will reference many times in the future.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Each chapter in the book is methodically laid out in a standard introduction, body and summary format.  However, like a small quiz at the end of each class, Campbell adds a set of “bullet points”, or as I call them “thinking points”, at the end of each chapter to drive home the goals and core takeaways of that chapter. They also act as a great reference point when going back to the chapter later.

Although there are 22 chapters and each stands alone with a subject unto itself there is an underlying message that crosses them all.  Prepare executive before the project starts, keep them informed and engaged throughout the project and don’t be afraid to challenge them.  All to ensure a successful project in the end.

The book provides the communication tools and methods needed for managers to engage and utilize Senior Management to obtain needed decision, resolve or mitigate office and project conflicts, handle competition and cross functional issues and overcome office politics to get to a successful project completion.

Highlights

The book started slow, reiterating many of the same concepts present in the PMBOK and other similar books.  However, Campbell has done a good job of organizing these concepts, that I often times felt were too academic and pie in the sky, and applying them to actual real-world projects.

More…

To read entire book review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


David Kressin, PMP

North Texas, USA

 


David Kressin, PMP
is a senior program manager in the retail and wholesale logistics industry specializing in improving warehouse strategic and tactical operations, labor and systems efficiencies. He has worked for over 35 years managing resource efficiency improvements and logistics, transportation, warehouse management software implementations in the retail and wholesale warehousing environments.  His concentration is in the high volume grocery, food and drug industries.  He has successfully planned, implemented, and managed several strategic projects to improve warehouse and logistics efficiencies around the world.  For the past 20 years he has been working as an independent consultant. David Kressin can be contacted at [email protected]


Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Say Yes to Project Success

BOOK REVIEW

Title: Say Yes to Project Success: Winning the Project Management Game
Authors: Karthik Ramamurthy and Sripriya Narayanasamy
Publisher: Notion Press www.notionpress.com
Publication Date: 2017
List Price: US $14.40
Format: Paperback; 198 pages
ISBN-13: 978-1947949034
Reviewer: Raju Rao, PMP, SCPM
Review date: November 2017

 



Introduction to the Book

This book presents best practices and tools and techniques of project management in an easy-to-read story-telling format. It is supplemented by cartoons and expert insights from professionals all over the world. A problem-to-solution approach has been followed with an appendix mapping ‘failure factors’ to various chapters.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book consists of 52 chapters each of which is based on a tip, technique or principle valuable for project success. Each chapter is followed by a list of bullet points as ‘keys to success’ and expert insights.

Some examples of chapter headings are

Me, CEO?
Vendor or Friendor?
A Risky Proposition
Trusty Bases
Fun and Games at Work
Minor Changes, Major Disaster

More than 100 professionals have provided their expert insights in this book who have worked on projects in 119 countries.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

Expert insights on each topic are a welcome feature in this book .This is particularly so because they have given their views from practical experience which is valuable for professionals who want to apply them.

Highlights: What I liked!

  • Story telling mode has been followed and content is easy to read. It is brief and concise and well supported by cartoons to convey the message.
  • Mapping of ‘failure factors’ to Chapters is a good way to use the book whenever there is a challenge.
  • Expert Insights are one of the best features in this book and could be very useful to readers to apply them in practice.

In my opinion, 3 chapters in this book are significant and

More…

To read entire book review, click here

 



About the Author


Raju Rao, PMP

Chennai, India

 


Raju Rao
, PMP, SCPM, OPM3 Cert Professional is Founder and Principal consultant – Xtraplus Solutions, a PM consulting and training company based in Chennai, India. Mr Rao has a B.Tech degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Madras, India; an Advanced PM certificate from Stanford University; and a certificate from IIM Calcutta. He has about 40 years’ experience in engineering, process and project management and has been an active member of PMI for several years. He held leadership positions in both the 1st and 2nd edition projects of OPM3 and has been involved in development of several PMI standards and awards.

Mr Rao has been a visiting and adjunct faculty for engineering and business schools in India. He has presented numerous papers in global congresses and is the coauthor of two books – Project Management Circa 2025 published by PMI and Organizational Project Management published by Management Concepts, USA. Raju has been a President of South India section of AACE International and is the founder of the Indian Project Management Forum.

Raju Rao lives in Chennai, India and can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Raju Rao, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/raju-rao/

 

 

Driving Digital

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Driving Digital: The Leader’s Guide to Business Transformation Through Technology
Author:  Isaac Sacolick
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   $29.95
Format:  Hardcover
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN:  9780814438602
Reviewer:   Kim Hylton-Reed, PMP
Review Date:   November 2017

 



Introduction

For forward-thinking leaders who want to drive a digital business transformation, every day represents another opportunity to do something that adds value for customers and makes their company smarter and faster.  In Driving Digital, the author carefully lays out the building blocks necessary for successful transformation and presents an approach, which emphasizes:  transformation is done is a series of baby steps; companies need an updated set of (agile) practices to compete; businesses need to be data-driven organizations; and culture matters!  For organizations and businesses desiring to undertake a business transformation through technology, Driving Digital is an excellent guidebook.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book begins with a “must read” introduction and covers the “how to” of digital business transformation in the subsequent seven chapters.  Chapter 1 describes “The Transformation Imperative”and makes the case for beginning or continuing a digital transformation to avoid obsolescence.  The author asks the reader to assess his/her own organization and to consider how a new competitor (“digital disruptor”) might enter the business today.  This is a thought that would keep any traditional business owner awake at night.

Chapter 2 through Chapter 7 describes the practices involved in a digital transformation and provides relevant examples that drive home the points.  The author explains that a business needs to start by creating a digitally driven IT organization that utilizes agile practices and is driven by customer and market feedback.  Later chapters describe how to create organizational alignment by instituting digital and data-driven practices in other parts of the enterprise, including Finance, Product Development, Marketing and Sales.  And finally, the author discusses the significant role of culture in a transformation program and emphasizes the need to gain the support of stakeholder groups, including the Board and CEO, the Executive team, management and employees.

Highlights

Some of the many highlights of Driving Digital, spread across several chapters of the book, include:

Agile is a Key Transformational Practices (Chapter 2; p. 20) – Establishing basic agile practices may enable an organization to execute at a higher level.  However, to truly transform an organization, agile practices must evolve to include marketing, operations as well as other functional areas and the organization must adopt an agile culture.

IT Culture (Chapter 3; p. 114) – A team that shares similar values and principles will develop its own culture.  Team values may be tied to practices such as agile, while other values may be business related or “may be more aspirational, like the ability to deliver innovative solutions”.  “Culture is what brings people together to collaborate and solve problems” and therefore, it is important to work on the unique culture within IT.

Data-Driven Organization (Chapter 5; p. 209) – “Leveraging data and analytics is the core competency to enable transformation…it requires the entire organization.” Being data driven is a business imperative for companies trying to compete in an environment of rapidly changing market conditions.

More…

To read entire book review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Kim Hylton-Reed, PMP

Maryland, USA

 

 

Kim Hylton-Reed is a Senior Program Manager with more than 20 years’ experience in the IT and Telecom industries. Currently, she is a Vice President at ITellect Consulting supporting U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) clients. Prior to 2017, she was a Lead Associate at Booz Allen Hamilton and previously worked in the telecom industry. Kim has an MBA from Harvard and a B.S. Engineering from MIT.

For comments regarding this review, Kim Hylton-Reed may be contacted at:  [email protected].


Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
PMI Silver Spring Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Essentials of Managing Quality

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    The Essentials of Managing Quality for Projects and Programmes
Author:  John Bartlett
Publisher:  Routledge
List Price:  $40.76
Format:  Softcover, 114 Pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN: 978-1-13-828827-0
Reviewer: Venkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP, CSTE, ITIL
Review Date: October 2017

 



Introduction

Quality is a perception. However, it can mean one thing to one person and something else to another. Managing Quality requires time, effort and discipline regardless of the project size. This book is enriched with scalable processes and simplified tools for immediate use in managing Quality for Projects. If you are new to managing quality or currently managing small projects and need more structure, The Essentials of Managing Quality for Projects and Programmes is for you. There are lots of easy-to-follow steps with practical application tips to facilitate learning.

The analysis and recommendations presented in this book reinforces the use of Quality Management on projects in preparation for eventually managing larger Programmes. This book demonstrates few hard and fast rules for managing quality in projects. Quality is not confined to a particular project stage. Like risk management it is all pervasive. It appears in every work package and every action.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The overall structure of The Essentials of Managing Quality for Projects and Programmes is divided into nine chapters.

Chapter 1 – Introduction
Chapter 2 – Quality Definition
Chapter 3 – Setting Expectations
Chapter 4 – Quality Roles
Chapter 5 – Planning for Quality
Chapter 6 – Controlling Quality
Chapter 7 – Quality Assurance
Chapter 8 – Testing for Quality
Chapter 9 – Quality at Implementation

All the above chapters covers majorly the risks of not having quality, justifying quality for projects and how to demonstrate the quality concepts are discussed in details in various chapters. It is important that, everyone associated with a Project or Programme has a clear view of the meaning of quality for a particular undertaking. Opportunities for tackling quality across a generic project lifespan and also provided examples of a Quality definition maps.

There is a detailed discussion on confusion over between success criteria and acceptance criteria. There is certainly a close link, and the two terms are occasionally used interchangeably. Clear examples provided around many companies and organizations have existing commitments to quality process. If quality cannot be sufficiently and clearly defined then it cannot be adequately built into components and deliverables.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Venkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP

Manager, Hitachi Consulting Corporation
North Texas, USA

 


Mr. Venkat Edagottu, PMP
is a Manager and leads “Testing and Quality Assurance” Communities of Practice sub group in Cloud Services division at Hitachi Consulting Corporation. He has extensive experience in Software Testing and  Project Delivery and played various roles at Client engagements. He holds several professional certifications including Scrum Master Accredited Certification (SMAC), Certified Software Tester (CSTE), IT Infrastructure Library V3 (ITIL), Six Sigma Yellow Belt (SSYB), Perfecto Mobile Automation Specialist and Project Management Professional (PMP). Venkat is an avid blogger, passionate learner and active Toastmaster Officer. He is also member of several professional organizations including the American Society for Quality (ASQ), Project Management Institute (PMI), Association for Software Testing (AST) and Quality Assurance International (QAI). Venkat can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Extreme Teams

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Extreme Teams
Author:  Robert Bruce Shaw
Publisher:  American Management Association
List Price:  $27.95/15.37
Format:  hardback/e-book   
Publication Date:   2017
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3717-9/978-08144-3718-6
Reviewer:     Heather Creer-Rygalski, PMP
Review Date:   November 2017

 



Introduction

What do Extreme Teams have in common? Demanding work hours, lofty goals, control over work and play hours are just a few items Extreme Teams in the book adhere to because of the successes the companies have seen. While the companies shared in the book are seen as successful today, all of the leaders agreed they made mistakes along the way. Only through continuously improving their processes have they continued to prosper and find suitable employees for their Extreme Teams.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Extensive chapters are interwoven with examples of Extreme Teams of well-known companies including: Whole Foods, Zappos, Patagonia, Pixar and Airbnb. The companies have all shared their successes in addition to past mistakes.

Revolutionizing the Way We Work, Foster a Shared Obsession, Value Fit over Capabilities and Take Comfort in Discomfort are just a few of the chapter titles. Looking at the titles only, one might wonder does this really work, or is this real? It does and has for the Extreme Teams but the ideas are not for everyone and will not work for every company.  Organizations need to create their own goals, missions etc. best suited for them to deliver “extraordinary results”.

Leaders within the companies outlined in the book, took charge of the goals and shared those goals with middle management. Middle management then shared the goals with those within their teams. Isn’t that the way goals are supposed to be shared? Of course, but how many times is it really communicated down through the ranks efficiently and effectively where all teams are embracing the goals and visions of the company? How many within middle management instead have their own agendas and those in turn are shared with the teams?

For companies with middle management with their own agendas, they are quickly replaced with individuals whose ideas are aligned to the goals of the organization. Success of the Extreme Teams is all dependent upon the leaders of the organizations having a feel for the pulse of company. Without knowing what is being shared throughout the company, can any organization continue to be successful?

Highlights

Each industry has its own set of norms and standards and the Extreme Teams while using the standards set for the industry, changed the way companies looked at norms. Does your company have full disclosure of employee salaries including the C-Levels? Whole Foods does. Does your company “fully engage callers, with the goal of meeting their needs whenever possible?” (pg. 79)  Zappos does. There’s a story of a Zappos executive who told some colleagues in a meeting he could call into his call center at any time and get unsurpassable customer service even if the question he had asked did not pertain to his company. Others in the room made a bet that it couldn’t be done. Not only did he call into the call center asking a question that had nothing to do with Zappos, he also won the bet all because of the extensive customer oriented training of the Zappos call center employees.

More…

To read entire book review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Heather Creer-Rygalski

Texas, USA

 


Heather Creer-Rygalski
, PMP has more than 20 years of experience working in training and development departments both in the corporate arena and within the public school system using her project management training for all of her projects. She has a BA in Psychology and a M.Ed., both from Texas State University

Heather can be contacted at [email protected]


Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

The Camino Way

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    The Camino Way: Lessons in Leadership from a Walk Across Spain
Author:  Victor Prince
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price: $21.95                Format:  Hardcover, 208 pages
Publication Date: 2017      ISBN: 9780814438244
Reviewer:     Laura Basurto, PMP
Review Date:   October 2017

 



Introduction

This compelling book tells a wonderful story of self-reflection, self-awareness, and the importance of putting issues at work, life events, etc. into perspective.

It is cleverly organized around the “seven guideposts of the Camino Trail” and how one can adapt those meaningful mantras to the workplace.

If you want to learn how to be a better leader, person and how to connect with your teammates, you will find this book most helpful and rewarding.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Mr. Prince provides an interesting explanation on the origin of the Camino Trail and the reason for its allure.

The following chapters relate the seven reminders/guidepoints of the Camino Trail, for which each pilgrim (“peregrino”) must be mindful during his or her journey.  Mr. Prince provides his own relatable experiences, and relays how he either could have done better or will improve in the future.

The remaining chapters, the “Post-Camino Impact”, take into consideration what the author learned about himself, others and how to improve for the better.

Highlights

This is a book about values and how to realize what priorities in life should be.  Some philosophies that resonated with me were:

    1. Be thoughtful of how your actions will impact the future for others.
    2. The skewed rationale in judging a person based on the company they work, the job they have versus the quality of person they are.
    3. Looking beyond nationalities, race and appreciating the shared goals and interests you have with others.
    4. How to address overwhelming situations by adapting a systematic approach to address them.
    5. Celebrate achievements and live in the moment.

Highlights: What I liked!

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book.  It is written in a conversational style so you feel as if the author is talking with you and not at you.

More…

To read entire book review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Laura Basurto, PMP

North Texas, USA

 


Laura Basurto
has worked in Project, Program and Product Management for the past 17 years in IT, both in the United States and internationally, namely in the telecommunications, computer and healthcare industries.  She holds a BA in Business Administration from Austin College and an MBA in Telecommunications Management from the University of Dallas, Texas, USA.

Laura is PMP & LSSGB certified, and can be contacted at [email protected]


Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

December 2017 Report from Spain

The PMI Madrid Chapter celebrated its second professional Congress on November 23rd 2017

 

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain

 



Around two hundred professionals joined the second PMI Madrid annual Congress in Madrid. Antonio Rodriguez Nieto (past PMI Global Chair) delivered a presentation about the value of Project management that was very well accepted by all the attendees. Other Keynote speaker was Ms. Milagros Mostaza from PMI Global. After those presentations, the attendees participated in a “cocktail” where they had the opportunity of “networking” among their professional colleagues. The PMI Madrid Chapter has been organizing two annual congresses since the last five years, and they are obtaining an exponential growth in attendance.

 

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 



About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011.  Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for December 2017

Updates on Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail transit project

 

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 



INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 individual and 200 organizational members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project Days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. This year the Project Days conference took place on 31.10. – 1.11.2017 in the Helsinki Expo and Convention Centre. Please navigate to www.3pmo.fi , www.projektipaivat.fi and www.pry.fi/en for further information on PMAF and its main events.

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland has a tradition of organizing an annual conference in the spring. This year the conference took place on May 10th, in Helsinki, with an overarching theme “Change!”. Please navigate to www.pmifinland.org and www.conference.pmifinland.org for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its main events.

OLKILUOTO 3

The 1 600 MW Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, originally contracted to be built by consortium comprising of Areva and Siemens for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto, announced a further delay from the previously agreed time schedule in October.  The previously agreed time schedule estimated for the plant to be on line at the end of 2018 – nine years behind original time schedule. Due to the latest delay, the plant will not be on line before May 2019 – full ten years behind the original time schedule. Once completed – ten years behind original time schedule and over 5 500 M€ over budget – Olkiluoto 3 will be the largest nuclear power plant in the world. TVO is understandably very disappointed about the latest delay – and the fact that the plant is well over 100 % over original budget and 10 years behind the original time schedule.

The contract for building the Olkiluoto 3 power plant was signed in 2003 for 3 000 M€, and construction began in 2005, targeting completion in June 2009. Due to numerous challenges during the planning and construction phases, the target date has been pushed forward several times, finally to 2018 – nine years in total. According to Areva, the delays have pushed the total cost up to 8 500 M€. Areva and TVO have conducted negotiations regarding the delay and related penalties, with TVO demanding 2 300 M€ from Areva, and Areva 3 500 M€ from TVO: Areva claims TVO has not carried out its contractual duties, and is therefore accountable for the costs of the string of delays. TVO claims Areva has failed to construct the plant according to contractual schedule.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 


Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

Contracting Strategies in Large Engineering Projects

STUDENT PAPER

By Sara Rifai

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Large engineering projects are increasing over time and representing a major area in the economic field. Thus a well fit relationship between the contractor and the owner is the key in order to allow a certain fluidity of these kind of projects. Despite the considerable development and improvement of the elaboration of the contacts, it is very important to know their types, application, and limitations. This paper aims to define and analyze the types of contacts involved in mega projects using the multi-attribute decision making. We can expect in the following stages of the paper the direct involvement of both the contractor and the owner with regards to the contracts. Besides, following the non-compensatory approach, attributes and criteria are set in order to choose the preferred contract for large engineering projects. In a nut shell, this paper might help to understand the use of contracts implicated in big projects and their importance to the owner and the contractor.

Key Words: Contracts, Large engineering projects, contracting strategies, Firm fixed price, cost reimbursement, unit price, incentives, project life cycle, development phase, implementation phase, contractor, owner, project participants.

INTRODUCTION

Nowadays, large engineering projects such as construction projects or the oil and gas industry represent an important percentage economically speaking in the worldwide societies. These kind of projects are huge, time consuming, and implicate an important capital investment. Thus, the contract between these large industries and the owner is critical since it specifies the obligations, the processes, and the risks. For instance, in the oil and gas field, the contractors play a foremost function in the development and the completion of such projects.

Large engineering projects are known as being massive and have a capital cost of millions of dollars. In other words, people that are investing in these projects are using their money and other recourses. Hence, these people can either be the owner who is investing his money to bring to life his ambitions and aspirations, the contractors or the subcontractors that will perform the project, the suppliers that will provide the project with the necessary raw materials and equipment, a sponsor that will finance the project, and many other organizations.

The people stated above will without any doubt form project teams in order to achieve specific targets and goals. As a result, the “contract” is introduced in order to get a corporative relationship between these people that have different conflicting interests in order to shape their behavior toward the project and the other participants.

The contract in general should express and demonstrate undoubtedly the financial, the legal, and the technical aspects of the project. For instance, a flight from city A to city B is a project. By acquiring the ticket flight, the passenger agrees on the terms and conditions which the airline is offering that may include the delays, the reservation, the failure to perform a service, the schedule change, and the loss of a baggage… In this case, both the passenger and the airline are participating in this project since they are both involved in the contract.

Any contract should be treated with a great concern as it is unique. Besides, every single contract should be dealt with from different perspectives: the owner, the market condition, and the contractor perspective.

The aim of this paper is to analyze the contracts that are involved in large engineering projects. Besides, this paper will also describe the contracting strategies used in these kinds of projects during the development and the implementation phases. Hence, this paper has as objective to enlighten about the use of contracts from the owner, the contractor, and the market condition perspectives.

In light of this we will be able to answer the following:

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Sara Rifai

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 

 

Sara RIFAI is an MSc student at SKEMA Business School majoring in Project and Program Management & Business development (PPMBD). Graduated for AL AKHAWAYN University of IFRANE, Morocco, and holding a Bachelor degree in Engineering and Management Science- Renewable Energy. She did an internship in VALEO, and worked in the quality department in order to improve the quality indicators. Besides, for her capstone project, she was part of one of the biggest projects in renewable energy in Ouarzazate which is NOOR 4, the world’s biggest solar power plant. She has both engineering and management knowledge. Sara can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Should there be an Internal Contract

Between PMO’s and Functional Departments?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Xiaohua Zeng

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Organizations have been facing various challenges and more complex when they deal with projects because there are many factors that might lead to a project failure which could generally perform as quality reduction, cost increases and time postpone etc. In project-oriented organizations, there are both external and internal projects. The biggest difference is that internal projects are a strategic choice and an option for the organization design while external projects are performed per force because of the customized nature, in other words, external projects are undertaken for an external client. In this context, organizations are usually aware of taking a contract with the external clients while used to ignoring the necessity of setting contracts for internal projects.

Since internal projects are driven by organizational strategies and in most cases performed by a PMO, they form networks that extend across the hierarchical functional units and meanwhile PMO plays the role of interacting with both projects and hierarchy. Therefore, the tensions and conflicts between PMO and functional departments are rising and inevitable, which absolutely increase more risk for project success as well as organizational strategy realization. How to resolve the conflicts and ensure a better internal project environment is significant for organizations. This paper discusses the necessity of an internal contract between PMO and functional departments and the value/effects it could bring to organizations for internal conflicts resolution. By analyzing and comparing with other solutions, the paper aims to prove there should be an internal contract between PMO’s and functional departments.

Key Words: Internal contract   Conflicts resolution   Project environment   Organization structure    Hierarchy

INTRODUCTION

Managing projects are never easy. The ultimate question that we ask ourselves from time to time is how can we ensure the project deliverables and realize expected benefits? In this paper, we focus on internal projects in project-oriented organizations and compare the conflicts resolutions between PMO and functional departments.

Firstly, let us take a look at the differences between external projects and internal projects. Organizations do external projects based on customer demands. Therefore, there are at least two entities involved in an external project: project owner and project contractor. And organizations tend to set a contract with involved entities in order to set rules and define responsibilities. However, internal projects are as much important as external projects for organizations based on the fact that organizations could improve some processes, upgrade infrastructure and enhance business/strategies by internal projects. Generally speaking, most internal projects are undertaken without an external contractor and because of which there is no contract applied either, the efforts are based on the cooperation of PMO and functional departments.

In project-oriented organizations, running internal projects are often not desirable. A simple reality they are facing now is the conflicts between projects and other functional departments. Managing projects are different from managing operations or any other business processes, while they share a common resource pool in the organization without any agreements in legal effect. It could result in many problems, for instance, unlike the conflicts between project owner and contractor in an external project that could be solved by a legal process according to a contract, the tensions between PMO and functional departments could only be solved by negotiations, tolerances, shared understanding and culture influences.  Therefore, it could cost longer time to resolve the conflicts in organizations and leave long-term culture issues. This paper proposes to adopt a contractual agreement to better resolve the conflicts between PMOs and functional departments.

The paper is going to identify some common conflicts between PMO and functional departments. And develop alternatives based on the problems, by comparing and analyzing the options we are going to choose the preferred proposal. With the research findings, the paper needs to answer the question “should there be an internal contract between PMO’s and functional departments” and contribute more value to sustain internal project success in organizations.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Xiaohua Zeng

Paris, France

 


Xiaohua Zeng
is a MSc student in SKEMA Business School, major in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). She graduated from Jimei University with a Bachelor degree in Economics. In 2015, she joined HSBC and worked as anti-money laundering investigator in Financial Crime Compliance Department located in Guangzhou, China. For the past few years, she has participated both campus and social activities, such as volunteer teacher in rural parts of China, the founder of Mandarin tutor center in Xiamen, entrepreneur in churches and business assistant in a trade company. Xiaohua (Diana) Zeng can be contacted at [email protected].