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Welcome to the July PMWJ

Welcome to the July 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the July 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). With this 48th edition, we celebrate the 4th year anniversary of the Journal with 30 original articles, papers and other works by 36 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We think the international content of the PMWJ sets it apart; we hope you agree.  The primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, so please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever they may be.

The above is my standard introductory paragraph each month.  But lately I have been wondering if I should return to editorials in which I take on some global or professional issue as I once did when editing the PM World Today publication.  Or should I write something simpler, a one page summary of the current edition without trying to mention each author and new work?  I’m somewhat torn.  I want to recognize contributors; some of their articles and papers are important new additions to the overall body of project management literature. What do you think?  Is this welcome article worthwhile or useful?  Should I shorten and summarize it?  Meanwhile, I will continue this month as I have over the last 4 years, briefly mentioning the new contents by category.  So here is…

This month in the Journal

We start with another Featured Interview conducted by our correspondent in Istanbul, Ms. İpek Sahra Özguler.  Ipek has conducted an interesting interview with Olfa Hamdi, founder of the Advanced Work Package Institute in the United State.  Who knew such an organization existed?  What’s it for?  How does it related to project management? Read the interview this month.

5 Featured Papers by authors in four countries are included in the July edition. Frank Parth in California has authored another paper titled “Successful Program Delivery Starts Long Before the Program Does – Part 1.”  Frank will be following up soon with part 2 on managing mega programs. Paul Giammalvo in Indonesia has authored an interesting research paper titled “Cost Estimatore/Quantity Surveyor Defined – A Key Word Analysis of Current Job Descriptions as the Basis for Exam and Competency Assessment Scoring Models.” This is a follow on to his paper last month on “Project Planner/Scheduler Defined…” as Paul examines some important project management support roles around the world.

Bilal Khan, Saif ul Amin, Muhammad Shakil Ahmad and Abdul Wahid in Pakistan have contributed a paper titled “Effects of Project Manager Leadership Style on Employees’ Job Satisfaction in Construction Projects in Pakistan KP Region.” Ali Haider Khan, Junaid Aftab, Uxma Anjum and Saif ul Amin are co-authors of “Impact of Organizational Justice Perceptions on Employees’ Performance Behaviour in Project Oriented Organizations in Pakistan.”  Badri N. Srinivasan and Chandan Lal Patary have authored “Exhibiting Rebus Leadership in the Complex Domain.”  These are striking papers exploring core organizational issues underlying leadership challenges.  Featured papers are serious works, generally of conference quality; please take some time to read them, now or later.

Series authors David Hillson (UK), Ann Pilkington (UK), and Darrel Hubbard and Dennis Bolles (USA) are back with good new articles in their respective series – risk, communications and enterprise PMOs. Ann comments on the recent Brexit vote in UK, suggesting some communication lessons learned for project managers. David wraps up his Risk Doctor Briefings on “Effective Risk Facilitation”, this month dealing with “handling difficult people.” Darrel and Dennis continue their sharing of lessons learned and good practices related to the “enterprise project business management office (PBMO).”

Prof Darren Dalcher (UK) has authored another interesting introductory article for Louise Hart’s Advances in Project Management series article; both authors offer new perspectives on project contracting.  Prof Marco Sampietro at SDA Bocconi in Milan has provided a 6th instalment in his series on “Project Management for Team Members” with “Project Team Members and Change Requests.” And we launch a new three-part series by Alan Stretton this month on “Project Integration, Interfaces and Context Management.” His first article tackles “Project Integration”. Series articles are by global experts so please read these important new contributions this month.  The articles are also very interesting!

One Commentary article is included, “Brexit: Threat or Opportunity,” by Dr. David Hillson in UK, in which the author relates the Brexit vote and aftermath to basic risk management concepts.  This certainly seems appropriate now, continuing…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

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DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

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David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.

David has more than 35 years of project management related experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars.  His experience has been in both government and private sectors.  He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

 

Successful Program Delivery

FEATURED PAPER

Successful Program Delivery Starts Long Before the Program Does – Part 1

Frank R. Parth, MS, MSSM, MBA, PMP

CEO, Project Auditors

Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, USA


Abstract

Multiple independent research efforts are beginning to show a more consistent approach to developing successful mega-projects in the areas of oil/gas, mining, major infrastructure, and construction projects than has been used in the past. These mega-projects are characterized by high value (often defined as greater than US 1$ billion), comparably high benefits, years-long time-lines, and correspondingly high risk. While there have been great advances in both project management methodologies and in the tools the project managers have available (such as CAD/CAM, BIM, and advanced project scheduling and budgeting tools), the complexity of these multi-year programs has advanced even more quickly than the tools have. Construction and large engineering projects (called LEPs by Miller and Lessard) have become more complex and ambitious faster than our ability to manage them. These “mega-projects” now are much longer in duration and far more complex than even ten years ago, with concomitant increased risks and failures. Projects costing tens of billions of dollars are no longer rare. The International Energy Agency estimates that meeting global energy needs will require investing more than $17 trillion by 2030 (van der Veer).

“Costs are becoming too high,” Christophe de Margerie, CEO of Paris-based Total, said Friday in an interview from Switzerland. “Projects of $50 billion leave one thinking ‘Isn’t it crazy?’ ” (Margerie)

This paper examines the common approaches identified by both academics and real life approaches by private industry. It then expands on both the theory and practice to develop a more effective way to approach the early management of these projects. It suggests starting each new megaproject the way you would start up a new business, and developing a strategic planning document to guide the stages of the project, from the early study/feasibility stages through engineering/ architecting and through construction/commissioning.

The emphasis of the approach is on effectiveness, not on efficiency. We can be truly efficient only if we can perfectly predict the future. Since we cannot do that, we must build adaptability into the process, flexibility, to respond to changes and to unexpected events. To effectively produce these projects we need a different approach than the traditional project management approach than has been promulgated by professional organizations for smaller, less complex projects. This approach begins long before the traditional project management approaches and extends into the early operations stages.

In Part 1 of this series of three articles we will look at some of the problems faced by large complex projects. We will discuss the critical emphasis on the external environment on making these projects successful or not, and we will look at the normal approach commonly used more successfully on simpler projects.

In part 2 of this series we follow up on the discussion of part 1 by examining the current approaches to these mega-projects being used by both private industry and by the academic community. We then review two common assessment approaches to determining the thoroughness of the planning and execution stages of the projects.

The final paper in this series follows parts 1 and 2 by proposing new approaches to developing these complex projects. The emphasis is on treating these projects not as projects, but as starting a new business. We will also examine changes in the risk management, stakeholder management, and the procurement process to make these projects more successful.

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Frank R. Parth

Rancho Santa Margarita
California, USA

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Frank Parth
, MS, MSSM, MBA, PMP is the President of Project Auditors LLC, a past member of PMI’s Board of Directors, and is currently on the core management team for PMI’s PMBOK Guide version 6. Mr. Parth brings 35 years’ experience in project and program management to his teaching and consulting work.

He had a first career designing satellite systems for the US government and in 1993 he set up a consultancy and began consulting in program management and systems engineering. He has created PMOs for several Fortune 1000 companies and for companies internationally. He consults to clients in multiple industry sectors, including telecom, construction, high tech, chemical processing, utilities, government, healthcare, mining, financial services, and aerospace. He is currently supporting Saudi Arabia’s Saline Water Conversion Corporation in improving their project management processes and in developing a PMO.

Mr. Parth teaches project management courses throughout the world and has taught over 4000 students worldwide in preparing for the PMP certification exam. He is a guest lecturer at USC’s Marshall School of Business, the University of California, Irvine, and at the American University of Sharjah (AUS) in the UAE, is an accomplished international speaker, and does pro bono teaching of project management in Vietnam.

He has co-authored or contributed to multiple books on project management and has published numerous papers in project management and systems engineering. He is actively involved with PMI, serving on local and national committees and was PMI’s Project Manager for the Standard for Program Management, 2nd edition published in 2008.  Based in California, Mr. Parth can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Mr. Parth, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/frank-parth/

 

Project Manager Leadership Style

FEATURED PAPER

Effects of Project Manager Leadership Style on Employees’ Job Satisfaction in Construction Projects in Pakistan KP Region

By Bilal Khan, Saif ul Amin, Muhammad Shakil Ahmad, Abdul Wahid Sherani

Pakistan


Abstract

An effective leadership style is a perquisite for job satisfaction of employee and organizational performance.  Countless research studies have been conducted for determining the Impact of transformational and transactional leadership style on the job satisfaction but are few in construction sector projects in Pakistan KP region. Therefore, the present also aims to assess the impact of transformational and transactional leadership style on job satisfaction in construction sector projects in Pakistan KP region.

Data was collected from a sample of 183 respondents through an adopted questionnaire.  The collected data was subjected to reliability test, descriptive calculation, correlation, and regression analysis.

The findings of the study show that both leadership styles have a positive and significant relationship with job satisfaction. But transformational leadership has a more significant impact on job satisfaction of employees in construction sector of Pakistan KP region.

Keywords: Leadership style, Transformational Leadership, Transactional Leadership,  Job satisfaction, KP, Pakistan.

Introduction

Human resources are considered as the most important resources for every organization. Most organizations are putting focus on deeply studying the leadership. Leadership is an important concept that plays an important role in both organizational development as well as in making and maintaining high performing teams. But in today’s era due to environmental complexities and the diverse nature of organizations leaders face many challenges. It is leaders who motivate and encourage their followers to accomplish the organizational goals who are successful. Both leaders and employees are the most important resources for every organization. Motivated and satisfied employees increase the performance of the organization. Leaders have the ability to change the behavior of their followers and to keep them satisfied and motivated towards the achievement of organizational goals. The mutual understanding between leaders and employees can give birth to innovations. Leadership is one of those factors that has positive and negative impacts on employees’ job satisfaction. This research is also based upon examining the impact of leadership styles on the employees’ job satisfaction

According to Hui, Jenatabadi, Ismail, & Mohamed (2013), the teacher job satisfaction can be made higher by employing the decision making style by the principals to be adopted. The studies conducted by Sadeghi & Pihie (2013) describe that by adopting transformational leadership behavior administrators and heads of departments may increase the level of job satisfaction of lecturers.

The higher the quality of leadership, the more effective and efficient will be management of the people (Albion & Gagliardi, 2007). With help of leadership, organizational human resources are well connected with each other and work together. Most organizations are busy nowadays in familiarizing themselves with leadership and to improve leadership. In this era, transformational leadership plays a vital role in the organization and this style is considered a modern leadership style. A researcher argues that transformational leadership is an effective and systematic process which moves the behaviors of people towards organizational goal achievement (Hall et al., 2008).Leaders may have positive or negative impacts on the employees. The leaders have to change their rigid autocratic style and bring a friendly environment in the organization if they want to have positive impacts on employees (Dess et al., 1998).

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Authors


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Bilal Khan

Peshawar, KP, Pakistan.

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Bilal Khan
is working as a teacher at private section KP, Pakistan. Bilal has a Graduate degree in Project Management from COMSATS (CIIT), Pakistan. His research areas include digital communication, Project management, Leadership, Finance, Entrepreneurship and interdisciplinary/experimental approaches to teaching ESP, education, and new technologies. Bilal can be contacted at [email protected]

 

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Saif ul Amin

Nowshera, KP, Pakistan.

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Saif ul Amin
is a project management specialist and research scholar who works in the public sector of Pakistan. Saif graduated from the COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan with the MS degree in Project Management. He has been interested in conducting researches in project performance, project human resource management, leadership style and behaviors, new technologies, project team performance, engagement and team building. Feedback for improvement is always welcome at [email protected]

 

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Muhammad Shakil Ahmad

Attock, Punjab, Pakistan.

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Dr. Muhammad Shakil Ahmad
is a PhD degree holder in Management and a Research Focal Person (ORIC) in the Department of Management Sciences in COMSATS Institute of Information Technology Attock, Pakistan. He has almost 26 publications in the research field. He is also working as a professor in the COMSATS Institute of IT. His main research interests are SPSS, Governance, Community Empowerment, Higher Education and Descriptive Statistics. Email address: [email protected]

 

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Abdul Wahid Sherani

Peshawar, KP, Pakistan.

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Mr. Abdul Wahid Sherani
is specialized in finance field. He has done MS in Finance from Islamia College University Peshawar. His main interests in research are in the fields of finance, management, project management and leadership. He is also working as a lecturer in Muslim Educational Complex Peshawar and University of Peshawar. Email address: [email protected]

 

Project Management Update from Buenos Aires

REPORT

June in Argentina; IX Jornadas Cuyanas of Project Management; PMI Argentina Chapters Seminars and Workshops

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina


Activities related to project management have had a strong momentum during June in Argentina.

On June 16th, PMI Buenos Aires Chapter offered the workshop about conflict management, called “Leader in the heat of conflict”, facilitated by the recognized professional Agnieszka Gasperini, former president of the PMI Poland Chapter and current PMI Mentor of Central Europe Region, in her visit to Buenos Aires.

Akselrad Fabian, President of PMIBA, opened the meeting with a brief introduction and Chapter PMI Buenos Aires and presented to the exhibitor Agnieszka Gasperini.

After an introduction and definition on the topic Conflict, Agnieszka proposed holding some group activities and attendees were very interested in being able to manage conflicts more efficiently.

By the side of PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter, the Project Management Conferences called “IX Jornadas Cuyanas of Project Management”, were carried out during June, organized by the four Branches of the Chapter.

The first of the conferences was held in the city of Mendoza on June 2nd. As every year, this event was held at the Faculty of Engineering of the National University of Cuyo in Mendoza City, and he counted with the participation of prominent referents of project management at national and regional level, and the attendance of over 100 participants, including professionals linked to the specialty and students.

I had the pleasure of welcoming to this important event for the region, organized by Chapter Nuevo Cuyo, in my rol as PMI Mentor of the Region Southern Latin America. Subsequently lead to the participation of Eng. Patricio González Viescas who presented his experience on “Corporate Purchases for Projects,” followed by Lic. Alfredo Diez, specialist in management skills and development of potential skills, who spoke on the subject of his book “Never give up, be the protagonist” and finally exposed Ing. Alberto Tristan Armaretti of Petrobras Argentina SA, who spoke on “Experiences in development of unconventional project.”

More…

To read entire report click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

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CECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent
Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

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 Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector. Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012.  Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016.  Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia.

She can be contacted at [email protected] and www.activepmo.com

To view other works by Cecilia Boggi, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/cecilia-boggi/.

 

Project Management Report from Spain

REPORT

Spanish Project Management Pioneers; PMI Madrid Interim Management Event

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain


Professor Heredia Scasso was one of the fathers of Project Management in Spain. His example is still alive in our memory since 2004, from his papers, articles and especially from his book “Dirección Integrada de Proyecto”.

Mrs. Lourdes remind us that Professor Heredia was the inspiration from AEDIP; and that one of his researches gives the translation to Spanish of the term “project management” as “Dirección Integrada de Proyecto” (DIP). AEDIP adopted that translation on 1999 to distinguish AEDIP as a professional association of project managers in the Construction industry.

Mrs. Lourdes Rodriguez, advanced pupil from Professor Heredia, donated 122 books about Project Management that were part of the personal library from Professor Heredia. Such donation counted with the permission of Mrs. Rosario Ibáñez Palomeque, wife of Mr. Heredia.

The final objective of that donation is to keep that set of books as an AEDIP asset; his disciple Mrs. Rodriguez and his wife Mrs. Ibañez are convinced that it would be the desire of the Professor Rafael Heredia, to allow AEDIP to administrate those books to put them available for the AEDIP entrepreneurs, employees, professionals and students.

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Jordi Seguro, AEDIP President, receives the donation of the books from Mrs. Lourdes Rodriguez.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

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Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent
Madrid, Spain

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Alfonso Bucero
, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011.  Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Global Scrum Alliance® Orlando 2016

REPORT

By Theofanis Giotis

Athens, Greece


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It took me 25 hours to reach this event. From Athens to Istanbul, to Washington DC, and then to Orlando, Florida. Loews Royal Pacific Resort was the hosting resort for Global SCRUM GATHERING® Orlando 2016 event that took place between 18th and 20th of April 2016.

This was the biggest ever Global Scrum Gathering event ever with 1150+ participants from 30 countries.

More than 400 papers were submitted and about 50 were approved in three tracks:

  • Agile Galaxy
  • Orbiting the Earth
  • Mission Control

Phoenix Co-Chairs

The event started on Monday morning with welcome remarks from the two co-chairs Anu Smalley & Kate Megaw

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and Scrum Alliance CEO Manny Gonzalez (pictured below).

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The opening keynote was “Agile Leadership, The Key to Scaling Scrum” by Brian Rabon.

Lyssa Atkins presented “Developing an Organization’s Internal Agile Coaching Capability

More (with many photos) including interview with Manny Gonzalez …

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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THEOFANIS GIOTIS

Athens, Greece

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Mr. Theofanis Giotis
(BA, MSc, Ph.D. C., PMP, PMI-ACP, PRINCE2 Practitioner, PRINCE2 Trainer, CTT+, CSM) is CEO of ITEC CONSULTING (12PM CONSULTING) (1988-now), Co-Founder and first President of PMI-GREECE Chapter (2005-2014) and Deputy BoD member of PMI-GREECE Chapter (2014-2016).

Theofanis has 27 years of professional experience in Project, Program and Portfolio Management, Economics and Management. As an entrepreneur, consultant, international speaker and trainer, Theofanis has worked in different cultural environments in EMEA region. Since 1992, he was heavily involved in Project Management as part of a team to setup the first PMO in Greece for managing a €200 million programme with 16 projects.

Since 1987 he has managed hundreds of projects in the EMEA region using plan driven (waterfall) and change driven (agile) approaches. He has envisioned, planned, designed, developed & implemented hundreds of projects with 22.000+ consulting and training hours.

He has given 150+ presentations worldwide in ICT & Project Management and has passed more than 80 professional certifications. Since Sept. 2005, he has published more than 150 articles for Project Management.

Theofanis holds a BA in Economics from University of Athens, Greece, a MSc in Management (O.R.) from Lancaster University, UK and he is a Ph.D. candidate in Project Management at University of Piraeus. Also he holds a Computer Programming/Systems Analysis degree from ACE College, Greece. He was certified as a PMP in 2004 and graduated from PMI Leadership Institute Masters Class (LIMC) in 2007.

Theofanis serves as the International correspondent of PM World Journal and PM Ambassadors in Greece. Also he is a member of PMI, IEEE, ISACA & AMACON.

Since 2001, he has taught 200+ Project Management courses (PMP, Agile, Scrum) with 2000+ attendees. As of July 2010, he has trained over 35% of all Greek PMPs.

He is an adjunct professor at four Greek Universities teaching Project, Program and Portfolio Management at MBA level. Also he represents Greek Standardization Organization (ELOT) at ISO TC 258 for Project, Program and Portfolio Management Standard. Theofanis can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Theofanis Giotis, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/mr-theofanis-giotis/

 

 

Project Management Report from Belo Horizonte

REPORT

LOW GROWTH, LOW INVESTMENTS, NO PROJECTS

By Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

International Correspondent

Minas Gerais, Brazil


Brazil lives a severe economic and political crisis. Started by investigations regarded corruption in PETROBRAS, the gigantic Brazilian oil company, and fueled by a Congress decision to start President Dilma Roussef impeachment process, political crisis is far from its end.

Every day new investigations accuse politicians, lobbyists, bankers, executives and company owners of deviation and irregular operations on an amount of hundreds of million dollars (probably billions). These accusations come from investigation, documents, evidence and a dozen “collaborations” from those involved and sometimes condemned. The things extrapolated from the PETROBRAS case and are spreading to a lot of companies, agencies and state banks.

Otherwise, because of her disastrous decisions, inability to talk and negotiate with Congress and a lot of illegal actions, Mrs. Roussef is accused of “responsibility crimes”, what, according to Brazilian Constitution is sufficient to start an Impeachment Process. The process is evolving according to constitutional and Supreme Court rules. First, a Committee of Representatives concluded that effectively Mrs. Roussef is responsible by some acts that are Responsibility Crimes. Then, in an historical session, most of the representatives agreed to admit the Impeachment Process. According to Constitution, the Senate is who must judge presidents in case of Impeachment.

First, a Senate Committee confirmed the Impeachment admissibility and started sessions where prosecution and defense are spending their best arguments and testimonies defending their points of views and interests. Finally this Committee will present its final conclusion.

Next August this phase will be concluded and this Committee report (pro or against Mrs. Roussef) could be voted on by the 81 senators. If two thirds or more of them agree with the impeachment then, Mr. Michel Temer, the vice president, automatically turns into President.

Today, as Mrs Roussef is suspended from her presidential charges, Mr. Temer is the interim President, facing a lot of problems, including accusations of leading a coup against Mrs. Roussef.

What is the problem? Simple, as the president and the things are interims confidence is very low. So, the economical agents are waiting for a definition. Business and investments are awaiting better days and actions by a legitimate government.

Last, but not least, Speaker from Representatives House is facing a lot of corruption accusations (a lot of them proved) and is out of its charges by a Supreme Court decision.

The Senate Speaker is also accused by a lot of people, but that seems without evidences.

Considering that political and economical issues come together, the situation is too bad for the Brazilian economy.

First Mrs. Roussef opted for a so called “New Economic Matrix”, which means, strong government expenses (not investments), prices artificially contained (including fuels and energy), reduction of taxes for certain items, no strong worries about inflation, government budget deficit,  forced reduction of interest rates, and a lot of other things. These things were increased in 2014 in order to reelect Mrs. Roussef. Consequences: high inflation, low growth and lack of confidence.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto, MSc, Mech. Engineer and PMP
is Fundação Dom Cabral Invited Professor and also Consultant. He is a seasoned professional with over 40 years of experience in Project Management, Process Management and Strategy. Manuel has managed or participated in more than four hundred huge projects across different fields including Steel, Mining, IT, Telecom, Food Processing, Government and Construction, to mention a few. He worked also in projects to implement PMO (Project Management Office) and Project Management Methodology. He has also strong skills in Leading People and Finance. He served as Minas Gerais State Undersecretary for Planning and Budget, from 2007 to 2008. Manuel can be contacted at carva[email protected].

To view other works by Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto, visit his Author Showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/manuel-carvalho-da-silva-neto/

 

 

Project Management Update from Kraków

REPORT

Portfolio Experience Conference in Warsaw; PMI Poland Chapter Project of the Year; Agile Europe 2016; Pint of PM in Brussels

By Artur Bialy

Kraków, Poland


Portfolio Experience Conference in Warsaw

Another edition of the conference Portfolio Experience has finished recently in Marriott Hotel in Warsaw. It gathered nearly 100 participants interested in the subject of project portfolio management and design office. Conference Portfolio Experience is the only such event in Poland, which collects in one place such a large group of people strongly associated with the PMO.

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The conference was aimed at exchange of experience between the key persons responsible for the operation of PMO organizations, knowledge of best practices and knowledge on emerging trends in foreign markets. This year’s edition was first divided into two days conference and workshop, and its main theme was the transformation of the PMO in response to the expectations of the business.

Project of the Year – PMI Poland Chapter

On behalf of the Project Management Institute Chapter Poland we invite to participate in the next edition of the Competition for the Design of the Year.

Entries can be submitted until 30 September 2016.

PMI Project of the Year Competition PC is the ability to check in the course of the competition for the prestigious title of the Project of the Year in two categories:

-traditionally managed TPM (including also hybrid – a combination of conventional management agile)

-project managed nimbly APM (Agile)

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Artur Bialy

Kraków, Poland

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Artur Bialy
is an experienced project manager, program manager and technical manager/leader, with approximately 15 years of experience managing IT projects on various levels. He has managed the implementation of complex internet applications, data warehouse and real-time systems. Artur has worked in various roles for international companies in Poland, Ireland, France and Spain. He is an expert in IT project management, business intelligence and real-time applications. Mr. Bialy graduated from the University of Technology and Science, the Department of Computer Science, where he conducted research into Intelligent Agent Systems and Artificial Intelligence. Artur holds a Master’s Degree in Applied Computer Science. He also holds the Project Management Professional (PMP ®) certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) and is an active member of PMI; he was a founding member of the PMI Poland Chapter. He is involved in new agile project management practices, works as an active Scrum Master and helps in implementations of lean/agile practices. He is certified Scrum Master and as one of few in Poland – Certified Scrum Practitioner (CSP) by Scrum Alliance. Artur is a Member of PMI® and the Scrum Alliance (Certified ScrumMaster).

Artur Bialy lives in Kraków, Poland and can be contacted at [email protected].

Artur’s project management blog can be found at http://www.bialy.eu.

To view other works by this Artur Bialy, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/artur-bialy/

 

 

Project Management report from Athens

REPORT

HELLINIKON – a 10 billion Euros project in Greece: The largest urban regeneration project in Europe!

By Theofanis Giotis

Athens, Greece


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Short history of Hellinikon Airport

Hellinikon airport started construction in 1938 and remained the only commercial airport for Athens, Greece until 2001 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellinikon_International_Airport). After 27th of March 2001, a new airport started operating in Athens named Eleftherios Venizelos (Athens  International Airport – AIA) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athens_International_Airport) replaced the old Hellinikon airport.

Since 2001, all Greek governments had in mind to make investments on the area of old Hellinikon airport which totals 6,008,677.00 square meters (m2) (1,484.77 Acres) and it is considered to be one of the best land properties in Europe. Now we are at the final stages of Hellinikon privatization.

Memorandum of Understanding for Hellinikon

On 7th of June 7, 2016, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund SA, HELLINIKON Global I. S.A. and Lamda Development S.A.

The Memorandum of Understanding amends the existing Share Sale and Purchase Agreement of HELLINIKON S.A. of 14.11.2014, in which important technical features of the Hellinikon former airport’s redevelopment are delimited so that the Project is fully aligned with the expectations of the citizens, the local communities and the wider region of metropolitan Athens.
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Τhe President of the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund SA, Mr. Stergios Pitsiorlas and the C.E.O. Mr. Odisseas Athanasiou of Lamda Development S.A sign the memorandum.

This MOU agreement, which specifies all the basic design requirements and economic parameters of the Project is a milestone because it provides the opportunity to accelerate all procedures for commencing the project that will become the largest urban regeneration throughout Europe for the coming years.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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THEOFANIS GIOTIS

Athens, Greece

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Mr. Theofanis Giotis
(BA, MSc, Ph.D. C., PMP, PMI-ACP, PRINCE2 Practitioner, PRINCE2 Trainer, CTT+, CSM) is CEO of ITEC CONSULTING (12PM CONSULTING) (1988-now), Co-Founder and first President of PMI-GREECE Chapter (2005-2014) and Deputy BoD member of PMI-GREECE Chapter (2014-2016).

Theofanis has 27 years of professional experience in Project, Program and Portfolio Management, Economics and Management. As an entrepreneur, consultant, international speaker and trainer, Theofanis has worked in different cultural environments in EMEA region. Since 1992, he was heavily involved in Project Management as part of a team to setup the first PMO in Greece for managing a €200 million programme with 16 projects.

Since 1987 he has managed hundreds of projects in the EMEA region using plan driven (waterfall) and change driven (agile) approaches. He has envisioned, planned, designed, developed & implemented hundreds of projects with 22.000+ consulting and training hours.

He has given 150+ presentations worldwide in ICT & Project Management and has passed more than 80 professional certifications. Since Sept. 2005, he has published more than 150 articles for Project Management.

Theofanis holds a BA in Economics from University of Athens, Greece, a MSc in Management (O.R.) from Lancaster University, UK and he is a Ph.D. candidate in Project Management at University of Piraeus. Also he holds a Computer Programming/Systems Analysis degree from ACE College, Greece. He was certified as a PMP in 2004 and graduated from PMI Leadership Institute Masters Class (LIMC) in 2007.

Theofanis serves as the International correspondent of PM World Journal and PM Ambassadors in Greece. Also he is a member of PMI, IEEE, ISACA & AMACON.

Since 2001, he has taught 200+ Project Management courses (PMP, Agile, Scrum) with 2000+ attendees. As of July 2010, he has trained over 35% of all Greek PMPs.

He is an adjunct professor at four Greek Universities teaching Project, Program and Portfolio Management at MBA level. Also he represents Greek Standardization Organization (ELOT) at ISO TC 258 for Project, Program and Portfolio Management Standard. Theofanis can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Theofanis Giotis, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/mr-theofanis-giotis/

 

 

Brexit: The Aftermath

REPORT

UK Project Management Round Up

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK


Brexit: Part 1 – 26 June 2016

INTRODUCTION

The surprise of the month has not been “Brexit” but a candid report on the British Army, the challenges it faces and the way it is meeting them.  But there can be no doubt that the main story has to be Brexit, the short term implications for the country and the longer term impact on UK projects.

BREXIT IN THE SHORT TERM

When the country went to bed on Thursday night, most people, including some of the main “Leave” camp were forecasting a narrow win for the “remain” camp so there was some surprise when early the next morning, it emerged that the referendum had resulted in a 52% vote to Leave the European Union (EU) and 48% in favour.  The turnout was about 72% of the voting population – some 30 million voters had spoken.

The immediate impact was a drop of nearly 400 points (~4.5%) on the Stock Exchange on opening but this was reduced to a total day’s loss of about 175 point (~2.75%).  Most of the FTSE companies were down on the day but in the main posted only small losses.  However, banks and house builders took massive hits with construction down an average of 25% – total losses on the day across all listed companies were about £150 billion.

The political impact has been significant: as might have been expected, the Prime Minister, David Cameron, has declared that he will step down once a new Conservative leader is elected, probably in the early autumn.  Perhaps more surprisingly, the main opposition party has been heavily impacted with a call on Black Friday for a vote of no confidence.  In itself, this is not particularly significant but on Sunday, after the Opposition Leader, Jeremy Corbyn, sacked a member of his shadow cabinet for disloyalty, a further 7 members of his leadership team resigned with more expected to leave shortly.

Perhaps the most important aspect is that the short term is actually not all that short.  Very little will happen for at least 2 years once the Article 50 declaration has been made.  Article 50 makes provision for members to leave the EU and sets a 2 year project in place – a point we will return to shortly.

STAKEHOLDER IMPACT

A stakeholder analysis of the results would show that the external impact of BREXIT introduces as much uncertainty to the EU as it does to UK.  Several other countries in the EU are said to be preparing demands on their governments to hold similar referendums with dissatisfaction in Scandinavia prominent while France and Netherlands having vociferous calls to leave.  Remaining EU members are reputed to be shocked by the outcome and concerned about the impact on their own situations.  They cannot say they were not warned – Mr Cameron explained the likely issues to result from the very limited changes offered by fellow members in response to his negotiations over the last 18 months.

Most of the stakeholders are British based.  The major issue emerging is the impact of the vote on the stability of the United Kingdom.  The Scots have already raised the spectre of another referendum over leaving the UK while Northern Ireland are now claiming that they should have a referendum on unification with the Republic of Ireland.  Somewhat further afield, Spain are claiming joint sovereignty over Gibraltar.  And just to keep the referendum pot boiling, there is an on-line petition with a reputed 3 million signatories asking for a parliamentary debate on declaring the first vote invalid as the margin was small and the vote less than 75% of eligible voters!  Whether this last gasp attempt to move the goal posts is successful will depend on the results of a challenge on the validity of the electronic ‘signatures’.

SHORT TERM IMPACT ON PROJECTS

The major point to emerge is the drop in the value of the £ which will make it much cheaper to buy British goods and services and to invest in UK projects.  So we can expect an influx of foreign money into the country.  Set against that will be the impact on business cases – if the Sterling returns are worth less, some overseas projects may not be able to justify the outlay.  For instance, the cost of developing Hinkley C nuclear reactor should be less but the long term return on investment is also likely to be less – as if the financial analysts don’t have enough to worry about!  The UK press reckon this is the death knell for the Hinkley project.

More…

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About the Author

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MILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

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Miles Shepherd
is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

Tangible Strategies for Aligning Your Processes with Agile

SECOND EDITION

By Kim Hobson

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Oak Ridge, TN, USA


ABSTRACT

This paper describes a victory: how a highly functioning project team adapted a traditional software development methodology while staying true to the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, converging the two to meet both process maturity requirements and the project’s needs. The project has been an overwhelming success. The resulting software has aided customers in not only meeting but exceeding their mission goals, and the project team has remained cohesive, happy, and productive.

Introduction

In the software development world, “process” is a dirty word. Process implies stale unnecessary rigor that bogs down creativity and the swiftness with which products can be delivered, potentially impairing momentum. Mention process to a software development team and watch the resulting eye rolling. Using an Agile approach seems so much better – the antithesis of following a cumbersome process.

Here’s something you may already know. “The Agile Manifesto” includes 12 principles, one of which is At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly (Agile Alliance, 2001). The trick, in terms of processes, is determining how the secret synergy of processes can work best; how a project team can employ necessary rigor while letting team members stay in the flow.

G2

Victory over the process conundrum came by way of a project funded by the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Its name is a mouthful: the NNSA Program Management Information System Generation 2, called simply “G2.”

In February 2007, G2 was the brain child of a meeting wherein the G2 system’s initial functions, design assumptions, budget, and schedule were agreed upon by a federal NNSA sponsor in Washington, DC, and an IT project manager based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee. The goal was to have a functioning G2 system by September 2007. At the time, G2 was a program information and performance management system that integrated DOE headquarters and national laboratory scope, schedule, and budget information at the project level, creating a single repository of data. It also integrated financial data for budgeting and cost reporting in addition to providing geographic information systems (GIS) visualization to monitor work progress worldwide. One of the fundamental requirements of the system was to provide DOE with a “common truth” for reporting at a time when the program office was experiencing budget increases at a 70–80% rate. The visibility and expectation of the program to achieve its mission, “to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide,” (National Nuclear Security Administration) was increasing, and the G2 system was integral to the process, both for planning and progress reporting. To have data integrity issues was unthinkable. To miss the September deadline was also unthinkable. Imagine the pressure.

The G2 project was then, and still is today, a project that moves at breakneck speed. Don’t be fooled though. G2 is also all about excellence. The expectation for every member of the project from the executive sponsor through the ranks of team leads and down through the entire project team can be put into one word: Excellence. A desire for excellence drives the team. Retaining that excellence and staying on deadline is tough.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 3rd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Kim Hobson

Tennessee, USA

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Kim Hobson
is an award-winning PMP with nearly 30 years of project management and business operations experience. Kim has used her strategic insight and clear communication style to help numerous diverse organizations define their business processes, build relationships, and actuate performance. Kim is a currently a Project Manager at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee, USA, where she leads a software development project for the intelligence community and provides operational business analysis for a number of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) initiatives homed at ORNL. Kim received her B.S. in Business Administration from The University of Tennessee, earned an MBA from Trident University, and is a certified SAFe Agilist. Email: [email protected]

 

Evaluating and Building Portfolio Management Maturity

SECOND EDITION

By Susan Hostetter and Sherri Norris

U.S. Census Bureau

Washington, DC, USA


Executive Summary

This paper focuses on implementation of portfolio management process in a Federal program. It introduces a maturity model designed to evaluate and track portfolio management capability at the U.S. Census Bureau. The authors used their collective experience implementing portfolio management in Federal Programs to inform the paper and create the model.

The model evaluates and tracks the following program maturity characteristics:

  • The portfolio management process maturity levels;
  • The levels of strategic planning practiced;
  • The level of organizational acceptance for the portfolio management processes.

Important topics that emerged from the development of this maturity model were the definition of portfolio management characteristics, the value of strategic planning to the portfolio management process, and the importance of organizational acceptance in the success of implementing a new process.

Portfolio Management in a Federal Agency

Portfolio management is an important tool to support the fiscal accountability and transparency of government programs. The portfolio management process allows programs to select and prioritize projects that are essential to supporting important government programs.  These programs and agencies work within defined budgets, with the focus being on achieving program objectives, followed by adhering to rigid standards and established protocols.  Typically, agency budget authority lies with Congress and not within the organization (agency divisions and directorates). This uncertain budget environment increases the need for portfolio management.

Portfolio management aids governments programs by managing limited funds and ensuring that mission critical processes remain effective and up-to-date. It also helps government programs identify projects they should cancel or re-prioritize. Portfolio management also increases stakeholder engagement, aids in decision-making and tracks project investments throughout their lifecycle. Portfolio management is essential to completing important government work.

Background

According to MITRE Corporation, a recognized expert in Portfolio Management,  “Portfolio Management is a continuous and persistent process that enables decision makers to strategically and operationally manage resources to maximize accomplishment of desired outcomes (e.g. mission results, organizational improvements, enhancement of operational capabilities) within given constraints and constructs such as regulation, interdependent architectures, budgets, concept of operations, technology, and mission threads.”  More simply put, portfolio management is “doing the right things” to achieve organizational strategic goals. A portfolio is the complete inventory of investments required to achieve strategic priorities.

At the U.S. Census Bureau, the agency implemented portfolio management at either the directorate or the division level. Characteristic of a large government agency, there was variation in implementation of portfolio management among the different work groups and subsequently, portfolio management in some areas is more mature than in others. Previous presentations by Hostetter et al focused on only one program, the American Community Survey, which was an early adopter of portfolio management within the agency.  Now we are interested in taking a broader look at the portfolio management throughout the agency and evaluating the maturity of those processes. Through our experience with the American Community Survey and other programs, we now have a better idea of what would be key indicators of portfolio management maturity at the agency. As a natural step, we would like to apply that knowledge to evaluate the portfolio management capability across the different work groups at the agency, assess their maturity and classify the programs into workable levels.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 3rd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

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Susan Hostetter

Washington, DC, USA

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Susan Hostetter
, PMP, is a project management professional with over twenty years’ experience with Federal Statistical programs. Ms. Hostetter has been instrumental in standing up and managing risk management, project management, portfolio management, strategic planning, and performance management processes for large survey and Census programs. She has a Master’s Degree in Management with a Project Management emphasis from the University of Maryland’s University College, a Master’s Certificate in Program Management from George Washington University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from Mary Baldwin University. Susan can be reached at [email protected].

 

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Sherri Norris

Washington, DC, USA

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Sherri Norris
is a project management and statistical professional with over twenty years of public policy, project management and operations experience. Ms. Norris has coordinated and implemented schedule, requirements, performance management, and governance processes for survey and Census Programs. She has a Public Policy Master’s Degree in Justice: Law and Society from American University, a Master’s Certificate in Program Management from George Washington University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from University of Delaware. Sherri can be reached at [email protected].

 

 

A Conceptual Model of National Public Projects Implementation Systems

SECOND EDITION

Stanisław Gasik

Vistula University

Warsaw, Poland


Abstract

Many countries have established practices of public projects governance and management which they systematically apply. These practices can be grouped into three well-defined, interrelated territories: Execution, Governance and Development. Each territory consists of functional areas. The Execution Territory consists of The Portfolio Management Area, Project Management Area, Actors Management Area, and Stakeholder Engagement Area. The Governance Territory consists of a single Governance Area, and the Development Territory similarly consists of just one Development Area. These Territories, Areas together with institutions, organizational units and other entities interrelate one with another and together constitute National Public Projects Implementation System (NPPIS). This paper presents conceptual model of NPPIS created on the basis of analysis of public projects governance and management solutions from over 70 countries all over the world. The model contributes theoretically to the knowledge of public projects. As projects are the main tool of public administration, it also contributes to countries’ economical development.

Key words: public administration, project management, National Public Projects Implementation System

JEL code: H110 Structure, Scope, and Performance of Government

Introduction

A public project is a project executed by a public administration or with the participation of a public administration, or implemented with the involvement of funds from the budget of such an administration.

Public projects account for a growing portion of expenditure in most countries of the world. Turner et al. (2010) estimate that about one-third of the global gross domestic product ($16 trillion) is generated by projects. Public projects, like investments in road infrastructure or information technology often consume large budgets. The number of publications devoted to public projects management, as well as the growing budgets they involve, point to increasing interest in this type of projects. One can easily find hundreds of pages describing specific solutions for public projects implementation online, with some of them cited in the references section of this article. It is evident that the importance of public projects is growing rapidly. However, to date there exists no consistent model for public projects management. This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework that addresses this gap.

The paper elaborates on, and further develops the concept of National Public Projects Implementation System (NPPIS) defined by Gasik (2014), who defined basic areas of public projects management and governance.

The research, on which the paper is based, consisted of three key stages. First, the literature and Internet resources published by institutions and organizational units responsible for public projects were analyzed, resulting with data collection from over 70 countries. At the second stage, a survey was conducted amongst people engaged in public projects management, with 512 respondents from over 60 countries.

The research, on which the paper is based, started from the review of literature and internet resources published by institutions and organizational units responsible for public projects management. More than 70 countries were analyzed at this stage. The third phase of the research consisted of face-to-face interviews with 36 public project actors from 6 countries (United States, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Argentina, and Poland). One of the goals of both the survey and the interviews was triangulation of data collected in the first phase of the project by the Internet review, i.e. verification whether earlier identified practices are really performed and beneficiary for project goals. The other goal of interviews was gaining deeper knowledge of public project implementation practices.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Stanislaw Gasik

Warsaw, Poland

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Dr. Stanisław Gasik, PMP is an adjunct professor at Vistula University in Warsaw, Poland. He holds M. Sc. in mathematics and Ph. D. in organization sciences (with specialty on project management), both from University of Warsaw. Stanisław has over 20 years of experience in project management, consulting, teaching and implementing PM organizational solutions. He has lectured at global PMI and IPMA congresses and other conferences. He was a significant contributor to PMI’s PMBOK® Guide and PMI Standard for Program Management and contributed to other PMI standards. His professional and research interests include public projects, portfolio management, project management maturity, and project knowledge management. He may be contacted at [email protected] or [email protected]

 

Social Project Management

SECOND EDITION

Gilbert Silvius

University of Applied Sciences

The Netherlands


Abstract

The last 10 to 12 years has seen the spectacular rise of social media and online social networks, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Yammer, Google+ and LinkedIn. The use of these media is not only growing in terms of active users, but also in intensity of use. Given the importance of communication and collaboration in projects, it can be expected that social media also provide good opportunities for application in project teams and project management. However, the availability of documented experiences, research and ‘best practices’ of the use of social media in projects is still quite limited. This paper reflects on the content and contributions of the book “Strategic Integration of Social Media into Project Management Practice”. This book provides an overview of opportunities, barriers, technologies, limitations and experiences of social media in projects, by a diverse coverage of studies and applications from Europe, North America, South America, Africa and Asia.

The different contributions and cases show that Social media and Web 2.0 technologies provide great opportunities to enable teams, especially virtual teams, to collaborate and share information, thereby enhancing project collaboration and coordination. However, social media also allows project managers to take this development even further and to make project management truly social. ‘Social Project Management’, recognizing that project teams are part of a broader project community, which is both formal and informal, and that engaging with that community is the key to getting things done.

Keywords: Project management, Social media.

JEL code: M1: Business Administration

Introduction

The last 10 to 12 years has seen the spectacular rise of social media and online social networks, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Yammer, Google+ and LinkedIn. The use of these media is not only growing in terms of active users, but also in intensity of use. Especially since the introduction of smartphones and other mobile internet devices, using the social media is literally a ‘finger tap’ away. And although concerns about privacy and misuse of personal data may discourage certain users to engage in these media, the largest social media (Facebook, QQ and WhatsApp) are reporting active users’ numbers of between 700 and 1.400 million people. That is almost 1/5th of world population and roughly half of all people with an internet connection.

The role social media play in the social life of their users can hardly be overestimated. The way people express and present themselves on social media may be considered an inseparable part of their lifestyle and existence (Silvius and Kavaliauskaite, 2014). Also in the professional context, the use of social media is developing. The ease of use of social media, their rapidly developing functionality and their mobile accessibility, make them an efficient tool for team communication and collaboration. Some organizations even redesigned their corporate intranets and knowledge sharing systems as social media. In part replacing top-down structuring of information by bottom up inputs, discussion, personal profiling and ad-hoc collaboration.

Given the importance of (team) collaboration and (stakeholder) communication in projects, it can be expected that social media also provide good opportunities for application in project teams and project management (Harrin, 2010). However, the availability of documented experiences, research and ‘best practices’ of the use of social media in projects, is still quite limited.

This paper reflects on the content and contributions of the book “Strategic Integration of Social Media into Project Management Practice” (Silvius, 2016). This book provides an overview of opportunities, barriers, technologies, limitations and experiences of social media in projects in 18 chapters, that provide a diverse coverage of studies and applications from Europe, North America, South America, Africa and Asia.

Following this introduction, the paper is structured in three paragraphs. The next paragraph will provide an overview of the content of the book. The third paragraph, Discussion and reflection, will reflect upon this content and discuss the lessons that may be learned from the book. The final paragraph of this paper will provide some conclusions and will discuss the concept of ‘social project management’.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the author

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GILBERT SILVIUS

Utrecht, The Netherlands

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Dr. Gilbert Silvius
  (1963) is professor of project and programme management at LOI University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands and senior research associate at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa. He initiated and developed the first MSc in Project Management program in the Netherlands and is considered a leading expert in the field of project management. Gilbert has published over a 100 academic papers and several books. He holds a PhD degree in information sciences from Utrecht University and masters’ degrees in economics and business administration.

As a practitioner, Gilbert has over 20 years experience in organizational change and IT projects. He is principal consultant at Van Aetsveld, project and change management, and is a member of the international enable2change network of project management experts. He can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Customer Centric Project Management

SECOND EDITION

Engaging stakeholders is not just to manage changes to requirements

Charles Villanyi Bokor

The CERP Group

Ottawa, CANADA


ABSTRACT

Customer Centric Project Management (CCPM) is defined as the continuous re-examination, evolution and integration of organizational strategy, desired outcomes, stakeholders’ vital needs and expectations, business processes, and project development methodology, into the enabling technology project’s mandate and deliverables. It is to produce deliverables/outputs that are fit for the purpose and can be leveraged to achieving the intended outcome.

CCPM is based on empirical observations and current literature on project management and requirements change management, as well as on limited trials and test. When approved by executives, CCPM engages stakeholders to define the outcome and continuously during the project development lifecycle, enhance the vital requirements that define the output to be produced. It is often viewed by IT as involving ‘them’ in what ‘we’ do. CCPM focuses less on how we meet estimated schedules or costs and more on what are the vital outputs so corporations can create business value. It is not new, but this return to the obvious requires a cultural shift, and holds the involved senior executives, system owners, business analysts and the project manager, accountable.

Key Words: project development, customer centric, business requirements, requirements definition process, project management, requirements change management, project development team, outcome, methodology, value, accountability, project failure.

THE PROBLEM

In a recent article on the “10 common causes of IT project failure” [Carlson, 2013] one of the causes was: “Letting users delay projects by constantly requesting tweaks”. According to this cited cause of project failure and common belief, allowing business requirements to be changed post system design (that is based on the requirements) and during project development, i.e. allowing tweaks, may force the designed and partially developed project to be reworked, delaying the project and or adding costs that were not budgeted. A 1996 article [McConnell. 1996] noted that: “Studies have found that reworking defective requirements, design, and code typically consumes 40 to 50 percent of the total cost of software development (Jones 1986).”. Such significant variance between the pre-design estimated and the eventual cost of delivery or time to deliver, can in turn fail and have failed IT projects. Thus according to this school of thought changes to requirements should be limited to minimize changes to schedules and costs.

Limiting customer requested ‘tweaks’ or changes to the requirements is considering the changes to be less important than the originally stated requirements. It implies that the customer was not aware that the requested changes can be postponed. Not easily allowing changes to requirements implies that the customers who presented the original requirements and the Business Analysts (BA) who elaborated them and consequently defined the project’s output, knew the right or best business solution with which to create the expected business value or outcome, which is the original (not new) and the future definition of project success. It implies that they have expressed all vital customer business needs and expectations at the time the requirements were gathered and defined. It further implies that since the time the requirements were defined no one has learned or identified a better way to solve the business problem. In other words, due to an organizational flaw that prevents the organization from innovating or naivety there has not been any learning during the development of the project. By keeping the list of requirements static, the organization implicitly declares, that those who can prevent the additional effort to develop the changes or tweaks or act on opportunities to improve needed capability to be made, can decide on the eventual business results. By not making changes the mandated functionality is delivered over the significantly higher cost of an enhanced system indicating that being on-time, on-schedule and / or within budget is the organization’s priority.

People still exist who believe that a project should and could get all user requirements documented [waterfall concept] before project design and development. Some people still believe that people, organizations or project teams can if they try, involve the client/customer business experts and produce the list of requirements that does not need any further changes.

IT spending in Canada is in the neighborhood of $270 billion per year based on it being $2.68 trillion in the US [NY Times, 2013]. The annual cost of IT project failures is $1.2 trillion in the US and $6.2 globally [Sessions, 2009]. As a generalization, the lifetime cost of an application is about 6.7 times [Outsystems] its initial development cost and some or most of this cost is to fund what many in the profession term “PHASE II”, which is the ensuing phase to develop the needed requirements that were not delivered in Phase I. We know and now must practice how to develop projects that deliver the right functionality for a fraction of the cost we spend on them today.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 3rd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Charles Bokor

Ottawa, Canada

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Charles Villanyi Bokor
is a Strategic Management Consultant focused on Leading to Better Decisions. Principal activities include Business Transformation, Problem Project Recovery & Leadership, Strategic Planning. Charles works mostly in Ottawa but has successfully completed assignments in Florida, Wales, Malaysia, Sweden and Australia, and was key-note speaker in Johannesburg South Africa and Victoria BC. Formal education includes an Executive Development and Diploma in Management (McGill University), M.Sc. Mathematics (Université de Grenoble, and U. de Montréal) and B. Sc. Mathematics (Concordia University). He was: Program Director of the Corporate Performance Management Program, Sprott, Carleton; Director of IS/IM at Royal Trust; and at Northern Telecom; CMC; CMC Board Member; PMI-OVOC Board Member; Governor of ICCC; is ITIL Certified and a TBS Independent Project Reviewer. Email: [email protected]

 

 

Insurance for Project Managers

SECOND EDITION

Microeconomical impact factor for project management – Professional liability (Indemnity) insurance for project managers

By Emīls Pūlmanis

University of Latvia, Professional Association of Project Managers,
State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia

Riga, Latvia


Abstract

Project managers have a great deal of responsibilities, whether it’s overseeing production, ensuring key objectives are met or working to complete projects on time and on budget. A project manager, however, could also be held responsible for any errors or omissions that a client feels you may have made during the course of your duties.

Many project managers and companies have Commercial General Liability Insurance in place. Unfortunately, these types of policies typically don’t cover professional services or advice. As a result, project oriented organisations and project managers’ could face legal action and be held personally responsible for any financial damages to the client.

Paper analyse professional liability (indemnity) insurance types and impact factors in project management as risk cost reduction as well as insurance environment in the European Union member state – Latvia. Empirical research and insurance companies’ survey shows that there is still different approach of defining project management practices and project managers’ responsibility giving their professional services. That leads also to problems what causes by lack of regulatory framework of project management recognition as professional service.

Key words: Project management, project manager, professional liability insurance, risk management.

JEL code: D80, G2, G32, O22.

Introduction

Risk management is one aspect of project management and like quality management, environmental management and safety management it is about the project or the service we deliver to our clients. Liability management on the other hand is about managing the impact of claims for loss on our business. Project management is described also as activities what implemented in risk environment, what requires to take appropriate management steps to reduce risks at micro-economical level in each project.

Paper analyse project management micro-economical aspects as risk limitation factor choosing professional indemnity insurance for project managers. As a case study author analysed professional liability insurance environment in EU member state – Latvia.

Relevant provisions depend on the nature of the project. However they are usually governed by the conditions specified by the forms of ‘model’ contracts/agreements issued by professional bodies or those in common use in the construction industry. Typical examples of insurances applicable to construction projects include:

  • Contractors’ all-risk (CAR) policies, usually covering loss or damage to the works and the materials for incorporation in the works; the contractor’s plant and equipment’s including temporary site accommodation; the contractor’s personal property and that of his employees (e.g. tools and equipment). The CAR policy is normally taken out by the contractor but should insure in the joint names of the contractor and the client (employer). The subcontractors may or may not be jointly insured under the CAR policy.
  • Public liability policy – this insures the contractor against the legal liability to pay damages or compensation or other costs to anyone who suffers death, bodily injury or other loss or damage to their property by the activities of the contractor.
  • Employers’ liability policy – every contractor will have this either on a companywide basis, covering both staff and labour, or on a separate basis for the head office and for each site separately.

Professional indemnity (PI) – the purpose of this is to cover the liabilities arising out of ‘duty of care’. Typically, the consultants (including the project manager) will require this policy to cover their design or similar liabilities and liabilities for negligence in undertaking supervision duties. In the case of a design and build contract, the contractor has to take out a separate PI policy, as designing is not covered by the normal CAR policy (Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development).

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Emīls Pūlmanis

Riga, Latvia

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Emīls Pūlmanis
is a member of the board of the Professional Association of Project Managers in Latvia and development project manager at State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia. He has gained a BSc. in engineer economics, a professional master’s degree in project management (MSc.proj.mgmt) and currently is a PhD candidate with a specialization in project management. He has elaborated and directed a number of domestic and foreign financial instruments co-financed projects. He was a National coordinator for a European Commission-funded program – the European Union’s financial instruments PHARE program in Latvia. Over the past seven years he has worked in the public administration project control and monitoring field. He was a financial instrument expert for the Ministry of Welfare and the European Economic Area and Norwegian Financial Mechanism implementation authority as well as an expert for the Swiss – Latvian cooperation program as a NGO grant scheme project evaluation expert. He has gained international and professional project management experience in Germany, the United States and Taiwan. In addition to his professional work, he is also a lecturer at the University of Latvia for the professional master study program in Project management. He has authored more than 35 scientific publications and is actively involved in social activities as a member of various NGO’s.

Emils can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Emils Pulmanis, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/emils-pulmanis/

 

Facilitative Leadership

SECOND EDITION

Facilitative Leader and Leadership development during a mega project implementation phase: A case study

By Chrisjan R van Wyk,

Institute of Transdisciplinary Development,

Pretoria, South Africa


ABSTRACT

Organisations are turning to project managers to deliver one-of-a-kind or complex initiatives required to remain competitive. Despite the formalisation of the project management profession up to 65% of industrial capital projects fail to meet business objectives. Research literature suggests that project managers require leader and leadership skills to contribute to the successful completion of projects, meeting business objectives and ensuring customer satisfaction throughout the project life cycle. Fortunately, leader and leadership skills can be developed, but due to the uniqueness and temporary nature of projects different methodologies are required to develop these skills.

This study utilised a case study research approach and evaluated the benefits of facilitative leader and leadership development of the project management team on a mega project over a two-year period. Facilitative development combined the benefits of on-the-job training linked to a strategic business goal, action learning, coaching and the development of the emotional intelligence of the project management team.

This research shows that the development of the emotional intelligence of the project management team during the project contributed to both the personal development of each team member and enhanced the efficacy of the management team. The two-year development process entrenched the learning and development of the leader and leadership skills of the project team members. This development contributed to the successful completion and ramp up of the project. The model developed from this research can contribute to the continuous development of project managers and project teams to enhance the success rate of capital projects.

INTRODUCTION

As organizations are required to change and adapt in the new millennium project management is seen as the “new” form of general management used to scope, plan and deliver one-of-a-kind or complex initiatives (Pant and Baroudi, 2008). Despite the formalization of project management as a profession and the development of systems and tools to assist projects and project managers, 65% of industrial projects with budgets larger than $1 billion (in 2010 real terms) to meet business objectives (Merrow, 2011).

The current mostly used standard approach to project management is the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) (2013a) guide, developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Although the PMBOK® guide states that “effective project managers require a balance of technical, interpersonal, and conceptual skills that will help them analyze situations and interact appropriately…” they offer little in how to acquire or use interpersonal and leadership skills effectively on projects. Project leadership is required to influence management, peers and stakeholders to buy-in to the vision of the project and ensure alignment in defining the project objectives (Cleland, 1995). The uniqueness and temporary nature of projects and project teams imply that traditional leader and leadership development will not be as effective as what is used for operational organizations. The question is therefore not “is leadership development required?” but rather “how must project leadership development be approached in project organizations?” A balanced approach to teaching the technical (hard) and interpersonal (soft) skills of leadership will contribute to more successful project outcomes (Cleland, 1995; Pant and Baroudi, 2008; Day, 2000; Thompson, 2010). Leaders learn and develop through challenging work, solving complex problems and leading teams (Hirst et al., 2004).

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

The research objectives are: (1) to investigate and determine the benefit of leader and leadership development of the project management team during the implementation phase of a mega mining project as a case in South Africa, and (2) to determine if the leader and leadership development approach had a sustainable impact on the leader and leadership skills of the project management team.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 3rd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2016.  It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Chrisjan van Wyk

Pretoria, South Africa

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Chrisjan van Wyk
has a mechanical engineering background and has been involved in projects in the metals and minerals industry since 1992. He started his career in project management in 2001. He has managed various projects as a client project manager as well as project manager for the EPCM’s or EPC contractors.

His project experience includes executing projects in steel plants, platinum smelters, base metal refineries, sulphuric acid plants, diamond processing plants, uranium processing plants, open pit iron ore mining and processing. Infrastructure projects included railway lines, water pumping systems, roads, municipal services and housing developments.

His strengths are strategic thinking, project execution strategy, leadership and team development. He believes that successful projects are delivered by successful teams and therefore places a huge focus on leadership, team development and team integration.

He completed his M.Eng in project management (Cum Laude) in 2015. He also founded a consulting company in 2015 which focuses on the leadership development of project managers and project teams to contribute to project success. He can be contacted at [email protected].

 

The Conscious Project Leader

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj48-Jul2016-Carvajal-BOOKBook Title:     The Conscious Project Leader
Author:  Colin D Ellis
Publisher:  Colin D Ellis
List Price:   29.95 AUD       
Format:  soft cover
Publication Date:  2016      
ISBN: 978-0-9945376-0-7
Reviewer:     Vickie Carvajal, PMP
Review Date:   June/2016

 


Introduction

In this book, the author’s focus was to higlight details of what makes a Conscious Project leader and introduces the Consious Project Leader Model, for which key components are Leadership, Culture and Methods.

The author higlights the differences between tranditional project managers and  conscious project leaders.  He reviews the differences between leadership and management as that’s what the author sees as key to understand in order to be a conscious project leader.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book was structured in three sections:

Section 1 – Leadership

Section 2 – Culture

Section 3 – Methods

Within each section, the author provided supporting documentation via multiple chapters. There are 52 chapters in the book.  At the end of each chapter, the author provides recommendations on items to read, watch, do or post that are in line or support the content of each chapter.

Highlights

Section 1: Leadership

In the Leadership section, the author provides insight into the leadership component of the conscious project leader model.  He defines leadership for the reader and confirms that in order to become a conscious project leader, a project manager should have an understanding of and desire to practice leadership by being a person that serves others and be the kind of person others would like to be.  The author also goes into detail on how certain traits and skills such as humor, gratitude, active listening, self-awareness, empathy, generosity, relationship-building and understanding of the team members, among others, are key to becoming an effective leader that others want to follow.

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About the Reviewer

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Vickie Carvajal 

Texas, USA

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Vickie Carvajal
, PMP has more than 20 years of experience working in application services and consulting. She has provided project management for a variety of clients in various industries and countries. Vickie has a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Angelo State University and a Master’s degree in Business Administration from Southwest Texas State University.

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Key questions to increase project owner’s oversight in mega projects

STUDENT PAPER

By Tariq Hussain, M.Eng., PMP

Calgary, Alberta, Canada


Abstract

Project organizations utilize a phase gate process for execution of mega projects and successful completion of all phases indicates that the project has been completed and has achieved its objectives set by project owner. This increases project owner’s responsibility for oversight, project owners can accomplish this by asking some key questions about deliverables of each project phase which will increase their visibility and control, help keep track of progress of the phase deliverables, enable them to make informed decisions, help identify risks and address them proactively and ensures that the project teams attain the benefits of the phase gate process.

Background and Need

“Projects and programs are the vehicles for delivery of corporate strategies, effective project governance, within the corporate governance framework, has become a serious concern for organizations, offering company directors clear visibility and control of non-routine corporate operations and delivery capability” (Crawford, Cooke-Davies, 2005). “Effective management and oversight of complex construction projects is a critical challenge for project owners in the public sector” (Deloitte, 2007).

Project organizations utilize a phase gate process for execution of mega projects and by meeting the requirements of each phase they complete the projects successfully. The project owner’s team reviews the phase gate requirements to pass the gate, which ensures that the project achieves its objectives for that phase and can move to the next phase. Successful completion of all phases indicates that the project has been completed and has achieved its objectives set by project owner.

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Table 1.1: Phase gate process by Dr. Lavingia (2006).

This increases project owner’s responsibility for oversight through all phases of the project in order to keep track of progress and make informed decisions. This paper recommends senior executives or project sponsors in project owner organizations to ask some key questions for each project phase to increase their oversight. These questions are focused on goals for each phase and must be answered by the project teams in addition to completing the checklist for each phase gate. These questions will help project owners to identify key deliverables for each phase, track progress of the key phase deliverables, move onto the next phase with confidence, make timely and informed decisions, identify risks and address them proactively, use archived data and lessons learned, and ensure that the project teams benefit from the phase gate process.

More…

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About the Author

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Tariq Hussain

Calgary, AB, Canada

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Tariq Hussain
holds a Master’s of Engineering degree in Project Management from the University of Calgary and a Project Management Professional (PMP) designation. He received his BSc in Pakistan.  Tariq has over 20 years of experience working in planning & scheduling and project management fields, in oil and gas, power transmission, telecommunication and pharmaceutical industries. His current research interests include PMO, project governance and the governance of mega projects in the oil and gas industry.  Mr. Hussain can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Brexit: Threat or Opportunity?

COMMENTARY

Dr David Hillson, PMI Fellow, HonFAPM, FIRM

The Risk Doctor Partnership

United Kingdom


Today marks the start of a new era of uncertainty, following the recent referendum vote by the UK population to leave the European Union (EU). The forthcoming British exit from the EU (so-called “Brexit”) will raise the degree of uncertainty to new high levels in many areas, including politics, trade, international relations, travel, employment, and so on. The result has already produced major volatility on global stock markets and financial exchanges, and the British Prime Minister has already announced his intention to step down within the next three months.

You may view this new reality as a good thing or you may not, or perhaps you have no strong opinion either way. In any case, the fallout is likely to affect many of us in ways that we cannot currently predict. One thing is clear: the UK’s exit from the EU is not a Black Swan because it will certainly happen. But the rustling of wings is becoming louder, and we’re bound to see one or two newly-hatched cygnets emerging in the near future.

How can risk-based thinking help us in this situation?

  • Firstly, we need to recognise that uncertainty is natural, inevitable and to be expected.
  • Secondly, we should have confidence in our ability to respond to uncertainty appropriately, either in proactive and protective ways for foreseeable risks, or in developing resilient contingency plans for the unforeseen.
  • And thirdly, perhaps most importantly, we must remember that risk includes both upside and downside. There is no doubt that some of the risks we face threaten us with unpleasant consequences, and we need to minimise these threats wherever we can. But the new political realities will also present us with new opportunities, which we should identify, exploit and maximise as far as possible.

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About the Author

Dr. David Hillson
Dr. David Hillson

The Risk Doctor

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Dr David Hillson CMgr FRSA FIRM FCMI HonFAPM PMI-Fellow is The Risk Doctor (www.risk-doctor.com).  As an international risk consultant, David is recognised as a leading thinker and expert practitioner in risk management. He consults, writes and speaks widely on the topic and he has made several innovative contributions to the field. David’s motto is “Understand profoundly so you can explain simply”, ensuring that his work represents both sound thinking and practical application.

David Hillson has over 25 years’ experience in risk consulting and he has worked in more than 40 countries, providing support to clients in every major industry sector, including construction, mining, telecommunications, pharmaceutical, financial services, transport, fast-moving consumer goods, energy, IT, defence and government. David’s input includes strategic direction to organisations facing major risk challenges, as well as tactical advice on achieving value and competitive advantage from effectively managing risk.

David’s contributions to the risk discipline over many years have been recognised by a range of awards, including “Risk Personality of the Year” in 2010-11. He received both the PMI Fellow award and the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) for his work in developing risk management. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the UK Association for Project Management (APM), where he has actively led risk developments for nearly 20 years.  David Hillson is an active Fellow of the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), and he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) to contribute to its Risk Commission. He is also a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and a Member of the Institute of Directors (IOD).

Dr Hillson can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works previously published in the PM World Journal by Dr David Hillson, visit his author showcase at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-david-hillson/