SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Steven Fakrenkrog nominated ISO/TC 258 Chairman

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 


The Technical Management Board (TMB) of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has announced that Mr Steven Fahrenkrog is to be the next Chairman of the Technical Committee (TC), ISO/TC 258 for Project, Programme, and Portfolio Management. Mr Fahrenkrog, representing the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), assumes ISO/TC 258 chairmanship when Mr Miles Shepherd’s term expires at the end of 2016. Mr Shepherd has served in this role on behalf of the British Standards Institute (BSI). The nomination follows Mr Shepherd’s earlier announcement that that he would not be seeking an extension at the end of his leadership term, ending at the end of 2016. Mr Fahrenkrog assumes leadership at the beginning of 2017. Mr Karl Best, also representing ANSI, continues as ISO/TC 258 Secretary.

pmwj52-nov2016-vaskimo-fahrenkrog-photo

The two Chairmen (from left to right): Mr Steven Fahrenkrog and Mr Miles Shepherd

Mr Fahrenkrog, the newly nominated Chairman of ISO/TC 258, is very pleased to have been chosen to be the next Chairman of ISO/TC 258: “I look forward to working with the Heads of Delegation from the countries that are P members to the committee, the Convenors of the Working Groups and Study Groups that work within the committee and the subject matter experts that do the hard work required to develop the standards produced by the committee. I also look forward to working with the members of the Chairman’s Advisory Group and the Technical Development Group to provide input to the Technical Committee. I hope Karl Best and I will be as good a team at helping the TC as Miles and Karl have been.”

“I wish to thank Miles for his leadership since he became Chairman of ISO/PC 236 and later ISO/TC 258. I also want to thank him for his assistance and counsel during our transition period.” Mr Fahrenkrog can be contacted at [email protected] .

Most people aware of ISO/TC 258 will be familiar with Mr Fahrenkrog – also known as F9 – as he has been active in ISO/TC 258 as well as ISO/PC 236, the predecessor to ISO/TC 258. Mr. Fahrenkrog has recently served in the role of Convener of ISO/TC 258 WG1 which developed the International Standard 21504, Project, programme, and portfolio management – Guidance on portfolio management, which was published by ISO on 1 July 2015.

Mr Fahrenkrog served 30 years in the US Navy, retiring as a Captain in December of 1999. During his Navy career, he spent the first half flying helicopters and the second half buying and selling helicopters for various services of the United States and several other countries. Mr Fahrenkrog served as the Commanding Officer of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron 3 and Major Program Manager of the US Marine Corps Light/Attach Helicopter Program.

Mr Fahrenkrog joined PMI in July 2000 as the PMI Standards Manager and held several other positions of increasing responsibility, retiring from PMI as Vice President of Special Programs in September of 2012…

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

Jouko-Vaskimo
Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

flag-finland


Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist. Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258. Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted atmailto:[email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51 .

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

 

Leapfrogging in Project Management

And Welcome to the November 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the November 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 52nd edition again reflects the international nature of this publication; 29 original articles, papers and other works by 37 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. The primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, so please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I discuss an issue that I thought I recognized about a year ago; now I think it is a very real trend and perhaps an opportunity for those new to project management and those in developing economies. But it also introduces new risks.

Leapfrogging in Project Management

Leapfrog is a very old children’s game whereby a child bends over while another spreads his legs, places hands on the bending child’s back and leaps forward over the bending child. Then the one who leaped bends over and the original bending child leaps over the new bending child. I played this game when I was very young and actually do not remember the objective; I think it was to cross a yard or space faster, perhaps in a race.

Leapfrogging as a verb, however, has come to symbolize jumping over something in order to move ahead faster, for example, leapfrogging a generation or older technology. The best example that I have seen in recent years is the leapfrogging of old telecoms technology in Africa whereby countries decided not to invest in networks of landline-based telephones but rather went straight to mobile phones. Rather than spending huge sums and years to implement land lines, these countries promoted and supported cellular mobile phone systems, companies, technologies and networks, thereby “leapfrogging” decades of telecoms technologies and investment. The result can now be seen across the continent where anyone with a mobile phone can connect to the internet and communicate with anyone in the world, often as easily as anyone in a fully developed economy.

I now see signs of the same thing happening in the project management world, most apparently in academia in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Where it has taken decades for major universities in North America and Western Europe to introduce project management into undergraduate and graduate degree programs, universities in many developing countries have recognized the importance of programs and projects to economic development (and global competition) and have introduced project management courses and degree programs. There may now be more project management degree programs in Nigeria and Pakistan, for example, than in any European country other than the United Kingdom. Project Management degree programs are widespread in South Africa and Turkey, among others, with becoming more visible in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Panama, Peru and others. This trend seems to be accelerating.

Academic research in developing countries also seems to be more aggressive, more practice oriented and increasing. The research that I’ve seen from Kenya and Nigeria, for example, is aimed at solving local problems, improving local industry performance or addressing national/regional issues – all from a project management perspective. (See Alan Stretton’s paper in the October PMWJ for some perspective on this topic.)

More developing countries also seem to be recognizing program/project management as a national competence, with more government bodies embracing enterprise project management, maturity models, centers of excellence and project management offices. It has taken decades for American government agencies to reach this point (many are still not there); organizations in Africa and Latin America are leapfrogging to OPM best practices in one generation. (See my 2009 paper on this topic, republished this month as a Second Edition)

You can also see this among individuals and organizations in many countries with their very visible interest in project management certifications. The number of Project Management Professionals (PMPs) and PRINCE2 certified professionals around the world has exploded in recent years. There are hundreds of certified PM professionals now in countries where the PM profession itself is only a few years old.

Leapfrogging is also happening with P/PM concepts and approaches in Europe and North America. The topic of “agility” for example has captured the attention of executives in many organizations; it’s no longer acceptable to take years or even months to implement organizational changes or PM best practices. Executives want improvement faster. Agile methodology is moving from IT project management to organizational change management to mainstream programs and projects; learning and changing must happen faster everywhere. Other examples include resilience, sustainability, reference class forecasting, and value management.

At the highest levels of P/PM research and experience in Europe, I think there is a growing appreciation for the role of human psychology, economics, statistics (think big data) and politics in the success or failure of projects (and project management). Top down approaches to program risk management have led to leapfrogging; I believe the Scandinavian School of project management has this concept at its heart. Such concepts as the Successive Principle (Lichtenberg 2016) and self-organizing teams will soon move to the forefront of advanced project management.

Similar trends occur with P/PM tools and technologies, with new cloud-based solutions introduced almost monthly in many countries. This has been happening in the United States for many years, really beginning with the introduction of the personal computer in the 1980s and accelerating with internet-based solutions in recent years. Every project manager wants a better tool; every organization wants to “leapfrog” to the latest and greatest technology.

Leapfrogging in project management carries significant risks however. If organizations embrace the latest tools and concepts without some resident knowledge of fundamental project management topics such as project lifecycles, cost/resource planning, scheduling, risk management, stakeholder engagement and other “PMBOK topics”, there will be project failures. If those planning and managing large projects know nothing about earned value, those projects will most likely fail. If there is no knowledge of project portfolio management, the wrong projects will be financed with time and money wasted.

Discussion of any of the topics above could be vastly expanded. These paragraphs were just to introduce this topic. Those new to project management and those in developing economies should carefully assess current topics, recognize good practices, determine what is most beneficial, and embrace the newest and best. Be aware of the risks, but neither should you nor your organization reinvent the wheel. Leapfrog ahead!

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works. Six featured papers are included this month, on some very important topics. Alan Stretton has contributed another good paper, sharing his decades of experience and knowledge about project management. Isaac Abuya and his co-authors have contributed another important paper about conditions on orphan support projects in Kenya, the topic of Isaac’s PhD research at the University of Nairobi. Tororiro Chaza in Zimbabwe has authored a very important paper on how to fight corruption with project governance. Dr. Chima Okereke in UK has authored an important paper on how PPM can be a “silver bullet” for advancing development in emerging economies (including his homeland of Nigeria). David Tain in Canada and professors Abu Dief, Aly Kotb and El Beheiry in Saudi Arabia has contributed papers on strategic alliances and arbitration/claims management for major international construction projects. These are all excellent contributions to the P/PM literature.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

PMP Practice Makes Perfect

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj52-nov2016-regan-bookBook Title:   PMP Practice Makes Perfect
Authors: John A Estrella, Charles Duncan, Sami Zahran, James L Haner, Rubin Jen
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
List Price: $39.99 USA; $47.99 CAN
Format: soft cover, 383 pages
Publication Date: Feb 2012    
ISBN: 978-1-118-16976-6
Reviewer: Emma Regan, MBA
Review Date: Oct 2016

 


Introduction

The introduction has the information needed explaining why one would need to pass the PMP exam and the advantages of being PMP certified. It also provides the requirements needed to in order to sit for the exam. It does a breakdown of the questions by process group.

This helps the reader understand if they can qualify to be certified as a PMP or what requirements they need in order to do so. It helps in preparation for the process group and what area needs more studying.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Chapter 1 is quick review question which are broken down to 9 knowledge areas. It is does not have multiply choice questions. They are questions which are to test once familiarity with the knowledge areas. The answers are in Chapter two so one can use them to see if they got the questions correct. This is great because they assist the reader in knowing where there are of weakness is and they can review the topic again.

There are 4 practice tests and each contain 205 questions. There is an answer key and also an explanation as to why the answer was selected and the area of reference in the PMBOK guide 4th Ed.

Highlights

The book has great questions that the student can use in preparation for the exam. The practice questions are random just as the exam. They are 205 per exam and this is great practice since the exam is 200 questions.

Highlights: What I liked!

I like that the book has over 1000 PMP practice questions and the answers. The reference page in the PMBOK guide is helpful when I need further explanation as to why the answer was chosen. The breakdown of the exams to 205 is a great number that way I can practice as if I was doing the exam. This helps in the preparation for the PMP exam.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj52-nov2016-regan-photo
Emma Regan

North Texas, USA

flag-usa

 


Emma Regan
is an accomplished Financial Service Professional with a broad knowledge base developed in project Management, Mortgage services, Accounting, and Bankruptcy. She has an undergraduate degree in Management Accounting and an MBA in Management and is currently studying to pass the PMP exam. Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

UK Project Management Round Up

REPORT

Infrastructure, Energy and Other Projects in UK, including HS2, Thames Tideway Tunnel, Hinkley Point C, London runway 3, raising of the HMS Invincible, Palace of Westminster reconstruction and tunnel under Stonehenge

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 


INTRODUCTION

This past month has been pretty boring with BREXIT dominating even though precious little happened on that front until just before closing for press. Fuel prices have been increasing due as much to OPEC production restrictions as a weak £, British consumers are still spending so many businesses are claiming the Referendum result is ‘good for Britain’ while the economic figures for the period immediately after the vote are holding up pretty well, on the surface.

That is the key right now – things look good on the surface. The FTSE is riding high but then most of the stocks are quoted in $US so are benefiting from the weak £. The Bank of England has raised its estimation of economic growth this year to 2% so what’s to worry anyone? Well, the main issue in the coming months will be higher input costs, rising inflation which will be coupled with wage increase demands plus lower output prices for exporters.

On the project front, the big news concerns Hinkley Point, London’s 3rd runway, the HS2 programme and London’s new sewerage system although there is much other news of projects both large and small. So this month, I’ll be looking at infrastructure projects, energy, national economic policy as it affects projects, and a few other smaller items should there be space.

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

Apart from the Government’s Infrastructure Projects Portfolio supervised by the IPA (note this is not the beer of similar abbreviation), there are many infrastructure projects ‘out there’. Perhaps the most eye-catching are the top trio of Hinkley Point Nuclear Power Station III, the London 3rd Runway and the new rail link connecting the South of England to the so called Northern Powerhouse or as it is fondly called, HS2.

Taking the train first, HS2 is beset by a barrage of moaners, NIMBYs and other critics. This seems to have proved too much for its Chief Executive, Simon Kirby, who decamped to Rolls-Royce. As the first phase of this massive engineering project, the upgrade of the London to Birmingham line is due to receive Parliamentary approval before Christmas, this seems like taking the hand off the tiller at a crucial juncture. Members of Parliament have warned that a leaderless major project increases risk perceptions and weakens confidence in the whole project.

pmwj52-nov2016-shepherd-image

However, shortly after Kirby left, a report by Albion Economics claims that failing to complete the £50 billion project will cost the nation some 27,000 jobs by the end of the decade. This is the number of people employed by contractors and includes thousands of apprentices who many see as the key to improving Britain’s work force and productivity. Interestingly, amid all the noise over HS2 comes a whining lead article stating that the programme has spent £2 billion yet no track has been laid. Seems the journos and politicians forget that project need to be planned and preliminary work done, including purchase of land for said new track. As the image above shows, there is quite a bit of work in 2016 alone.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Shepherd-PHOTO
MILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

UK small flag

 

 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president, chair and a Fellow of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

Managing the Project of Your Life

SECOND EDITION

By Paul C. Dinsmore

DinsmoreCompass Consulting

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 


Since the 1990s, a recurrent theme has surfaced in studies and at forums on human resource behavior. The theme is known by sundry names. Here are some: Project You, The Brand Called You, Employability, You Incorporated, Looking out for Number 1: are these terms still a sign of the times? Does it confirm the shift in focus for professionals: a trip into egomania where the big “I” is the center of the Universe? Does it mean that organizations will be full of renegades who think more about themselves than the company goals? What does all the rhetoric about You Incorporated really mean?

Now well into the Twenty-First Century, the name “millennial”, also sometimes called the Y generation, has moved to the forefront. Millennials are generally people born between 1982 and 2002, making them a highly digital generation. Due to the aging work force, company personnel have morphed into a mixture of waning baby boomers and the growing number of millennials.

The trend of individuals being choosier about the kind of work they perform is indeed a direct outcome of the times. Mergers, sell-offs, downsizing, outsourcing and reengineering have left the “forever faithful to the company cause” with a bad taste. Hoards of these dedicated professionals found themselves out on streets, with no visible marketable skills. And those who are left within the company ranks know that their time may come.

Even the millennials who haven´t tasted the reality of company life, may have an awareness for what might be in store for them. Working at a job that isn´t what they dreamed of, and knowing that they don’t control their future career has surely left many millennials with a cautious posture

For companies and professionals to survive and prosper jointly in these twirling times of jostling priorities, a major initiative is required to align company goals with individuals’ goals. Such alignment, say for a company that works with gypsy-like “project junkies”, calls for a major shift in behavior on the part of both professionals and organizations. Once these goals are aligned and mutually understood, the probability for achieving mutual objectives is highly enhanced.

Companies are obliged to understand that they need to cater to the changing needs of the professional marketplace. If people can’t count on keeping their jobs, then undying loyalty with no regard for personal survival in a shrinking job market, is not a reasonable thing to ask. Thus organizations need to encourage their employees to develop their “lifetime projects” and share that with the company, just as the company must share its goals and objectives with the organization’s members. That alignment of individual objectives, ensures that, while the person and the company are jointly collaborating, mutual productivity is boosted.

Individuals, thus, need to have a clear vision of where they are going, and in what way personal goals and interests are complementary to those of the company. To fully understand this, a “life project” is called for, using project management tools based on the premise that life is a project. The development of such plans on the part of employees of all levels generates the basis upon which the alignment of objectives can take place.

Such a “life project” also generates a healthy fringe benefit. By using project management techniques, including a project breakdown structure, and life cycle planning techniques, employees are exposed to the basics of managing projects and will tend to apply them in the daily work place.

Here are the topics for individuals to develop a life plan using project management techniques.

  1. Life as a Project
  2. Life Models and Strategies
  3. Scoping Out Your Life
  4. Manage Your Time–Manage Your Life
  5. Money and Such
  6. The Quality of Life
  7. People from the inside Out
  8. Farming Stuff Out
  9. Communicating Every Which Way
  10. Life is a Risky Business
  11. Putting All the Pieces Together

 

  1. Life as a Project–a Sign of the Times

Free agents–self-employed, independent contractors and temps–made up 16% of the US workforce, numbering roughly 25 million in 1997. The number grows geometrically as more people are outplaced from companies and others decide to go it alone. By 2020, more than 40% of the US workforce will be so-called contingent workers, according to a study conducted by software company Intuit in 2010. That’s more than 60 million people. June Walker of New Mexico is a tax consultant whose says, “Free agency forces you to think about who you are and what you want to do with your life.”

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the PMI’98 Annual Seminars/Symposium in Long Beach, California, USA. It is republished here with the author’s permission.


 

About the Author

pmwj52-nov2016-dinsmore-photo
Paul C. Dinsmore

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Brazil flag

flag-usa




Paul C. Dinsmore
is an international speaker, executive coach and consultant on project management and organizational issues. He has authored or co-authored 20 management books, and has written more than one hundred professional papers and articles. Mr. Dinsmore is Board President of DinsmoreCompass, a training and consulting group focused on consulting, outsourcing, training, coaching and IT support. Prior to establishing his consulting practice in 1985, he worked for twenty years as a project manager and executive in the construction and engineering industry.

Mr. Dinsmore has performed consulting and training services for major companies including IBM, ENI-Italy, Petrobrás, General Electric, Mercedes Benz, Shell, Morrison Knudsen, the World Trade Institute, Westinghouse, Ford, Caterpillar, and Alcoa. His speaking and consulting practice has taken him to Europe, South America, South Africa, Japan, China, and Australia. The range of projects where Mr. Dinsmore has provided consulting services include company reorganization, project start-up, and training programs, as well as advisory and coaching functions for the presidents of major organizations.

He participates actively in the Project Management Institute, which awarded him its Distinguished Contributions Award as well as the prestigious title of Fellow of the Institute. As Executive Coach, he has extensively coached Company Owners and C-level executives in the fields of Oil & Gas, Construction, Engineereing, Organizational Consulting as well as Health Care and Services.

Mr. Dinsmore graduated from Texas Tech University and completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School. He can be reached at [email protected], or [email protected].

To view other works by Paul Dinsmore, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/paul-dinsmore/

 

 

Enterprise Social Networks

SERIES ARTICLE

Enterprise Social Networks (ESNs) – they’re not just about collaboration

Communicating Projects – The Series

By Ann Pilkington

The PR Academy

United Kingdom

 


We recently conducted some research at PR Academy, led by my co-director Dr Kevin Ruck, to look at the challenges and benefits of using Enterprise Social Networks (ESNs). The following article provides an overview of the report’s findings.

According to Global Industry Analysts, the global market for Enterprise Social Networking is expanding at a rapid rate globally and is forecast to reach US$4.8 billion by 2020. The main objective for ESN deployment is enterprise-wide communication and collaboration. However, associated benefits – such as an improved ability to visualise consumer insights for enhanced decision making and for improving business strategies – are expected to build momentum for ESN solutions. On a more practical communication level, internal social media are forecast to supplant email as the dominant form of workplace communication within a decade. However, despite these predictions, current adoption still seems to be slow and patchy. For example, in research in the US, Cardon and Marshall found that traditional communication channels are used more frequently and are considered more effective for team communication. However, they also found that Gen X and Gen Y business professionals are quite likely to consider social networking tools as the primary means for team communication in the future.

CHALLENGES OF USING ESNS

Our research shows that the key challenges to the successful implementation of ESNs mainly relate to the culture of organisations and their readiness to embrace two-way communication. These challenges include encouraging employees to post comments on blogs (68%), getting managers to reply to comments (64%), and gaining buy-in from senior management (62%).

ESN MANAGEMENT SKILLS GAPS

ESN management skills gaps provide evidence of a further barrier to the successful implementation of ESNs. The top five skills gaps cited by respondents include measuring the impact of using ESNs (53%), engaging senior managers to use an ESN (45%), integrating an ESN with other internal communication channels (44%), technical knowledge (42%) and community management skills (36%).

More…

To read entire article, click here

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project communications is by Ann Pilkington, founding director of the PR Academy (UK) and author of the book Communicating Projects published by Gower in 2013. Ann is one of the UK’s leading experts on communications; she shares her knowledge with project managers and teams around the world in this series in the PM World Journal.

 


 

About the Author

140507-pilkington-photo
Ann Pilkington

United Kingdom

flag-uk

 


Ann Pilkington
is the author of Communicating Projects published by Gower in 2013. She is a founding director of the PR Academy which provides qualifications, training and consultancy in all aspects of communication including change project communication and project management.

Information about Ann’s book, Communicating Projects, An End-to-End Guide to Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Effective Communication, can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/isbn/9781409453192.

Ann can be contacted at [email protected]

To see previous articles by Ann Pilkington, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ann-pilkington/

 

 

Affordable Project Management

COMMENTARY ARTICLE

BY Almahdy Eltonsy

Africa Service Manager
Affordable Care, Life Care Solutions and Ultrasound

Cairo, Egypt

 


The new “Value” Segment

Africa has a great potential for business growth specially in the infrastructure sector.

HealthCare is a challenging sector as it touches each citizen and need to be near to people.

Cannot wait for a road to build healthcare facility; Cannot wait for electricity to provide healthcare coverage.

The need is to provide the coverage with what exist.

With the economic challenges with a pressure to provide healthcare for all puts a great pressure on governments and healthcare manufacturers as the demand changed.

The demand is to serve high population with economical resources.

These factors created a demand for products that are “good enough” and competitively priced.

This segment of products raised big time.

This new segment is growing twice as fast as the industry (in some categories). This demands awareness of the emerging opportunity; global medical-product manufacturers have been looking to capture it and protect themselves from disrupters that could eventually move upstream.

The next challenge is the putting these products in duty with affordable life cycle.

Project execution or execution life cycle from Order to Cash should reflect the economical demands and the purpose of these products.

With affordable products, the whole product cycle should be affordable, it makes no sense to have affordable products with a high cost of execution and product life cycle.

The actual situation and challenges:

  • Affordable products with a low margin (sales margin).
  • Low risk mitigation and low hedging due to low priced equipment.
  • Relatively distributed in rural areas with low or no infrastructure (roads – telecom ..etc.).
  • Hard to find local trained labor to conduct the installation.
  • Low tech, primitive tools only available.
  • In some areas, security issues.

As a project managers with a full ownership of cost, team, … etc. what could be done?

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author                                  

pmwj33-Apr2015-Eltonsy-PHOTO
Almahdy Eltonsy

Cairo, Egypt

 flag-egypt



Almahdy Eltonsy
, IPMA – B is a Senior Project Manager in the HealthCare industry, and the first healthcare PM granted the IPMA-B certification in Egypt. Starting with Siemens in 1993, Almahdy has extensive technical and managerial experiences, gaining the ability to work cross-functionally in a time-intensive environment. One of the most important milestones in Almahdy’s project management career is Children’s Cancer Hospital in Egypt (57357) (www.57357.com ), a 30 Million Euro Project. As a GPM for this strategic pivotal project, the scope was not only project management but also the service management, in addition to work with accreditation bodies.

In 2012 Almahdy moved to GE HealthCare to work as a product service manager for Surgery – X-Ray – Intervention – Ultrasound – Life Care solutions, using his experience in leading the service team with project management methodology. Almahdy’s motive to change is to take a new challenge and exposure to new cultures and discipline, taking advantage of his technical and managerial skills and using the project management tool box in general management aspects.

In addition to his work in healthcare, Almahdy worked as an IT project developer with one of the largest media and advertising groups in Egypt. Almahdy was able to realize a new methodology and software for Media planning and advertising campaign planning. Almahdy holds a B.Sc. in Systems and Biomedical Engineering from Cairo University – Faculty of Engineering, and passed many specialized courses in Siemens, GE and Microsoft. Linkedin: Almahdy Eltonsy. Email: [email protected]

To view other works by Almahdy Eltonsy, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/almahdy-eltonsy/.

 

 

Lived Experiences of Orphaned Children

FEATURED PAPER

Lived Experiences of Orphaned Children with Dehumanizing Orientations in Orphan Support Projects in Homa Bay County, Kenya

By Isaac Odhiambo Abuya (PhD Candidate), Prof. Paul Amollo Odundo, Prof. Charles Mallans Rambo & Dr. Raphael Ondeko Nyonje

University of Nairobi

Nairobi, Kenya

 


Introduction

Dehumanization in the form of emotional abuse and maltreatment has been identified as one of the most under researched issues in child welfare systems (O‟Hagan, 1993, Gabarino & Vondra, 1987; Wiehe, 1990). Whereas this form of dehumanization has not been seriously explored in child welfare systems and projects, O”Hagan (1993) argues that emotional abuse (maltreatment) is one of the most pervasive forms of dehumanization against vulnerable and disadvantaged children (O‟Hagan, 1993). Emotional maltreatment reflects a caregiver’s failure to provide a developmentally- appropriate and supportive environment, including persistent, pervasive or patterned acts such as frequent name-calling (emotional abuse; act of commission) and lack of affection (emotional neglect; act of omission).

Dehumanization of children may take many forms including emotional abuse. Emotional abuse is described as overtly rejecting behaviour of carers, and involves active hostility; verbal or emotional assaults, threatened harm, or close confinement (Gabarino & Vondra, 1987; Wiehe, 1990). Parents and carers who persistently criticise, shame, rebuke, threaten, ridicule, humiliate, put down, induce fear and anxiety, who are never satisfied with the child’s behaviour and performance (and who show this deliberately to hurt a child) are emotionally abusive. Their behaviour towards the child can be described as overtly abusive, actively painful, and developmentally and cognitively damaging (Iwaniec, 1995).

As a form of dehumanization, emotional abuse has been described as overtly rejecting behaviour of carers, and involves active hostility; verbal or emotional assaults, threatened harm, or close confinement (Gabarino & Vondra, 1987; Wiehe, 1990). Parents and carers who persistently criticise, shame, rebuke, threaten, ridicule, humiliate, put down, induce fear and anxiety, who are never satisfied with the child’s behaviour and performance (and who show this deliberately to hurt a child) are emotionally abusive (Gabarino & Vondra, 1987; Wiehe, 1990). Their behaviour towards the child can be described as overtly abusive, actively painful, and developmentally and cognitively damaging (Iwaniec, 1995). O‟Hagan, (1993)identified six types of emotional abuse: (1) rejecting (e.g., constant criticism, belittling); (2) isolating (e.g., keeping family and friends from child); (3) ignoring (e.g., non-responding to child attentional bids, achievements etc.); (4) terrorizing (e.g., threatening abandonment or harm), (5) corrupting (e.g., child involvement in criminal activities); (6) exploiting (e.g., assigning caregiver role to child for parent or other children, expecting child to maintain family finances). Further, other forms of maltreatment – sexual and physical abuse, and physical neglect – are considered to have emotional maltreatment components. Thus, emotional maltreatment may be a stand-alone form of abuse or neglect, as well as a frequently co-occurring form.

Many experts have considered emotional abuse to entail a repeated pattern of behaviour that conveys to children that they are worthless, unloved, unwanted, only of value in meeting another’s needs, or seriously threatened with physical or psychological violence (Brassard, Hart & Hardy, 1991). A common feature of most definitions of emotional abuse is that isolated instances or incidences of inappropriate responses do not constitute sufficient emotional abuse to warrant intervention. Unlike physical and sexual abuse, where a single incident may be considered abusive, emotional abuse is characterized by a climate or pattern of behaviour occurring over time. Thus, emotional abuse is not an isolated event but rather a sustained and repetitive pattern of psychically destructive behaviour (O‟Hagan, 1993).

Extant and recent studies in sub-Sahara Africa have documented the dehumanizing experiences that children believed to have been orphaned and made vulnerable by AIDS undergo in their families, schools, and communities (Skinner et al ,2006; Meinck, Cluver & Boyes, 2015; Thurman & Kidman, 2011; Soneson, 2005; Kotze ,2010; Petersen, Bhana and McKay, 2005; Tsegaye, 200 ). One of the worst forms of dehumanization that has been under researched in child welfare is emotional abuse and maltreatment (Glaser, 2002). However, studies conducted in high HIV and AIDS prevalent countries in developing countries, especially in sub-Sahara Africa, have underlined and confirmed that the distressing psychological harm that these children experience following the death of their parents are compounded further by the emotional abuse and maltreatment that they experience in the hands of their caregivers, peers and teachers (Meinck, Cluver & Boyes, 2015; Thurman & Kidman, 2011).

Skinner et al (2006) argue that the dehumanization and vulnerability of orphaned children are caused by factors that include: direct experience of physical or sexual violence, or severe chronic illness, severe chronic illness of a parent or caregiver, poverty, hunger, lack of access to services, inadequate clothing or shelter, overcrowding, deficient caretakers, and factors specific to the child, including disability. According to Skinner (2006) orphaned children have been suffering from a lot of problems associated with these vulnerability factors. Some of the problems they face include hunger, lack of access to health and education, physical and psychological abuse, lack of love and affection and negative communities’ attitude towards them. Because of these, orphans and vulnerable children require urgent basic needs and services supports that can be provided either within the community or institutionalized care.

In a very recent study by Meinck et al (2016) in South Africa among a sample of 3515 orphaned adolescents, 35.5% of the orphaned children reported life time emotional abuse, 31.6% reported past-year emotional abuse, and 20.7% reported frequent monthly emotional abuse victimization, with past-year incidence of emotional abuse at 12.1%. At follow-up, 14.8% of children reported lifetime sexual harassment and 12.8% reported sexual harassment in the past year. Up to 2.4% reported lifetime forced exposure to pornography, and 2% reported forced exposure to pornography in the past year.

In the same study nine per cent of children reported lifetime contact sexual abuse, 5.9% reported past-year contact sexual abuse exposure, and 2.8% reported frequent monthly sexual abuse victimisation. Up to 3.3% of children reported lifetime rape, 0.8% reported past-year rape, and 0.3% reported frequent monthly rape victimisation. Past-year incidence of contact sexual abuse was 5.3%; past-year rape incidence was 2.1%. Since sexual harassment and exposure to pornography were not measured at baseline, incidence of either was not calculated. Multiple victimisations: Up to 27.1% reported being victims of two or more types of abuse victimisation in their lifetime, with physical and emotional abuse most commonly co-occurring. Up to 19.6% reported frequent multiple victimisations. At follow-up, 56.3% of children reported lifetime physical abuse, 37.9% reported past-year physical abuse and 16.6% reported frequent monthly physical abuse victimisation. Past-year incidence of physical abuse was 18.2%.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Authors

160912-abuya
Isaac Odhiambo Abuya

Homa Bay, Kenya

flag-kenya

 


Isaac Odhiambo Abuya
is a PhD candidate in Project Planning and Management at the University of Nairobi. He holds Masters of Arts in Project Planning and Management from the University of Nairobi and Bachelor of Education from Egerton University. Isaac Abuya is the Chief of Staff in the County Government of Homa Bay, Kenya. Mr. Abuya has 22 years’ experience in designing, implementing and evaluating high impact educational, health and social projects for vulnerable populations and communities in Kenya. He is the chairman of the Kenya Association for Performance Management (KAPM), and the Value Chain Management Association (VCMA). He can be reached through his e-mail: [email protected]

 

160912-odundo
Paul Amollo Odundo, PhD

Nairobi, Kenya

flag-kenya

 



Prof. Paul Amollo Odundo
is Professor of Education and Chairman of Educational Communication Department, University of Nairobi. Prof. Odundo obtained his PhD in Administration from the University of Nairobi, Master of Arts degree in Administration from Lagos University, Nigeria and Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Nairobi. Prof. Odundo is a distinguished scholar and has published a number of research papers and articles on Public Governance, Educational Management, Public Administration, Project Planning and Management and Project Financing and. He has supervised a number of Masters and PhD students in diverse areas. Jointly with Professor Rambo and Dr. Nyonje, Prof. Odundo is supervising Isaac Abuya’s doctoral research on Deficit Designs in Orphan Support Projects in Kenya Prof. Prof. Odundo can be reached through his E-mail: [email protected].

 

160912-rambo
Prof. Charles Mallans Rambo, PhD

Nairobi, Kenya

flag-kenya




Prof. Charles Mallans Rambo
is Professor of Education and Chairman Department of External Studies, University of Nairobi. Prof. Rambo holds a PhD in Financing University Education from the University of Nairobi, MBA (Finance) from Newport University, California, USA, and Bachelors of Business Administration (Finance & Accounting) from Newport University, California, USA. Prof. Rambo is a distinguished scholar and published over 50 research papers and articles on Project Financing and Financing of Distance Learning Education, Project Planning and Management. He has supervised a number of Masters and PhD students in diverse areas. Jointly with Professor Odundo and Dr. Nyonje, Prof. Rambo is supervising Isaac Abuya’s doctoral research focusing on Deficit Designs in Orphan Support Projects in Kenya. Prof. Rambo can be reached through his e-mail: [email protected].

 

161008-nyonje-photo
Dr. Raphael Ondeko Nyonje, PhD

Nairobi, Kenya

flag-kenya

 

 

Dr. Raphael Ondeko Nyonje is a senior lecturer at the Department of Extra- Mural Studies, University of Nairobi, and the Resident Lecturer, Kisumu Campus, University of Nairobi. He holds a PhD in Education (Measurement and Evaluation) from the Catholic University of Eastern Africa (CUEA-Kenya), a Master of Education Planning from the University of Nairobi and Bachelors in Education from Kenyatta University. Dr. Nyonje has published a number of research papers and articles on Project Planning and Management, Project Monitoring and Evaluation, and has supervised a number of postgraduate students. Jointly with Professors Odundo and Rambo, Dr. Nyonje is supervising Isaac Abuya PhD research based on Deficit Designs in Orphan Support Projects in Kenya. He can be reached through his e-mail: [email protected]

 

 

 

Fast Forward MBA in Project Management (Wiley)

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj52-nov2016-galvan-bookBook Title:   The FAST FORWARD MBA in PROJECT MANAGEMENT, 5th Ed
Author: Eric Verzuh
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
List Price:   $30.00 USA    
Format: Soft Cover, 510 pages
Publication Date:  Nov 2015       
ISBN: 978-1-119-14822-7
Reviewer:     Jorge Galvan, PMP         
Review Date: October 2016

 


Introduction

The book though extensive is pretty easy to read and enjoyable. The approach seems to be a combination of PMI and some personal approach from the author Eric Verzuh.

It describes project management in a way that emphasizes the role of the project manager even as more important than the methodology itself.

He exposes the product development process in a way that differentiates it very clearly from project management, and the five project success factors he points out to accomplish successful projects are really handy.

The mention and use of the IDEO factors that are used to evaluate potential solutions for a project are gracefully linked to project management.

I like the very useful inclusion and brief explanations about three different approaches to project management based on “Lean Startup”, “Agile” and “Stage Gate”.

The book then moves into the project life cycle stages and touches different areas of project management that are very much in line with PMI.

The stellar performers and Microsoft project guideline are a really good mix as well as the downloadable forms.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The structure of the book in general seems fine and well done from the author’s perspective, although with some slight differences from the PMI approach.

After a good introduction, it brings project initiation and does pretty well with explanations but there is not much mention of the project Charter which I considered an essential part of an initiation process; it is mentioned later in the book though.

He provides a good view on how a project is initiated, by means of an idea or a problem and the analysis that is done to choose which project(s) to carry on. He pushes us to focus on the “why” we are delivering a product, service or result rather than focusing only on delivering it.

The author then goes over the stakeholder analysis, identifying four major roles (Project Manager, Project Team, Management and the Customer) and adding the extended types of stakeholders that may affect the project such as government bodies and organizations of people.

The “write the rules” chapter contains to my perspective the fundamentals of a Project Charter even though he doesn’t explicitly mention it. I see somehow confusing how he handles the Project Charter and SOW and the mention he does regarding what PMI favors.

From what I know PMI differentiates SOW (that is used in the Project Chapter) from Project Scope Statement that is done during the Scope Baseline (BS), but the author uses SOW and Project Scope Statement indifferently from my view.

WBS is well explained and the examples are very handy, though it gets a little confusing with the use of “summary tasks” and the definition of a “work package”. This of course is based on my knowledge that is primarily from PMI.

The chapters on Risk, Scheduling and Estimating are explained very well and very clear with the again confusing part of differentiating a “work package” from a “summary task”.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj52-nov2016-galvan-photo
Jorge Galvan, PMP

Texas, USA

flag-usa




Jorge Galvan
has extensive experience in the telecom industry working as a software, hardware and infrastructure Engineer for both Core and Radio systems. He has a bachelor’s degree in Telecommunications and Electronics Engineering with a minor in Control. He has over 10 years of experience working with projects in different parts of the world and performing different roles such as project team member or technical engineer, as well as project coordinator and SME.

Extensive experience includes different phases of software development projects from feasibility to testing and deployment. Jorge is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter and obtained his PMP certification from PMI in July 2016. He can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Hiring and Firing

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj52-nov2016-romagnoli-bookBook Title:   Hiring & Firing
Author:   Brian Tracy
Publisher: AMACON books
List Price:   $9.95   
Format: hardcover, 112 pages
Publication Date:   August 2016  
ISBN: 9780814437513
Reviewer:     Diana Romagnoli, PMP
Review Date: October 2016

 


Introduction

This book is about hiring and firing of employees in a business executive environment. It is written by a seasoned executive business professional we all admire.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book has a very approachable structure. It was an easy read; I read this book while on a business trip. I found the chapter set up and content presentation inviting the reader to approach the topics with ease and simplicity. The section headings within the chapters allow you to return to the subject and quickly find the topic you are searching for reference.

This matter is anything but easy and simple, however Brian Tracy gives the hiring manager the action items required throughout both processes to confirm a successful outcome at each engagement. We have used many of these points but the presentation of all of them together with personal examples of the employments and terminations brings the points closer to reality.

Highlights

The first highlight of the book was the transition the author made from hiring to firing. He addresses the importance of introducing the new employee to their position, responsibilities and expectations taking nothing for granted. Secondly, to improve performance continuously, we who are reading the book are in many circumstances employees subject to the hirings & firings the book covers. We must know how important this topic is personally. And lastly a highlight for me was zero-based thinking. I really enjoy critical thinking. It is key to future successes. Zero-based thinking is essential to taking a “course correction” for yourself or others on your team.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj52-nov2016-romagnoli-shadow
Diana Romagnoli, MBA, PMP

Texas, USA

flag-usa




Summary background: 30 years in the health care industry. Diana lives in Texas and works nationwide for a large enterprise health system based in Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Project Management Report from Brussels

REPORT

Fall in Brussels, Project Leadership on LinkedIn, on Being a PRINCE2 Trainer, IPMA Young Project Manager of the Year, PMI Rome 20th Anniversary Congress, PM Day in Kiev, PM Spring in Lithuania, Pint of PM in Belgium

By Kamil Mroz

Brussels, Belgium


Fall Edition – 2016

pmwj52-nov2016-mroz-scary-imageThis PM World Journal Belgium Fall edition is full of events, information, experiences and best practices from my PM experiences in Belgium. On a great positive note, we have started an informal network called Pint of PM, with the goal of connecting Project Managers in Belgium, which is taking off and even sparked the attention of Chairman of PMI, Antonio-Nieto Rodriguez – who participated as a keynote speaker!

Now with Halloween just around the corner it’s time to get out those some spooky costumes. Why not dress us up as the scary Project Manager… the one feared by all Project Team members…..

Wishing you a HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Linkedin Publication Series – Project Leadership

I would like to share with you an article that I have been working on for the last few weeks about Project Leadership. Not only has leadership recently become a trendy business topic, it’s also become arguably one of the most important traits for project success. But what exactly makes a good leader? Is there a standard definition of leadership? And what does it mean for us as Project Managers? Check out the following link and take the leap to Project Leadership: http://bit.ly/2e0Mwz4

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj42-Jan2016-Mroz-PHOTO
Kamil Mroz

Brussels, Belgium

eu-small

belgium-small-flag

poland-small-flag-50x32canada-small-flag


Kamil Mroz
is a Certified P2 Trainer, Lean Six Sigma professional & strategic consultant (in BSC & EFQM techniques) combined with many years of experience leading projects for clients in Biotech & Pharma. He is deeply involved in the PM community as an International Correspondent for PM World Journal – regularly speaking at PM conferences, actively contributing to publications and enthusiastically sharing his experience with the next generation of project managers! In 2013 he received the prestigious International Project Management Association (IPMA) Young Project Manager of the Year Award for outstanding leadership and project management excellence, and since then he has been part of the yearly Global IPMA Jury to select future winners.

Kamil is based in Brussels and can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Kamil Mroz, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/kamil-mroz/

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup

REPORT

Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri is a light rail transit project

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland


INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF also works as a promoter and an intermediary of good project practices and experiences. PMAF members receive the biannual Projektitoiminta magazine, electronic newsletters, and web services. As of 2015, PMAF has over 4000 individual members.

For further information on PMAF please navigate to www.pry.fi/projectassosiation .

PMAF hosts an annual national project management event, Projektipäivät, in early November – this year on November 1st and 2nd. Projektipäivät offers national and international keynote presentations, several parallel streams covering various themes, workshops, competitions, awards, and certification events. Projektipäivät is the largest annual IPMA event in the northern hemisphere. For further information on Projektipäivät please navigate to http://www.projektipaivat.fi/ .

pmwj52-nov2016-vaskimo-image

Mr Juhana Juppo keynoting at Projektipäivät 2016 (photo courtesy Jouko Vaskimo)

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

Jouko-Vaskimo
Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

flag-finland


Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

Project Management Report from Spain

REPORT

PMI Madrid Chapter 13th Annual Congress; Ciudad Can Project in Bogota, Colombia

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain


PMI Madrid Chapter organizes its 13th Anual Project Management Congress

All project Management methods and skills are valuable for any type of business in all industry areas. On November 24th, the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter will bring those tools for you, helping you to enhance the power of your technical, leadership and knowledge management skills through the application of methodologies and techniques based on the PMI best practices.

This event, which venue will be the “Hipódromo de La Zarzuela”, emblematic Madrid place for many fans from the horsemanship sport world, and a good place to generate business in many occasions, giving you a great opportunity as a Project Manager and/or executive to do networking and experience sharing.

This event will count on keynote Speakers from the different industry fields, demonstrating once more time that Project Management has no borders. The PMI Madrid Chapter Board of Directors has done an important effort to make this event happen with its deserved importance.

24 de noviembre de 2016

Hipódromo de La Zarzuela, Madrid, España

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj42-Jan2016-Bucero-Photo
Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 flag-spain

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Project Management as a National Competence

SECOND EDITION

How Modern Program & Project Management can Strengthen Organizations, Industries and Economies

David L. Pells

Addison, Texas, USA


It has now been widely proven that modern program and project management (PPM) can help an organization become more efficient, more productive and more competitive in the global economy. It therefore seems logical that if more organizations within specific industries embrace PPM best practices, then those industries will become more productive and competitive. If organizations and industries within regions, states and countries become more efficient and competitive, then local economies will benefit.

At the same time, if governmental agencies adopt project and program management best practices, and become more mature in the application and usage of advanced program management principles, then those agencies can also become more efficient and productive. As more government agencies implement PM, more programs and projects funded with public monies should be more successful, accomplished in less time and for less money than otherwise. In other words, governments can also become more efficient, productive and competitive in a global marketplace.

If both industrial and governmental organizations become more productive, accomplishing more and better results while using fewer resources, citizens will benefit in various ways and economies will grow. This article builds on that theme originally promoted by Ed Naughton at the Institute of Project Management of Ireland.

This subject is also supported by recent research by Professor Roland Gareis and his team at the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration in Austria, who have been studying and publishing research results related to the project-oriented organization and project-oriented society. Their research related to project-oriented nations is particularly relevant.

The Value of Project Management

The entire argument that project management can help strengthen organizations, industries and economies is based on the premise that the use of modern project and program management adds value. While most experienced project managers and project management professionals know this intuitively, based on the value they have seen or created themselves, the Project Management Institute (PMI) actually funded a formal research project on this topic. A good description of that study follows here.

In 2004 the PMI commissioned the researchers at Athabasca University in Canada to conduct a study to find evidence of the value to organizations when project management is appropriately implemented. After conducting 447 interviews, reviewing 418 project summaries, and looking at more than 60 case studies from a globally dispersed array of industries, they concluded that project management has the ability to deliver significant value to organizations. Janice Thomas, PhD, and Mark Mullaly, PMP, documented the three years of global fieldwork and cross-disciplinary analysis conducted by the team in their book, Researching the Value of Project Management, published by PMI. [1]

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally published in PM World Today in Mar It is republished here with the author’s permission.


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Abba-PELLS
David L. Pells

Managing Editor
PM World Journal

 flag-usa



David Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Successful Project Management Leadership in a Multigenerational Workplace

SECOND EDITION

By Jamie B. Gelbtuch, MBA, PMP
Founder and Principal Consultant, Cultural Mixology
New York, USA

and

Conrado Morlan, PfMP, PgMP, PMP
Consulting Manager, Daugherty Business Solutions
North Texas, USA


Abstract

The English writer George Orwell famously said, “Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.” The existence of five generations in today’s project management workplace can bring brilliant synergies and frustrations at the same time.  We continue to wrestle with typical project management work issues on a daily basis – timelines, quality control, cost issues, risk management.  Yet, we also find the need to develop additional leadership competencies as part of the PMI Talent Triangle. Managing multigenerational teams has come to the forefront of many discussions about organizational success as one of these competencies.

This paper will explain why “generational competence” is a critical added leadership skill in the Project Manager’s toolbox. By comparing generational cultures to national cultures, it will help project managers understand the key drivers that shape the five generations in today’s workplace and how those impact values and behaviors, particularly in the areas of leadership, time management and prioritization, and communication.  It will also identify how, why, and where generations may differ across cultures and suggest best practices for managing multigenerational project teams.

Introduction    

The rhythm of the workplace has changed. As people are living longer, and economic conditions are requiring many people to continue working past a traditional retirement age, companies often find that they have a team that has four generations working together.  This means four generalized sets of expectations, motivations, attitudes, behaviors, and communication styles.  On the receiving end, it’s four different sets of perceptions, and often misperceptions.  That’s a lot of complexity and we haven’t even considered the upcoming Generation Z, or the cultural differences among the Matures, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials that make up our current global project management environments.

The Skills of the Project Manager of the Future

Project Management Professional (PMP®) certification has been one of the premier certifications for the last 30 years. Initially, project management practitioners who acquired the certification primarily focused on mastering technical best practices in project management including requirements gathering techniques, project controls and scheduling, risk management and scope management.  The global business landscape, however, has since evolved.  As Mark. A. Langley, President and Chief Executive Officer of PMI said, “Against the backdrop of constant change, increasing complexity and technology advances, organizations are demanding leadership, strategic management and technical skill from their project managers – essentially turning them into project leaders” (Raconteur, 2014).

After several years of research and surveys of for profit, nonprofit, and governmental organizations, the Project Management Institute (PMI) has identified a set of employer-desired skills needed by project management professionals to lead projects, programs and portfolios that will enable organizations to achieve their strategic objectives. These skills, which are broken down into the areas of Technical Project Management, Strategic and Business Management, and Leadership make up the PMI Talent Triangle (See Exhibit 1).  The resulting project manager role is a high-level, strategic one that encompasses a much wider range of competencies than ever before.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2015 PMI Global Congress North America in Orlando, Florida. It is republished here with the authors’ permission.

 


 

About the Authors

pmwj52-nov2016-gelbtuch-photo1
Jamie B. Gelbtuch

New York, USA

flag-usa




As Founder and Principal Consultant of Cultural Mixology, Jamie B. Gelbtuch serves as a strategic thinking partner to support innovative companies and thought leaders that are faced with multicultural challenges. Through coaching, training, mentoring, and consulting, she looks for creative ways to help globally minded individuals, organizations, and teams increase cross-cultural effectiveness, manage the complexity, uncertainty, and challenge presented by living or working in an international environment, and reach their highest personal or professional potential in the process. Jamie can be contacted at [email protected].

 

pmwj52-nov2016-gelbtuch-morlan-photo2
Conrado Morlan

Texas, USA

flag-usa

 


Conrado Morlan
is an experienced global portfolio, program and project manager with more than 20 years of experience in aligning projects with organizational strategy for multinational companies and leading virtual and collocated multicultural and multigenerational teams in the Americas and Europe. Mr. Morlan was one of the first 150 individuals to achieve the PfMP credential worldwide and was the recipient of the PMI 2011 Distinguished Contribution Award for his activities and influence in championing project management to Spanish-speaking practitioners and organizations. His contributions to Project Management are numerous as he strives to increase the field’s visibility and advance the profession through conferences, blogs, articles, and interviews. One can also consider that his presence and its effects are multiplied by three, as his linguistic talents enable him to work across borders at equal levels of comfort in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Conrado can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Project Management in the Danger Zone

COMMENTARY ARTICLE

By Mark Reeson and Helen Green, RN

United Kingdom


World disasters are Indiscriminate

Disaster can strike anywhere and at any time, these calamities can sometimes be predicted and prepared for due to the time of year or a change in atmosphere, yet mother nature with her majesty and mastery, has been and will be able to surprise the greatest minds when they least expect it. It is at the time when disaster strikes that people look directly or indirectly for guidance and support. It is at that time that the project manager and their team come to the fore and are at their best.

To place this importance into perspective and to give a general view of the scale of the situation that we are now addressing, a quick overview of 2016 paints a dark picture of what is happening and what continues to harm the environment and the population of the world. With a count of 109 earthquakes covering the globe, with a measurement of greater than 6.0 on the Richter scale, 6 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes with immeasurable damage and with flooding, disease and hunger rife throughout the world, the biggest question has to be what can we do to protect and prepare ourselves next? Nothing is beyond human capability nor should it be beyond a future role for project management in relief, emergency management or disaster zones.

Much as the message is typically passed through industries that select their products and projects to gain profit or success, the same rules apply in this more emotive environment; you still need to handle the right disasters, with the right people, using the right method.

The Benefits of Project Management through the Phases of a Disaster

To best explain now how the project manager would suit the emergency management, relief or disaster environment and the work involved, it is best to break down the skills and competences into their appropriate uses through the phases of such a disaster much as in the life cycle of a project. To do this I chose to use the Faulkner Disaster Lifecycle and then to overlay the project management skill and competence sets for each stage.

The first of Faulkner’s stages is called the pre-event stage which is the period when pre-planning and prior preparation has to be done. What could be more natural to a project manager than to prepare a prevention or protection plan for an approach to disaster management dependent upon the region and the type of disaster? The planning, preparation and early warning solution would include the identification and the analysis of any potential risks or the issues that currently exist within the living or working environment and within the recovery of the incident make up some of the most fundamental skills of the project manager.

This need not and in many cases is not a technical stage but in actual fact, by having local knowledge and an understanding of the demographic, something as simple as an action board explaining the approach to any incident can be handled using the PESTLE environmental assessment to create a pre-planned checklist of processes and procedures. In addition, the opportunity at this stage to design and create various overview action plans to each of the proposed disasters can be drafted. The suggestion and the knowhow that it is in the quiet times when we should best prepare for disaster has never been more true than today.

Preparing and having an initial action plan gives you, the project manager and those around you (the locals, the government officials and the team members, yes your stakeholders) a greater confidence that should this plan ever be activated, there is guidance and a route map for survival and success to follow in the early days when so much more is happening around you. Once it is recognised that certain events trigger other certain occurrences, this overview plan can then be made more formal so allowing a delivery framework or process map to be drawn that gives greater credence and increased early warning to what, how and who will carry out what and so identifying the dependencies on how the necessary actions and services relate.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Authors

pmwj52-nov2016-reeson-photo
Mark Reeson RPP FAPM PMP

United Kingdom

flag-uk




Professor Mark Reeson is a project management specialist with over thirty years’ experience. A Fellow of the Association for Project Management, he has been involved in many project and programme consultative roles.   Most recently Mark has been working with the Saudi Arabian Municipality of the Eastern Province to change the way that project management is carried out within the region, using his newly recognised SMART Sustainability Modelling for project and business management.

He was appointed a Professor of Project Management at the University of Business and Technology, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia which was a culmination of his work in training and consulting in the region on matters that relate to project management, supply chain management and sustainability modelling. Having previously held the position of a specialist Sustainability Management Global Advisor he has moved forward from that position and now regularly supports businesses and projects alike in streamlining their approaches to change and strategic development providing greater longevity in their business planning.

Having started his career in the Royal Air Force, Mark has continued to develop by working and delivering projects in multiple fields of industry ranging from the nuclear environment, into pharmaceuticals, finance and also the international sporting fields.

Mark has developed his role within project management through further experience with the nuclear industry and is now the owner of M R Project Solutions Limited where he has fulfilled the role of Project Management Advisor for the last three and a half years covering every continent. His role is very much client facing and Mark now almost permanently travels the world meeting clients, developing solutions and providing training for their project families either directly through his own organisation or in support of others. Mark’s main role is the development and the consultation with many organisations on ensuring they choose the right approach or methodology to deliver their projects and then follows this up with the correct bespoke training programmes for how their company wants to share this learning with their staff members.

Mark has changed the approach to learning by the ongoing development of his original ‘Living Learning’ programme by introducing a new learning experience for all taking the classroom format and making it come to life with his popular and original ‘Applied Learning’ simulation training and coaching technique. He has taken this forward over the past few years to introduce this training style so that project management learning and behaviour has now started to be delivered into the schools and colleges looking to develop the technical, behavioural and contextual skills and attitudes of their students.

As a regular public speaker Mark now shares his experience, knowledge and commitment with those associations wanting to move forward in a more sustainable and successful manner.

Mark’s next aim is to develop this further and to spread project management knowledge and competency to many more organisations worldwide, having already started with successful deliveries globally.

Mark can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj52-nov2016-green-photo
Helen Green RN (Adult) Dip HE

United Kingdom

flag-uk




Helen Green
is a Registered Nurse (adult) with over 20 years’ experience within the NHS. Her specialism is in Surgical and Theatre Nursing.

Helen has interests in Health and Fitness and is currently studying to qualify as a Health, Fitness, Nutritional and Lifestyle Coach.

This is Helen’s first piece of advisory and collaborative work, and publication with the Project Management community, and hopes that the two elements of health and project management both benefit from her involvement in the future.

Further information can be obtained from Helen at [email protected]

 

 

Learning with Project Management Simulations

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Rüdiger Geist

Zurich, Switzerland


Simulations support the increase of competences by means of defined learning areas, tailor-made complexity and roll-specific decision-making and room for manoeuvre. Simulations therefore allow dealing with problems and authentic realistic situations in so-called “error-tolerant environments”.

Together, the team develops and implements appropriate strategies for action. The consequences of the actions are immediately experienced and over the entire simulation, long-term effects are also experienced. Thus, game plans are experimental and experiential learning environments (“experiential learning”).

What makes simulations so special?

The following components distinguish (“experiential learning” -based) simulations of conventional training and development forms (such as case studies):

  1. Simulations are empirical and experience-based. The playful execution allows “learning-by-doing” without real risks.
  2. Simulations are stochastic. The contents and complexities are adapted to the participants, but the actual sequence is randomised. Thus, extremely life-related situations are created, as in no other form of learning. The participants literally immerse themselves in a simulated reality where the discussion about learning topics is replaced by action.
  3. Simulations are dramatic. The exciting and emotional character of a simulation focusses attention and sharpens the senses. The participants anchored what they had learned.
  4. Simulations are (still) unusual. The uniqueness and thus the unpredictability of the course and the context act as “equalizer”. Nobody is perceived as an expert, and hierarchical barriers are thus easily broken.
  5. Simulations are transferable. The behaviour in the microcosm “simulation” does not differ from the de facto behaviour in the professional life. New findings from the simulation are transferred to practice.
  6. Simulations stimulate reflection. Much stronger than other forms of learning, simulations stimulate a comparison with practical experience.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author

geist
Rüdiger Geist

Zurich, Switzerland

 flag-switzerland

 

Rüdiger Geist, PfMP, PMP, IPMA Level B is the Managing Director of [email protected] GmbH, a Swiss-based consultancy specializing in coaching, consulting, outsourcing and training in the areas of Project, Programme and Project Portfolio Management. He is also Associate Professor of Project Management at Kalaidos Fachhochschule (Zurich). In the past he also lectured for the International Institute of Management (Fribourg) and IFA AG (Zurich). He was Managing Director for Agora Associates GmbH during 2007-2008, where he was engaged in consulting, coaching and training in project, program and portfolio management. He was previously lead PM coach, project manager and project portfolio manager for Credit Suisse; senior project manager, coach and portfolio manager for SPOL AG; assistant CFO, contract manager, project manager, and coach for CSC Switzerland; project designer, manager and coach for CSC PLOENZKE AG in Wiesbaden, Germany; and information systems developer for BVV Versicherungsverein des Bankgewerbes AG, Freie University and others in Berlin.

Rüdiger has a Diploma in Political Science from Freie University Berlin (1988) and in Informationsorganisator from Siemens/Nixdorf, Berlin. He is also a CMMI and SPICE certified assessor. Rüdiger holds an IPMA Level B project management certification and the Project Management Professional (PMP®) certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®), as well as the PMOS (CSC) and a Masters Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University (GWU) in the USA. Rüdiger has authored papers and presentations at IPMA and PMI conferences and sat on the board of the PMI Switzerland Chapter as Vice President Education & Certification.

Fluent in English and German, Rüdiger is based in Zurich and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

The 5 Steps to Achieve PMP® Certification

ADVISORY ARTICLE

Fábio Mourão

Rio de Janiero, Brazil


I believe that everybody can learn from the experiences of others. In this article, I will share how I planned for and studied to pass the PMP® exam. I followed five steps:

  1. Choose your preparatory course. 

You need to search at least three training centers and compare the material, benefits and costs. After that, choose the best cost/benefit for you.

Tip: Make sure that you choose a Registered Education Provider (REP) that is a registered and authorized by the Project Management Institute.

  1. Choose your study material. 

Pay attention when choosing the material. You will have a lot of options of books, courses, blogs and specialized websites that will offer everything about PMP certification. You have to choose (at maximum) three books; otherwise, you will not have time to read them all.

When I studied for the exam, I used:

  • Preparatory course materials, with books and simulation exams
  • A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)
  • The PMP Exam Prep textbook by Rita Mulcahy
  • FASTrack PMP Exam simulation software (with over 1,600 questions)

I am sure that the material above is enough to study and pass the exam. You don’t need read all the books and materials that you find on the internet.

Tip: Spending too much time searching for exam materials on the internet will be a waste of time.

  1. Plan your studies. 

You will find people that studied one month, three months, six months and even a year for the exam. You have to find the way that works best for you. In my case, I did the preparatory course, and after three months I took the exam with success.

My planning of study was in seven steps:

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj52-nov2016-mourao-photo
Fábio Mourão

Rio de Janiero, Brazil

Brazil flag

 

 

Fábio Mourão, Project Manager & Personal Coach, has worked for over 20 years with IT Projects in small, medium and large companies. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in System Analysis, MBA in IT Business Management and Post MBA in Executive Project Management.

Fábio is certified in PMP, PRINCE2, PSM-I, ASF, SFC, MCTS, CI-ASP, COBIT, ITIL V3, ISO20000, ISO27000, CCF, CNE, CI-SCS, GRITC, CCSP, PCC, PDC, HCMP & HCMBOK.

Personal website: http://www.thinkcoaching.com.br/

Linkedin: https://br.linkedin.com/in/fabiomourao

Email: [email protected]

 

 

Customer Centric Project Management

ADVISORY

By Charles Villanyi Bokor

The CERP Group

Ottawa, CANADA


ABSTRACT

Customer Centric Project Management (CCPM) is defined as the continuous re-examination, evolution and integration of organizational strategy, desired outcomes, stakeholders’ vital needs and expectations, business processes, and project development methodology, into the enabling technology project’s mandate and deliverables. It is to produce deliverables/outputs that are fit for the purpose and can be leveraged to achieving the intended outcome.

CCPM is based on empirical observations and current literature on project management and requirements change management, as well as on limited trials and test. When approved by executives, CCPM engages stakeholders to define the outcome and continuously during the project development lifecycle, enhance the vital requirements that define the output to be produced. It is often viewed by IT as involving ‘them’ in what ‘we’ do. CCPM focuses less on how we meet estimated schedules or costs and more on what are the vital outputs so corporations can create business value. It is not new, but this return to the obvious requires a cultural shift, and holds the involved senior executives, system owners, business analysts and the project manager, accountable.

Key Words: project development, customer centric, business requirements, requirements definition process, project management, requirements change management, project development team, outcome, methodology, value, accountability, project failure.

THE PROBLEM

In a recent article on the “10 common causes of IT project failure” [Carlson, 2013] one of the causes was: “Letting users delay projects by constantly requesting tweaks”. According to this cited cause of project failure and common belief, allowing business requirements to be changed post system design (that is based on the requirements) and during project development, i.e. allowing tweaks, may force the designed and partially developed project to be reworked, delaying the project and or adding costs that were not budgeted. A 1996 article [McConnell. 1996] noted that: “Studies have found that reworking defective requirements, design, and code typically consumes 40 to 50 percent of the total cost of software development (Jones 1986).”. Such significant variance between the pre-design estimated and the eventual cost of delivery or time to deliver, can in turn fail and have failed IT projects. Thus according to this school of thought changes to requirements should be limited to minimize changes to schedules and costs.

Limiting customer requested ‘tweaks’ or changes to the requirements is considering the changes to be less important than the originally stated requirements. It implies that the customer was not aware that the requested changes can be postponed. Not easily allowing changes to requirements implies that the customers who presented the original requirements and the Business Analysts (BA) who elaborated them and consequently defined the project’s output, knew the right or best business solution with which to create the expected business value or outcome, which is the original (not new) and the future definition of project success. It implies that they have expressed all vital customer business needs and expectations at the time the requirements were gathered and defined. It further implies that since the time the requirements were defined no one has learned or identified a better way to solve the business problem. In other words, due to an organizational flaw that prevents the organization from innovating or naivety there has not been any learning during the development of the project. By keeping the list of requirements static, the organization implicitly declares, that those who can prevent the additional effort to develop the changes or tweaks or act on opportunities to improve needed capability to be made, can decide on the eventual business results. By not making changes the mandated functionality is delivered over the significantly higher cost of an enhanced system indicating that being on-time, on-schedule and / or within budget is the organization’s priority.

People still exist who believe that a project should and could get all user requirements documented [waterfall concept] before project design and development. Some people still believe that people, organizations or project teams can if they try, involve the client/customer business experts and produce the list of requirements that does not need any further changes.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj48-Jul2016-Bokor-PHOTO
Charles Bokor

Ottawa, Canada

flag-canada

 


Charles Villanyi Bokor
is a Strategic Management Consultant focused on Leading to Better Decisions. Principal activities include Business Transformation, Problem Project Recovery & Leadership, Strategic Planning. Charles works mostly in Ottawa but has successfully completed assignments in Florida, Wales, Malaysia, Sweden and Australia, and was key-note speaker in Johannesburg South Africa and Victoria BC. Formal education includes an Executive Development and Diploma in Management (McGill University), M.Sc. Mathematics (Université de Grenoble, and U. de Montréal) and B. Sc. Mathematics (Concordia University). He was: Program Director of the Corporate Performance Management Program, Sprott, Carleton; Director of IS/IM at Royal Trust; and at Northern Telecom; CMC; CMC Board Member; PMI-OVOC Board Member; Governor of ICCC; is ITIL Certified and a TBS Independent Project Reviewer. Email: [email protected]

 

 

Implementing OPBM using a PMO: A Business Strategy

SERIES ARTICLE

Implementing Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) using a Project Management Organization (PMO): A Business Strategy (Series on Project Business Management and the PMO)

By Darrel G. Hubbard, PE
President, D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC
California, USA

and

Dennis L. Bolles, PMP
President, DLB Associates, LLC
Michigan, USA


Introduction

During our PMO case study research over the past 13 years, we delved into the construct, organizational concept, and framework of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM). In addition, we delved deeply into the models, framework, and organizational concepts of the Project Business Management Or­ganization (PBMO). We documented those research results in our latest book, A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}.

Organizational Project Business Management and its supporting and implementing Project/ Program/Portfolio Business Management Organization—or generically the Project Business Man­agement Organization—within major enterprises, have become keys to business success, as illus­trated within our second set of eight PMO Case Studies {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}.

The discipline of Project Management has grown and matured, during the past sixty-five years, and has incorporated many aspects of general business management. That growth has facilitated the integration of the methodologies and processes of Project Management with those of Opera­tions Management that are related to the enterprise’s business management of its project-portfo­lios, project-programs, and projects. This integration led to the construction of the Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) framework. This evolution of OPBM has also made it nec­essary for the enterprise’s management to assume a direct role in the executive management of the implementation and desired functionality of OPBM and the associated Project Business Manage­ment Organization.

Organizational Management – General Concepts and Constructs in Business

Business Administration, as studied at colleges and universities and pursued within enterprises, is com­posed of multiple areas of management within an enterprise. The names of the most common management fields or disciplines include: Financial Management; Quality Management; Production Management; Man­ufacturing Management, Engineering Management Information & Technology Management; Operations Management; Accounting Management; and Project Management. Each of these unique disciplines con­tains the requisite knowledge, skills, and means to govern, direct, supervise, manage, and control the con­duct, performance, and execution of the associated tasks and work within that management discipline.

Most major enterprises, those organizations created for a specific business purpose, employ most of those common fields of Business Administration. In addition, each of those management disciplines is implemented and deployed within an enterprise by a specific functional business-oriented organization—whose organizational-name usually reflects that discipline. Each of those functional organizations is created for the purpose of organizationally instituting that specific management discipline, on an enterprise-wide basis or division-wide basis. Which is to say, that each management discipline has an “Organizational Man­agement” aspect, which is employed to establish the requirements, design, implementation, and operational organizational strategy, for that specific management discipline, within each specific enterprise.

Organizational Accounting Management – An Analogy

Based upon the above constructs and concepts a general business oriented definition for Organizational “Insert a Discipline-Name” Management for any management discipline can be stated as follows: It is the framework of organizational strategies with requisite capabilities that utilizes a “Discipline-Name” Busi­ness-oriented Management Framework and a “Discipline-Name” Organization Model to provide the sys­tematic business-oriented management of an enterprise’s “Discipline-Name” specific tasks and work. Or­ganizational “Insert a Discipline-Name” Management organizationally facilitates the business-based iden­tification, selection, prioritization, and execution of “Discipline-Name” specific tasks and work to effec­tively and efficiently accomplish the enterprise’s strategic initiatives, and related business objectives—and to establish a sustainable competitive business posture and culture.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: Bolles and Hubbard are the authors of The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management (PBMconcepts, 2014); A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts (PBMconcepts, 2012); and A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts (PBMconcepts, 2016). This series of articles is based on their books, research, courses and executive consulting experience.


 

About the Authors

pmwj42-Jan2016-Bolles-BOLLES
Dennis
L. Bolles, PMP

Michigan, USA

flag-usa

 


Dennis Bolles
, PMP, President – DLB Associates, LLC, has over forty-five years of experience in multiple industries providing business and project management professional services. He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their business strategic objectives with the analysis of their business process improvement needs and development of business and project management capabilities.

He has been a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI) since 1985, received his PMP® certification in 1986 (#81), and is a founding member of the PMI Western Michigan Chapter, serving on its Board of Directors and in several positions since its 1993 inception.

Bolles performs speaking engagements and assists Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) start-up teams begin the planning and implementation processes; conducts on-site organizational project management capability assessments; provides virtual and periodic on-site support for development of business and project management methodologies, policies, procedures, processes. systems, tools, and templates for organizational governance and corporate strategy; assists in the implementation of a project business management methodology that integrates strategic planning, business objective development, portfolio management, program management, and project management processes to achieve strategic objectives and maximize operational efficiency enterprise-wide through the development and management of Project Management Organizations.

Bolles served as the PMI Standards Project Manager who led the project core team to a successful completion and on-time delivery of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition in 2004. He has served on and has contributed to multiple PMI Standards bodies over the past 20 years.

He is a published author of many project management articles, is a PMI Congress/ Symposium/Chapter speaker, and author of Building Project Management Centers of Excellence, AMACOM, NY, 2002. He is the co-editor of The PMOSIG Program Management Office Handbook, JRoss, 2010. He is the co-author with Darrel G. Hubbard of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2012 and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2015. He can be contacted at [email protected] and at LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/dlballc01. Visit the http://www.pbmconcepts.com/ for information about current and future book projects.

To view other works by Dennis Bolles, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darrel-g-hubbard/

 

pmwj42-Jan2016-Bolles-HUBBARD
Darrel G. Hubbard, P.E.

California, USA

flag-usa

 


Darrel G. Hubbard
is President of D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC providing executive consulting and assessment services. He has over 50 years of experience in consulting, line management, and technical positions. He has served as a corporate executive officer; managed the due diligence processes for numerous mergers and acquisitions; managed information technology, proposal, accounting, and project control organizations; was a program manager on engineering projects; was a project manager on commercial projects; and a designated “key person” under government contracts. He has also held executive positions in, and was professionally licensed in, the securities and insurance industries.

He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their en-terprise’s strategic business and tactical objectives. He provides analysis of their man-agement structures, business processes, general business operations, and project man-agement capabilities, while supplying specific recommendations on business, methodology, and process improvements. Mr. Hubbard also assists companies, as an out-side third party, with the intricacies of the due diligence process in their merger and acquisition activities. He also supports companies in the managerial development and establishment of their Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) and provides work­shops and seminars focusing on the business management aspects of project management.

Mr. Hubbard holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics with a minor in chemistry from Minnesota State University at Moorhead. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Control Systems in California. Mr. Hubbard joined the Project Management Institute (PMI) in 1978 (#3662), is a charter member of the PMI San Diego Chapter, and was deputy project manager for the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition ANSI Standard by PMI. He was the Exhibitor Chairperson for the 1993 PMI North American Congress/Seminar/Symposium, is a published author of many articles, a presenter at several PMI Congresses and other Project Management Symposiums, and a guest speaker at PMI and IIBA Chapter meetings. Darrel is also a Life-Member of the International Society of Automation (ISA).

He is a contributing author to The AMA Handbook of Project Management, AMACOM, 1993 and The ABCs of DPC: A Primer on Design-Procurement-Construction for the Project Manager, PMI, 1997. He is the co-author with Dennis L. Bolles of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of Enterprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – PBMconcepts, MI, 2012 and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2016. He can be contacted at [email protected] and LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/DarrelGHubbard Visit http://www.pbmconcepts.com/ for information about current and future book projects.

To view other works by Darrel Hubbard, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darrel-g-hubbard/