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Welcome to the August 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

 

Introduction to and Overview of the Current Edition

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the August 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 37th edition of the Journal contains 35 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 41 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge and information related to program and project management (P/PM), please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of articles, papers, reports, book reviews and news stories are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for you and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers in the news section of the PMWJ this month; if interested in submitting works for publication, review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month with one Letter to the Editor – from Russ Archibald in Mexico “On the subject of Marco Sampietro’s paper on Project Team Member’s Perspective in the July edition”. If you have a reaction to something in this month’s edition and won’t mind sharing it with others, please send it in an email to [email protected].

We start this month’s edition with a wonderful Featured Interview with Debbie O’Bray, PMI Fellow and Former Chair of the PMI Board of Directors. Debbie has been an active PMI leader for 25 years, has traveled and spoken widely on behalf of the Institute and has a great personal story to tell. Debbie is also a global advisor for the PMWJ. Don’t miss this interview, captured by PMWJ managing editor (me) via email. (Of course, I’ve known Debbie for twenty years, so I knew what questions to ask!)

7 Featured Papers are included this month, by 12 authors in six different countries. Lev Virine, Michael Trumper and Eugenia Virine in Calgary, Alberta (Canada) have authored a new paper titled “Emotions in Project Management.” Building on their theme of ‘choice engineering’, they describe how both positive and negative emotions can affect management decisions often to the detriment of project success.

Beyond Buildability: Operability and Commissioning of Industrial Facilities” is a featured paper by Maurini Elizardo Brito, Raphael de Oliveira Albergarins Lopes, Luiz Rocha and Prof. Eduardo Qualharini in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. These authors, who work together in support of IPMA Brazil, rightly focus on the value delivery of projects, after the project has officially ended. After all, a facility must be fully operational as planned after construction.

Hareshchandra Thakur, an executive with Wartsila India in Mumbai, has authored “Determinants of Project Success in a Multicultural Environment – a Project Team’s Perspective” in response to our call for papers on leading multicultural teams. His paper is based on experience at Wartsila working with a wide variety of stakeholders. According to Mr. Thakur, “… once we act with mindfulness, apply the principles of leadership and consciously work with higher EI (emotional intelligence), we find that not only the efficiency and effectiveness is enhanced, but also working is more of a pleasure and is purpose driven.” This paper contains some astute insights gained over numerous programs and projects.

Emils Pulmanis, our correspondent in Riga, Lativa and an active project management leader in multiple organizations there, is the author of the featured paper this month titled “The Investment Plan for Europe and European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI): New project management challenges.” According to Emils’ introduction, “During the Latvian presidency of the EU council, The European Commission approved a € 315 billion Investment Plan to get Europe growing again and get more people back to work… This paper analyzes the new EU Investment plan and shows different opinions and problems that might arise during its implementation…” If you live or work in Europe, you need to read this paper.

David Hulett, PhD, one of the world’s leading project scheduling and risk management experts based in Southern California, has authored “What Should We Do with Unknowns in Schedule Risk Analysis.” Dr. Hulett concludes with “This paper presents four different concepts of knowns and unknowns and shows how they are, or could be, represented in a schedule risk model using uncertainty, risk events and confidential interviews.” Dr. Hulett doesn’t stop at traditional schedule risks, rather drawing on the work of Ed Merrow, Bent Flyvbjerg, John Hollmann and others on major project failures to assess the impact of underestimating costs and resource requirements on projects.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 



About the Author


pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTODAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

Texas, USA

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David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]net.

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit https://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.

 

 

Election Year in Argentina and MSA’s Unique Electronic Ballot System Project

 

REPORT

Project Management Update from Buenos Aires

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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2015 is an election year in Argentina. The citizens of this country are electing their leaders at municipal, provincial and national levels. The general election of Buenos Aires City Mayor and Deputy City Mayor that took place on July 5th, in the first round and the runoff between the top two candidates, on 19th July. It has been a novelty, because for first time, the electronic voting has been used in this jurisdiction, using the unique electronic ballot system.

The unique electronic ballot system is an innovative electronic system for selecting candidates through a touch screen and then printing the own ballot of the voter while recording information in an RFID (Radio Frequency Identification chip) inserted in it, so the scrutiny can be counted quickly, by reading the chip.

To carry out this important project, the Government of the Buenos Aires City has hired the company MSA Group (http://www.msa.com.ar/) for its experience in electoral processes. MSA is characterized by the generation of “Unconventional Software for mission-critical processes” and it main activity includes solutions for electoral processes by using technology.

President and CEO of MSA Group, Mr. Sergio Osvaldo Angelini, told us about this important project and mentioned that, because MSA has been responsible for several ballots in municipal and provincial elections since 1999, it has been discussed for a long time the need to use technology to facilitate the electoral process, ensure transparency and speed up the scrutiny.

More…

To read entire report click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 



About the Author


pmwj36-Jul2015-Boggi-PHOTOCECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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 Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector. Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012. Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016. Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia.

She can be contacted at [email protected] and http://www.activepmo.com/

To view other works by Cecilia Boggi, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/cecilia-boggi/.

 

PMI Santiago Chile Chapter, Cono Sur Tour 2015 Call for Papers and SunEdison’s Solar Plant Project

 

REPORT

Project Management Update from Chile

By Jaime Videla

Santiago, Chile

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PMI Santiago Chile Chapter

Project Management Course

Objective: Train participants in the fundamentals of project management and in the main processes, tools and techniques that are required to achieve the objectives and goals of Project Management. Upon the completion of the course, the students will acquire the basic concepts of project management and have the basic tools to define, document, and manage projects.

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Target audience: People with no or little experience in project management, wishing to develop their skills, competencies and professional skills in this discipline and students in need of advanced training in project management who want to become professionals in the discipline.

Start Date: August 7

End Date: August 29

Program Duration: 24 hours spread over 6 sessions of 4 hours each time Friday 14:30 to 18:45 and Saturday from 9:00 to 13:15 hours. Value UF22 exempt from VAT.

For more information, please contact Susana Moreno at [email protected] or at phone +56 2 24814060

Cono Sur Tour 2015 – Call for papers

The deadline was extended to apply to call for papers until July 19th

PMI members or certified PMI professionals or other PMI credential holders, and any person related to Project Management who wants to participate actively in this initiative.

Santiago: November 11th; Antofagasta: November 13th

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


pmwj37-Aug2015-Videla-PHOTOJAIME VIDELA

Santiago, Chile

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Jaime Videla, PMP, is the Managing Director for Videla Montero Consultores a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of Accufast, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 20+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Mexico and Perú. Since 2006 has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects. Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Jaime Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

 

 

Connecting EVM with Agile

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Earned Value and Agile provided by the College of Performance Management

By Glen B. Alleman

Niwot Ridge, LLC

USA

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Introduction

Several concepts needed to be established before proceeding:

The connection of agile development practices starts with the principle of Earned Value Management, not Agile development.

When the Agile community says VALUE, it means Business VALUE, not EARNED VALUE.

The details of ANSI–748–C are shown here. In the current Earned Value Management Practice guide, ANSI–748–C is only references. The content of ANSI–748–B is not mentioned or used in the suggested practices of Earned Value Management. In order to incorporate agile development practices with Earned Value Management, it is critical to understand the intent of ANSI–748–B.

A second document not referenced in the current Practice Guide, is the National Defense Industry Association Earned Value Management Intent Guide. The NDIA EVMIG is the second document needed when incorporating Agile practices with Earned Value.

Principles of This Appendix

Before any of the current “agile” development methods, Earned Value Management provided information for planning and controlling complex projects by measuring how much “value” was produced for a given cost in a period of time. One shortcoming of an agile development method is its inability to forecast the future cost and schedule of the project beyond the use of “yesterday’s weather” metrics.

Earned Value Analysis provides a means of predicting future schedule and cost variances through three measurements – budgeted cost for work scheduled, actual cost for work performed, and budgeted cost for work performed (earned value).

Before proceeding let’s look at some top level similarities between Earned Value Management and Agile Development.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The College of Performance Management (CPM) published a Compendium of articles on Earned Value and Agile based program management in The Measureable News in late 2014. The articles are now being republished in the PM World Journal, as agreed with CPM and the authors. For information about CPM, visit their website at https://www.mycpm.org/

 



About the Author 


pmwj37-Aug2015-Alleman-PHOTOGlen B. Alleman

Niwot Ridge, LLC

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Glen B. Alleman
leads the Program Planning and Controls practice for Niwot Ridge, LLC. In this position, Glen brings his 25 years’ experience in program management, systems engineering, software development, and general management to bear on problems of performance based program management.

Mr. Alleman’s experience ranges from real time process control systems to product development management and Program Management in a variety of firms including Logicon, TRW, CH2M Hill, SM&A, and several consulting firms before joining Niwot Ridge, LLC. Mr. Alleman’s teaching experience includes university level courses in mathematics, physics, and computer science.

 

Managing Complex Projects and Programs: How to Improve Leadership of Complex Initiatives using a Third Generation Approach

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Hudson-BOOKBook Title:   Managing Complex Projects and Programs: How to Improve Leadership of Complex Initiatives using a Third Generation Approach
Author:        Richard J Heaslip
Publisher:    Wiley
List Price:     $85.00
Format:       Hard cover
Publication Date:   2014    
ISBN:           978-1-118-38301-8
Reviewer:     Clint Hudson
Review Date: May 2015

 



Introduction

The author, Richard Heaslip, spent much of his career in scientific experimentation as a biochemical pharmacologist. As his career advanced, he found himself serving as Vice President of Program, Project, and Portfolio Management. It is the convergence of these two roles that serves as the catalyst for this book. In his Project Leadership role he became very dissatisfied with the way projects were being managed in his organization. This dissatisfaction led him on a journey to learn about, analyze, and form a new hypothesis regarding how best to handle complex projects and programs. This book, Managing Complex Projects and Programs, details that journey and his recommendations.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Managing Complex Projects and Programs is broken down into two major sections: The first section focuses on the history, successes and limitations of first and second generation programmatics. The second section provides an explanation of third generation programmatics, its structure and benefits, and why Heaslip believes that third generation programmatics is a superior structure for managing complex projects and programs. The following is a brief explanation of first, second, and third generation programmatics as outlined in these two sections.

In first generation programmatics the structure for a project or program in a corporate environment is highly formal and rigid. The Project Manager is responsible for ensuring that the project is on-time, on-budget, and to specifications. The project managers have extremely limited authority to change the project specifications and answer to oversight committees who authorize changes to the project or program. The oversight committees maintain tight control over project’s strategies, plans, timelines, budgets, and specifications. The project manager focuses on project outputs.

In second generation programmatics the project or program manager has greater responsibility for projects whose timelines, budgets, and specifications need to be managed adaptively. The project manager is more responsible for ensuring that outcomes meet the business objectives of the company rather that rigidly conforming to project specifications. The project manager must adapt the project to meet a changing environment and business needs. The project manager is also responsible for managing multiple internal constituencies. In second generation programmatics, companies often add layers of sub-committees that the project or program managers must answer to or manage to ensure that the project meets the needs of all.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 



About the Reviewer


pmwj37-Aug2015-Hudson-PHOTOClint Hudson

Texas, USA

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Clint Hudson, PMP currently serves as the Director of Account Management for EnTouch Controls, a provider of energy management services, solutions and products. Clint holds the PMI PMP credential and has successfully completed projects involving the deployment hardware, software, and services to companies ranging from Fortune 100 companies to single site proprietors. He has also led the formation of account management, project management, accounts receivable and customer service organizations in small and medium sized companies. He currently resides in Frisco, Texas, USA with his wife Elisa and three children; Kara, Clayton, and Katie.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

The Power of Project Leadership: 7 keys to help you transform from project manager to project leader

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Sitaula-BOOKBook Title: The Power of Project Leadership: 7 keys to help you transform from project manager to project leader
Author: Susanne Madsen
Publisher: Kogan Page Limited
List Price:   39.95
Format: Soft cover, # 286 pages
Publication Date:   2015    
ISBN: 978 0 7494 7234 4
Reviewer:     Manjeeta Sitaula
Review Date: 06/2015

 



Introduction

The book “The Power of Project Leadership” by Susanne Madsen addresses the need for leadership in today’s fast paced world with complex and diverse projects. The book is a great motivator for project managers to take that step towards becoming a project leader which is very critical to project’s success. The book contains exercises that provide the opportunity for readers to evaluate their current way of management and contemplate possible ways to understand and improve their practice by being innovative and taking risks.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into four different chapters and consists of advice and experiences from experts in the field of project management. Chapter one discusses the differences between project management and project leadership which is illustrated elegantly using examples and graphic representation. The chapter highlights how the approaches for delivering projects have changed in today’s demanding world. The author further discusses common mistakes that project managers make.

Chapter two discusses personal skills and behavior that a manager can change to empower his/her mindset. Further the chapter elaborates on how the six human needs control a manager’s decision. Chapter three presents the seven keys to help to transform a project manager to a project leader. The seven keys are discussed in detail as a subchapter. At the end of each key, the author discusses how to embed these new behaviors.

Chapter four provides a synopsis on implementing the knowledge presented in previous chapters. The author also explains how to get rid of the old ways that have not been serving and utilize these tools to achieve the project goal.

Highlights

The author points out the three most fundamental mistakes project managers make. Though these three mistakes are common they can be overlooked by many and as the author describes, a manager could “fall prey” to the mistakes which could ultimately hamper the performance and goal of the project.

Furthermore, project management is not limited to following specific guidelines and tools and techniques but knowing how to lead with a wider vision. It is of utmost importance that project managers hone their soft skills and also recognize the specialty and inspire each team member to achieve the desired goal.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 



About the Reviewer


pmwj37-Aug2015-Sitaula-PHOTOManjeeta Sitaula, PMP

Texas, USA

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Manjeeta Sitaula
is a Civil Engineer by profession and has been certified as a PMP since 2013. She can be reached at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Managing Technology-Based Projects: Tools, Techniques, People and Business Processes

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Frost-BOOKBook Title:   Managing Technology-Based Projects
Author: Hans J. Thamhain
Publisher: Wiley
List Price:   $125.00
Format: hard cover, 528 pages
Publication Date:   2014
ISBN: 978-0-470-40254-2
Reviewer:     Christopher Frost
Review Date: 06/2015

 



Introduction

For years, my job centered on medium sized database projects that work well with a traditional waterfall approach. However, last year, I was promoted to manage an application solutions group. This group had a wider range of responsibilities – everything from database development to web design and training. The group had some recent informal exposure to Agile methodologies and was trying to get used to new change management procedures. To succeed, I realized that I had to update my project management skills. That is why Thamhain’s book appealed to me.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The first fourth of the book looks at contemporary project management and the role of project management in modern organizations. After a chapter on project evaluation and selection, it moves into a couple of chapters that focus on monitoring and controlling the project. From there, it delves into different subject areas – with chapters on managing projects through risk management, collaboration, human resources, and conflict management.

The book ends with a chapter specifically on leading technology teams, another on the challenges of professional development, and a last one on the future of project management.

Highlights

One thing that Thamhain returned to at various points in the book was the concept of Strategic Project Management. Coined by Aaron Shenhar (2004), this approach looks at business results and human issues in addition to project management efficiency. Too often, it is natural as project management professionals to become overly concerned with project processes and lose sight of the larger objective. In addition to simply managing projects, the PMO project leader has to deal with the issues of organizational culture, politics, and power (Thamhain, 2012).

Another recurring item in Managing Technology-Based Projects, is the Stage-Gate process. Stage-Gate is a framework of phased development developed by R. Cooper and S. Edgett in 1985 and is similar to Agile. In Stage-Gate, projects have deliverables at certain pre-defined stages. These gates allow project managers to get better buy-in because the development is iterative and customer feedback is gathered at each gate.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 



About the Reviewer


pmwj37-Aug2015-Frost-PHOTOChristopher Frost

Texas, USA

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Christopher Frost
, MBA, PMP, works for Columbia Advisory Group as a Senior Consultant and is currently the Director of Student Information Systems for Texas A&M – Commerce. He is also a charter member of the TCC Leadership Council and resides in Richardson, Texas with his family.

Although currently active in higher education, Chris has worked with a number of Fortune 100 companies including UPS, Verizon, and American Airlines. With more than 15 years of experience in Information Technology, Chris has been active in dozens of projects involving enterprise databases, business intelligence, and web-related projects.

In addition to his PMP certification, Chris is both an Oracle Certified Professional and a Microsoft Certified Professional. He has authored a book on Android and spoken at several higher education conferences as a technical expert.

In his free time, Chris volunteers with the PMI Dallas chapter, the Soupmobile, and is on the board of the Dallas Oracle Users Group. He also is passionate about staying fit and recently completed his first half marathon.

Email: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management for Small Projects, 2nd Edition

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Edagottu-small-BOOKBook Title:   Project Management for Small Projects, Second Edition
Author: Sandra F. Rowe, PhD, PMP
Publisher: Management Concepts Press
List Price: $32.00
Format: Paperback, 219 Pages
Publication Date:   April 15, 2015 
ISBN: 978-1-56726-474-6
Reviewer: Venkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP, CSTE, ITIL
Review Date: Jun/2015

 



Introduction

Managing projects requires time, effort and discipline regardless of the project size. This book is enriched with scalable processes and simplified tools for immediate use in managing small projects. If you are new to managing small projects or currently manage small projects and need more structure, Project management for Small Projects is for you. There are lots of easy-to-follow steps with practical application tips to facilitate learning.

The analysis and recommendations presented in this book reinforces the use of project management on small projects in preparation for eventually managing larger projects. This work uses the Project Management Standard, A Guide to the Project management Body of Knowledge, Fifth edition (PMBOK Guide) as the base to build off. In this book, Author takes the traditional practices used for larger projects and tailored them for small projects, while staying true to PMI’s project management standards.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The overall structure of the Project management for Small Projects is divided into three parts.

Part 1 – Project Management Discipline
Part 2 – Project Management Process for Small Projects
Part 3 – Additional Discipline

Part one covers, Introduction to Project Management, Concerns for Small Projects, Managing and Leading Small Projects and Pre-Project Activities. Elaborated differences between small and simple projects with good case studies are provided. When small projects and simple projects require different approaches, explained where and how to approach and summarizes action items to consider when planning a small project. Great references are provided for how to build an effective SoW with the Business and strategic objectives.

Part two covers, Process Overview, Initiating, and Planning for Small Projects, Planning for Simple Projects, Controlling and Closing Activities. The Small and Simple Project Management (SPM) methodology, created by the author, provides the framework, processes, tools and techniques to manage small projects and it can be further tailored for simple projects. Introduced and abbreviated charter, referred to this book as a ‘Project Charter Lite’ can be used for simple projects. Pros and Cons using top-down and bottom-up approaches for developing a WBS are very helpful. As part of Closing activities, how to conduct formal lessons learned and capture the information and use it for future projects are also included.

Part three covers, Managing Multiple Small Projects, Projects as Part of a Program, Building Effective teams, The Power of One and Transitioning to Larger Projects. Small Project Portfolios followed by portfolio of related projects consist projects of a similar type, organization or subject matter. Interested challenges are listed for project managers who work on projects within a program. Survey results of 80 project managers are thought provoking on their lessons learned.

Highlights and What I liked!

Three parts and 15 Chapters give the reader a comprehensive overview of project management processes, tools and techniques that are scalable and adaptable to small projects. A new chapter on Program Management offers important insights and guidance for managing a group of related small projects in a coordinated way to obtain benefits and control not available from managing them individually.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 



About the Reviewer


pmwj37-Aug2015-Edagottu-PHOTOVenkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP, CSTE, ITIL

Manager, Hitachi Consulting,

Texas, USA

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Mr. Venkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP, CSTE, ITIL works as Manager of Testing and Quality Assurance (TQA) and is a part of IT Profesisonal Services (ITPS) group at Hitachi Consulting, Americas region. He has more than a decade and half of Software Quality Assurance and Project Management experience using multiple delivery models. Venkat is an active blogger, passionate learner and Agile practitioner. His Paper “Kanban – A visual process management – Empower Delivery needs,” was published at the 8th International Project Management Leadership Conference (PML 2013) organized by QAI. He is member of several professional organizations including the American Society for Quality (ASQ), Project Management Institute (PMI), Association for Software Testing (AST) and Quality Assurance International (QAI). Email address: [email protected]

150806 - Hitachi-Consulting-logo

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Real Project Management: The skills and capabilities you WILL need for successful project delivery

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Edagottu-realpm-BOOKBook Title:   Real Project Management: The skills and capabilities you WILL need for successful project delivery
Author: Peter Taylor
Publisher: Kogan Page
List Price: $36.00
Format: Paperback, 226 Pages
Publication Date:   Dec 28, 2014 
ISBN: 978-0-7494-7121-7
Reviewer: Venkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP, CSTE, ITIL
Review Date: July 2015

 


Introduction

Real Project Management explores and very well describes the history and evolution of the Project Management discipline and real world challenges, and provides better vision into future trends. Throughout this work, the author provided good techniques and strategies to conquer the current issues facing industry. The analysis and recommendations presented in this book will unfold the Real Project Management field.

Peter Taylor is author of the popular The Lazy Project Manager book. With his vast project management experience, he provided interesting ways of looking at project management challenges and problems. There are good takeaways from this book, if project management is your career of choice. A lot of interesting case studies and interesting data are presented throughout this book.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The overall structure of the Real Project Management is divided into five parts.

Part 1 – Legacy
Part 2 – Challenges
Part 3 – Multi-generations
Part 4 – The Future
Part 5 – Tips for Success

Part One covers,

  • History of Project Management
  • Adoption of ‘project management’ as a means to make business success
  • Understanding and managing what really matters for a project manager to be successful

Part Two covers,

  • Focus on the challenges of project management
  • Careful selection of the channels of communication
  • How to be good virtual team manager in order to get the best from remote resources
  • How to set the tempo of the project and having good control
  • What makes for good sponsorship
  • Three things to make sure that projects connect to the organization strategy
  • How to match project managers to projects according to their experience and capabilities
  • Necessary effort into gathering lessons learned
  • Offering a ‘safe haven’ for learning practical project lessons
  • How succession planning brings both growth and stability along with good opportunities
  • Ongoing dangers that organizations need to be aware of

Part Three covers,

  • Understanding more about generational differences of thought and behavior
  • Aware of the challenges and opportunities for multi-generational workforce

More…

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About the Reviewer


pmwj37-Aug2015-Edagottu-PHOTOVenkata Ramana Edagottu, PMP, CSTE, ITIL

Manager, Hitachi Consulting,

Texas, USA

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Mr. Venkata Ramana Edagottu
, PMP, CSTE, ITIL works as Manager of Testing and Quality Assurance (TQA) and is a part of IT Profesisonal Services (ITPS) group at Hitachi Consulting, Americas region. He has more than a decade and half of Software Quality Assurance and Project Management experience using multiple delivery models. Venkat is an active blogger, passionate learner and Agile practitioner. His Paper “Kanban – A visual process management – Empower Delivery needs,” was published at the 8th International Project Management Leadership Conference (PML 2013) organized by QAI. He is member of several professional organizations including the American Society for Quality (ASQ), Project Management Institute (PMI), Association for Software Testing (AST) and Quality Assurance International (QAI). Email address: [email protected]

150806 - Hitachi-Consulting-logo

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

The Project Management Answer Book, 2nd Edition

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Abdullahi-BOOKBook Title: The Project Management Answer Book, Second Edition
Author: Jeff Furman
Publisher: Management Concepts, Inc.
List Price: $69.00
Format: Paperback
Publication Date:   2014    
ISBN: 978-1-56726-446-3
Reviewer: Fatuma Abdullahi
Review Date: 05/15 -7/7/15

 



Introduction

I wish I had reviewed this book prior to taking my first PMP exam. It has not only aided me in understanding the myriad of information presented in the said exam, but it has also equipped me with the confidence to pass the second time around and exceed my own expectations.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book contains excellent examples and situations while simultaneously breaking down the many processes necessary for the test. It essentially provides an informative alternative source in lieu of having numerous books that don’t exactly go into depth. Mr. Furman was able to bridge the gap between the factual information and successfully apply it to the real world.

Highlights

The Project Management Answer Book, Second Edition gives you what you need to pass the toughest area of the (PMP) certification. He covers the critical math, how to solve the problems, and explains how he got the answers in a simple way. There are practice charts of how to memorize the 47processes and 10 knowledge areas. He goes in great depth on how some out puts are inputs of other processes.

Highlights: What I liked!

I enjoyed how the author’s wit and sarcasm shone through without being too overt. It provides the obligatory amount of guidance without being overpowered by unsolicited opinions.

More…

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About the Reviewer


pmwj37-Aug2015-Abdullahi-PHOTOFatuma Ali Abdullahi

Texas, USA

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Fatuma Ali Abdullahi
is a highly motivated Clinical Laboratory Scientist with 14 years of laboratory experience in hospital and clinic settings and 3 years of management experience.  She is committed to cost effective management of resources and quality improvement performance, which is why she ended up in project management. Fatuma holds a Master of Health Systems Management and Master of Business Administration degrees from Texas Women’s University in Denton, Texas (2011) and a BS Degree in Biology from the University of Arlington, Texas, USA (2000).

Her current certifications include MLS CM (ASCP) June, 2002- Present and she has been approved to take the (PMP) exam in August. After reading this book, she is confident that she will pass the exam. Fatuma can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Ethics

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj37-Aug2015-Azam-BOOKBook Title: Project Ethics         
Authors: Haukur Ingi Jonasson & Helgi Thor Ingasson
Publisher: Gower Publishing Limited
List Price: £28.50 ($49.46)
Format: Soft Cover; 142 Pages
Publication Date: 2013     
ISBN: 978-1-4094-1096-6
Reviewer: Javed Azam, MBA, MSc, PME, P.G.
Review Date: June 2015

 



Introduction

Ethical misconduct contributes and accelerates negative workplace culture and damages trust and project leadership effectiveness. Ethical dilemmas and associated problems are prevalent in projects where team members (multi-disciplinary-cultural) operate with differences in education, past experience, diverse religious backgrounds, values and various degrees of motivation. Ignoring and/or underestimating the significance of ethical project leadership behavior will lead to project failure. It is therefore, essential in the interest of the project that ethical dilemma/s are recognized and addressed quickly to enable the project team get back on scope delivery track.

The book offers the readers concepts of ethics in the context of project management and makes extensive references to philosophical theories related to ethics. It emphasizes the need for a broader approach for handling the issues than the Iron Triangle (time, cost & quality) alone. The authors attempt to describe project ethics using a set of decision-making tools and concepts to navigate around issues with reference to a value system and present a range of grey-areas and dilemmas in project management, suggesting how such issues can be approached. Ethical theories based on value, utility, duty & rights are discussed and a framework for ethical risk analyses is presented. The authors recognize the role of project leader as a key player in environment/s where values, people’s rights, and sensitivity to traditions and cultures are neglected in the pursuit of monetary rewards.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book consists of six chapters. The Chapter 1-Critical Path of Project Ethics, describes the fundamental concepts of ethics, related issues, role of ethics in projects and four theories (virtue, utility, duty & rights). An academic survey consisting of closed- questions related with the perception of ethics conducted in Iceland that formed the basis of research is also introduced. The Chapters 2 & 3 describe Outcome-Oriented Ethics (Virtue & Utility) while Chapters 4 & 5 describe various areas in Process-Oriented Ethics (Duty & Rights). The Chapter 6-Project Evaluation and (Ethical) Risks, attempts to describe conventional project risks and ethical risk factors and an approach incorporating the four ethical theories discussed in previous chapters. Based on project elements and ethical principles, the authors present the descriptive Project Ethics Tool (PET) matrix/chart, followed by brief Conclusions, References and Index.

The book presents 9-Cases across chapters concluding with open-ended questions for the readers to ponder and 2-Cases to apply in the proposed PET matrix.

More…

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About the Reviewer


pmwj35-Jun2015-Azam-PHOTOJaved Azam, MBA, MSc, PME, P.G.

Dallas, Texas, USA

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Javed Azam
has more than 25 years of technical/engineering and management experience in conducting and leading projects in more than 15 countries (U.S., W-Europe and SE-Asia). He served in progressively responsible positions as Regional Director, Program/Project Director and Chief Operating Officer of consulting engineering firms, and demonstrated his management, operations and leadership skills in the acquisition and implementation of complex and multidisciplinary projects (capacity enhancement, geotechnical, inspection/testing, environmental, infrastructure & water resources development) projects in often culturally challenging environments.

In addition to his technical certifications, Javed is a Licensed Professional Geoscientist (P.G., Geologist), Certified Professional Geologist (CPG), and a Certified Project Management Expert (PME). He is member of several professional organizations including the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG) and the Project Management Institute (PMI). He is an alumnus of University of Texas, University of California-Berkeley, and Delft University of Technology/ITC.

Javed is driven by passion, integrity, high performance teamwork, and servant leadership to deliver successful project/program outcomes, and provides expertise to his clients and quantifiable value to his organization. He serves as a Principal Consultant with Development Group International in Dallas, TX and can be reached at [email protected].

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Keep the Momentum Going: A Project Manager’s Plan to Sustaining High Team Performance on Time-Sensitive Projects

 

SECOND EDITION

By Bria R. Griffith, PMP and

Brenda N. Yombo, PMP

CohnReznick Government and Public Sector Advisory

Bethesda, MD, USA

________________________________________________________________________


ABSTRACT

A confluence of recent natural and manmade disasters—such as Hurricanes Katrina, Ike, and Sandy; environmental disasters such as the Gulf Coast oil spill; and global threats including bioterrorism and cybersecurity breaches—have caused a heightened demand for resilient disaster recovery program and project planning. In light of the increased frequency of these catastrophic events in recent years, project team managers have borne the onus of grooming talented teams, and then leading team members at high-performance levels consistently throughout the full lifecycle of the recovery program. Since project managers often initially assume leadership roles to oversee short-term relief projects, their time is focused less on consideration for building team rapport and nearly solely on meeting deadlines; yet, if the project’s duration extends to satisfy a long-term recovery mission, the project team must shore up its performance to see the project through to its conclusion. Once team members have become acclimated in their roles and with their cohorts, project managers must proactively engage with the team as a whole to stave off complacency. By utilizing traditional team development life cycle models such as Bruce Tuckman’s, while incorporating the preventative aspects of supplemental models such as Tom Edison’s that expand upon the Tuckman foundation, project managers can create their own high performance framework which, when executed correctly, creates a high-momentum pace successfully sustained over the course of the recovery program.

INTRODUCTION

Despite the planning and mitigation efforts of governments, businesses, and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), catastrophic events not only cause widespread physical destruction, but also severely disrupt the social and economic balances in communities. The crippling physical, psychological, and financial impact of these disasters is felt many years after the event has occurred. Therefore, the affected citizens and governments, as well as responding aid givers, face difficult, long-term challenges of disaster recovery (Leonard & Howitt, 2012). Decisions affecting community welfare—many of which may have long-lasting impacts—are made under intense pressure and scrutiny because it is not realistic to take into account the views, priorities, and concerns of each individual stakeholder (Natural Hazards Center, 2001). Project managers in the disaster recovery field, not uncommonly, may struggle to skillfully balance competing priorities (e.g., regulatory, financial, political, contractual, etc.), which all require them to employ a variety of tools and tactics to complete the project. According to Project Management Institute’s (PMI, 2013) Pulse of the professionTM report, properly aligning team members’ individual talent with the project’s long-term strategy can reap a project success rate, on average, of 14% higher than a poorly aligned team and plan respectively. If the recent rise in both natural and manmade disasters has proven any indication, those responsible for leading recovery efforts must be skilled at building and sustaining high team performance to meet the demand.

Disaster response and recovery activities are often assigned to teams unfamiliar with these activities; therefore, roles and responsibilities are often undefined and may lead to duplicative efforts (Natural Hazards Center, 2001). This only increases the need for project managers to be highly adept at effective team building. In the early stages of immediate disaster relief – i.e., when goodwill sentiments are highest – project managers must seek, identify, support, and rely upon those individuals who inspire others through their creativity, ingenuity, optimism, willingness to work productively, and to make difficult choices, and accept sacrifices (Ahlers, Howitt & Leonard, 2011).

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 



About the Authors


pmwj37-Aug2015-Griffith-PHOTO BRIABria R. Griffith

Maryland, USA

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Bria R. Griffith
, PMP is a Senior Manager with CohnReznick Government and Public Sector Advisory. Bria has most recently worked with the disaster recovery units of New York, Louisiana and Mississippi administering disaster recovery programs, assisting with fund compliance and monitoring, project administration and coordination, business process analysis, creating training programs, among other things.

Prior to working as a management consultant, Bria gained experience in handling multiple large contracts and delivering projects on schedule and within budget in the aerospace and automotive industries as a Supply Chain Buyer and Materials Manager.

Giving back and empowering communities is also important to Bria. With CohnReznick, she leads the National Social Impact Committee and the Pay it Forward subcommittee.

The Warren County Youth Court swore her in as a Court Appointed Special Advocate, representing abused and neglected children who have been removed from their homes. Her devotion to seeing the lives of children improve led her to serve as a Junior Achievement classroom volunteer for seven years. She took the devotion to children and her mind for business and took on the tremendous task of spearheading Lemonade Day Greater Jackson, a program that teaches children about entrepreneurship and life skills.

Bria holds a MBA in International Leadership and a BBA in Business Administration and Political Science, both degrees from Millsaps College, Jackson, MS, USA. She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj26-sep2014-Yombo-AUTHOR1 YOMBOBrenda N. Yombo

Maryland, USA

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Brenda N. Yombo,
MBA, PMP, CPA is a Senior Consultant with the CohnReznick Government and Public Sector Advisory team. Brenda has over 13 years of project management, accounting and consulting experience. Brenda has worked on a number of projects providing support and as project Manager.

Currently she serves as a senior team member on the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)’s Mark-to-Market (M2M) Multifamily project. A multi-million dollar project analyzing Audited Financial Statements, liaising with HUD Project Managers, property owners and HUD’s Office of Multifamily Asset Management and Portfolio oversight (OAMPO) officials. She also worked with the compliance monitoring team on the Illinois Disaster Recovery program (IDRP) testing grants provided to grantees and the work performed on various projects to rebuild Chicago after the IKE disaster. She also assists on various consulting projects on the CohnReznick Government and Public Sector Advisory team.

Prior to immigrating to the US in 2010, Brenda gained experience in handling multiple management consultancy contracts, delivering on schedule and within allocated budget. She was a Project Coordinator for projects of Christoffel Blinden Mission (CBM) an international non-profit that strives to remove the barriers that marginalize people with disabilities in the most disadvantaged societies in the world. It does this by working with partner organizations in these regions, by influencing policy at all levels and by responding to emergencies and natural disasters. Brenda has a MBA degree (Accounting and Finance) from Maastricht School of Management, Netherlands and a Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) degree from Makerere University, Kampala-Uganda. A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) licensed in Virginia, Brenda also holds certifications from the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) and Project Management Professional (PMP).

Brenda can be contacted at [email protected].

 

The Agile PMO: Leading the Effective, Value Driven, Project Management Office

 

SECOND EDITION

By Michael A Nir

Massachusetts, USA

________________________________________________________________________


Abstract

This article depicts the best practice approach for integrating Agile approaches and specifically Scrum development with traditional overarching linear approaches, specifically waterfall methodology. The Agile PMO, properly defined, can be positioned to secure Agile-Scrum benefits while maintaining the necessary overarching control.

The challenge

Over the last two decades, various Agile approaches have been introduced and practiced. Of these, in the last 5 to 7 years, Scrum has gained the most popularity resulting from a combination of simplicity, ease of use, and effective public relations. Scrum success in software development organizations has been a powerful driver for roll outs across products, industries and businesses. It was exacerbated by focused marketing efforts on part of Scrum evangelists. Unfortunately, most of these organizations were not structured in a way that supports Agile-Scrum. Even more so, scrum in its raw and pure form is not suitable for some organizations.

The concepts which are presented and embodied in Agile-Scrum are too good to be ignored; however implementing it outside pure software development requires adaptation.

Complex scenarios for Agile

The main hurdle in achieving the benefits of Agile- Scrum outside software development is integrating it with existing top down control mechanisms. These control mechanisms are stipulated by various organizational prerequisites and are normally actualized implementing Linear Waterfall methods. Four of these typical organizational prerequisites are depicted below:

  • Big global corporates – in these hierarchical matrix organizations, top down portfolio control is the rule of the day. The free spirited agile approach has a tough time adjusting to the rigorous controls. Specifically the inherent Agile plan-free concepts, make Agile-Scrum difficult for the organization to swallow.
  • Highly regulated industries – some industries are required by compliance and governance bodies to have a strict binding control mechanism. These can be for example medical equipment, aircraft, and pharmaceuticals research and product development business units. While individual teams might operate Agile-Scrum, the development process must follow rigid Linear Waterfall methods for traceability and governance.
  • Complex predefined products –integrated products which include hardware, software, are developed as a contract with an end customer based on predefined requirements. In these cases the degree of requirement flexibility is small, though larger than what is anticipated initially. Agile-Scrum concept of a fully flexible backlog suffers considerably in these cases.
  • Generic IT departments – much of the daily and weekly activities in maintenance driven IT departments is ad hoc. Changes to the daily schedules are numerous and immediate. Constant interferences with the team work are the norm. The concept of time boxing and no interference is difficult to maintain in these situations.

Often the four discrete categories detailed above, mix; so it is common to find a complex product in a global big corporate which is required to comply with firm regulation.

Based on practical experience, the recommended approach to manage these scenarios is by structuring and empowering the Agile PMO; it acts as an enabler, driver and translator between the emerging Agile-Scrum teams and the Linear Waterfall elements.

Refer to the table below for specific guidelines.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 



About the Author


pmwj37-Aug2015-Nir-PHOTOMichael Nir

Boston, MA, USA

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Michael Nir
, President of Sapir Consulting US LLC – PMP, Scaled Agile Consultant, has been helping clients overcome business challenges and achieve their potential for over 16 years. He is passionate about Gestalt theory and practice, which complements his civil and industrial engineering background (M.Sc. and B.Sc.) and contributes to his understanding of individual and team dynamics in business. Michael authored bestsellers on Influencing, Agile, Teams, and Leadership. His experience includes significant know-how in the telecoms, hi-tech, banking, R&D environments and petrochemical & infrastructure industries. He develops creative and innovative solutions in Agile project and product management, process improvement, leadership, and team building.

Michael’s professional background is analytical and technical; however, he has a keen interest in human interactions and behaviors. He holds two engineering degrees from the prestigious Technion Institute of Technology: a Bachelor of civil engineering and Masters of Industrial engineering. He has balanced his technical side with the extensive study and practice of Gestalt Therapy and “Instrumental Enrichment,” a philosophy of mediated learning. In his consulting and training engagements, Michael combines both the analytical and technical world with his focus on people, delivering unique and meaningful solutions, and addressing whole systems.

Michael can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Knowledge Management in IT Outsourcing/Offshoring Projects

 

SECOND EDITION

Jarosław Polak, PMP

Przemysław Wójcik, PMP

AGH University of Science and Technology

Kracow, Poland

________________________________________________________________________


Abstract

Outsourcing and offshoring in the Central Europe countries are increasingly common and they impact on sales and growth of global companies nowadays. This region attracts corporations from around the world because of the crucial costs reduction and by providing highly educated workforce with excellent language skills. The O&O projects in IT are a well-known trend; however, this sector is difficult, unstable and complex due to dynamic technology changes, frequent indecision of the customers and instability on the IT market. There are many challenges in O&O projects which can have potentially negative consequences, such as a loss or distribution of knowledge, when a company decides to outsource a part of its work abroad.

The aim of this paper is to present how companies can leverage knowledge management in O&O projects. The researchers indicate the barriers and facilitators in KM process and point out how maturity and experience in PM and KM are important in project life cycle.

The study was initiated by a review of literature, followed by a set of informal, conversational interviews which helped to determine areas of interests and prepare a list of the final questions. The last part of the research consisted of several standardized, open-ended interviews with members of top management, boards, executives and projects managers employed by medium and big companies implementing IT projects in Poland.

Introduction

A characteristic feature of service development is nowadays creating centers of support services and the transfer of business services between countries. The key here is the strategy of transnational corporations, which move a range of their activities outside the home office. Usually, it refers to activities and business processes that are not core business and can be successfully pursued outside the main seat of the organization. This is due to the phenomenon of globalization in the world economy. The changes result from, at least, two reasons. On the one hand, they are effects of competition and the consequent need to find ways of increasing productivity and efficiency of the company, where the reduction of operating costs is one of the basic methods. On the other hand, rapid technological development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) facilitates the development of successful models in the field of provision of business services. In practice, this amounts to the creation of outsourcing and offshoring centers.

Reports of A. T. Kearney Global Services Location IndexTM (The AT Kearney Global …, 2011.2014) indicating the most interesting countries as far as investing in offshoring services is concerned, show that the top three countries have remained unchanged over the recent years. These are still India, China and Malaysia. However, a very significant place on the list belongs to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). This is due to several factors, among others, to favorable business environment, financial attractiveness, or still cheaper and highly educated workforce, as well as the fact that most countries in the region are members of the European Union. One of the leaders is Poland, which over the last three years, has jumped thirteen positions up the list. About 40 percent of IT sector companies are in Krakow, Poland’s “Silicon Valley.” Among the global providers in Poland are IBM, HP, Accenture, Atos, Capgemini, and HCL, alongside tech giants such as Google and Cisco (The A.T. Kearney… 2014). The slide of the Baltic States in the ranking may be surprising (Latvia by 10 and Estonia by 11 positions), but the rate has not changed significantly, which means that there has not been a deterioration of conditions for O & O project and the countries are still attractive to investors.

The scope of outsourcing and offshoring is wide and can cover: financial services, logistics, HR and IT. In IT projects the key factor is knowledge management, especially when tasks are performed beyond the client’s site or are carried out by an independent entity.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 



About the Authors


pmwj37-Aug2015-Polak-PHOTO WOJCIKPrzemysław Wójcik

Krakow, Poland

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Przemysław Wójcik has been working as a Project Manager for over 6 years in different areas and sectors. He is actually involved in delivering solutions for finance and banking sector. He has gained a BSc. in IT, a professional master’s degree in IC. He is also currently a PhD candidate with a specialization in knowledge management. He has gained international and professional project management experience while working for global companies. He is PMP, P2P certified professional and he has rich & diverse experience in delivering complex projects. In addition to his professional work, he is also a lecturer at the University of Science and Technology in Cracow, Poland for the professional master study program in Project management. He is the author of several scientific and business publications. Przemysław can be contacted at [email protected].

 

pmwj37-Aug2015-Polak-PHOTO POLAKJaroslaw Polak

Krakow, Poland

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Jaroslaw Polak
has been working in the telecommunications industry, especially in mobile telephony, for over 20 years. He holds a master’s degree in telecommunications engineering. He has also completed postgraduate studies in management (based on MBA programme). He is currently a PhD student with a specialization in management sciences. The areas of his scientific interests are issues related to inter-organizational relations. He has gained a broad managerial experience participating and managing the implementation of projects related to the construction and expansion of mobile networks in Poland. He was a project manager of a number of the telecommunication projects such as the exchange and sharing of technical infrastructure, introduction of new technologies (3G, CDMA, HSDPA +, LTE) and functionalities in mobile networks. He is PMP certificated professional and the author of several scientific publications. Jaroslaw can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

The Way of Establishment of the Organization’s Project Management Process

 

SECOND EDITION

By Ipek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

________________________________________________________________________


Abstract

This paper delineates the way of establishment of an organization’s project management process based on a Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). It begins by introducing the current situation of organizations in today’s changing world. The organizations have to be able to learn to be flexible, adapt quickly to the changing world and survive through achieving organizational strategy and objectives via portfolio management and project management. In order to manage portfolios and projects efficiently and effectively, the organizations should develop their own processes, their own portfolio management process. In the Project Management Institute’s view, the project management process is stated as “the process ensures the effective flow of the project throughout its life cycle. This process encompasses the tools and techniques involved in applying the skills and capabilities.” (PMBOK Guide, 2013, p.47) By developing their own project management process, the organizations take benefits as follows: Enhance the organizational ability to meet organizational strategies and objectives, obtain greater business value, provide a structural way, increase the project success rate, be the outcome significantly better, complete more projects on time and under budget, occur no surprises.

This paper focuses only on project management process. Before explaining it in detail the key terms are defined based on standards such as PMBOK, Projects In Controlled Environments version 2 (PRINCE2) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Next it describes the benefits and challenges of developing project management process. Finally, this paper proposes a new way for establishing of an organization’s project management process.

Introduction

The world has changed rapidly and dramatically due to globalization and advances in technology in the last few years. The world! Everything in the world! To be able to adapt to rapidly change, the organizations have to change themselves in order to survive and thrive in this changing world. They must develop new products, new services and new businesses, improve their business processes, design strategies to enter in the new markets, maximize their market sharing rate, increase their margin, decrease their cost, update their internal technology or be compliant with regulations.

In order to realize these aims, the organizations should select the right works and do the right works. In addition, doing the right work is not enough, doing the right works in the right manner is necessary. The organizations achieve these as using two tools: Portfolio management and project management. The portfolio management, a tool for doing the right works, is defined in the standard for portfolio management as “the coordinated management of one or more portfolios to achieve organizational strategies and objectives.” (The Standard for Portfolio Management, 2013, p.17) The focus of the portfolio management is to assure that the right projects or programs are selected, prioritized and done. According to the standard for portfolio management, the three process groups are defined as follows: Defining, Aligning, Authorizing and Controlling. In addition, there are five knowledge areas: Portfolio Strategic Management, Portfolio Governance Management, Portfolio Performance Management, Portfolio Communication Management and Portfolio Risk Management. (The Standard for Portfolio Management, 2013)

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 



About the Author


pmwj34-May2015-Ozguler-IMAGE2Ipek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Tukey

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Ipek Sahra Özgüler
, a project portfolio manager in TAV IT PMO, has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She has managed a wide-variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), telecommunication, audit (Deloitte), ICT and aviation sectors and gained broad insights.

In addition, she is a contributing writer of the book “A Day In The Life of A Project Manager” which was authored and edited by Frank Saladis and managed by Elaine Jackson in 2013. Her story explained when she decided to develop a multiprocessor project manager’s system.  She holds a master’s degree in Software Management from Middle East Technical University and a Bachelor’s Degree from Istanbul University.  Ipek is a certified project manager (PMP) and Professional Scrum Master I (PSM I). She can be contacted at [email protected].

 

The Importance of an Effective Project Management Approach to EU Projects – A Case Study: CBRN COE Project Failure Means Putting the EU’s Security at Risk

 

SECOND EDITION

By Kamil Mroz

Managing Director
European Centre for Project Excellence SCS

Brussels, Belgium

________________________________________________________________________


Abstract

CBRN are weaponized or non-weaponized Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) materials that can cause great harm and pose significant threats in the hands of terrorists. Recently, the European Union (EU) together with the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) have established some CBRN Centres of Excellence (CoE) in several regions worldwide. The objective of these CoEs is to mitigate CBRN risks of criminal, accidental or natural origin by promoting a coherent policy, improving coordination and preparedness at national and regional levels and by offering a comprehensive approach covering legal, scientific, enforcement and technical issues. This is planned to be done through projects, but also establishing these CoEs in eight different regions is a complex project in itself that requires an effective plan, execution and project management approach. The relevant EU initiative currently covers African Atlantic Façade; Central Asia; Eastern and Central Africa; Gulf Cooperation Council Countries; Middle East; North Africa; South East Asia; South East Europe, Southern Caucasus, Moldova and Ukraine. In each region a regional secretariat has been or is being established to assist partner countries in the assessment of national needs, to facilitate the implementation of projects and to provide technical support to national chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear teams, in particular in the development of related national action plans and the development or enhancement of an integrated policy in this area.

Although the European Commission (EC) uses the Project Cycle Management (PCM), which is an approach of management activities and decision-making procedures used during the life cycle of a project. There is no standardized project management methodology approach highlighted in the stated plans for the “The Cycle of Activities” of the CoEs. According to PMI, program failure in government can have dreadful consequences. In addition to the very bad visibility of being seen mismanaging public initiatives, project failure can results in taxpayer funds being wasted. Not to mention that in the current political and economic circumstances, the ‘euro-crisis’ governments are highly scrutinize on their spending. According to PMI, government organizations in the USA risk $148 million for every $1 billion dollars spent, which demonstrates that government lags behind private industry in key success areas that point a way forward for effectively managing programs.

This same assumption applied to the CoE initiative means that without a standardized project management approach, it will be more difficult to realize the stated goals and benefits of this initiative in general. There are different project management methodologies that cater to the needs of different projects spanned across different domains such as PMP, PRINCE2, EXIN AGILEPM and IPMA. Not to mention, there is a wealth of knowledge on establishing Project Management Offices as a basis of international best-practices. This paper emphasises the need for a standardized project management approach to assure success of the CoE initiatives. Just as with other EU-funded projects, not only is the tax-payers money at stake – but potentially the increased risk of a CBRN event, which is even more disastrous for the reputation of Europe and safety of its citizens.

This paper will also explore the importance of an effective project management approach in the execution of CBRN CoE and their projects and emphasize that in the cycle of the activities of the programme there are two important steps that must be managed with a careful project management approach (project implementation and benefits realization). Also, the paper will examine examples best-practices in implementing a strong project management approach in the public sector to see how the EU can learn from best practices in other countries that have an integrated project management approach.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 



About the Author


pmwj37-Aug2015-Mroz-PHOTOKamil Mroz

Brussels, Belgium

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Kamil Mroz
(PRINCE2 Practitioner, LSS Black Belt) is the Managing Director of the European Centre for Project Excellence SCS in Belgium.

Kamil graduated from the University of Ottawa with a double Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering and Biochemistry, later completing a Masters of Arts in International Relations at the Brussels School of International Studies (University of Kent), where he also served as the President of the Graduates’ Student Union. In 2013, he received the IPMA Young Project Manager of the Year and in 2014 he was awarded the Young Alumni of the Year by the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Ottawa. In addition, he is frequently invited as a keynote speaker on leadership, entrepreneurship, community development, project management and youth empowerment. He enjoys contributing to articles and publications in sharing his experience in project management, and in 2014 was invited to write the forward to Peter Taylor’s (award winning author) book entitled “Real Project Management”.

Kamil was invited twice as ‘Leader of Tomorrow’ to the St. Gallens’ Symposium, received a Coin of Excellence from the Canadian Chief of Defence Staff and is currently the President of JCI ‘The Heart of Europe’, which aims to provide development opportunities that empower young people to create positive change. He is also known to have conceptualized and led two successful international projects as a volunteer Project Manager (Quo Vadis Leadership Conference and Your Future).

Kamil can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Mentorship, SPPR Conference, PMI Netherlands Summit, International Youth ProAktivity Summit, PM Fair Belgium and University of Ottawa Alumni Week

 

REPORT

Project Management Report from Belgium

By Kamil MROZ, IPMA Young Project Manager of 2013

International Correspondent

Brussels, Belgium

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Introduction

As this is my first publication for the PM World Journal, I would first like to take this occasion to thank the readers and the publisher for entrusting me to report on Project Management events in Belgium. It is an honour to hold this position and a true pleasure to write this first article to be published. And although, this first article comes during the summer months, I have to say that there have been some interesting events and activities in Belgium and the Netherlands that I would like to share with you. And remember, project management is a life philosophy; although it may be summer, try using some of your PM skills to organize a picnic, BBQ and social event to celebrate the summer!

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Linkedin Publication Series – Mentorship

To complement the information in these publications, and expand on some topics like leadership and Project Management, in parallel to my monthly reports I will be publishing a monthly series of articles that you can find on my Linkedin profile. This month’s article focuses on Mentorship entitled “Mentorship – We Rise by Lifting Others!” This publication combines my perspective on how to leverage diversity (both global and inter-generational) using mentorship to drive project teams, check out the following link: http://linkd.in/1IlFItI

SPPR Conference (May 2015)

Although the following event did not take place in Belgium, I wanted to share with you my experience of the SPPR Conference in Bratislava, Slovakia. This international conference aimed to explore some important questions in Project Management, while exchanging practical experience and being get inspired by successful PM stories.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author                                                          


pmwj37-Aug2015-Mroz-PHOTOKamil Mroz

Brussels, Belgium

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Kamil Mroz graduated from the University of Ottawa with a double Bachelor’s degree in Chemical engineering and Biochemistry, later completing a Masters of Arts in International Relations at the Brussels School of International Studies (University of Kent), where he also served as the President of the Graduates’ Student Union. In 2013, Kamil received the IPMA Young Project Manager of the Year award and in 2014 he was awarded the Young Alumni of the Year by the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Ottawa. In addition, he is frequently invited as a keynote speaker on leadership, entrepreneurship, community development, project management and youth empowerment.

He enjoys contributing to articles and publications and in sharing his experience in project management, and in 2014 was invited to write the forward to Peter Taylor’s (award winning author) book entitled “Real Project Management”.

Kamil was invited twice as ‘Leader of Tomorrow’ to the St. Gallens’ Symposium, received a Coin of Excellence from the Canadian Chief of Defence Staff, and is currently the President of JCI ‘The Heart of Europe’, which aims to provide development opportunities that empower young people to create positive change. He is also known to have conceptualized and led two successful international projects as a volunteer Project Manager (Quo Vadis Leadership Conference and Your Future).

Kamil can be contacted at [email protected]

 

No Projects at All

 

REPORT

Project Management Report from Belo Horizonte

By Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

International Correspondent

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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When governments decide to improve country, states or provinces or even cities’ infrastructure, and companies decide to make new plants, improve their operations, implement new systems or increase their productivity, this usually happens through projects.

When banks and real estate companies realize that there are avid customers for new housing and that these customers have ways and credit to obtain mortgages for their real estate, it’s time to build new homes and apartments. This is also achieved through projects.

When many people improve life and realize that they can get credit in order to change car, buy a new TV or that new fridge full of features, the companies that provide these goods may need to increase their production and will certainly have to introduce new products to win new customers and retain those who already have. Again, projects allow companies to provide expansions, new factories and new products.

These are, as everyone knows, some of the engines that make the projects market works and consequently Project Management market.

But, when governments do not have money to improve the infrastructure and the economy as a whole is stagnant, people start to lose their jobs, businesses sell less and the climate of uncertainty and lack of confidence prevails? Obviously, no new expansions, no improvements, no new systems! People do not risk exchange of property or car. In this case, the projects become scarce or disappear, or are paralyzed.

Well, that’s the situation in Brazil and in Minas Gerais State.

There are, behind this phenomenon or situation, a series of cultural, structural and cyclical factors.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


pmwj33-Apr2015-Neto-PHOTOManuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto
, MSc, Mech. Engineer and PMP is Fundação Dom Cabral Invited Professor and also Consultant. He is a seasoned professional with over 40 years of experience in Project Management, Process Management and Strategy. Manuel has managed or participated in more than three hundred huge projects across different fields including Steel, Mining, IT, Telecom, Food Processing, Government and Construction, to mention a few. He worked also in projects to implement PMO (Project Management Office) and Project Management Methodology. He has also strong skills in Leading People and Finance. He served as Minas Gerais State Undersecretary for Planning and Budget, from 2007 to 2008. Manuel is a part-time international correspondent for PM World Journal in Brazil.

Manuel can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/manuel-carvalho-da-silva-neto/

 

APM Activities, Successful Projects, Crossrail, the Not So Positive News and weird names given to buildings

 

REPORT

UK Project Management Roundup

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

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INTRODUCTION

The summer here got off to its usual frantic start with many families embarking on the delivery stage of their major annual project – their holiday. We had fewer reports of failed projects, at least initially, as many families got away without major blockages on the road system and the airports seemed to cope with the sudden rise in numbers of passengers. Since then, problems have arisen but most of these are outside the control of holiday-makers. Road and rail access to Europe is severely disrupted by the attempts of large numbers of migrants to board trains and trucks using the Channel Tunnel.

Elsewhere, the project world rumbles on and despite this being the best time to release bad news, there is a surprising amount of good news to report. This comes from the Association for Project Management (APM) and Crossrail. This is not to say that there is no bad news so High Speed 2 (HS2) comes under renewed scrutiny as does the national rail network. So let’s look at the good news first…

APM ACTIVITIES

The Planning Specific Interest Group released their latest publication in July at a launch in London.

Work on the guide by the current authoring group began in October 2013. It was finished ahead of schedule and is on sale now. Lead author Paul Kidston said it was practical guide that aimed to bridge the gap between planning theory and practice. Simon Taylor, from HS2 and member of the authoring group, added it was a “catch-all guide” that was relevant to every sector. Both acknowledged that it was not an answer on its own, but did provide a foundation to improve project management capability. It also provided an example of what good looks like.

More good news came from the Awards Judges who have completed their first round assessment of entries to the 2015 Awards. The Award Board released details of the finalists after a record entry across the 12 professional and 3 academic categories.

More…

To read entire report, click here



About the Author


pmwj36-Jul2015-Shepherd-PHOTOMILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

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Miles Shepherd
is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

Systemic Comparison of the Application of EVM in Traditional and Agile Software Project

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Sam Ghosh

Maryland, USA

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Abstract

This paper reviews the differences between the traditional waterfall software project and agile software project. It identifies the approaches for applying Earned Value Management (EVM) for both waterfall and agile project. It analyzes how an agile software project can overcome the inherent pitfalls of EVM that are also applicable in waterfall project.

  1. Introduction

EVM is predominantly used in traditional software projects that use waterfall approach. Literature review shows that the adoption of EVM is not widespread in agile software projects. There is also a misconception that EVM cannot be applied to the agile projects because, the agile projects rely on progressive elaboration. This paper analyzes how EVM can be applied to the agile projects.

  1. Key Characteristics of Traditional Waterfall Software Development

The traditional software application is known to follow waterfall software life cycle development. It follows sequential steps of analysis, design, development, testing and rework, implementation. A subsequent step is not started, until the previous step is completed. There is no overlap between these sequences. A thorough analysis of the entire software application is done during the analysis phase. Design is done only after thorough analysis is done. Software coding starts only after all the functions are analyzed and designed. Software testing begins after all the software features are coded.

If a defect is identified in a later stage e.g., during testing or implementation stage, it is costly to fix it as it may require re-work of previous steps of analysis, design and coding.

Requirements are gathered up front. For complex projects spanning months, requirements may change mid-way through the project. Change in scope is costly to incorporate in waterfall project as it will require re-work of many of the previous stages of development.

The milestones and Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for the entire software application is decided early in the project during the planning process group.

The Figure 1 shows WBS of an Inventory management System. All the work packages are identified during the planning phase.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: This paper was prepared for course ENCE667 Project Performance Management, a core course for the Master of Engineering in Project Management degree in the A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland (UM), College Park, Maryland, USA. Course instructor was Dr. Gregory Baecher, Professor and Director of Research of the Project Management Center of Excellence at UM. This paper was originally published in the February 2012 edition of PM World Today and is republished here with permission of the author.

 



About the Author


pmwj37-Aug2015-Ghosh-PHOTOSam Ghosh

Maryland, USA

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Soumajit (Sam) Ghosh has over twenty years of experience in industry, and academia in Information Technology, and Project Management. He has worked as Project Manager, and Enterprise Architect for start-up ventures, government agencies and Fortune 500 companies in mission critical projects. He is certified Project Management Professional (PMP), PMI, Sun Certified Enterprise Java Architect, Sun Certified Web Component Developer, Sun Certified Java Programmer and Competent Toastmaster, Toastmasters International. He holds MS in Computer Science, and MS in Industrial Engineering from Texas Tech University. He is a PhD Candidate at A. James Clark School of Engineering, The University of Maryland, College Park, specializing in Project Management. He can be reached at: [email protected].