SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Are you listening to me or hearing me?

PM ADVISORY

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow

Managing Partner & CEO

BUCERO PM Consulting

www.abucero.com

Madrid, Spain
________________________________________________________________________

Communication is a critical skill for project managers. Some leaders are able to listen to and other people are always hearing instead of listening to their membership. Some project managers do not spend enough time understanding how they communicate to his project team and rest of project stakeholders. Effective communication among team members is a key for project success. Because of time unavailability many people use written communication much more that verbal, but many times we are not conscious about body language communication is more than 65%. I learned, over the years that not all project managers are conscious about the amount messages he/she may transmit to their people with his body language; and mainly how those messages may affect them positively or negatively.

To communicate well and being a good listener are not easy but it is not impossible, it takes time, learning from your mistakes and practice, practice and practice. In my experience as a project manager, I consider effective communication skills are a critical element in your career as a project manager. We all must use a variety of communication techniques to both understand and be understood. If we want to be effective we need to assess our communication skills periodically.

Have you thought about what are your communication goals in the project you are managi

Probably your goals are related to: change people behavior, or to get action, to ensure understanding, to persuade some team members or stakeholders, or perhaps to get and give information. In any case you always will have some distortions in communications:

There are several factors that affect the sender and the receiver in Communication. For example when we talk about the sender we need to take into account willingness, time, location, cost/consequences, competition. When we talk about the receiver we need to take into account cost/consequences, role expectations, behavior consistency, sensitivity, timing, appropriateness, belief systems, motivating factors. What is true is that we need to improve our communication as 70 % of our communication efforts are: misunderstood, misinterpreted, rejected, distorted or not heard. Communication is a critical success factor; the majority of your perceived ability comes from how you communicate.

Are you listening to me or hearing to me? Based on my experience I use a questionnaire to assess my listening skills…

More…

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About the Author

alfonso-buceroAlfonso Buceroflag-spain

Madrid, Spain

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow is the founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Alfonso is the author of seven books:

  • Dirección de proyectos – Una Nueva Visión (Díaz de Santos Editor) 2002 and 2013
  • Today is a Good Day! – Multi Media Publications 2010
  • !Hoy es un buen día! – Diaz de Santos 2013
  • Project Sponsorship (co-authored with Randall L. Englund), 2006
  • The Complete Project Manager (Co-authored with Randall L. Englund) 2012
  • The Complete Project Manager Toolkit (Co-authored with Randall L. Englund) 2012
  • The Influential Project Manager published by CRC Editors on 2014

Alfonso is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To view more works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

Threats and Opportunities Don’t Matter …

COMMENTARY

Crispin (“Kik”) Piney, B.Sc., PfMP

[email protected]

France
________________________________________________________________________

…but problems and advantages do!

This may seem to be a trivial statement, but it does help to provide a new perspective on risk management, and answers some questions that arise in the management of risk – the first ones being: why do it, why spend money, time and effort on addressing something that may never happen? The answer here is that, when carried out correctly, risk management ensures that the investment made to deal with uncertain situations that do not in fact occur is covered several times over by the benefit gained from preparing for – and therefore being able to deal with or take advantage of – the problems and advantages that arise from the occurrence of uncertain events or conditions. This potential end-game therefore justifies the investment in the management of risk.

Introduction

This paper aims to be provocative in order to get people thinking around the subject of risk management. It does not pretend to provide a definitive answer and, as such, finishes not with a conclusion but with additional points to consider – some of which might invalidate ideas presented earlier in this paper!

The Issue with “issues”

All too many managers are more impressed with the way in which issues are dealt with and tend to ignore (at best) the efforts that are put in to manage the upstream risks. One reason for this is that risk management is seen more as dealing with imaginary situations whereas issues are real, here and now. You never become a hero for ensuring peace.

Now let us examine how issues currently fit in with the process of risk management. In most approaches, unfortunately, they fit in badly, if at all.

“Good” issues

The simple statement that is found in a number of risk management publications is “once a risk occurs, it becomes an issue”. How can we align this with the clear intention of risk management to address both positive and negative events? One way is to take care – as I have above – to use the terms “threat” and “opportunity” rather than “risk”, and to pair these with “problem” and “advantage” rather than with ”issue”. The other – but less intuitive – approach is to take the same approach as for the term “risk” and to say that, in our context, an issue can also be positive (an “advantage”) or negative (a “problem”). Considering the resistance that the double-valued definition of risk has encountered, this approach is unlikely to meet with general acceptance in the short term. In the rest of this paper, however, I will use the term “issue” in this broader sense.

So let us see what happens as a risk becomes an issue. 

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

pmwj26-sep2014-Piney-AUTHOR IMAGECrispin (“Kik”) Pineyflag-france

 

South of France

 

After many years managing international IT projects within large corporations, Crispin (“Kik”) Piney, B.Sc., PgMP is a freelance project management consultant based in the South of France. His main areas of focus are risk management, integrated Portfolio, Program and Project management, scope management and organizational maturity, as well as time and cost control. He has developed advanced training courses on these topics, which he delivers in English and in French to international audiences from various industries. In the consultancy area, he has developed and delivered a practical project management maturity analysis and action-planning consultancy package. He has carried out work for PMI on the first Edition of the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3™) as well as participating actively in fourth edition of the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge and was also vice-chairman of the Translation Verification Committee for the Third and the Fifth Editions. He was a significant contributor to the second edition of both PMI’s Standard for Program Management as well as the Standard for Portfolio Management. In 2008, he was the first person in France to receive PMI’s PgMP credential; in 2014, he did the same for the PfMP. He is co-author of PMI’s Practice Standard for Risk Management. He collaborates with David Hillson (the “Risk Doctor”) by translating his monthly risk briefings into French. He has presented at a number of PMI conferences and has published formal papers. He can be contacted at [email protected].

Multi-project management in companies’ development (an example of shipping companies)

FEATURED PAPER

Professor Inna O. Lapkina, Doctor of Economics,

Yuliya Prykhno 

Odessa National Maritime University,

Odessa, Ukraine
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract 

The necessity of multi-project management of shipping companies’ development is grounded. A lot scientists such us V. N. Burkov, V. I. Voropajev, M. L. Razu, I. I. Mazur, V. I. Nikolaev, D. A. Novikov, L. S. Tovb, G. L. Tsipes, R. Archibald , V. D. Shapiro, R. Turner, and others devoted their works to the problem of creating a methodology for management and development of organizations through projects. Most of the studies are devoted to the development of scientific-theoretical and scientific-practical basis of the methodology of project management in the enterprise’s development.

On the basis of these studies and according to the scale (in order of increasing it) and degree of interdependence, the theory of project management reveals the following classes of targeted changes:

  • work (operations)
  • work packages (set of operations)
  • projects
  • multi-project:
    • ‘Projects that consist of several technologically independent projects with common resources (financial and material)’ [8]
    • ‘Containing a number of projects with a common resource base or characteristics’ [9])
  • program:
    • ‘Complex of operations correlated technologically, organizationally and by resources, and provides for achievement of the assigned objectives’ [10]
    • ‘Group of projects managed in an interconnected form for producing results that are unachievable under their separate execution’ [11]
  • portfolios:
    • ‘Set of projects that can be independent technologically implemented by the organization in terms of resource constraints and ensuring achievement of the strategic objectives’ [11]
    • ‘Complex of programs and projects that supports and provides the strategic objectives’ [12]

Due to the fact that success of the company’s strategy depends on the choice of the class, type and size of the project, the theory of project management allocates a separate category ‘multi-project’, which allows companies to conduct their activities in a number of directions and to invest in several projects in parallel. 

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Authors

pmwj31-Feb2015-Lapkina-LAPKINAProf. Inna O. Lapinaflag-ukraine

Odessa National Maritime University

Odessa, Ukraine

Inna O. Lapkina is Doctor of Economics, Professor, Head of ‘System Analysis and Logistics’ department at the Odessa National Maritime University in Odessa, Ukraine. She is a certified project management professional (PMP®) by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), based in the United States. Prof Lapkina is the author of more than 70 scientific and methodological publications, which are devoted to the development of methods of efficient management in transport systems. 

pmwj31-Feb2015-Lapkina-PRYKHNOYuliya Prykhnoflag-ukraine

Odessa National Maritime University

Odessa, Ukraine

Yuliya Prykhno is an assistant in ‘System Analysis and Logistics’ department at the Odessa National Maritime University in Odessa, Ukraine. Yuliya achieved Project Management Professional (P2M) certification in 2013. Field of research is project and program management. She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

UK Project Management Round Up

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

I got off to a pretty poor start to the New Year and missed my deadline for the January edition so I have a small backlog to clear. This month I want to look at some transportation projects, construction issues, defence capability and energy sector matters, so quite a lot to get through.

TRANSPORTATION

The main issues around transport in UK relate to the lack of space for most of the major projects needed so we have more upgrades than blue sky projects. This generates quite a few problems as commuters and others found over the Holiday period where several much needed improvements to major hubs overran their durations and so the commuter capacity was severely affected. The good news is, however, that the work, especially around Reading, has been completed and the lines are all open again. There is an extensive programme of rail improvement in and around London but Manchester and the Midlands also can expect some new work in a series of projects costed at over £10million.

Sticking with the rail industry, the much debated High Speed 2 line continues to spark controversy as the revised route is announced. Press reports in December suggested that the schedule for the northern extension, intended to improve links between Manchester and Leeds may be delayed by up to 3 years. The delay is attributed to escalating costs and problems with Network Rail’s electrification programme. The cost of changes needed to allow electric powered trains to run on the route, rather than diesel, is thought to have escalated well beyond the original estimates.

Experience of similar electrification on the West Coast Mainline has shown that costs can be difficult to forecast. The cost for electrification of the line from London to Swansea has risen from £1 billion to £1.7 billion and the cost of similar work on the line between Bedford and Sheffield has risen from a planned £650 million to over £1 billion. The works programme is the biggest overhaul of the nation’s railway system since Victorian times and involves many major infrastructure projects such as Cross Rail and the electrification of about 2000 miles of track. The overall budget is now in the region of £34 billion and is at the mercy of the Treasury as Network rail’s deficit has been reclassified as a government liability.

Slightly different in character is the issue at the heart of the Great North Western Railway where the route has been blocked. This new operator, owned by Deutche Bahn, would challenge the current monopoly held by Virgin Trains but a decision by the Office of Rail Regulation has blocked the route. Leading to a row involving the Government who are accused of failing to promote competition amongst rail operators. The dispute rumbles on.

From Rail to Road – it is 18 years since the Land Speed Record was broken, there are 3 teams trying to raise the speed from its current 763 mph to over 1000 mph. The British team is led by Richard Noble (left) who is bankrolling the £40 million project which also aims to interest young potential engineers. Andy Green, holder of the current record is the ‘pilot’ for this attempt and is expecting a test run later this year at over 800mph in South Africa.

More…

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About the Author 

pmwj29-dec2014-Shepherd-PhotoMILES SHEPHERD flag-uk

Salisbury, UK 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

Project Management in Spain – monthly report

REPORT 

By Alfonso Bucero

International Advisor & Correspondent

Madrid, Spain
________________________________________________________________________

Monthly PMI Madrid Chapter Meeting at Microsoft in Madrid (Spain) 

On January 27th happened the monthly PMI Madrid Chapter meeting where joined 80 professionals on site and 175 professionals online through Webex software . The monthly PMI Madrid Chapter meetings started in 2010 with only 4 or 5 attendees. The persistence from the respective Board of Directors over the years, and the continuity of those meetings were the vehicles for that achievement.

This time the keynote Speakers were Amanda Palazón, Change Management specialist and president of IMM, who spoke about the importance of leadership skills to manage a Change Management project, and Alfonso Bucero, BUCERO PM Consulting who spoke about “How to develop the project manager influence” based on his last book “The Influential Project Manager” (published by CRC in the US).

After that meeting there was a cocktail where all the attendees had the opportunity to talk to the speakers, asking them questions and making comments. That meeting, the second on this year, was sponsored by Microsoft Spain in their offices at Pozuelo (La Finca).

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

About the Author

alfonso-buceroAlfonso Bucero flag-spain

International Advisory & Correspondent

Madrid, Spain

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow is the founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Alfonso is the author of seven books:

  • Dirección de proyectos – Una Nueva Visión (Díaz de Santos Editor) 2002 and 2013
  • Today is a Good Day! – Multi Media Publications 2010
  • !Hoy es un buen día! – Diaz de Santos 2013
  • Project Sponsorship (co-authored with Randall L. Englund), 2006
  • The Complete Project Manager (Co-authored with Randall L. Englund) 2012
  • The Complete Project Manager Toolkit (Co-authored with Randall L. Englund) 2012
  • The Influential Project Manager published by CRC Editors on 2014

Alfonso is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

Project Management Update from Nigeria

REPORTS 

By Taopheek Babayeju

International Correspondent

Lagos, Nigeria
________________________________________________________________________

Project Management: 2014 Nigeria in Retrospect!

Continuing from the momentum built in 2013 are the landmark occurrences of the just concluded year 2014. This presentation seeks to offer you a retrospection of these events which strike a shadowing effect in the project management community.

  • NAPMP Appoints National Officers
  • PMI Nigeria Gets Inaugural Board
  • PM Stakeholders Fosters Unity
  • ProMaCon 6.0 postponed
  • Phoenix Host PMI Congress 

NAPMP APPOINTS NATIONAL OFFICERS

The National Association of Project Management Professionals (NAPMP) at an inaugural meeting held in Lagos at Four Points by Sheraton Lekki, Lagos on Saturday, 13th September 2014 appointed its national officers.

In attendance are Mrs. Doyin Odunfa – CEO, Digital Jewels also had in attendance Trustees of the National Association and key stakeholders in Project Management in Nigeria such as Mr. Deji Ishmael – PMI Regional Mentor for Africa; Mr. Taopheek Babayeju – CEO, iCentra & Programme Director, ProMaCon; Mr. Ike Nwankwo – President, PMI Nigeria; Mr. Lambert Ofoegbu – Publisher, PM Foresight Magazine. Also present are Mr. Kolapo Solesi – CEO, Abridge; and Mrs. Oluyemi Shonubi – CEO, Savant Integrated Concepts.

The meeting was aimed at selecting a set of executives vested with responsibilities of driving the association to quality administration. Officers appointed to execute this duty are: Mrs. Oluyemi Shonubi – President, Mr. Lambert Ofoegbu – Vice President, Mr. Taopheek Babayeju – Secretary/PRO. The interim board will pilot the affairs of the association until elections are held.

PMI NIGERIA GETS INAUGURAL BOARD

Acknowledging a famous saying by Harvey S. Firestone “The growth & development of people is the highest calling of leadership”.  With this we introduce you to the maiden set of executives of PMI Nigeria under the leadership of Mr Ike Nwankwo, President.

More…

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About the Author

TAOPHEEK-BABAYEJU-bioTaopheek Babayejuflag-nigeria

Lagos, Nigeria

Taopheek Babayeju is a seasoned professional with hands-on experience in Project Management, Technology and Entrepreneurship. He is known for his detailed and analytical approach to solving problems; he specialises in using technology and innovations to enhance business models and processes. His expertise includes strategies, innovations, planning and concept development.

Taopheek started out his career as a telecoms engineer at TCC Nig. Ltd and later attended the United Kingdom Telecoms Academy (UKTA) where he trained as a network engineer. Before joining Nigerian Mobile Telecommunications Ltd, MTEL as a Network Engineer, he had worked with various organisations in the ICT sector including SonyEricsson. While at MTEL he trained as a Project Manager in the U.A.E. and certified in U.K. As a Project Engineer at the Implementation Unit, he handled several projects including the organisation’s network roll-out and expansion programmes. He later voluntarily resigned to pursue a career as an independent Technology and Project Consultant. He has managed several projects across different fields including IT, Telecoms, Civil, and Capacity Development, to mention a few. Taopheek studied Physics (Electronics) at the Lagos State University and he is an Alumnus of Pan African University.

He is currently the CEO at iCentra and serves as the Programme Director of ProMaCon, an initiative that won him PMI award for the “Most Outstanding Contribution to Project Management in Nigeria”. He was the Vice President, Outreach of the Project Management Institute (PMI Nigeria) and a member of the Society for Monitoring and Evaluation of Nigeria (SMEAN). He is also an international correspondent for PM World Journal, and an editorial board member of PM Foresight Magazine. He is a Certified Entrepreneurial Manager, trainer and facilitator.

Taopheek can be contacted at email: [email protected]

twitter – https://twitter.com/TAOPHEEK

linkedin – http://ng.linkedin.com/in/taopheekbabayeju

facebook – https://www.facebook.com/taopheek.babayeju

youtube – http://www.youtube.com/taopheekbabayeju

To see previous works by Taopheek, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library.

 

Welcome to the February 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells,

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the February 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 31st edition of the Journal is another full issue, containing 29 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 32 different authors in 14 different countries. An additional 30+ news articles about projects and project management around the world are included. More than 20 countries are again represented by authors or subjects this month. The primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge and information related to program and project management (P/PM), so please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of articles and papers, case studies and reports, book reviews and news stories are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for you and your organization; publish an article, paper or story in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers in the news section of the PMWJ this month; if interested in submitting something for publication, check out the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month with one Letter to the Editor. Patrick Weaver in Australia has commented on Alan Stretton’s most recent series article on the topic of project successes and failures. If you have a reaction to something in this month’s journal, please send an email for publication next month. Let’s see if others agree.

7 Featured Papers by authors in six different countries are included this month. Bob Prieto in the USA is back with another very interesting paper on the “Improbability of Large Project Success.” Essam Lottfy in UAE and Frank Parth in the USA have co-authored another paper titled “Failures in Construction due to Ineffective PMIS.” Emils Pulmanis in Riga, Latvia has authored another paper titled “Public Funding and Ensuring Public Project Efficiency.” Prof Inna O. Lapkina and Yuliya Prykhno at the Odessa National Maritime University in Ukraine have co-authored “Multi-project management in companies’ development (an example of shipping companies).”

Walt Lipke in Oklahoma, USA is back with another paper about Earned Schedule titled “Applying Statistical Forecasting of Project Duration to Earned Schedule – Longest Path.” Subhashish Sengupta and Dr. Debashish Sengupta are the authors of “PMS, Managerial and Cultural Barriers to Agile Implementation in Indian IT Project-based Organizations.” And Dr. O. Chima Okereke in UK is back with another paper about conditions in his native Nigeria in a paper titled “Why Projects Fail or Succeed – A Project Management Preview of the Nigerian General Election of 2015.”

Featured Papers are serious, research-based contributions to the literature and field of professional P/PM.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

141010-pmwj28-30-new-PELLSDAVID PELLS flag-usa

Managing Editor, PMWJ 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit www.pmworldjournal.net and www.pmworldlibrary.net.

Playing The Project Manager

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj31-Feb2015-Stewart-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title:    Playing The Project Manager
Author: Charles Smith
Publisher: Charles Smith
List Price:   £8.00
Format: Soft cover; 133 pages
Publication Date:   November 2014
ISBN: 9781502444967
Reviewer: Trellis Stewart
Review Date:            January 2015


Introduction

The beginning of the book emphasizes that people engaged in project management should think of themselves as performers, and the world of projects as the stage on which they play their roles. The manager’s credibility is not built on their knowledge of mechanized practices and administrative procedures, but on how they handle the complexities and challenges of the real project world.

Overview of Book’s Structure 

The first three chapters give a high level overview of expectations. It touches on the psychological aspects of the manager’s social behaviors with those with whom they interact. The information is conveyed through stories acquired from project managers as they describe their approach to specific challenges. The different performance types are categorized in subsequent chapters, with explanations of the psychology behind the project manager’s actions.

Highlights

The book covers the different categorization of various performers. The six archetypes identified are Analyst, Enforcer, Expert, Impresario, Master of Ceremonies, and Re-shaper.

The Analyst needs to know all the details and relies heavily on team members for facts, information, and cooperation. This performer strives to always derive suitable solutions.

The Enforcer is not necessarily interested in the minute details. The primary concern here is to ensure that all parties involved complete their tasks in a timely manner. This person emphasizes the consequences of failure.

The Expert works mainly in a specialized career discipline. This person relies heavily on knowledge as Subject Matter Expert more than on the principles of project management.

The Impresarios strives to produce something great that may have social or political impact. The objective is to contribute to an outstanding project which provides fulfillment to the manager. This archetype accomplishes tasks regardless of rules or regulations. 

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

pmwj31-Feb2015-Stewart-IMAGE2 REVIEWERTrellis Stewart, PMPflag-usa

North Texas, USA 

Trellis Stewart acquired PMP status in 2012 and has a background in Mainframe Project Development, Quality Assurance, Project Management, and Business Analysis. She has served as a consultant in Information Technology for over 20 years and is currently an active member of the PMI Dallas Chapter.

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Bridging the Business-Project Divide

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj31-Feb2015-Morris-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title: Bridging the Business-Project Divide
Author: John Brinkworth
Publisher: Gower
List Price: US $124.95
Format: hard cover; 213 pages
Publication Date: September 2014
ISBN: 978-1-4094-6519-5
Reviewer:      Diane Morris
Review Date:            January 2015


Introduction to the Book

Bridging the Business-Project Divide is a one-of-a-kind book that provides a dual perspective of both the business and project viewpoints for various stages of a project. The author, John Brinkworth, aims to help teams, comprised of both business and dedicated project resources, better understand each other’s viewpoints. He then provides practical steps to bridge any gaps that occur at each stage of the project. These steps can be a real breakthrough for teams to stay on track.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Bridging the Business-Project Divide is structured into two major sections: Part 1: The Project Lifecycle and Part 2: Common Strands. The book also includes an introduction and conclusion.

Within Part 1, there are nine chapters related sequentially to the project lifecycle from “Identifying the Project” to “Post-Live Realization of Changes”. Part 2 has six chapters of central themes such as “Quality” and “Finance”. The main chapters are organized the same way with the following outline: The Business Perspective, The Project Perspective, Bridging the Divide, and Key Points.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

Bridging the Business-Project Divide provides a thorough and organized approach to understanding viewpoints of team members who have to work together to achieve project goals. By having this perspective, each team member, no matter which side they are on, can best build common goals and ensure the project success.

A book dedicated to really understanding the differing perspectives of team members is unique in helping teams to overcome potential pitfalls caused by these differences.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

pmwj17-dec2013-morris-IMAGE2 REVIEWERDiane Johnson Morris, PMP, MBAflag-usa

 

North Texas, USA

Diane Johnson Morris is an Industrial Engineer and certified PMP. She has over 25 years of experience in the Defense and Retail Industries. She has worked in the Manufacturing, Supply Chain, and Information Technology areas as an Engineer, Process Leader, Strategy Manager, and Program/Project Manager.

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Dynamic Scheduling with Microsoft Project 2013 – The Book by and for Professionals

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj31-Feb2015-Crudgington-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title: Dynamic Scheduling with Microsoft Project 2013 – The Book by and for Professionals
Author: Rodolfo Ambriz PMP & Mario Landa PMP, with Keith Wilson PMP
Publisher: Published by J. Ross Publishing and IIL I
List Price:   US$69.95
Format: soft cover; 699 pages
Publication Date:   2014
ISBN: 978-1-60427-112-6
Reviewer:      Penelope Crudgington PMP, MSc
Review Date:            December 2014


Introduction to the Book

The book gives a really good overview of pretty much everything under the sun that anyone would ever wish to know about dynamic project scheduling using MS Project 2013– and some!

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book starts with an interesting introduction and comparison of MS Project 2013 and previous versions.

Chapter 1 (Concepts of Project Management) and 2 (Getting started with MS Project 2013) are a great ‘warm up’ to the subject of practical Project Management using a tool such as MS Project 2013. It should also be noted that the text is well aligned with the PMI methodology. Subsequent chapters are grouped by specific topics of data entry in MS Project e.g. “optimizing the schedule”.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

The book begins with a useful section on the differences between old and new versions of MS Project which I imagine would help direct the more experienced MS Project users on where to focus their learning efforts for 2013.

Highlights: What I liked!

A particularly useful feature of the book was the symbols used throughout, to denote where to take warnings/ reminders of consideration and points of interest. It is written and structured in a way that is almost verbal walk through of work examples you are doing with a team.

The authors are clearly from an experienced Project Management background and have written the text to be specifically useful to other Project Managers and the challenges they may face when undertaking project scheduling. The alignment of the text to PMI and specifically PMBOK 5th edition terminology is particularly useful in a working context. 

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About the Reviewer

pmwj31-Feb2015-Crudgington-IMAGE2 REVIEWERPenelope Crudgington (Roberts)flag-uk

Penelope Crudgington is currently working in the Banking & Finance sector for a leading US business bank as a Project & Portfolio Manager. She is a PMP & Prince2 Certified Project Manager with 15 years of management experience and 9 years in Project & Bid Management. Penelope has an MSc degree in Environmental Management & Sustainable Development, and a BA (Hons) degree in Business & Tourism Management. She has International experience across several sectors with specific focus in energy, sustainability and environment and the built environment. Professional achievements include several large data domestic energy research projects which are revolutionizing European energy policy.

linkedin.com/penelope-crudgington-pmp-msc

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Reinventing Communication – How to Design, Lead and Manage High Performing Projects

PM World Book Review

pmwj31-Feb2015-Martin-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title: Reinventing Communication – How to Design, Lead and Manage High Performing Projects
Author: Mark Phillips
Publisher: Gower Publishing Limited
List Price:   £60.00
Format: hard cover; 157 pages
Publication Date:   2014
ISBN: 978-147241100-6
Reviewer:      Rodger L. Martin, PMP, JD, MBA, BSEE
Review Date:            January 2015


Introduction to the Book

The author proposes methods to analyze, design, manage and lead Project Environments (rather than single projects). It is based upon the centrality of communication in determining project outcomes and the inherently social aspect of all Project Environments.

He asserts that communication is more than a “soft skill.” Communication can be quantified and therefore measured. As a Project Performance Management Tool, it is similar to other commonly expressed performance measurements such as Earned Value Method (EVM), Cost Variance and Schedule Variance.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into two Sections.

  • Part I (Why Communications Matter) develops the argument for using communication as a Performance Management Tool with chapters on:
    • Communication Determines Project Outcome
    • Elements of Communication Design
    • Communication Objects and Design
    • Observable Behaviors of Project Environment
    • Using Communication as a Performance Management Tool
    • Checklist
  • Part II (Communication Manages Project Complexity) develops the argument for the competitive need to use communication as a Performance Management Tool with chapters on:
    • Orientation Towards Uncertainty
    • All Uncertainty is Wicked

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

Communication can be quantified and measured for use as a Performance Management Tool. The author provides the rationale for each chapter’s topic with examples. He concludes each chapter with a “What It Means for Us” benefit recap.

More…

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About the Reviewer

rodger-martinRodger Martin, JD, MBA, BSEE, PMPflag-usa

Texas, USA

Rodger Martin has a broad background in business, law, engineering and Project Management. He is a retired US Air Force officer with expertise in rockets and National Ranges. His work experiences include government, military, public corporations, small business consulting and high-tech non-profit organizations. For the last 12 years, he has worked on Document Management, Knowledge Management and Process Management/Modeling projects for commercial companies. He acquired his PMP certification in 2007. He is also a certified Mediator. 

About the Author 

Mark Phillips is an accomplished CEO and thought leader. For over 17 years, he has built a project management software company and consultancy, serving clients including multinational automotive, global telecoms and financial services. He led product development on a cutting-edge US Army Research Lab program.

He can be reached at www.communicationmeasurement.org

To view other works by Rodger Martin, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/rodger-martin/

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Series on Project Success and Failure:  Factors affecting Level 1: “Project Management” success

SERIES ARTICLE

Article 3 of 6 

By Alan Stretton

Sydney, Australia
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

This is the third article of a series on project successes and failures. The first two articles (Stretton 2014j, 2015a) looked at levels and criteria for project successes/ failures, at success/ failure rates, and causes of project failures. There was a paucity of data available on these topics, and no agreed criteria for establishing project success/failure. These articles concluded that there was an evident need to establish and agree on success and failure criteria for projects; to develop comprehensive success/failure data covering all significant project types and project management application areas; and a need to develop much more comprehensive and validated data on causes of project failures.

The sampling in the second article threw up two (of five) groups of failure causes which particularly stood out, namely project initiation-related causes, and project management operational-related causes, which together made up 70% of all causes. I considered this figure too high to ignore, even with the very meagre data available, and therefore decided to examine them in more detail. This will be done in the context of their linkages with the three levels of success identified in the first article.

The first of these success levels was Level 1: “Project management” success – described by Cooke-Davies 2004 as “doing the project right”. The second article of the series portrayed linkages between this level and the two primary cause-of-failure groups as shown in Figure 3-1 below (reproducing Figure 2-1 in that article).

The primary linkage shown is with project management operational-related causes of failure, which is a very obvious and natural link, to be discussed in more detail shortly. However, most types of failure in initiation phases also have consequences for ensuing operational phases (as is broadly indicated by broken lines between the two, and vertical dashed arrows in Figure 3-1), and thence for “project management” success, as indicated by lighter infill and linkage lines. These will also be discussed in more detail shortly.      

More…

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Editor’s note: This series of articles on project successes and failures is by Alan Stretton, PhD (Hon), Life Fellow of AIPM (Australia), a pioneer in the field of professional project management and one of the most widely recognized voices in the practice of program and project management.   Long retired, Alan is still accepting some of the most challenging research and writing assignments; he is a frequent contributor to the PM World Journal. See his author profile below.

About the Author

141215-pmwj30-new-stretton-PHOTOAlan Stretton, PhD       flag-australia

Faculty Corps, University of Management

and Technology, Arlington, VA (USA)

Life Fellow, AIPM (Australia) 

Alan Stretton is one of the pioneers of modern project management. He is currently a member of the Faculty Corps for the University of Management & Technology (UMT), USA. In 2006 he retired from a position as Adjunct Professor of Project Management in the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia, which he joined in 1988 to develop and deliver a Master of Project Management program.   Prior to joining UTS, Mr. Stretton worked in the building and construction industries in Australia, New Zealand and the USA for some 38 years, which included the project management of construction, R&D, introduction of information and control systems, internal management education programs and organizational change projects. He has degrees in Civil Engineering (BE, Tasmania) and Mathematics (MA, Oxford), and an honorary PhD in strategy, programme and project management (ESC, Lille, France). Alan was Chairman of the Standards (PMBOK) Committee of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) from late 1989 to early 1992. He held a similar position with the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), and was elected a Life Fellow of AIPM in 1996. He was a member of the Core Working Group in the development of the Australian National Competency Standards for Project Management. He has published over 140 professional articles and papers. Alan can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Alan Stretton, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alan-stretton/.

 

IPMA Education and Training Series: “Let practitioners speak” – An open invitation to the PM community for the development of Annotated Project Handbooks (APHs)

SERIES ARTICLE

Professor John-Paris Pantouvakis

Chair, IPMA Education and Training Board

Athens, Greece
________________________________________________________________________

Project Management is an applied discipline in much an analogous way to constructing a road, flying an airplane or performing a surgery. Applied disciplines require performing in real-world situations, not merely having knowledge about the subject matter. Performing, in turn, requires hands-on experience, possibly coaching, analysis of successes and failures and integration of lessons learned. This may be straightforward for some disciplines, such as medical doctors and airplane pilots, where many similar cases can be found and made available for study. Unfortunately, Project Management is not one of them. Projects are unique by definition, happen in different locations, represent a collective effort of different project teams and extend, usually, over a long period of time. Such features make embedding hands-on project management experience in training programs problematic.

In my view, this explains why most project management training programs are generally theoretical in nature or at least with a minimal practical dimension. Many courses spend too much time on teaching concepts and methods and too little on practicing in real-world projects. Likewise, there are many project management books that include exercises mainly confined to testing knowledge on theoretical issues, or on performing relatively simple numerical calculations. The value of existing E&T programs and literature cannot be diminished, however, it can be argued that practical advice is by enlarge incomplete and segmental in many current offerings.

This in turn makes a lot of successful project managers to be based on limited academic grounds and a lot of trainers and educators (like myself) to have an excellent theoretical background, much of which cannot and possibly will never be applied in practice. As such, Project Management seems to be somehow fragmented between theory and practice; the former is accomplished in Universities, Colleges and many books and the latter is practiced in the real world. Do real professionals benefit from the thoughts of all those books and research papers published every year on project management? Do educators, trainers and researchers benefit from practical insights? In my mind (I may be wrong), yes, but only in a small percentage. Ask professional project managers how many books or how many research papers they read or ask educators, trainers and researchers how much they base their courses on current practical experiences and you may corroborate this argument. And there may be good reasons for this such as lack of time, limited relevancy, perceived high value of the effort vs benefit ratio etc. The fact remains that we need a different approach to be able to educate and further develop project managers for real-life projects through Education & Training (E&T).

IPMA (International Project Management Association) has long been advocating competency based certification where theoretical knowledge is coupled with appropriate skills and attitudes gained through practical experience. Much of IPMA effort has been streamlined towards certification with limited effort devoted to E&T. As a matter of fact the two disciplines are kept separate and they are not related to one another. There is a sound theoretical and regulative basis for this.

What is important is that E&T is considered as an independent endeavor. This means that one may select between different courses and/or develop through self-study. The concept seems working, as more than 200,000 IPMA certificate holders may indicate. This, in fact does not mean that there may not be a more efficient approach. And a proposal of such an approach is the subject of the remainder of this paper.

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Editor’s note: This series of articles is by members of the IPMA Education and Training (E&T) Board or other IPMA leaders on the subject of project management education, training, careers and related topics. More information about the IPMA E&T can be found at http://ipma.ch/education. 

About the Author

john-paris-pantouvakisJOHN-PARIS PANTOUVAKISflag-greece

National Technical University of Athens, Greece

& Chairman IPMA Education & Training Board 

Athens, Greece

John-Paris Pantouvakis, M.Eng., M.Sc., PhD, C.Eng; following a ten year career in industry moved to Academia and is now a Full Professor and the Director of the Centre for Construction Innovation at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). John-Paris is also an Adjunct Lecturer and a Postgraduate Module Coordinator at the Hellenic Open University. Currently (2015-17) he chairs the IPMA E&T Board and he is the President of PM-Greece, the Greek IPMA Member. John-Paris is also a First Assessor for IPMA Certification in Greece and an IPMA Project Excellence Awards Assessor. He has chaired the 26th IPMA World Congress in Greece. More information is available at his personal website (http://users.ntua.gr/jpp/jpp_en.htm).

To view other works by Prof Pantouvakis, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/john-paris-pantouvakis/

 

The Role of Academic Institutions in Educating and Training Project Managers

SERIES ARTICLE

A series of short articles on 

Article 1 of 6

By Prof Helgi Thor Ingason

and

Haukur Ingi Jonasson, PhD

Reykjavik University

Reykjavik, Iceland
________________________________________________________________________

The journey – we have come a long way in a short time

Since its introduction in the middle of the 20th century, professional project management has evolved from a narrow field with a technical focus, to the rich and diverse multi-disciplinary field it is now. The rapid diffusion of project management is related to change in modern societies, and increased international competition that calls for new ways of working, with greater emphasis on teamwork and collaboration. Last but not least, the advancement of project management has to do with increased demands for being responsive, for speed and efficiency in meeting the demands of clients and interested parties.

Many see project management solely as a method to prepare and manage the defined and constrained undertakings that we refer to as projects. This understanding is partly true, yet project management entails much more than just what its description might portray. Project management is in fact a general management philosophy, which is currently applied by a rapidly growing number of organisations world-wide. These organisations have, to a large extent, made the fundamental decision to organise their activities to a large extent as projects.

In the business environment, the speed of change has never been greater and it is still growing. New markets bring new expectations that require new products and fresh ideas, which in turn call for new regulations. Businesses must evolve their objectives and process the ever-increasing flow of information at even greater speeds to stay within the game. This dynamic landscape requires networking and a high level of collaboration in order to meet the demands of stakeholders within and outside of any organisation.

The landscape is evolving and this inevitably means organisations must have the ability to manage ‘change’ fast, sensitively, and efficiently. Recent research conducted by PMI shows that the characteristics of organisations that survive in today’s demanding business environment are the ones that are able to adjust well to the ever-changing environment; to change their ways of working, develop new products or services, increase their efficiency and generally meet the demands that they are subjected to by their environment.

When it comes to dealing with change, the project perspective is ideal: you design, plan, execute, deliver and learn from the whole experience. Project-driven organisations that foster a culture that supports continuous improvement have a great advantage in the modern marketplace. They have a defined vision, yet they are flexible enough to adjust rapidly to changed circumstances. Their success is built on employing well educated and well trained workers who are eager to take responsibility for their work. They use best project management practices to do what needs to be done and have the ability to deal with even the most difficult and challenging situations. Managing change effectively requires not only the conventional project management skills that focus on technical measures, but also a long-term view of projects and their products through the dynamic alignment of an organisation’s project portfolio and its overall strategy.

More…

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Editor’s note: This series of articles is by Professors Helgi Thor Ingason and Haukur Ingi Jonasson at Reykjavik University in Iceland. Active researchers and educators in the field of project management for many years, they are the authors of Project Ethics published by Gower (UK) in 2013. See their author profiles below.

About the Authors

helgi-thor-ingasonHelgi Thor Ingason iceland-flag

Reykjavik, Iceland 

Helgi Thor Ingason (b. 1965) holds a PhD in process metallurgy from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), MSc in mechanical and industrial engineering from the University of Iceland and a Stanford Advanced Project Management Certification from Stanford University. He is an IPMA Certified Senior Project Manager (B level).

Dr. Ingason is an associate professor at Reykjavik University. He is the head of the MPM – Master of Project Management – program at the university. The research fields of Dr. Ingason range from quality- and project management to system dynamics and renewable energy, production, transport and utilization, changes in the energy infrastructure and energy carriers of the future.

Dr. Ingason has reported on his research at conferences and in several reviewed conference and journal papers. He is the co-author of 6 books in the Icelandic language on project management, strategic planning, product development and quality management. He is also a co-author (with Dr Haukur Ingi Jonasson) of the book Project Ethics, published by Gower in January 2013.

Dr. Ingason was interim CEO of Orkuveita Reykjavikur (Reykjavik Energy) from 2010 to 2011. A co-founder of Nordica Consulting Group, Dr. Ingason is a management consultant and a recognized speaker. In his spare time he plays piano and accordion with Icelandic jazz and world music ensembles. More information on Dr. Ingason can be found on www.academia.edu. Information about the MPM program at the University of Reykjavik can be found at http://en.ru.is/mpm/why-mpm/. Dr. Ingason can be contacted at [email protected].

haukur-ingi-jonassonHaukur Ingi Jonassoniceland-flag

Reykjavik, Iceland

Haukur Ingi Jonasson (Cand. Theol., University of Iceland; STM, PhD, Union Theological seminary; clinical training in pastoral counseling, Lennox Hill Hospital; psychoanalytical training, Harlem Family Institute New York City) is an assistant professor and chairman of the Board for the MPM – Master of Project Management – program at Reykjavik University in Iceland.

He is also a psychoanalyst in private practice and a management consultant at Nordic Consulting Group ehf. As a consultant, his clients have included energy companies, banks, hospitals, the government and other public and private organizations. Dr. Jonasson is also a mountain climber and a member of the Reykjavik Mountaineering Air Ground Search and Rescue Squad. He is co-author with Helgi Thor Ingason of Project Ethics, published by Gower (UK) in 2013. Dr. Jonasson can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement: Stakeholder Theory

SERIES ARTICLE 

By Lynda Bourne, DPM

Melbourne, Australia
_______________________________________________________________________

Stakeholder theory’ is a specific approach to recognising and dealing with stakeholders, based on the concept of stakeholder developed by Ed Freeman in his books Strategic Management: a Stakeholder Approach (1984), and Stakeholder Theory: The State of the Art (2010).  These ideas are central to the ESEI™ approach to stakeholder engagement.

The way in which organisations approach stakeholder engagement, the tools and techniques used to engage stakeholders and, at a philosophical level, the purpose of the organisation are built on which view of stakeholders is accepted by the organisation’s governing body.

The traditionalist / Friedman view of stakeholders focused on the ‘owners’ of the organisation (in the commercial world shareholders) with the simple purpose of maximising profits. A range of public relations and physical disasters highlights the short term, self-defeating outcomes of this approach.

pmwj31-Feb2015-Bourne-PHOTO1 FREEMANR Edward (Ed) Freeman’s stakeholder theory poses the deeper philosophical question: ‘can business leaders make decisions about the conduct of the business without considering the impact of these decisions on (all) those who will be affected by the decisions?’ Is it possible to separate ‘business’ decisions from the ethical considerations of their impact?

Photo: Ed Freeman

The evidence suggests it is impossible to build a sustainable organisation of any type, including a profitable business, if that organisation fails to meet the needs of most (if not all) of its stakeholders, most of the time. Freeman is considered to be one of the early proponents of this wider view of organisational stakeholders, writing that they could be defined as “any group or individual who can affect or is affected by the achievement of the organisation’s objectives” 

More…

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Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.

About the Author

Dr Lynda BourneDr. Lynda Bourne flag-australia

Melbourne, Australia 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, the second, Advising Upwards in 2011. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is a columnist for PMI’s PM Network. Her next book Making Projects Work is due for publication in 2014.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected]der-management.com.

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

Bridging perceived value gap between business stakeholders and PMO

SECOND EDITION 

By Dwaraka Iyengar

Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Overview

Business sponsors are generally organized based on their functions and hence have a wholesome group when it comes to performing their function. A different story emerges when businesses have to execute projects to meet corporate objectives and goals. Businesses no longer have the resources to be fully self-sufficient and hence have to depend on other parts of the organization to make their projects successful. Business has never had to integrate the various departments until now to carry on with their regular functions. They now rely on the Project Manager to perform the integration function and thus fill the gap. In large/semi large organizations PMOs supply businesses with PMs for this function. The PMs however sit in the PMO organization and from a business standpoint ‘do not belong’ to them. Frictions and cracks appear as the engagement progresses and business does not seem to be happy with the situation. This paper attempts to identify and analyze these gaps and proposes solution for the benefit of both the PMO and the business.

To achieve this objective, the paper will begin with a definition of the value of PMOs to business, measures of value and how intangibles affect the measures of value. The paper will continue to provide some case studies from PMOs in various industries and then conclude with ideas for closing the gap of the a lack of perceived value to business.

PMO and its value

The Boston Consulting Group recently identified the following four imperatives for successfully delivering strategic initiative implementation. The PMO will serve a critical support function in these imperatives. The imperatives are:

  1. Focus on Critical Initiatives – Provide senior leaders with true operational insight through meaningful milestones and objectives for the strategic initiatives
  2. Institute Smart and Simple Processes – Through the use of the above mentioned milestone and objectives, communicate progress and identify issues early without adding undue burden to business
  3. Develop leadership skills and capabilities within the organization, and
  4. Institute change management as a real competitive differentiator

Additionally PMO provides intangibles such as:

  1. Enhanced communication and collaboration
  2. Alignment of values, goals and strategies within different parts of the organization
  3. Improved efficiency in work cultures
  4. Improvements in decision-making and problem solving capabilities
  5. Improved transparency , clarity of roles and responsibilities

Values can be measured in terms of tangibles such as: Cost savings, increased revenue, increased customer share, customer retention, reduced rework and write-off etc. Intangibles on the other hand can be measured in terms of improved competitiveness, greater social good (going green), improved quality of life, more effective human resources, improved reputation, staff retention, improved regulatory compliance etc.

Now let’s look at some of the aspects of constraints that contribute to the gap in the expectations of stakeholders and PMO, and the way PMOs bridge those gaps.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 8th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2014. It is republished here with permission of the author and symposium organizers. For more about the UTD PM Symposium, click here.

About the Author

pmwj31-Feb2015-Iyengar-PHOTODwaraka Iyengar, PMPflag-usa

Texas, USA

Dwaraka Iyengar, PMP has over 30 years of IT management consulting experience in the government, health, housing, insurance, manufacturing, finance, retail promotion and transportation industries. Dwaraka is a Senior Manager, IT-PMO, at MoneyGram International Inc, a global leader in the financial service industry enabling money transfers. In this role, Dwaraka is in charge of mentoring Project Managers, establishing standards and ensuring IT delivers business value to the organizations. Prior to this, Dwaraka was Assistant Vice President, Technical Communications at Innodata, a publicly traded Content Management Solutions consulting service organization. At Innodata, Dwaraka stood up a global Program Management Office and also headed the business development and delivery wings of Technical Communications Practice. He is also a part-time instructor at Collin County Community College District in North Texas.

Dwaraka manages and leads large development projects and has also successfully done so for Fortune 500 transportation and retail promotion companies. Dwaraka was primarily responsible for implementing offshore projects and processes in those engagements. Prior to the offshore engagements, he had served as an Engagement Manager for Syntel Inc., an outsourcing IT company that consulted to Ford, AIG and Blue Cross Blue Shield among its clients. Dwaraka received his PMP certification in 1998 and has served on the award winning PMI Dallas Chapter education committee since then. Dwaraka is a Past President of the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) and is currently a member of the Governance and Admin Best Practices committee at the Region 6 level of PMI.

Dwaraka Iyengar can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Project Management Update from Istanbul

REPORT 

By İpek Sahra Özgüler

International Correspondent

Istanbul, Turkey
________________________________________________________________________

This report is a contact point between Turkey and the world. As everyone knows, project management is an efficient tool to ensure that the projects are completed on time, within budget and meeting customer quality expectations. The organizations have to manage the projects efficiently in order achieve organizational strategy and objectives through project management.

In this first report, I want to share brief information of nonprofit organizations and their structure. Which nonprofit organizations are existing in Turkey? What did they achieve in the previous year? What will they plan to do in the next year? Then, I want to share the real experiences in project management through interviews.

My first guest is Ahmet Taspinar, who has over 40 years of experience in petrochemical and energy projects, and in management information systems development.

My second guest is Ismail Mehmet Yeyinmen. He has worked as an industrial entrepreneur involved either as consultant, advisor and/or founder CEO of many industrial establishments in Turkey.

My last guest is Sertug Yılmaz, a young professional. He works as project manager in the aviation sector.

More…

To read entire report, click here

About the Author

141210-pmwj30-Ozguler-PHOTOİpek Sahra Özgülerflag-turkey

Istanbul, Turkey

İpek Sahra Özgüler graduated from the Istanbul University with the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014. Ipek works as project portfolio manager at TAV IT Project Management Office. TAV IT is a core technology provider and systems integration company specialising in aviation. It delivers turn-key airport systems and infrastructure solutions for various parties at airports, including airport authorities, airlines and ground handling companies. Her main responsibility is to move the organization to the future by executing the organization’s strategy through portfolio management. Before joining TAV IT, she worked for global multinational companies and leading local companies such as Coca Cola, Deloitte, Turkcell Superonline and Havelsan. Over the years, she has gained extensive experience in managing various medium and large scale projects, programs and portfolios.

Her article named “When I Decided to Develop Multi Processing Project Manager’s System” published in the book “A Day in the Life of a Project Manager”. She has published several articles in the PM World Journal and one in PMI’s PM Network magazine. Ipek is actively involved in sailing, writing and discovering new cultures. She can be contacted at [email protected]. 

To view other works by this author, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

On the subject of Alan Stretton’s series article: Some deficiencies in published causes of project failures Jan. 2015

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

14 January 2015

Dear Editor,

Whilst wholeheartedly agreeing with Allan’s conclusions and appreciating the fact this paper is a meta-study of published works, there remains one serious flaw in the source documents and the analysis which I hope will be addressed in a future article in the series.

Many of the project management and project leadership failures listed are likely to be either unavoidable consequences, or symptoms of far more significant underlying issues. Focusing on the superficial prevents a more thorough ‘root cause’ analysis of the real issues and problems in organizations. I will take 2 examples and borrowing from Toyota’s ‘Five Whys’:

  1. Failures of PM leadership. The project manager did not appoint him/herself, some of the unanswered questions are:
    1. Why did the organisation appoint a PM lacking the requisite skills?
    2. Why did the organisation fail to support/train the PM?
    3. Why were the failings not picked up and resolved during routine project surveillance?
  2. Failing to use recognised techniques such as risk management. Some of the unanswered questions are:
    1. Why does the organisation allow sub-standard practices to exist?
    2. Does the organisation have proper templates, processes and support in place to support the practice?
    3. Does the organisation provide adequate time, training and resources to implement the practice?
    4. Why were the failings not picked up and resolved during routine project surveillance?

The answer to these questions goes back to organisational culture, the overall organisational ability to effectively manage and support its projects (‘the management of projects’) and ultimately the governance of the organisation.

Certainly some projects will fail for project related reasons; projects and programs are innately risky and this means project related failures are to be expected – minimising this cause of failure will be valuable.

However, I expect a proper study of the root causes of many so-called ‘project failures’ will show many more projects are set up to fail by the organisation. And allowing executive management to continue with these practices is ultimately a governance failure. Addressing the ‘root causes’ hidden in executive management practise, culture and governance is likely to generate significantly greater benefits. Work is happening in this area in some parts of the world. ISO is developing a standard on the governance of projects, programs and portfolios and Prof. Peter Morris and the APM (UK) are starting to focus on the overarching management of projects; to name two.

Hopefully Allan’s studies can help support these efforts.

Yours sincerely,

Patrick Weaver

Melbourne, Australia

Why Projects Fail or Succeed – A Project Management Preview of the Nigerian General Elections 2015

FEATURED PAPER

By O. Chima Okereke, PhD

Hereford, England
________________________________________________________________________

Nigeria has planned to conduct general elections, in February 2015, comprising the presidential election, governorship elections, senatorial elections, elections to the House of Representatives and State House of Assembly. The event, General Elections 2015, constitutes a major project with defined objectives, specified dates for execution and allocated budget. Given the many challenges that impact on the country such as insecurity and destruction of lives and properties by the Boko Haram, problems in the economy, corruption, underdeveloped infrastructure, political instability fuelled by the dubious utterances and questionable activities of some top politicians, etc., it is little wonder that all Nigerians should be praying that the project will succeed.

Normally, a project is successful if it is completed on time, within budget and most importantly achieves its objectives. The success of the Nigerian General Election project transcends such factors as time and cost to issues of scope and quality. The focus on scope in this case is on the achievement of the project’s objectives. Success is not and cannot be limited to the physical execution of the process of an election and the declaration of one of the contestants as a winner. No, it is what happens during and after the elections that will determine the success of the project. For example in the presidential election, one would suggest that it is not just that the current president, Dr. Goodluck Jonathan, wins the election and continues in office or that his opponent, Major General Muhammadu Buhari, wins and comes into office.

This is not correct; success in the project should be the establishment and sustenance of a government that, among other things, will engender peace and harmony in the country. It is relevant to underscore the point that elections are not just conducted at intervals in order to conform to agreed time table. It should be more important than a routine adherence to a plan. Rather, a national general election should be seen as a tool for national political, social and economic development. It should provide an opportunity for national reassessment. It should give the people the freedom hopefully, to elect a government of persons with ideas and commitment that will help the nation make progress in its areas of deficiencies. In particular for our country Nigeria, such a government should fulfil major critical success factors that address the various challenges which impact on the stability, integrity, political and economic development of the Nigerian nation. In line with this reasoning, it is relevant to suggest and examine the Critical Success Factors for the General Election 2015. These are factors that should be achieved for success of the elections.

Critical Success Factors for the General Election 2015

The suggested conditions for success in the General Elections could be summarised as the achievement of the following:

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To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

o-chima-okereke-bioO. Chima Okereke, PhD, PMPflag-nigeria

Herefordshire, UK

Dr. O. Chima Okereke, Ph.D., MBA, PMP is the Managing Director and CEO of Total Technology Consultants, Ltd., a project management consulting company working in West Africa and the UK. He is a multidisciplinary project management professional, with over 25 years’ experience in in oil and gas, steel and power generation industries. Before embarking on a career in consulting, he worked for thirteen years in industry rising to the position of a chief engineer with specialisation in industrial controls and instrumentation, electronics, electrical engineering and automation. During those 13 years, he worked on every aspect of projects of new industrial plants including design, construction and installation, commissioning, and engineering operation and maintenance in process industries. Chima sponsored and founded the potential chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, acting as president from 2004 to 2010.

Dr. Okereke has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Lagos, and a PhD and Masters in Business Administration (MBA) degree from the University of Bradford in the UK. He also has a PMP® certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) which he passed at first attempt. He has been a registered engineer with COREN in Nigeria since 1983. For many years, Total Technology has been a partner for Oracle Primavera Global Business Unit, a representative in Nigeria of Oracle University for training in Primavera project management courses, and a Gold Level member of Oracle Partner Network (OPN). In the UK, the company is also a member of the Herefordshire and Worcestershire Chamber of Commerce. He is a registered consultant with several UN agencies. More information can be found at http://www.totaltechnologyconsultants.org/.

Chima is the publisher of Project Management Business Digest, a blog aimed at helping organizations use project management for business success. Dr. Okereke is also an international advisor for PM World. He can be contacted at [email protected]  or [email protected].

To view other works by Mr. Okereke, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-o-chima-okereke/

 

 

PMS, Managerial and Cultural Barriers to Agile Implementation in Indian IT Project-based Organizations

FEATURED PAPER

By Subhashish Sengupta, PMP

and

Dr. Debashish Sengupta

Bangalore, India
________________________________________________________________________

Literature Review

What is Agile Project Management? 

Agile project management is an iterative approach towards managing all the phases in a project lifecycle. Unlike waterfall model where the phases are managed in a sequential order, agile project management can have all phases of the project repeated iteratively throughout the project lifecycle in the form of small increments or sprints which are directed towards completing a small portion of the overall delivery. Due to this incremental model and iterative approach, Agile provided much more flexibility in managing projects where the requirements are not very clear at the beginning of the project or where there are possibilities of changes in requirements throughout the lifecycle of the project (PMHut, 2008).

Agile project management ensures that the stakeholder involvement is extremely high leading to better efficiency and more cost effective and reliable solutions. The biggest advantage of Agile project management is the ability provided to the project manager to respond to various changes related to the project which can sometimes be crucial towards delivering projects successfully (Rouse, 2011).

The key aspects related to Agile Project Management are as follows (Tutorialspoint, 2014)-

  • Agile project management is about having all roles needed to deliver are a part of one team. Hence all roles needed should be in the same team in an Agile context.
  • The communication needs in Agile Project Management is extremely high. The team needs to interact and take stock of the progress on a daily basis. Besides open and honest communication is one of the essential pillars in Agile Project Management.
  • The entire delivery is split into shorter cycle or sprints 

Application of Agile in IT project based organizations

The whole idea behind introducing Agile into IT development was to be able to develop software in a better and much more efficient way thereby reducing the wastage and making the process of software development much more efficient.

The Agile software development is governed by the Agile manifesto which was written in the year 2001. The Agile manifesto is based on the following 4 governing principles (Beck, et al., 2001):

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About the Authors

pmwj18-jan2014-senguptas-titus-PHOTO1 SUBASHISHSubhashish Sengupta, PMPflag-india

 

PMP Pro & Project Manager

Bangalore, India

 

Subhashish Sengupta is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®). He has over 15 years of work experience in the IT industry and his key strengths are in Project Development & Management, Delivery management, Project Analysis & Design. He currently works as Project Manager. He has played a leading role in coming-up with recommendations on implementing Agile in the Indian IT scenario. He has received several awards in his career and was awarded the ‘Star performer of the Year’ award for his professional contributions. Besides his present role, Subhashish also has interests in practice-oriented research, especially in the area of Project Management. Email: [email protected]

pmwj31-Feb2015-Senguptas-AUTHOR2Dr. Debashish Senguptaflag-india

 

Alliance School of Business, Alliance University

Bangalore, India

 

 

Dr. Debashish Sengupta currently works as a Professor in Organizational Leadership & Strategy Area with Alliance School of Business, Alliance University, Bangalore (India). Dr. Debashish Sengupta is the author of a Crossword bestseller book – ‘Employee Engagement’ (Wiley India, 2011). The book has been cited by KPMG in its report ‘Post Merger People Integration’ (2011). He has also authored four other books – ‘Business Drama’ (Zorba, 2014), ‘Human Resource Management’ (Wiley India, 2012) ‘You Can Beat Your Stress’ (Excel Books, 2007) and ‘FMI’ (Excel Books, 2010). He has been a book reviewer for the prestigious Emerald Group Publishing, London (U.K.). He is an avid researcher and has won best paper awards and best young researcher award for his research works. He occasionally writes columns, articles and case studies for reputed business publications. He writes a professional blog on people engagement – http://www.peopleengagement.blogspot.in Dr. Sengupta is a much sought speaker at various business forums and a resource person in several MDPs, corporate training programs. His invited talk on ‘Engaging Gen Y’ for the entire HR fraternity of Tata Consultancy Services, Bangalore was contributory in design of a Gen Y policy of the company. Email: [email protected] Twitter: @d_sengupta