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UK Project Management Round Up

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

The past month has been interesting for observers of the Project World.  First, the National Audit Office (NAO) released its comments on the Major Projects Agency (MPA) first Annual Report; then came the opening of Heathrow’s rebuilt Terminal 2 and as we close for publication, HM The Queen is due to name the first Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier.  As this was not enough to capture the project eye, we had the low key launch of a ‘new look’ Private Finance Initiative.  All the old favourites resurface, too, so you will find the latest on energy projects and a brief mention of celebrations of success in the project world.

GOVERNMENT PROJECTS

The main focus for the Government recently has been the elimination of nasty surprises on the successful delivery of its ‘projects’.  This has manifested itself in the adoption of some basic portfolio management actions, of which the reporting of a range of project data by Departments is a major part.  The Major Projects Authority (MPA) consolidates data provided by Departments into its annual report which is available not only to Government but is also to key stakeholders – the taxpayer.  Another key component is the reviews of MPA reports by the NAO.  This review provides direct advice to MPA and also provides a key input to the formal scrutiny of infrastructure projects by the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) of the House of Commons.

The latest MPA Report covers the period from June to September 2013.  While this may seem to be a much delayed report, but the sheer size and range of the projects reported coupled with the need to take ‘fiscal drag’ mean that some time is needed for the analysis.  The good news is that the report shows that NAO advice following the first report has been acted upon and much more analysis of data has been included so that the amount of undisclosed data has been reduced by nearly a third.  This follows the issue of revised guidance which has improved the quality of the data published by departments.

Inevitably, there is also some bad news, or at least, not so good news.  The overall performance reported shows a deterioration in ‘deliverability’.  There are many more value of amber-red rated projects, and more worryingly, the value of these projects has increased.  At the same time, the number green rated projects have fallen. This is partly attributed to a change in the make-up of the portfolio; 39 mature projects have left the Portfolio while 47 new projects have joined.  The NAO report notes that, the rating of ongoing projects declined slightly, with 27 projects receiving an improved delivery confidence rating and 32 receiving a lower confidence rating.  

More…

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About the Author

pmwj17-dec2013-shepherd-AUTHOR IMAGEMILES SHEPHERDflag-uk

Salisbury, UK

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

Welcome to the July 2014 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells,

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the July 2014 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This month’s edition again contains a wide range of content from around the world, with 32 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 35 different authors in 15 different countries.  An additional 40+ news articles about projects and project management around the world are included. More than 25 countries are again represented by authors or subjects this month.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience related to program, project and portfolio management.  We publish a wide variety of articles and papers, case studies and reports, book reviews and news stories.  Share knowledge and gain visibility for you or your organization; publish an article, paper or story in the PMWJ.  See our Call for Papers in the news section of the PMWJ this month; if interested in submitting something for publication, check out the Author Guidelines on www.pmworldjournal.net, then contact me at [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin with 1 Letter to the Editor this month, from Amer Fahmy in Oman.  Amer is responding to the June letter to the editor regarding his paper published in the PMWJ in May on the topic of Dynamic Scheduling.  Is it a debate or argument?  You decide.  If you have a reaction to something you read in this publication, share it with the world in an old fashioned letter to the editor – but send as an email please.

7 authors have contributed Featured Papers this month. Pat Weaver in Australia has returned with a paper entitled “The Origins of the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) Calendar.”  Monica Gonzalez in Argentina is the author of “Green Project Management – A Case Study in Sustainability – Management of Chemical Containers for Social Good: Child Health and Nutrition.”  Walt Lipke in Oklahoma, USA has returned with a new paper on earned schedule, titled “Testing Earned Schedule Forecasting Reliability.” Dr. Goparaju Purna Sudhakar in India has contributed “Project Management Insights from the Bhadavad Gita.” Dan Epstein in New York is the author of “Project Estimating Process.” Muhamed Abdomerovic in Georgia, USA is the author of “Development and Implementation of Project Management Plan.”  And Dr. Stanislaw Gasik in Warsaw, Poland is the author of “p-Government – A Framework of Public Projects Management.”

Featured Papers are generally significant works that contribute to the P/PM literature, often by academic researchers.  If you are associated with an academic institution, involved in serious research related to project or program management, and are not required to publish only in refereed journals, consider submitting your research results for PMWJ publication.  We publish quickly and can assure you that your paper will be read.

4 Series Articles are includedthis month, by 6 authors in 4 different countries. Another article in the series on the broad topic of Maturity in Project Management within organizations by Russell Archibald (Mexico) and Darci Prado (Brazil) is included this month. Their article is titled “Impact of PPPM Maturity on the Success of Software Application Development Projects in Brazil.” Don’t miss this new article on this important topic by two leading authorities on the subject.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author 

david-pellsDAVID PELLS flag-usa

Managing Editor, PMWJ 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999.He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.  He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations.  David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at[email protected].

For more, visit www.pmworldjournal.net and www.pmworldlibrary.net.

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

The Art of Agile Risk Management

SECOND EDITION                                                         

Susan Parente, PMP, CISSP, PMI-RMP, ITIL, MSEM

S3 Technologies, LLC

USA
________________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACT

In today’s world of fast paced technology and continually changing requirements and project scope, the need for Agile Project Management has greatly increased. Responding to this demand, the PMI® (Project Management Institute) launched a new certification, the PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)SM. The result of this fast growing certification is the creation of a new space where Project Management and Agile Practices for Software Development meet. This calls us to ask how do standard critical project management methodologies like Risk Management fit into Agile Practices.

This paper details the methodology of Risk Management as it applies to Agile Project Management. It engages in the steps of Risk Management including: identifying, assessing and managing risks, while mapping these to Agile Practices. Most Project Managers are familiar with Risk Management and Agile, but how do these methodologies relate, and how can we use them to manage resources and do more with less on our projects?

What is Agile Project Management and when does it make sense to use it? How Risk Management relates to Agile and how it is incorporated into Agile Practices will be evaluated. Recommendations for implementing Agile Risk Management will be provided along with best practices and how organizations are applying this into practice.

Risk Management is not only a practice and discipline, it is an Art. Knowing the tools or techniques is not sufficient for success. The nuances of how Risk management is incorporated into agile practices are what generate project success. When requirements and environmental conditions are in flux, our ability to anticipate Risk and plan for it, is critical to managing projects with agility.

OVERVIEW

The objectives of this paper on the Art of Agile Risk Management are to first provide an overview of Project Risk Management (including defining Risk) and Agile Projects. After providing this foundation, Agile Risk Management will be discussed using the analogy of flight. A view of how this will look for Agile projects will be provided. Finally, recommendations on how to implement Agile Risk Management will be provided.

The goal of this paper is to provide the current landscape of Project Risk Management and Agile project management. Then detail what Agile Risk Management entails and how to implement it for Agile projects.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note:  Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 1st Annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA and included in the conference Proceedings in June 2014.  It is republished here with permission of the author and the Project Management Center for Excellence at the University of Maryland.

About the Author

pmwj24-jul2014-Parente-AUTHOR IMAGESusan Parenteflag-usa

USA

Susan Parente is a project engineer, consultant, speaker, author, and mentor who leads large complex IT software implementation projects, and the establishment of Enterprise PMOs. She has 15+ years experience leading software and business development projects in the private and public sectors, including a decade of experience implementing IT projects for the US Department of Defense. Ms. Parente is also an Associate Professor at Post University in Connecticut, and a PMP and PMI-RMP instructor. She has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Rochester in New York and has a MS in Engineering Management with a focus on Marketing of Technology from George Washington University in Washington, DC, USA. She is also PMP, CISSP, PMI-RMP and ITIL certified, and is a CMMI and ISO 9001 Practitioner.

Ms. Parente is Principal Consultant at S3 Technologies, LLC. Her company focuses on revitalizing projects through the use of risk management. S3 Technologies does this by teaming with clients, stakeholders and vendors and using risk management to deliver project successes. Ms. Parente trains and mentors project managers in the areas of project and risk management. She has developed a methodology which she uses to implement risk management programs for both small and large clients and is currently completing her manuscript for a book on implementing risk management.  Susan can be contacted at [email protected].

The Business Value of the Soft Stuff[1]

SECOND EDITION

Jocelyn Davis

Nelson Hart LLC, Virginia, USA

Adjunct Professor, Center for Excellence in Project Management,

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA

________________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACT

When individuals flourish, organizations thrive.  This paper will present the case for project managers to implement positive psychology into routine people management practices to deliver successful projects which meet the triple constraints and enhance the project team’s experience of their work.  To simplify the implementation of these people practices, we will present a well-being at work assessment which links personal resources, management systems, experience of work and functioning at work to organizational outcomes relevant to project management at all levels.

We will explore how your team members can be corporate athletes able to meet the daily challenges of stressful work, how to design management systems which support the team’s best work, how to enhance internal motivation on project teams, and how to enhance employee engagement, flow, satisfaction, and sense of purpose to attain and sustain great project results.  Each element of the well-being at work assessment will be linked to people management practices which drive attainment of key organizational outcomes.

Introduction

The next frontier for the development of project management competence is the development of a body of knowledge and practice which focuses on the sustainable management of people on projects.  A number of piecemeal efforts to do this have been underway for decades:  employee satisfaction surveys, employee engagement, culture assessment, wellness initiatives, flexible work schedules, etc.  Each of these efforts has merit conceptually in its own right, but used individually they lack a philosophical and empirical coherence that can persuade managers and their organizations to create workplaces that support sustainable, exceptional performance and yield the desired individual and organizational results.  Further, this lack of coherence reduces the scope of the actions likely to be taken by organizations resulting in less than satisfactory results.

Simplistic solutions are not sufficient to address inherently complex and dynamic issues involving people at work.

This paper will use a comprehensive model of subjective well-being (SWB) or Happiness at Work ([email protected]) to review the case for, and some selected interventions to enhance, SWB at work. This model considers the individual, their teams or work units, and the overall organization.  This paper case will highlight a few of the many organizational or project outcomes that are empirically linked to SWB in the workplace.  And, it will offer some of the proven interventions which enhance SWB at work.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note:  Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 1st Annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA and included in the conference Proceedings in June 2014.  It is republished here with permission of the author and the Project Management Center for Excellence at the University of Maryland.

About the Author 

pmwj24-jul2014-Davis-IMAGEJocelyn Davis flag-usa

Virginia, USA

Jocelyn Davis is the president and co-founder of Nelson Hart LLC, a women-owned consulting firm.  Nelson Hart works with clients in all sectors to help them develop teams and workplaces where individuals flourish and the organizations thrive.  She believes that each of us has unique strengths and capabilities to bring to our personal and professional lives as individuals and as members of various groups.  She is a leader in efforts to enhance the quality of workplace experiences and the performance of people, teams and organizations. Jocelyn is also an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA in the Clark School of Engineering’s Project Management Program where she teaches two innovative applied positive psychology courses:  Managing Project Teams and Evolving as a Leader. Jocelyn can be contacted at [email protected].

[1] Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 1st Annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA and included in the conference Proceedings in June 2014.  It is republished here with permission of the author and the Project Management Center for Excellence at the University of Maryland.

Project Management in Spain – monthly report

REPORT 

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain
________________________________________________________________________

PMI Barcelona Chapter 10th Anniversary

The past 8th of June, our Barcelona colleagues celebrated their 10th PMI Chapter Anniversary. The PMI Barcelona Chapter was chartered on 2004. Because of that, we could meet with all the Spanish PMI Chapters and meet Mr. Kris Troukens (Current PMI Region 8th Mentor) and Majda Elmakfi (PMI Chapter Development). In a similar way that PMI Madrid Chapter did last year, when celebrating their 10th Anniversary. It was a very nice event, where Alfonso Bucero (PMI Barcelona Sponsor and Former President), Marc Serer (Second President), Albert Cubeles (Third President) and Elisabet Duocastella (current President) did a chronological review around the PMI Barcelona Chapter activities, and in a lovely manner, remembered and shared some stories with the attendees that happened during the last ten years.

From here, we want to congratulate our PMI Barcelona Chapter colleagues for their achievements, and we wish them all the best for the upcoming years. Without any doubt, this celebration has served to reinforce the links among PMI Spanish membership. We hope from now we will be able to live new and common experiences to be shared in our next anniversaries.

Thanks to Elisabeth and to the PMI Barcelona Board of Directors for sharing that event with us.

PMP Certification is still growing up in Spain

In spite of the Spanish financial crisis, Spanish Project professionals continue investing effort and Money for getting their PMP (Project Management Professional) certification. PMP certification demand has grown in the Engineering and Construction industry in Spain. Multinational companies from Engineering and Aerospace are requesting it more and more. In the Construction sector the most Requests are coming from independent professionals and small firms that are looking their added value to obtain that certification.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

About the Author 

alfonso-buceroAlfonso Buceroflag-spain

Contributing Editor

International Correspondent – Spain

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011.  Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

Testing Earned Schedule Forecasting Reliability

FEATURED PAPER

Walt Lipke

Oklahoma, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

Project duration forecasting using Earned Schedule (ES) has been affirmed to be better than other Earned Value Management based methods. Even so, the results from a study, employing simulation techniques, indicated there were conditions in which ES performed poorly. These results have created skepticism as to the reliability of ES forecasting. A recent paper examined the simulation study, concluding through deduction that ES forecasting is considerably better than portrayed. Researchers were challenged to examine this conclusion, by applying simulation methods. This paper uses real data for the examination, providing a compelling argument for the reliability of ES duration forecasting.

Introduction

A research study of project duration forecasting was made several years ago, employing simulation methods applied to created schedules having several variable characteristics (Vanhoucke & Vandevoorde, 2007). The overall result from the study was that forecasts using Earned Schedule (ES), on average, are better than other Earned Value Management (EVM) based methods. However, in certain instances the ES forecast was not.

The scenarios examined in the 2007 study are depicted in figure 1. The scenario model indicates nine possible outcomes. These outcomes are grouped into three categories: true, misleading, and false. True outcomes are associated with reliable forecasts, whereas the misleading and false categories indicate unreliable ES duration forecasting.

The three groupings are more fully explained as follows:

  • The true scenarios (1, 2, 5, 8, 9) have the characteristic that the relationship of the real or final project duration (RD) to the planned duration (PD) can be inferred from the schedule performance efficiency indicator, SPI(t).Using scenario 1 for example, SPI(t) is greater than 1 (indicating good performance), while RD is less than PD (as one would expect from the indicator); i.e., the indicator is consistent with the duration result.
  • The misleading scenarios (4, 6) are characterized by the critical activities being completed as planned, while the non-critical activities are not. The RD equals PD; however, SPI(t) is either greater or less than 1. Thus, the indicator is inconsistent with the duration outcome.
  • The false scenarios (3, 7) occur for two circumstances: 1) When non-critical activity performance is good and critical performance is poor, or 2) When critical activity performance is good and non-critical is poor. For these scenarios, the indicator, SPI(t), infers an outcome in opposition to the actual duration.

As indicated by the model only five of the nine possible outcomes are true (SPI(t) consistent with the final duration). Thus, a negative perception is created as to the reliability of ES forecasting.

More (including figures and footnotes)…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

Walt-LipkeWalt Lipkeflag-usa

Oklahoma, USA 

Walt Lipke retired in 2005 as deputy chief of the Software Division at Tinker Air Force Base. He has over 35 years of experience in the development, maintenance, and management of software for automated testing of avionics. During his tenure, the division achieved several software process improvement milestones, including the coveted SEI/IEEE award for Software Process Achievement. Mr. Lipke has published several articles and presented at conferences, internationally, on the benefits of software process improvement and the application of earned value management and statistical methods to software projects. He is the creator of the technique Earned Schedule, which extracts schedule information from earned value data.Mr. Lipke is a graduate of the USA DoD course for Program Managers. He is a professional engineer with a master’s degree in physics, and is a member of the physics honor society, Sigma Pi Sigma (SPS). Lipke achieved distinguished academic honors with the selection to Phi Kappa Phi (FKF). During 2007 Mr. Lipke received the PMI Metrics Specific Interest Group Scholar Award. Also in 2007, he received the PMI Eric Jenett Award for Project Management Excellence for his leadership role and contribution to project management resulting from his creation of the Earned Schedule method. Mr. Lipke was selected for the 2010 Who’s Who in the World.  At the 2013 EVM Europe Conference, he received an award in recognition of the creation of Earned Schedule and its influence on project management, EVM, and schedule performance research. Most recently, the College of Performance Management awarded Mr. Lipke the Driessnack Distinguished Service Award, their highest honor. Walt can be contacted at [email protected].

Project Management Report from Milan

REPORT 

By Luca Cavone

International Correspondent

Milan, Italy
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

This month we will face a specific topic that has recently attracted much interest from professionals who deal with Project Management: this is the issue that concerns the Social Responsibility and how projects can bring a beneficial impact on society.

It’s a running topic and we will see as the subject has been treated in the paper “Social Management, is it a new Project Management Competence?” from Concari and Di Rubbo, published in the May edition of the PMWJ. On the same way, the Italian section of IPMA Young Crew has decided to dedicate an event aimed to speak about the developing countries as a new frontier for project management.

Another initiative that sees again at the center IPMA Young Crew, this time in partnership with Junior Chamber International, with the project called “(Y)Our Future in Milan”, that directly involves to the younger generation and that is topical in Europe: the youth unemployment.

Finally we will see a quick update on the MOSE project which is expected to be completed in the next two years and that will solve the problem of high water in Venice, with a direct impact on the lives of its citizens, tourists and all those who visit its lagoon. 

More…

To read entire report, click here

About the Author

luca-cavoneLuca Cavone flag-italy

Milan, Italy

Luca Cavone is a Consultant at JMAC Europe, the Consulting firm of the Japan Management Association. He is mainly focused to support companies in Innovation Management and Product Development Projects typical of R&D and Marketing areas, with an interdisciplinary background of the business processes. In JMAC Luca follows also the study and development of project management methodologies based on the application of Lean Thinking approach. Before joining JMAC he worked several years in the Aerospace industry.   Since 2009 Luca has been actively involved with the International Project Management Association (IPMA); at that time he was between the founders of the Young Crew Italy and was appointed as first chairman. In 2011 he left the position to join the Young Crew Management Board, where he’s currently Head of Membership and Responsible for the Young Project Manager of the Year award. Since 2010 Luca is also a member of the Executive Board of IPMA Italy.  Luca is an international correspondent for PM World in Italy; he can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Luca Cavone, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/luca-cavone/

Project Management Update from Zagreb

REPORT 

By Gordana Blažević

International Correspondent

Zagreb, Croatia

________________________________________________________________________

YOUNG WINNERS OF THE KOZMO FAIR DEAL COMPETITION LAUNCH A CHARITY CAMPAIGN FOR SOS CHILDREN’S VILLAGE CROATIA!

“Smile for a Loving Home” is the name of the winning campaign designed by the members of the Young Crew Croatia for SOS Children’s Village Croatia, to be launched in November 2014 in cooperation with Kozmo.

Zagreb, June 11, 2014 – Kozmo and SOS Children’s Village Croatia, partners in this year’s Fair Deal Youth Competition, organized by the Young Crew Croatia (Croatian Association for Project Management), declared the winners of the contest-based training in the category of project development and management. The contest ran from May 30 to June 5, 2014. Two Young Crew teams competed against each other to create a charity campaign under the expert guidance of Dubravka Vlajo.

The winning charity campaign, entitled “Smile for a Loving Home”, was designed for the SOS Children’s Village Croatia by a six-member Young Crew team over the course of seven days. The campaign will run in November and December of this year in all Kozmo drugstores in Croatia.

The campaign based on smiling and designed to highlight the importance of mutual aid will raise funds for the SOS Children’s Village Croatia. For the duration of the campaign, all Kozmo stores will have on display a small-scale model house symbolizing an SOS Children’s Village home, which will gradually be covered with stick-on smiles. By purchasing a “smile” for the children in SOS Children’s Village, everyone will be able to contribute to this wonderful charity campaign.

More…

To read entire report, click here

About the Author

pmwj16-nov2013-blazevic-IMAGE 2 AUTHOR PHOTOGordana Blaževićflag-zagreb-croatia

Zagreb, Croatia

Gordana Blažević is a member of IPMA Young Crew and president of Young Crew Croatia. She was born in 1985, graduated Faculty of Civil Engineering from the University of Zagreb in September 2010. After graduation, she was working until September 2012 for company OPTIMA Project Ltd, a registered company for performing construction services, expert supervision, consulting and project management. After that, the Faculty of Civil Engineering at the University of Zagreb in the Construction Management Department employed her as a young research associate pursuing a PhD degree. As president of Young Crew Croatia, Gordana is part of various projects on national and international level. She is also member of IPMA Marketing Working group. Questions are highly welcome via [email protected]

To view other works by Gordana Blažević, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/gordana-blazevic-croatia/

Positive Leadership in Project Management – A Practical Guide to Enhancing Individual, Team and Organizational Performance

PM WORLD Book Review 

pmwj24-jul2014-Zorinsky-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title:  Positive Leadership in Project Management – A Practical Guide to Enhancing Individual, Team and Organizational Performance
Author:  Frank P. Saladis, PMP
Publisher:  IIL Publishing, New York
List Price:   $25.00  Format:  soft cover; 260 pages
Publication Date:   2013     ISBN: 978-0-9708276-6-1
Reviewer:      Eldon J. Zorinsky, PMP
Review Date:              May, 2014
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

During the formative years of the project management profession, the success or failure of a given project was usually attributed to how well the “tangibles” of the project (scope, schedule and cost) were managed, with failures typically being ascribed to poor planning, estimating, scheduling or controlling (i.e., project leadership was viewed largely as the management of “technology” as opposed to “people” and failures were all quantitative in nature).  However, as many team members and other stakeholders could probably attest, a preponderance of less-than-successful projects was more likely the result of inadequate interpersonal skills, poor communication, dysfunctional team or organizational dynamics or other behavioral considerations.

Positive Leadership in Project Management – A Practical Guide to Enhancing Individual, Team and Organizational Performance,” written by Frank P. Saladis, PMP, clearly explains the many requirements and challenges associated with being a successful project manager in today’s competitive environment.  The author examines the various business, technical, interpersonal, personal and management skills and competencies that form the basic “tool kit” for effective project management, overlays them with the concepts of leadership (its embodiments, styles and qualitative attributes) and value creation and then provides examples that demonstrate the overall impact that comes about when skillful leadership, subject matter knowledge and practical experience converge.

The author explains in detail how the effective application of “positive leadership” by the project manager (in conjunction with his or her other skills and competencies) not only enhances the performance of individual team members, but also improves the overall effectiveness of the project team, which, in turn, drives project and organizational success to higher levels of achievement, and concurrently fosters opportunities for individual growth, innovation, creativity and continuous learning, all of which lead to greater job satisfaction, work focus and loyalty, and ultimately serve to provide the enterprise with future leaders.  In addition to numerous practical examples, at the end of each chapter the author provides numerous references, exercises and journal space for readers to use to assess their current capabilities and develop plans to improve their particular leadership styles and approaches.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book consists of 32 separate and succinct chapters that cover a broad range of topics and contain knowledge and wisdom drawn from a wide variety of experts in the area of leadership.  The author provides the reader with a collection of best practices, lessons learned, critical success factors, key performance metrics, project anecdotes, insightful quotes and creative acronyms drawn from his extensive research and, more importantly, his many decades of practical experience in the field of project management.

Each chapter ends with thoughtful “self assessment” questions and exercises along with additional reference material and suggestions for ways to further develop the reader’s knowledge and skills that pertain to that chapter’s material.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

eldon-zorinksyEldon J. Zorinsky, PMP flag-usa

North Texas, USA

Eldon Zorinsky is an experienced technology executive, program director, certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas who specializes in building high performance teams of technical and business professionals and leading them in the definition, development and commercialization of new products and technologies.  He received his Doctor of Engineering degree in Electrical Engineering and Master of Science degree in Engineering Management from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. He also earned a Master of Science degree in Physics from the University of Missouri at Columbia, MO and a Bachelor of Science degree from Creighton University in Omaha, NE.  He holds numerous patents in the areas of semiconductor devices and device isolation and over the course of his career, has successfully lead product and technology development and commercialization efforts that generated combined revenue of nearly $1B. Eldon is an active member of the Dallas Chapter of PMI and is currently serving as a volunteer with the Chapter’s Professional Development Group.  He is also a member of IEEE, The Engineering Management Society, AAAS, and The American Vacuum Society. He can be contacted at [email protected] 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI Dallas Chapter – www.pmidallas.org). Authors and publishers provide books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI members can keep the books as well as receive PDUs for PMP recertification when their book reviews are published.  PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Strategic Benefits Realization

PM WORLD Book Review

pmwj24-jul2014-Sohrwardy-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title: Strategic Benefits Realization
Author: Craig. J. Letavec
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   US$64.95
Format: Hardcover; 281 pages
Publication Date:     2014
ISBN: 978-1-60427-093-8
Reviewer:      Huma Sohrwardy
Review Date:            June 12, 2014
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Strategic Benefits Realization is a concise and succinct primer on benefits realization management in the context of portfolio / program / project management and organizational change management.

It provides a practical framework to identify, manage and realize benefits at these different levels and their inter dependencies. The author has used PMI’s standards to present the approach for realizing strategic benefits within an organization.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book has 16 chapters in total with appendices that contain a case study for a PMO’s role in benefits realization and a sample of the Program Management Professional (PgMP) examination related questions.

Chapters 1-10 describe benefits realization in the context of portfolio, program and project management. Subsequent chapters provide a description of the different phases of the benefits realization cycle. These chapters lay the foundation for specifics contained in the following ones.

Chapters 11-16 focus on organizational change management in the benefits realization and project environment context. Also discussed are PMO’s support role, business case considerations and a practical guide for implementing benefits management. In addition, there are related templates that can be downloaded from the publisher’s website at www.jrosspub.com.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

The book extends the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) program management standard by providing a high level approach for implementing the benefits realization framework within an organization. The book provides actionable steps that are easy to follow and implement.

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About the Reviewer

huma-sohrwardyHuma Sohrwardy, PgMP, PMP, CSM flag-usa

Texas, USA

Huma Sohrwardy is an experienced IT practitioner with 20+ years of experience in the use and management of Information Technology as a means to delivering business goals and objectives. She has extensive experience in the Healthcare IT, Finance, Manufacturing and public sectors and has worked as a consultant for the Australian Federal Government. Huma is the principal consultant with HZ Technologies, LLC (HZT). The company provides Project Portfolio Management solutions to small and medium sized organizations. HZT is a registered vendor with the Texas State and Federal governments. Prior to starting a career in consulting, she led a PMO in Healthcare IT. She is an avid reader and is a PMI Dallas Chapter volunteer member. She runs the Chapter’s Book Review Program and is a founding member of its Book Club. She has been a guest speaker at the Applied Project Management Forum at University of Texas Dallas. Her presentation on “PPM Implementation” can be accessed at the Jindal School of Managementwebsite. Huma can be contacted at: [email protected]

To view other works by Huma Sohrwardy, visit her author showcase page in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/huma-sohrwardy/.

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI Dallas Chapter – www.pmidallas.org). Authors and publishers provide books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI members can keep the books as well as receive PDUs for PMP recertification when their book reviews are published. PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Project Ethics

PM World Book Review

pmwj24-jul2014-Kelley-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title:  Project Ethics
Author:  Haukur Ingi Jonasson and Helgi Thor Ingason
Publisher:  Gower Publishing Limited
List Price:   £28.50  Format:  soft cover; 142 pages
Publication Date:   2013     ISBN: 978-1-4094-1096-6
Reviewer:      Patty Kelley
Review Date:              May 2014
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Ethical issues are part of all projects and there is not enough focus on evaluating the potential impacts to project success.  The authors review 4 different types of ethical theories and how the different theories apply to project management and execution.

The focus is on the importance of including ethical analysis during risk assessment of projects.  As project leaders we need to ensure that we step back from looking at scope, cost, schedule and quality and include an ethical review of the potential issues that may arise during the life cycle of a project.  Ethical considerations should be included when evaluating all areas of project success factors.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book’s structure is broken down into 6 areas:

  • Overview of the ethics methodology and how it applies to project management
  • Two chapters cover outcome-oriented ethical theories – Virtue and Utility
  • Two chapters cover process-oriented theories – Duty and Rights
  • One chapter providing a review of conventional risk management vs new thinking that includes ethical components and how it applies to different types of projects

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

The focus on ethics as part of the primary role of the project leader and the need to consider all four types of ethical theories when creating the risk management plan for a project.  The authors provide a Project Ethics Tool (PET) to assist with analyzing and managing all aspects of the project across contracting, designing, planning, executing and handing the project over to the owner. The view is to look at risk holistically not isolated to the traditional scope, cost and schedule components.

More…

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About the Reviewer

pmwj24-jul2014-Kelley-IMAGE2 REVIEWERPatty Kelleyflag-usa

North Texas, USA

Patty Kelley is aProject Management Institute certified project manager since 2005, employed at AT&T for 17 years working in a variety of areas including Information Technology Management, Project Process Auditing, Product Development, Project Management and, currently, Network Operations Strategic Program Management. Ms. Kelley has a Bachelors Degree in Management and Masters Degree in Engineering and Technology Management from Dallas Baptist University.

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI Dallas Chapter – www.pmidallas.org). Authors and publishers provide books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI members can keep the books as well as receive PDUs for PMP recertification when their book reviews are published.  PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

SuperCommunicator

PM WORLD Book Review

pmwj24-jul2014-Grigsby-IMAGE1 BOOKBook Title:  SuperCommunicator
Author:  Frank J. Pietrucha
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   US$17.95
Format:  soft cover; 258 pages
Publication Date:   2014
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3368-3
Reviewer:      Kurt R. Grigsby
Review Date:              June 2014
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

SuperCommunicator [Explaining the complicated so anyone can understand] is a practical resource to communicating effectively in this millennium. It guides us in recognizing how changing digital technology as a communication medium can be used and provides practical insights to bring meaning to your audience as you prepare your narrative for sharing.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book utilizes 9 sections called Parts which contains associated chapters. The first 5 parts outline the basics of why and how to effectively understand the audience you intend to communicate with.

If you only had limited time to read this work, I believe the introduction to Part 5 is the heart and soul of this book. Parts 6-9 gives much deeper insight to what’s required to relate to your audience and reinforces the importance and individual benefit of clear and concise communication while being yourself.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

The author provides many examples, illustrations, and easily understandable methods that can be used to communicate different types of subject matter with diverse audiences on multiple levels. The layout is easy to navigate and locate topics that are of interest to the reader.

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About the Reviewer

pmwj24-jul2014-grigsbyKurt R. Grigsbyflag-usa

Texas, USA 

Kurt R. Grigsby is a project manager with 20+ years of broad technical and engineering problem solving experience and known for creative innovation in project execution, and implementation. He embraces the ongoing challenge of communicating complex ideas and technologies in clear language.

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI Dallas Chapter – www.pmidallas.org). Authors and publishers provide books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI members can keep the books as well as receive PDUs for PMP recertification when their book reviews are published.  PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Ethics in Project Management – Research on Values-Based Leadership in Project Driven Arenas

SECOND EDITION

By William A Moylan, PhD, PMP 1, and, Loran W Walker, PhD, PMP 2

1 Eastern Michigan University, College of Technology, Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA

2 Capella University, College of Business & Technology, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

The paper addresses the values-based leadership skills, values and concepts of ethical project management professionals, and, considers the applicability of this leadership construct to the processes of managing major projects in different industries and applications.  The purpose of the research study is to determine the suitability of a values-based leadership approach for leading project teams, with a focus on improving the partnerships within industrial programs. The main research question addressed is: “Can the application of values-based leadership skills, values and concepts improve the processes of project management, especially within project-driven industries?” A follow on to this research question is the hypothesis of: “Values-based leadership skills, values, and concepts are highly applicable to the processes of project management, in particular, in the leading of programs from concept through completion.” The study assesses the eleven leadership values postulated in the criteria for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (2013) as means to establish an ethical rubric within project-driven industries. Additionally, the paper reviews the six core principles of values-based leadership postulated by G.W. Fairholm(1998). The research study uses a quantitative approach (survey) to assess the critical elements of this topic. On previous research performed on this topic, a mixed methods approach was found appropriate to identify the values shared between the leader and followers (qualitative), review the values-base for the particular application (quantitative), and compare the leader’s ethical values with the organization (mixed methods).

Introduction

Research on values-based leadership [VBL] and ethics in project-based industries and applications pose interesting challenges. In the past decade, ethics and professional conduct has become a “hot” topic in academia (especially in graduate level programs of business, engineering and management), within professional society discussion circles, and, throughout all levels of government. Unfortunately there is a paucity of substantial research available that points the way for professional conduct improvement.

In performing his dissertation research on ethics in construction and VBL (Moylan, 2005), the author noted one of the major areas requiring additional study is the topic of this research paper. The research study expands on the applicability of values-based leadership to other project-driven industries in order to show the relevance of ethics and professional conduct across the spectrum of project-driven industries. Suggested project-driven industries include information systems / telecommunications, new product development, and manufacturing. Further, the study uses a similar survey instrument following the Malcomb Baldrige (2013) criteria on interrelated core values and concepts of leadership, so that industry comparisons could be made.

The paper expands the application arena on research on ethics in project management based on using VBL as the analysis rubric. Key project-driven industries and applications are considered with the results being compared and contrasted with the original research on construction industry results. The paper summarizes the literature on VBL applicable to project management applications, and, the research study conducted by the authors.

More…

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Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 1st Annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA and included in the conference Proceedings in June 2014.  It is republished here with permission of the authors and the Project Management Center for Excellence at the University of Maryland.

About the Authors

William-A-MoylanWilliam A. Moylan, Ph.D., PMP, FESD flag-usa

Michigan, USA

Dr. William Moylan is an Associate Professor in Construction Management with Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA. In addition, Dr. Bill is a professional trainer, consultant, and expert witness in Construction Engineering and Project Management. He has extensive professional experience in all aspects of program and project management, including over eleven years internationally with the Arabian American Oil Co. Dr. Moylan has degrees from Lawrence Technological University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Capella University. He is s active in a variety of professional societies and civic activities including the Project Management Institute, the Engineering Society of Detroit, Habitat for Humanity, and Toastmasters International. Dr. Moylan can be contacted at [email protected]

Loran-W-WalkerDr. Loran W. Walker DMIT, PMPflag-usa

Minnesota, USA

Dr. Loren Walker has worked in the Computer Science and Information Systems fields for over 28 years. He has been an Adjunct and Full-time professor in information systems and the social sciences. He specializes in consulting and teaching High-Level Programming Languages (C, C++, Java, and .Net Technologies), Systems Analysis & Design, Project Management, Web Design, Programming Technologies and Enterprise Architecture. Currently he serves as a Core Faculty and Project Management Lead for the Project Management Program in the School of Undergraduate Studies (SOUS) at Capella University in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Dr. Walker can be contacted at [email protected].

Risk Doctor Briefing: Managing Reputation Risk

SERIES ARTICLE

Garry Honey

The Risk Doctor Partnership

UK
________________________________________________________________________

How can reputation be integrated within an enterprise risk management (ERM) framework? This is not possible, because reputation is both a behavioural and consequential risk, so you never know what might cause it until it is too late. Reputation is not easy to value or protect, and many insurers will not underwrite reputation risk.

It is however possible to reduce reputation risk at least partially. But first we need to recognise seven facets of reputation:

  1. Reputation cannot be controlled: it exists in the minds of others so it can only be influenced, not managed proactively.
  1. Reputation is earned: trust is based on consistent corporate behaviour and performance.
  1. Reputation is not a single entity:  it depends on the stakeholder’s view. One organisation can have many different reputations, varying with each stakeholder.
  1. Reputation quality will vary: each stakeholder brings a different expectation of behaviour or performance and so will have a distinct perception of reputation.
  1. Reputation is relational: you have a reputation with someone for something. The key question is therefore: ‘with whom, for what?’
  1. Reputation is comparative: it is valued in comparison to what a particular stakeholder experiences or believes in relation to peers, performance and prejudice.
  1. Reputation is fragile: it can take a lifetime to build and seconds to lose. The true value of reputation can only be appreciated once it is lost or damaged.

So how can reputation risk be managed?

The first step is to understand the scope of possible damage, as well as potential sources and the degree of possible disruption:

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About the Author

pmwj24-jul2014-Honey-AUTHOR IMAGEGarry Honey flag-uk

Plymouth, UK 

Garry Honey is a Visiting Professor at Plymouth University, specialising in strategic risk. He founded UK-based risk consultancy CHIRON which specialises in intangible or ‘soft’ risks such as reputation. He has clients in all sectors, but is particularly interested in public service brands (schools and hospitals) with complex stakeholder networks where public trust and reputation risk go together. Garry has enjoyed a variety of senior management roles. His early career was spent in Europe marketing consumer goods before moving into consultancy with KPMG. His expertise covers strategy, communication and risk particularly in the Governance, Risk & Compliance (GRC) arena.  He can be contacted at [email protected] or via website: www.risk-doctor.com

IPMA Education & Training Board Series: Closing the Gap between PM Training and PM Performance: Part 2: Closing the Gap

SERIES ARTICLE

By Stacy Goff,

asapm co-founder

IPMA VP Marketing & Events

ProjectExperts President 

Colorado, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

Enterprises and Government agencies have spent hundreds of millions of $USD over the last 25 years in Project Management training—just in the USA. Such a stimulus package! What do we have to show from this “investment”? Most people find it difficult to answer this question, because they cannot show improved PM Performance; nor can they even show the improved competences they hoped for. In fact, based on discussions with Executives, the perception is that programs and projects are significantly much-less successful today than they were 25 years ago. And Executives ask: What return on investment is that?”

This article, presented in two parts, explores secrets all Managers can use to Close the Gap between PM Training and PM Performance, improve PM Learning and Development methods, increase stakeholder PM Competence, improve PM Performance, and establish the success measures needed to prove you have done so. The secret: Base PM Learning on a Competence Baseline, rather than a Knowledge guide.

Part 1: Understanding the Gap

Part 2: Closing the Gap

Causing Learning, Versus Just Doing Training

Does training accomplish nothing? Au Contraire; poor training accomplishes nothing. Training that merely prepares for an exam accomplishes even less. Training that conflicts with your organizational standards and unique methods will damage performance. On the other hand, there are many ways your Learning and Development initiatives can productively involve training in your quest for improved PM Performance. Among the actions you should consider, for all PM learning:

A. Train the Right People. PM CompModel i, ProjectExperts’ PM competence assessment and development planning process and tool, helps identify the competence or performance gaps of all key project stakeholders. It does little good (for example) to send a Senior Project Manager to advanced PM training if the real project problem is Sponsors or Resource Managers who demonstrate significant competence gaps. Assess your project team to reduce risk and improve project performance. Assess your department to reduce risk and improve project performance. You get the idea. Note: We made this tool available to all of IPMA in 2006.

B. Assess Learning Needs for each selected learning event based on participant strengths and weaknesses against Targets. Use class Learning Objectives as the criteria for this assessment; note that some vendors list only their class topics, and one cannot readily identify from this information what Learners will be able to achieve after the class. The author has used SNAP™, Skills Needs Assessment Process ii for over 30 years to target Learner needs before any class, populate classes with participants having similar levels of learning needs, modify class timings for each audience’s needs, and assess progress and results six weeks after the class—with follow-on recommendations for coaching or other interventions, where needed.

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Editor’s note: This series of articles is provided by the IPMA Education and Training (E&T) Board on the subject of project management education, training, careers and related topics.  More information about the IPMA E&T can be found at http://ipma.ch/education.

About the Author 

pmwj23-jun2014-Goff-IMAGEStacy A. Goff flag-usa

Colorado, USA

Stacy A. Goff, PMP, the PM Per4mance Coach, is President of ProjectExperts®, a Program and Project Management consulting, methods, tools and Learning consultancy. A co-founder of asapm®, Stacy has been the USA representative to, and an officer in, the International Project Management Association IPMA®. He has also contributed to the success of the Project Management Institute® since 1983.

A Project Management practitioner since 1970 and PM consultant since 1982, he improves Enterprise or project team PM competence, efficiency, and Performance. Mr. Goff speaks at industry events, offers coaching and consulting services, and presents workshops of great interest to Executives, Managers, Project Managers and leaders, technical staff, and individual contributors.

His Project Management tools and methods are used by Government Agencies, Enterprises, Consultancies, and individuals on six continents. He combines his PM Process insights with wide-ranging experience in projects and programs, and with sensitivity for the human aspects of projects. The result: Measurably increased PM Per4mance™– Portfolio, Program, Project and Personal Performance.

Stacy can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Stacy Goff, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/stacy-goff/

Project Estimating Process

FEATURED PAPER

Dan Epstein

New York, USA

________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

The described below methods of project estimating are based on PM Workflow® Framework, developed by me and described in details in the book: Project Workflow Management – The Business Process Approach, written in cooperation with Rich Maltzman. The book will be further referred to as “the book”. You may find more of the book on authors’ website www.pm-workflow.com.

The purpose of this article is to describe practical steps of the project estimating and its timing to develop size, effort, cost, schedule and critical resource estimates. Due to limitations of the article size, some process flow diagrams, their descriptions, tables and examples are not shown here. For more detailed guidance, please refer to the book.

In order to better understand the article’s terminology, it is necessary to highlight minor differences in terminology, such as using the word “frame” instead of “phase,” used in both ISO 21500 and the PMBOK® Guide and PM Workflow®. The difference between frames and phases is that phases imply a sequential execution. Execution of frames instead depends entirely on the workflow. The project management process flow starts with receiving request for project in the requirements management processes of the Requirements frame and ends with the project closeout set of processes in the Closing/Testing frame. Based on the control point test conditions and the project health evaluation results, the process flow may branch forth and back between specific processes in any frame.

The Project Estimating process is not a stand-alone process. It depends on results of execution of other processes and in many cases it runs simultaneously with them. The timing and type of estimates are determined by the project process flow, which leads the project manager through the flow of processes and indicates when and what type of estimate should be made. In order to better understand the estimating process, some familiarity is required with the following processes which may run concurrently with estimating:

  • Project Planning
  • Risk Management
  • Issue Management
  • Communication Management
  • Scope Change
  • Outsourcing
  • Resource Management
  • Quality Management
  • Construction
  • Tracking
  • Testing
  • Closing

Estimating accuracy

Today, the vast majority of projects are incorrectly estimated, which causes monetary losses and may threaten projects and even the entire business. The reason for poor estimates is non-compliance with requirements of estimating process, as described below.

The estimating process is executed many times throughout a project life cycle. Most estimates are done iteratively; first with low accuracy, increasing it as the project is being developed with the final best accuracy of –5% to +10%. The accuracy of each estimate depends on: 

More…

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About the Author

pmwj24-jul2014-Epstein-AUTHOR IMAGEDan Epstein flag-usa

New York, USA

Dan Epstein combines over 25 years of experience in the project management field and the best practices area, working for several major Canadian and U.S. corporations, as well as 4 years teaching university students project management and several software engineering subjects. He received a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the LITMO University in Leningrad (today St. Petersburg, Russia) in 1970, was certified as a Professional Engineer in 1983 by the Canadian Association of Professional Engineers – Ontario and earned a master’s certificate in project management from George Washington University in 2000 and the Project Management Professional (PMP®) certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in 2001.

Throughout his career, Dan managed multiple complex interdependent projects and programs, traveling extensively worldwide. He possesses multi-industry business analysis, process reengineering, best practices, professional training development and technical background in a wide array of technologies. In 2004 Dan was a keynote speaker and educator at the PMI-sponsored International Project Management Symposium in Central Asia. He published several articles and gave published interviews on several occasions. In the summer of 2008 he published “Methodology for Project Managers Education” in a university journal. His book, Project Workflow Management – The Business Process Approach, written in cooperation with Rich Maltzman, was published in 2014 by J. Ross Publishing.

Dan first started development of the Project Management Workflow in 2003, and it was used in a project management training course. Later this early version of the methodology was used for teaching project management classes at universities in the 2003–2005 school years. Later on, working in the best practices area, the author entertained the idea of presenting project management as a single multi-threaded business workflow. In 2007–2008 the idea was further refined when teaching the project management class at a university. In 2009–2011 Dan continued working full time on development of the Project Workflow Management, completing it in 2012.  Dan can be contacted at [email protected].

p-Government – A Framework for Public Projects Management

FEATURED PAPER

By Stanislaw Gasik, PhD

Warsaw, Poland
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

Public project management is one of the basic tools for modern public administration. Currently there exists no integrated conceptual framework for this area of management. The article contains the results of the review of best practices of public project management from 93 countries. These practices were grouped into six areas: public project portfolio management, organizational units, processes and methodologies, knowledge management, actors of public project management, and the development of public project management. These areas together make a framework of public project management. The article introduces the concept of p-government, i.e. a government which bases its functioning on effective project management. The article prepares theoretical foundations for comparative public project management.

Introduction

A public project is a project executed by a public administration or with the participation of a public administration, or implemented with the involvement of funds from the budget of such an administration.

Public projects are of increasing interest to researchers. Entire books describe how to manage public projects (e.g., Kassel 2010; Wirick 2009). The differences between project management in the public and private sectors, as well as specifics of public projects, often in relation to particular countries, are examined (e.g., Bretschneider 1990; Abbasi and Al-Mharmah 2000; Olateju et al. 2011; Nagadevara 2012; Arnaboldi et al. 2004). The causes of inefficient public projects management are a subject that arouses great interest (e.g., Cats-Baril and Thompson 1995; Flyvbjerg 2007; Flyvbjerg et al. 2009; Sambasivan and Soon 2007; Assaf and Al-Hejji 2006; Iyer and Jha 2005; Yuttapongsontorn et al. 2008). The critical success factors for public projects (Moe and Pathranaraku 2006) and the impact of practices in public projects management on the success of these projects (Shah et al. 2011) are analyzed. Cultural factors are a special type of critical success factors in the implementation of public projects (Hall and Holt 2002). Mutajwaa and Rwelamila (2007) analyze the skills needed to carry out public projects in developing countries. Hallein and Bowman (2002) analyze the factors affecting quality management in public projects.

The number of publications devoted to public projects management, as well as their growing budget, point to increasing interest in this type of projects. However, to date there is no consistent framework of public projects management. This paper tries to fill the gap. The aim of my work is to identify and systematize public projects management practices. A structured description of these practices creates a framework of public projects management.

Public projects can be viewed from several perspectives. Project managers directly involved in their execution have another perspective than people accountable for the overarching systems of their execution: governments, ministers, heads of public institutions. Project managers are usually interested in the activities directly related to the implementation of projects: for example, the activities to be carried out to produce a specific product, ways to prevent specific risks, ways to build a project schedule. People and organizations accountable for the management of public projects see them in another way. These people are interested in organizing an effective system of public projects management as a whole. What is important to them is, for example: the organization of relevant institutions, developing and implementing a comprehensive process, the existence of mechanisms for project selection. The main questions that they ask may be: do we have an organizational unit supporting public projects? Have we defined the project selection process? Do we have an organized system for managing project subcontractors? This study is focused primarily on the second interest group: it tries to answer the question of how to organize the system of public projects management at the country level.

The focus of the study are the states and, in countries with a federal structure (e.g., Canada, Australia, United States), their main administrative components acting autonomously in the area of public projects management. All such units will collectively be called “countries”.

The next six chapters describe the main areas of public projects management.

More…

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About the Author

pmwj24-jul2014-Gasik-AUTHOR IMAGEStanislaw Gasik, PhD, PMPflag-poland

Warsaw, Poland

Dr. Stanisław Gasik, PMP is an adjunct professor at Vistula University in Warsaw, Poland. He holds M. Sc. in mathematics and Ph. D. in organization sciences (with specialty on project management), both from University of Warsaw. Stanisław has over 20 years of experience in project management, consulting, teaching and implementing PM organizational solutions. He has lectured at global PMI and IPMA congresses and other conferences. He was a significant contributor to PMI’s PMBOK® Guide and PMI Standard for Program Management and contributed to other PMI standards. His professional and research interests include public projects, portfolio management, project management maturity, and project knowledge management. He may be contacted at [email protected].

Editor’s note: Dr. Gasik is engaged in research related to the management of public projects in various countries.  To learn more, please contact the author. To participate in an international survey for those working in public agencies or working on publicly-funded projects, go to https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1auCWJG_gXXugU7HkDyZeKGkLwJBxrGa0pW2teyg_UNc/viewform 

See the news article about the survey at https://pmworldjournal.net/publicly-funded-projects-managed/.

Series on Program Management: Incorporating Risk in Program Decisions

SERIES ARTICLE

By Russ Martinelli and Jim Waddell

Program Management Academy

Oregon, USA
________________________________________________________________________

“I’ve learned that making decisions on gut instinct really isn’t a process of choosing an option and hoping for success,” stated Ricki Godfrey.  “One of my favorite sayings came from a former manager of mine who said ‘you can’t manage hope’.”

Godfrey is a senior program manager for T.C. Holmes, a construction engineering firm in the renewable energy industry.  What Godfrey is referring to, is that when a high degree of uncertainty surrounds a program, a program manager has to rely on intuition as much or more than current or past information to make decisions.  Intuition or “gut feel” as many call it, is rooted in our expertise.  Intuition accesses our accumulated experience in a synthesized way, so that we can form judgments and take action without any logical, conscious considerations.  The best intuitive decisions are those that are made with the uncertainty comprehended and bounded to the greatest extent possible.

As Godfrey explains, “risk identification and analysis can be applied in the decision process to understand what could affect the outcome of a decision, and factoring that in when making your decision.”  Effective program decision making incorporates both the most current information known about a program, as well as developing an understanding of the risks associated with the unknown.

In this article, the final installment of this three-part series on effective program decisions, we explore the use of a risk-based decision making framework that can be used to factor in the uncertainties associated with a program in order to bolster the intuitive or ‘gut feel’ approach to decision making that many program managers have to rely upon.

Dealing with the Known and Unknown

As covered in the first two articles in this series, executive sponsors of programs desire data as the basis for making many of the decisions in our organizations. This is based upon a belief that data increases the probability that the outcome of a decision will yield the desired results.  As also stated in earlier articles, data – being a representation of past events – is a poor predictor of future outcomes.  Particularly in environments involving a high degree of uncertainty.  This causes a dilemma for many decision makers.  How much should they rely on data to support their decision, or how much should they rely on experience and intuition?

The environments in which most programs operate can involve a high degree of uncertainty, many times due to the complexity associated with a program as well as an ever-changing business or organizational environment.  This means that the program manager, as the primary decision maker on a program, must comprehend both the known and unknown aspects surrounding the situation at hand and the decision to be made.

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The PMWJ series of articles on program management is authored by Russell Martinelli and James Waddell, principle advisors at the Program Management Academy in Oregon, USA.   More about the authors and the Program Management Academy can be found at http://www.programmanagement-academy.com/.

About the Authors

pmwj19-feb2014-martinelli-AUTHOR1 MARTINELLIRuss Martinelliflag-usa

Oregon, USA

Russ Martinelli is a senior program manager at Intel Corporation, one of the world’s largest semiconductor companies.  Russ has many years of experience leading global product development teams in both the aerospace and computing industries.  Russ is also a founder of the Program Management Academy (www.programmanagement-academy.com), and co-author of Leading Global Project Teams and the first comprehensive book on program management titled Program Management for Improved Business Results. Russ can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Russ Martinelli, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/russ-martinelli/

pmwj19-feb2014-martinelli-AUTHOR2 WADDELLJim Waddellflag-usa

Oregon, USA

Jim Waddell, former PMO director in the high-tech industry, is a founder of the Program Management Academy (www.programmanagement-academy.com) where he consultants in program management and mergers & acquisitions. He has held a variety of management positions in the high tech and energy industries, has been a speaker at numerous conferences, and is a co-author of two books:  Leading Global Project Teams and Program Management for Improved Business Results.  Jim can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Jim Waddell, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jim-waddell/

Development and Implementation of Project Management Plan

FEATURED PAPER

Learn from Production Management?

Muhamed Abdomerovic, Dipl. Eng.

Kentucky, USA
________________________________________________________________________

(Some notes on articles: ‘What is Dynamic Scheduling?’ and ‘Questionnaire Survey on Dynamic Scheduling in Construction’ by Amer Fahmy, MSc; Tarek M. Hassan, PhD; Hesham Bassiony, PhD, in the PM World Journal, May 2014, Vol. III, Issue V.) – A contribution

I have read with consideration the articles written by Fahmy, A., et al.  The article brings to readership an important subject – improvement in updating of project management plan. Here is my understanding of the subject.

Summary

In first article, What is Dynamic Scheduling?, Fahmy, A., et al., describe meaning of dynamic scheduling then its categories, rescheduling policies, strategies, techniques, as well as dynamic scheduling architectures and applications. In ‘Introduction’ authors define meaning of dynamic scheduling. They wrote:

Dynamic Scheduling is the process of absorbing the effect of real-time events analyzing the current status of schedule and automatically modifying the schedule with optimized measures in order to mitigate disruptions.  (Fahmy, A., et al., 2014a, p.1)

In other sections of this article authors present literature review relevant mostly for dynamic scheduling in manufacturing (‘Dynamic scheduling categories’, ‘Dynamic scheduling applications’) and scheduling in general where some of those may apply also in construction (‘Rescheduling policies’, ‘Rescheduling strategies’, ‘Rescheduling techniques’).

The article put forward an automatized and optimized update of project management plan. So, the part of a project that is not completed, i.e., that follows immediately after data date, should absorb the changes from project activities recorded at data date. This procedure comes to a continuous, automatized and optimized time / resource distribution for activities after data date.

In second article, Questionnaire Survey on Dynamic Scheduling in Construction, Fahmy, A., et al., describe the questionnaire intended to survey the application and perspectives of dynamic scheduling and associated software in construction industry. In ‘Introduction’ of this article authors extend the meaning of dynamic scheduling by defining the purpose of related software.  They authors wrote:

The main function of the new software is to work in the background on the progressing / open front activities and try to establish alternative solutions in case one or more of these activities is somehow disrupted. So, for any disruption which might happen, the planner will find few readymade fully optimized (time / cost / resources) alternatives to choose from; these alternatives will be generated based on his previous settings of the mass of changes to the schedule expected with the optimization processes and what kind of optimization he is searching for.  (Fahmy, A., et al., 2014b, p.2).

The authors describe the purpose, design and communication of questionnaire, as well as the survey’s statistics, various interest and suggestions of project management community on development and integration of dynamic scheduling into practice. The survey should help in design of applicable functional specification for a dynamic scheduling model and corresponding software, as well as in facilitating how the proposed tool should work.

However, the authors did not describe development and implementation of project management plan* in real life. To support the authors’ initiative that contributes to improvement in updating of project management plan I will describe:

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About the Author

muhamed-abdomerovicMuhamed Abdomero

Kentucky, USA

Muhamed Abdomerovic, Dipl. Eng., is a civil engineer specializing in project management. Mr. Abdomerovic belongs to tradition that renewing our half century history of scientific project management. He has more than forty years of experience in the application of scientific principles to project management. In working on variety of projects in the information technology, construction, the process industry and the energy sectors he has gained broad insight into the project management theory and practice.  Mr. Abdomerovic is currently an independent consultant. He was previously project planner with Vanderlande Industries, master scheduler with FKI Logistex’s and program manager with Luckett & Farley. Prior to these positions he worked with Energoinvest and was responsible for the design and implementation of systems for management of large-scale development projects. He began his project management career in Vranica as a construction manager.

Mr. Abdomerovic has been an active participant in the development of the project management profession and has published many professional journal articles on project content, time, cost and integration management. He has also published articles in six proceedings of Project Management World Congresses and has published four books. His current research activities cover several aspects of project management including development and implementation of project management plan,  process relationships, knowledge integration and compilation of project management system logic.  Mr. Abdomerovic joined The International Project Management Association in 1972 and was for decades a member of the Project Management Institute. Mr. Abdomerovic graduated from the University of Sarajevo with the Diploma of Civil Engineer. He was consecutively recertified as PMI Project Management Professional (PMP) from 1998 to 2010.  He can be contacted at [email protected] 

Project Management Insights from Bhagavad Gita

FEATURED PAPER

Dr. Goparaju Purna Sudhakar, PhD

The ICFAI University Group

Hyderabad, India
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

In the current day changing global business scenarios, employee confidence, assertiveness, job satisfaction and work-life balance are very much important for global organizations. There is evidence of current day organizations using Bhagavad Gita to achieve these objectives. These are not the only applications of Bhagavad Gita. It can also give insights on project management. In this article, project management insights such as project management framework, project stakeholders, task characteristics, project execution, project leader characteristics and project team member characteristics and behavior are derived. It is applicable to project human resources management knowledge area. The concepts derived indicate the reliance of ancient scripts even in current day global business scenario.

  1. About Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad Gita is the essence of all puranas. It is very simple and assertive. One can get insights from Bhagavad Gita with key observation. There are many insights and secretes hidden in Bhagavad Gita. Every word in Bhagavad Gita is taught in a positive attitude and positive essence. Bhagavad Gita consists of 18 chapters known as adhyayas. It consists of 700 slokas written in Sanskrit. The broader context of Bhagavad Gita is the epic Mahabharata. Bhagavad Gita was told by Lord Krishna to Arjuna and was watched by Sanjaya with the divya drishti given by the Veda Vyasa. Bhagavad Gita as part of Mahabharata was scripted by Veda Vyasa. Researchers express that it was scripted between 2nd and 5th century BC. There are different perspectives or claims over the date of authorship of Bhagavad Gita.

  1. Introduction

Bhagavad Gita talks more about project strategies, project leadership, individual characteristics, and project culture. The broader project context and environment can be found from Mahabharata. There were many scholarly who has brought management effectiveness, strategy and leadership insights from Bhagavad Gita in the literature. According to my knowledge and search on Google and Google Scholar, till now, none of the researchers or practitioners have tried to bring the project management insights from the ancient Bhagavad Gita. This is my journey towards the exploration of Bhagavad Gita seeking the insights for the growing and emerging discipline Project Management. In broad, Bhagavad Gita gives more about individual values, behavior and capabilities and leadership qualities required for project performance, success and effectiveness. In this article, to express the Kauravas as enemies of Pandavas, the word “competitorsis used to have business sense. These insights are useful not only in Indian context, but also in global context as more research and exploration was carried out on Bhagavad Gita in western world as well. Many global corporations and MNCs are looking for ways to improve them employee work-life balance, self-confidence, assertiveness, job satisfaction, loyalty, personality development, ethics and commitment using Bhagavad Gita. This is very much applicable in dynamically changing global economic and business scenarios.

In this article, the stakeholders of the project, project management concepts derived from Bhagavad Gita, project management framework derived from Bhagavad Gita, task characteristics, project execution, project leader characteristics and individual team member characteristics are discussed. 

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About the Author

pmwj24-jul2014-Sudhakar-AUTHOR IMAGEDr. Goparaju Purna Sudhakarflag-india

Hyderabad, India 

Dr Goparaju Purna Sudhakar, M.Tech, Executive MBA, PMP, MIMA, ADM, PhD, with over a decade of experience in IT industry is currently working as Faculty Member at The ICFAI University Group, Hyderabad, India. Earlier he worked as Sr. Faculty and Head (In-Charge), IT Division at Engineering Staff College of India, Hyderabad and Consulting Editor at ICFAI Research Center, The ICFAI University, Hyderabad, India. He worked in USA, UK, Ireland, Finland and India as Software Professional. He has B.Sc., MCA, M.Tech and Executive MBA. He is Project Management Professional (PMP®) certified from Project Management Institute (PMI), USA. He was awarded PhD in Business Administration from Aligarh Muslim University (AMU), India. He is member of All India Management Association (AIMA).

He worked as employee or consultant to companies such as IBM, Siemens, Interwoven, Wipro Technologies, Citicorp, Nokia, Salomon Smith Barney, SIAC, DSET Corporation, IONA Technologies, Birla-Horizons International, and PCL Mindware.  He held both managerial and technical roles in IT industry. He worked as Project Manager at Citicorp Overseas Software Ltd (COSL), Hyderabad during 2001-03. He worked as Systems Manager at Wipro Technologies during 1999-01. The reuse domain software product he managed, Scorpus was identified as one among the top 100 IT innovations by NASSCOM (2007).

He worked in Banking, Financial Services and Insurance (BFSI), Telecom, E-Commerce, Enterprise Content Management, Enterprise Software Asset Management (ESAM), Health Care and HR domains. He has extensive experience in project management, program management, general management, quality management, business process re-engineering, HRM, Organizational Behavior and human aspects of project management. He has wide experience in management consulting.

He has over 60 published papers. His papers were published in International Journal of Project Management Research (IPMA, Netherlands), Team Performance Management (Emerald, UK), Acta Universitatis Danubius. Economica, Scientific Annals of the “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” Univesity of Iasi: Economic Sciences, The annals of the Stefan cel Mare University of Suceava (Romania), The Serbian Journal of Management, Journal of Enterprise Information Management (Emerald, UK), Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (Netherlands), CSI Communications (Computer Society of India), HRM Review (ICFAI University Press), Indian Management, The Global Educator, Express Computer, Projects and Profits (ICFAI University Press), www.pmhub.net, Computers Today, and The Hindu, Businessgyan, and Business & Management Chronicle.

He has authored or edited 16 books. He authored Global Organizational Behavior (Lap Lambert Academic Publishing, Germany, 2012), Project Management FAQ (Galgotia, 2012), Elements of Software Project Management (Prentice-Hall, 2010),   Project Management: Training Manual (Akansha Publishing House, 2010), Business Essentials for Software Professionals (Excel Books, 2008), and edited 10 other books.  He has written about Project Management, Organizational Behavior, Human Aspects of Project Management, General Management and IT industry.

He is on the Editorial Board of International Journal Acta Universitatis Danubius. Economica (Romania) and International Journal Revista de Gestão & Projetos – GEP, a Brazilian Journal in Management and Projects. He is also an article reviewer for peer reviewed International Journal Team Performance Management (Emerald, UK, 2011).

He worked as Executive Vice President and President of VSPGS alumni association. He is recipient of Scholarship from Ministry of HRD, Government of India for 18 months during his M.Tech (Computer Science) at Devi Ahilya University, Indore, India. He has done an academic project at National Informatics Center (NIC), Hyderabad during 1993-94. In his spare time, He spends with his family. He is married and has two children. His hobbies include photography, gardening, reading, writing and seeing places. He can be reached at [email protected].