SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Mastering Project Portfolio Management

BOOK REVIEW

matering-project-portfolio-managementBook Title:  Mastering Project Portfolio Management

Author:  Michael J. Bible, Susan S. Bivins

Publisher:  J. Ross

List Price:   $89.95

Format:  Hardcover; 341 pages

Publication Date: 2011

ISBN: 9781604270662

Reviewer:      Richard D. Bonaparte

Review Date:              February/2013

________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Approaching the subject of Project Portfolio Management (PPM) can be a daunting task.  PPM requires an intentional, well thought out application to the centralization of processes, methods, and technologies, focusing on the strict adherence to the management of projects and the alignment to programs and organizational objectives.

Bible and Bivens bring an interesting perspective to the approach and use of PPM.  By presenting a holistic view for even the simplest of applications, along with some practical tools and an encouraging use of metrics, “Mastering” presents itself as a solid resource to understand and build out a PPM solution.

Overview of Book’s Structure

“Master” is presented in an intentional and formal manner by avoiding any unnecessary information and dividing the book into two distinct sections.  The first focuses on the theoretical aspects and the second focuses on the well-thought-through application of practical knowledge while following a ‘real world’ scenario.

This approach, along with a free eight-month access to Expert Choice, a pre-selected decision support software program, helps to both demonstrate and strengthen the PPM approaches presented.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

“Mastering’ stands out amongst the crowd as a great resource that provides the ‘how to’ in a land of books that long forgot that simple luxury.  It avoids overloading the reader’s senses with conjecture and broad information, while other books propose as the solution for the reader to decipher by themselves.

Highlights: What I liked!

Bible and Bivins get to it right out of the gate in their introductions by doing a good job to kick start the theoretical understanding of each of the phases of PPM and how these real life practices apply in today’s world.  

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].


About the Reviewer

richard-bonaparteflag-usaRichard Bonaparte 

Richard Bonaparte is the former President of R-Logic and founder of ProjectPros, a Project Management and Agile Consulting Group.

As an experienced IT practitioner Richard has over 20 years experience in delivering IT solutions, business process re-engineering and software development for the Mortgage Banking, Commercial/Corporate Banking, Insurance and Financial Services industries.

Richard holds several certifications, including the PMI Project Management Professional (PMP), has lead numerous mentoring organizations, spoken at Southern California PMP Bootcamps, and actively consults in the North Dallas area, USA.

Richard can be contacted at: [email protected]

Influencing your team members in a positive way

PM ADVISORY

By Alfonso Bucero 

Madrid, Spain
________________________________________________________________________

Connection is absolutely critical if you, as a project manager, want to influence your team members in a positive way. When you navigate for others, you come alongside them and travel their road for a while, helping them handle some of the obstacles and difficulties in their projects. But when you connect with them, you are asking them to come alongside you and travel your road for your and their mutual benefit.

When we think of connecting with people, we compare it to trains and what happens to them in a train yard. The cars sitting on the tracks in a train yard have a lot of things going for them. They have value because they’re loaded with cargo; they have a destination; and they even have a route by which to get to that destination. But they don’t have a way of getting anywhere on their own. To do anything of value, they have to hook up with a locomotive.

Have you ever been to a train yard and watched how unrelated and disconnected pieces of equipment come together to form a working train? It’s quite a process. It all begins with the locomotive. First, it switches itself onto the same track as the car it’s going to pick up. Then it moves to where the car is, backs up to it, makes contact with it, and connects. Once it’s all hooked up, together they move toward their destination.

A similar thing must happen before you can get people to go with you on a project. You have to find out where they are, move toward them to make contact, and connect with them. If you can do that successfully, you can take them to new heights in your relationship and in their development. To connect with people you will need communication skills, a desire to help people grow and change, and a sense of personal mission or purpose. My best practices to connect with the people you influence are as follows

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

alfonso-buceroflag-spainAlfonso Bucero

Madrid, Spain 

Alfonso Bucero, DEA, PMP, PMI Fellow, is founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting, based in Madrid.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was also the President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. Alfonso is a contributing editor and international correspondent for PM World in Spain.  Alfonso Bucero can be contacted at [email protected] or visit www.abucero.com

Financing Your Projects – Part 1

PM ADVISORY

Crowdfunding

By Alam Braga, PMP 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

You’ve probably thought: I have a great idea for a project, but where will I get money to do it? What if you do not have credit in the bank and no known investor interested?

A few years back here after the great Internet bubble that occurred in the 2000s, it was necessary to reinvent business models based on large networks, because only provide hosting services, e-mail communication and now is no longer enough.

It was this need that began to surface models for integrating business-to-business and business-to-consumer (B2B or B2C).

With that came “Crowdfunding”. According to Wikipedia it: “describes the collective effort of individuals who network and pool their money, usually via the Internet, to support efforts initiated by other people or organizations. Crowdfunding is used in support of a wide variety of activities, including disaster relief, citizen journalism, support of artists by fans, political campaigns, startup company funding, motion picture promotion, free software development, inventions development, scientific research, and civic projects”.

Based on this concept of collective funding, some sites have developed to unite investors (those who have some capital to invest and not necessarily a great fortune) to borrowers (people with ideas but no capital).

A very interesting feature of this model is that investors are generally rewarded for their investments to the extent that is invested and not necessarily in money, but in something of value attached to the goal of funding. For example: say you work with a project from a book of rare photos of old buildings, a reward could be receiving some photos not published in the book and exclusive only for investors.

Is it not interesting?

In Brazil there are some of these sites:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

alam-bragaflag-brazilAlam Braga, PMP

Author

Alam Braga, PMP is a Project Coordinator at SISTEMA FIRJAN, and a teacher at Universidade Veiga de Almeida and other universities. Expert in Project management focused on software. Graduated at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-RJ) in 2009. Working for FIRJAN (RJ´S Business Organization) since 1996. PMP certified by PMI. Currently developing FIRJAN´s project management systems, Alam Braga has also a personal site at www.alambraga.com.br with hints about Project Management. Volunteer in PMI-RJ (Communications VP).  Contact at  [email protected]

A New Construction Contract for the 21st Century

SERIES ARTICLE

Risk of Change 

By Keith Pickavance 

London, UK
________________________________________________________________________

In the third article in this series we look at how the CIOB’s Complex Project Contract deals with the risk of change. CPC2013 provides for risk-management in three ways. First, risk must be planned for before the work starts; secondly, there must be a strategy for dealing with risk when it matures to cause a delay to progress; and thirdly, provision is made for extensions of time and compensation when the consequences cannot be avoided. 

Planning for change 

Complex projects are inevitably more risky than simple projects. Apart from anything else, this is because they tend to be conceived, designed and constructed over a longer period of time and, inevitably, the longer the period between inception and completion, the more change is likely to occur.

All standard forms contain some reference to the risks for which the Contractor will be entitled to more time and/or compensation, but there is little in common between them as to how these risks are dealt with. Most separate the cost and time risks and provide a different mechanism for recovery of each. As to time risks, for example, AS4000 uses the formula of a “qualifying cause of delay” which, briefly defined is, in effect, anything other than a breach by the Contractor, or those other risks described in the Contract Appendix.

The AIA form, A201 (2007) contains a short list of risks and “other causes beyond the Contractor’s control”. FIDIC uses the formula of a brief list coupled with any other cause referred to in the conditions, a formula which is also followed by NEC3.  JCT adopts the formula of a list of what it refers to as Relevant Events with cross-references to other clauses, but still, in order to understand what the Employer’s time risks are, the user must trawl through many other clauses of the contract.

CPC2013 adopts a more easily understood approach to the definition of risk. It contains a table in three parts stating the risks and identifying in relation to each, whether it is to be an Employer’s risk as to time, cost or both. The first fifteen Events are identified as being within the control of the Employer and are the Employer’s risk as to both time and cost. The second part contains the descriptions of seven occurrences, which are not normally within either party’s control, the time and/or cost risk of which can be allocated to either party. These are what in other forms may be wrapped up in the rather ambiguous expression force majeure. CPC2013 provides greater flexibility for the parties than is available under any other standard forms by providing for these risks to be carved out according to the commerciality of the contract. Bad weather for example, referred to in the contract as weather in excess of the “Predicted Climatic Conditions” can be commercially varied by defining for the project what climatic conditions are predicted and whether particular conditions in excess of that specified is an Employer’s time risk, cost risk or both.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This article is one in a series by Keith Pickavance about the CIOB’s new contract for complex construction projects. For information about the new contract, visit http://www.ciob.org.uk/CPC.  The full article includes footnotes for some of the quotations and section references above.

About the Author

flag-ukkeith-pickavanceKeith Pickavance

Keith Pickavance first qualified as an architect in 1972 and then in 1978 obtained a law degree. After 20 years as an architect in private practice the last 10 years of which also involved construction management, dispute resolution and expert witness services, in 1993 he joined an American company specialising in forensic services and delay analysis. In 1996 he set up on his own again specialising in delay analysis and time management in London and Hong Kong. That practice was acquired by Hill International in 2006, an international construction management and claims consultancy with which he is now appointed an Executive Consultant.  He is  a Past President of the Chartered Institute of Building and has led the CIOB’s time management initiative since its inception in 2007.  Keith is the author of Delay and Disruption in Construction Contracts (4th ed., 2010, Sweet and Maxwell) and numerous other books and articles on delay related issues.   Contact [email protected]

Opportunities are the Same as Threats

SERIES ARTICLE

Dr David Hillson FIRM, HonFAPM, PMI Fellow 

UK
________________________________________________________________________

International risk standards and guidelines such as ISO31000:2009 define risk as a double-sided concept. This includes the possibility of both upside and downside risks, with either positive or negative effects on the achievement of objectives. We use the word “opportunity” to describe an upside risk with positive impacts, and “threat” is used for downside risks with negative consequences.

Although the theory is clear, in practice many organisations, teams and individuals have problems with including opportunities in the risk process. We’re not sure how to identify a genuine opportunity, how to assess or prioritise it, what response options exist, or how it should be managed. But we don’t seem to have the same difficulty with threats. If we believe that risk management could and should address both opportunities and threats, how can we bring our practice into line with theory?

The secret to effective opportunity management is to recognise that an opportunity is the same as a threat, apart from the sign of the impact. Once we see this similarity, the way to address opportunities becomes obvious. We can take the standard risk process which we already use for threats, and apply it to opportunities, with simple modifications to recognise that we are dealing with positive upside risks.

So how are opportunities the same as threats? The definition of risk as “uncertainty that matters” covers them both. Just like a threat, an opportunity is uncertain and it may not happen, but if it does occur then it will have an effect on our ability to achieve one or more objectives. The only difference is that if a threat happens it has a negative effect because it turns into a problem, but if an opportunity happens it has a positive outcome as it produces a benefit. 

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

flag-ukDr. David HillsonDr. David Hillson 

Author 

Dr David Hillson CMgr FRSA FIRM FCMI HonFAPM PMI-Fellow is The Risk Doctor (www.risk-doctor.com).  As an international risk consultant, David is recognised as a leading thinker and expert practitioner in risk management. He consults, writes and speaks widely on the topic and he has made several innovative contributions to the field. David’s motto is “Understand profoundly so you can explain simply”, ensuring that his work represents both sound thinking and practical application.

David Hillson has over 25 years’ experience in risk consulting and he has worked in more than 40 countries, providing support to clients in every major industry sector, including construction, mining, telecommunications, pharmaceutical, financial services, transport, fast-moving consumer goods, energy, IT, defence and government. David’s input includes strategic direction to organisations facing major risk challenges, as well as tactical advice on achieving value and competitive advantage from effectively managing risk.

David’s contributions to the risk discipline over many years have been recognised by a range of awards, including “Risk Personality of the Year” in 2010-11. He received both the PMI Fellow award and the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) for his work in developing risk management. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the UK Association for Project Management (APM), where he has actively led risk developments for nearly 20 years.  David Hillson is an active Fellow of the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), and he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) to contribute to its Risk Commission. He is also a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and a Member of the Institute of Directors (IOD).

Dr Hillson can be contacted at [email protected].

Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization

SERIES ARTICLE

EPG Principles and Framework 

By Paul Dinsmore & Luiz Rocha 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

This is the fourth article of this series. The previous three articles presented the evolution of corporate governance, a definition for EPG, and the view of major international project organizations regarding the governance of projects and programs. This article covers the principles and framework necessary to enable and drive projects and programs to achieve the expected outcomes for the organization.

Why did a project leader make such an ill-advised decision?  In reality project decisions cannot be attributed to a single person; in fact, projects evolve as a result of a decision chain. A pivotal reason for flawed decisions is that many project leaders think about decisions as events and not processes. Decisions are a long social process involving a series of interactions carried out by different people, unfolding over time and involving three levels of analysis: individual, team, and organizational. Many project managers focus too much on deciding the right solution for a problem rather than thinking about the right process for making key decisions. Effective project and program governance requires focusing on the right decision making process..

At the individual level,  poor decisions are made because of cognitive biases such as overconfidence, repeating old patterns, overestimating benefits and underestimating cost and time. At the team level, although teams can leverage the perspectives, experience and expertise based on the potential that diversity brings, teams tend to get immersed in a script of dealing with idiosyncrasies, conflicts and social pressures for conformity and fail to realize their potential. At the organizational level, decisions are shaped by culture, structure, and systems.

Here are the basic principles that define the effective approach to Enterprise Project Governance and  decision making on the individual, team and organizational level:

  1. 1.    Identify a single point of accountability

Identify the persons accountable for the success of the portfolio, programs and projects. The roles, responsibilities and performance criteria for the governance of project management must be clearly defined and all personnel involved in the project governance structure need to know for what they are accountable and responsible, and members of delegated authorization bodies must have sufficient representation, competence, authority and resources to enable them to make appropriate decisions. Accountability cannot be shared – more than one person, or a committee, cannot be held “accountable” for the success of a project – or delegated. Without a single point of accountability, projects lack clear authority because the validity of any decision is questionable since the authority that lies behind that decision has not been established.

  1. 2.    Ensure enterprise project governance is value focused

The focus on value creation is guaranteed by the EPG structure that considers three decision layers:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

This series includes articles by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha, authors of the book Enterprise Project Governance, published by AMACOM in the USA in 2012.  The articles are extracts and summaries of key topics from their book, providing information and guidance on one of the most important aspects of portfolio, program and project management today – governance.  For information about the book, go to http://www.amacombooks.org/book.cfm?isbn=9780814417461

About the Authors 

usa-brazilpaul-dinsmorePaul C. Dinsmore

Paul Dinsmore is President of Dinsmore Associates, and a highly respected specialist in project management and organizational change. A certified project management professional (PMP), he has received the Distinguished Contribution Award and Fellow Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®). He regularly consults and speaks in North America, South America, Europe and Africa.  Paul is the author and / or editor of numerous articles and 18 books, including the AMA Handbook of Project Management. Mr. Dinsmore resides in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

luiz-rochaflag-brazilLuiz Rocha

Luiz Rocha has 35+ years of experience in the industry and business consulting. Luiz worked with Andersen Consulting and Delloite in the USA and Europe when he had the opportunity to manage multi-cultural and geographically dispersed projects in Latin America, North America and Europe. In Brazil he worked with Dinsmore Associates and Petrobras. Luiz is an engineer by background, MSc. in industrial engineering from UFRJ – Brazil, PMP-PMI and IPMA certifications. He is also a published author with two previous books, Business Metamorphosis, in Brazil, and Mount Athos, a Journey of Self-Discovery, in the USA. Luiz can be contacted at [email protected].

Advances in Project Management: Professionalism, ethics and the freedom to ask the right questions

SERIES ARTICLE 

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire 

UK
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the March PMWJ Article by Michael Cavanagh 

The recently published sixth edition of the APM Body of Knowledge states that: “a key requirement of a profession is that individual members should act ethically”.

It is useful to remember that the concerns of practitioners extend beyond the financial aspects and considerations of a project, or even beyond the issues raised as part of the typical constraints of cost, time, scope and quality. The APM Body of Knowledge reminds practitioners that trust and respect are essential elements of professional practice and must underpin the actions of practitioners. Trust is gained by working consistently and transparently in a moral, legal, responsible and socially appropriate manner. Respect results from how professional conduct is perceived by relevant stakeholders and participants.

Yet, acting responsibly is never simple. Multiple stakeholders engage different perspectives, values and preferences. Their concerns and considerations reflect their role, personal position and interests. The more parties involved, the greater the challenge in reconciling and negotiating between their concerns. Untangling the complex web of politics, deception and coercion demands exceptional negotiation skills and insightful thinking.

Given the different sets of competing values and concerns, it is already clear that ethics is not about separating ‘right’ from ‘wrong’. Multiple participants will have relevant considerations that need to be addressed. It is never as simple as avoiding the wrongs.

In problem solving parlance the simpler distinction between good or bad is often utilised. This is not an absolute judgment, but is rather an expression of the ‘goodness’ of a solution. A solution is good if it satisfies the key concerns expressed in the problem. While it indicates acceptance that a solution is not right, but simply good enough, it still does not do justice to the tapestry of concerns, views and values embedded in every non-trivial project.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK.  Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ by Gower author Michael Cavanagh.  Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement. 

About the Author 

Darren Dalcher, PhDflag-ukDarren Dalcher, PhD 

Author, Series Editor 

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire

UK

Darren Dalcher, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK.  He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London.  Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management.  Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond.  He is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board.  Prof Dalcher is an academic editorial advisor for the PM World Journal.  He can be contacted at [email protected].

Advances in Project Management: Asking why? – Ethics, Engineering and Project Management

SERIES ARTICLE

By Michael Cavanagh 

Ireland
________________________________________________________________________

It is only when science asks why, instead of simply describing how, that it becomes more than technology. When it asks why, it discovers relativity. When it only shows how, it invents the atom bomb, and then puts its hands over its eye and says, ‘My God what have I done?

Ursula Le Guin

 Jo has a dilemma. She’s the senior engineer on a bid team for a contract with Acme plc., a major new client with which her company have never dealt before. The team are aware that relationships between the customer and their existing supplier are not particularly good – a number of previous projects have not been delivered on time and have been massively over budget. At a conference, she happens to be sitting next to the competitor’s project manager, who does not know who she is. Coming back very early from the lunch break she notices that he has left some papers on the desk, which appear to be the executive summary and pricing breakdown of their Acme bid. She has her new 10 Megapixel camera smartphone with her. There is no-one else in the room.

Rick has a problem, too. Based in the UK, he has just implemented a successful infrastructure project for the government of the Republic of Erewhon, and is called to a meeting with the Finance minister. After saying how pleased he has been, the minister tells Rick that there is a potentially much bigger project in the pipeline, and that he would be prepared to support a bid from Rick’s company – a bid which he indicates would be significantly expedited by appointing his brother as an agent. They are both travelling to Europe shortly for a trade show, and perhaps Rick would be able to ‘look after them’ during their visit.

Sinita, a chemical engineer, faces the hardest decision of her professional life. She is devoutly religious and a pacifist. One of the products for which she is responsible has been very successful in the field of agricultural pest control. Unfortunately, she discovers that it also has potential uses as an economic weapon, and that negotiations are under way to supply the product for this purpose in large quantities.

Sally’s loyalty is strongly tested. She is the Project manager of a major subsystem component of a transportation system recently sold to an overseas customer in a third-world country which has become very wealthy very quickly due to the discovery of large quantities of natural gas. As part of the contract, some manufacturing has been undertaken in that country, and by pure chance she discovers that they have used fake parts in a component for which she is not responsible.

Mohammed also has a decision to make. After a difficult project in which relationships between his company and their customer have been very poor, he discovers that with a slight modification to the design, the system for which he was responsible (which is currently about to undergo final acceptance) would perform significantly better in operation. Incorporating this modification, however, would delay acceptance testing beyond the contractual deadline.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author 

flag-ukflag-irelandmichael-cavanaghRevd. Michael Cavanagh, MSc

Author

Michael Cavanagh has been an independent for over twenty years in a number of business sectors. In recent years, the focus of his consulting activity has been the use of systems thinking techniques to perform ‘forensic’ analysis of major project failure and the ways in which lessons can be derived and corrective process improvement implemented, deploying a combination of Soft Systems, the Viable Systems Model and a number of tools and methods developed specifically for the task.

His book, published by Gower in 2011, introduced ‘2nd Order’ programme management concepts and the need and justification for their application to highly complex projects. The book is aimed at both practitioners and senior sponsoring management. He has also recently published two Kindle eBooks, ‘Ethical Issues in Complex Project and Engineering Management’, and ‘Project Complexity Assessment’.

Michael is an ordained Anglican priest in the Church of Ireland and is currently responsible for the churches of the Kenmare and Dromod Union, Co. Kerry. Michael can be reached at [email protected].

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK.  The articles are coordinated by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  Prof Dalcher also provides an introduction to the current month’s article, which you can see elsewhere in this month’s edition.”  Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement.

On the subject of the Second Edition paper in the March PMWJ about Global Population Megatrends and Project Management

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

 March 6, 2013

Dear Editor,

Thank you for your latest edition of the PM World Journal. I particularly enjoyed your most interesting paper: Global Population Megatrends and their Potential Impact on the World of Project Management 

I well remember when a number of us PMI members tried to raise awareness of this topic in the early nineties by launching the Project Earth SIG following Frank King’s address to the PMI’90 S/S in Calgary. Those were stirring days, followed, I regret to say, by years of complacency (And now look what has happened!). We certainly do not seem to have made much progress in this area in the last two decades!

What I think is missing in the learned diatribes of those you referenced regarding population growth is that the troubles cited will lead to internal conflicts such as we see currently in the middle east, conflicts that will only get worse. So, in a way, the problems may well find their own solutions.

Otherwise, where do you suppose all the money will come from for all the projects that you are anticipating?

I fear that the forecast may be more bleak than indicated.

Sincerely,

R. Max Wideman, FPMI

Vancouver, BC, Canada

On the subject of the articles in the March PMWJ by Oltmann and Pickavance

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

March 6, 2013

Dear Editor,

Jeff Oltmann’s article, “Agile vs. Traditional: an Unnecessary War” is a welcome and very clear explanation of what ‘Agile’ scheduling is.

His ‘Plea for peace’ and the last paragraph under “Who’s Right” above it are spot on.

And his wish is granted in Keith Pickavance’s article about, “A new construction Contract for the 21st Century” / “Time Management” which explains how ‘traditional’ work scheduling is used in the immediate time frame of 4 months and ‘agile’ is used in the medium and long range work planning and schedule forecasting or estimating.

These two articles are mandatory reading for all those engaged in construction time management.

Thanks to both authors.

Earl Glenwright, PE, MBA, PSP

Colorado, USA

Mathematical Models of Project Management for Investors

FEATURED PAPER

By Prof Vladimir I. Voropaev, PhD

and

Yan D. Gelrud, PhD 

Russia
________________________________________________________________________

Annotation

The mathematical models, which are intended for managing project activities at all stages with the participation of one of the major stakeholders – the investor of the project, are considered in the article. The use of these models is aimed at the raising of the effectiveness of the investor’s activity; it provides the implementation of corresponding competencies and the achievement of their goals on different conditions of the project’s implementation.

KEY WORDS: stakeholder, mathematical models of project management, competencies of project management.

Introduction

There was an attempt in [1] to structure the peculiarities of the main interested parties (stakeholders) and develop the mathematical model of project management based on those peculiarities. The examples of such models are made for an investor, a customer, a project team, principal performers, vendors and regulating authorities.

We have mentioned that the choice of PM methods and tools for each of the interested party is largely defined by the choice of the interested party to be managed and the conditions of this. Interested parties differ from each other by various expectations, roles, measures of responsibility and actions. This is caused by their different goals in the project, different success criteria and the performance measurement, various values and performance strategies. These differences significantly affect the project problem statement, the methods used, the instruments and technologies of PM tasks’ solution oriented towards their specific needs [9]. Nevertheless, different variants of problem statement may appear when modeling the activity of a particular interested party due to the different conditions of project implementation. Besides, the methods of objects implementation of taking optimal decisions have the good deal of variance as well.

The article proposes the mathematical models intended for managing project activity at all stages having one of the interested parties, project investor involved. For every suggested alternative the specific conditions which the given model is adequate to are considered, and at the same time, the methods of finding solution, which could also be multivariate, are proposed and analyzed. The use of these models is aimed at increasing the efficiency of investor’s activity; it ensures the implementation of relevant competences and the attainment of the set objectives under various conditions of the project environment.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Authors 

flag-russiaVLADIMIR-VOROPAJEVVLADIMIR VOROPAJEV 

Author, Professor, International PM Expert

Founder, Former President, Chair – SOVNET

Former Vice President – IPMA

Full Member, RussianAcademy of Natural Sciences

Moscow, Russia 

Professor Vladimir Voropajev, PhD. is Founder and former President and Chairman of the Board of the Russian Association of Project Management, SOVNET. Dr. Voropajev is professor of Project Management at the State University of Management, Moscow, Russia.  He is also Head of the Program and Project Management Faculty for the Russian State Academy’s Program for Professional Retraining and Professional Skill Development for Executives and Specialists in Investment Fields.  He is a full member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences on Information Science and Cybernetics, and of the International Academy of Investments and Economy in Construction. From 1991 to 2001, he was Vice-president and a member of the Executive Board of the International Project Management Association (IPMA), the global federation of national PM associations based in Zurich, Switzerland. He is the First Assessor for several IPMA certification bodies. In 2005 he was awarded IPMA Honorary Fellowship Award. He is also an honorary Fellow of the Indian Project Management Association and a past member of the Global Project Management Forum Steering Committee.  During his 40 years of engineering, scientific, teaching and consulting activities, he has published over 250 scientific research works including 7 monographs and 5 textbooks about the organization and planning of construction, information systems, and project management.  Vladimir serves on the editorial boards of several international project management journals, is a frequent participant in PM conferences worldwide, and provides ongoing counsel and support to PM professional leaders in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Yugoslavia and several other countries.  Professor Voropajev can be reached at [email protected]

yan-gelrudflag-russiaYan D. Gelrud

South Ural StateUniversity

Chelyabinsk, Russia

Mr. Yan Gelrud was born in 1947 in  Birobidjan (KhabarovskTerritory). In 1965 he finished a school of mathematics and physics at Novosibirsk. In 1970 he graduated from the mathematical faculty of university at Novosibirsk on “Mathematics” speciality. From 1970 to 1991 Yakov was working in the Research Institute of automated control systems as a head of mathematical division. He took part in creation and adoption of more than 100 automated control systems in different branches of industry.

From 1991 to 1997 Mr. Gelrud was doing business, being director general of “URAL-ASCО-SERVICE”.  Since the 1st of September 1997 till now he works as a professor of the “Enterprise and management” department in SouthUralStateUniversity. He teaches a multitude of disciplines, such as “Mathematics”, “Theory of probability and mathematical statistics”, “Econometrics”, “Economic and mathematical methods”, “Mathematical methods of decision-making”, “Bases of decision-making methodology”, “Economical evaluation of investments”, “Mathematical methods and models of project management”, “Studies of managerial systems.”

Yan Gelrud has more than 100 publications and speeches on seminars and conferences of different level. His monograph “Project management in conditions of risk and uncertainty” was published recently.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

Revisiting types of relationships between a program’s component projects

FEATURED PAPER

By Alan Stretton 

Sydney, Australia
________________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACT 

In a previous paper I identified some twenty different types of relationships that can occur between a program’s interdependent component projects, derived from the literature. These were then classified into three main groups, based broadly on a classification of ways in which a program’s projects can be organized, proposed by Maylor et al 2006.

However, this particular way of classifying inter-project relationships did not appear to be particularly useful when I began to think about the management of such relationships. In addition, I wasn’t happy with some of my decisions about which group to put certain relationships into, which had a somewhat arbitrary element. I therefore looked for another way of grouping these relationships which might be more useful.

This paper develops a simple two-type classification of inter-project interdependencies, which I have termed transactional, and change-related. The management of transactional interdependencies covers the normal vicissitudes which invariably occur in the quite complicated environment of programs and their interdependent component projects. At a different level, change-related interdependencies include the management of significant changes in the program, and dealing with consequent escalated issues among the projects that comprise the program, including those which are often the subject of risk management activities.

Hopefully this simple two-type classification may be useful to those who may be interested in developing more detailed materials on the management of inter-project interdependencies.

INTRODUCTION

In a paper in PM World Today (Stretton 2012c), entitled Program management: Types of relationships between a program’s component projects, I began by noting that there is widespread agreement in the literature that a primary component of the program management task is the coordinated management of its related component projects. I then derived some twenty different types of relationships between component projects from four primary sources. These were then grouped into three categories (following a classification suggested by Maylor et al 2006) into predominantly independent projects, partially inter-dependent projects, and substantially inter-dependent projects. 

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

flag-australiaalan-strettonAlan Stretton, PhD     

Faculty Corps, University of Management

and Technology, Arlington, VA (USA)

Life Fellow, AIPM (Australia) 

Alan Stretton is one of the pioneers of modern project management.  He is currently a member of the Faculty Corps for the University of Management & Technology (UMT), USA.  In 2006 he retired from a position as Adjunct Professor of Project Management in the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia, which he joined in 1988 to develop and deliver a Master of Project Management program.   Prior to joining UTS, Mr. Stretton worked in the building and construction industries in Australia, New Zealand and the USA for some 38 years, which included the project management of construction, R&D, introduction of information and control systems, internal management education programs and organizational change projects.  He has degrees in Civil Engineering (BE, Tasmania) and Mathematics (MA, Oxford), and an honorary PhD in strategy, programme and project management (ESC, Lille, France).  Alan was Chairman of the Standards (PMBOK) Committee of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) from late 1989 to early 1992.  He held a similar position with the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), and was elected a Life Fellow of AIPM in 1996.  He was a member of the Core Working Group in the development of the Australian National Competency Standards for Project Management.  He has published over 120 professional articles and papers.  Alan can be contacted at [email protected].

Adapting Professional Practices for Post-Disaster Reconstruction

FEATURED PAPER

By Owen Podger 

Bali, Indonesia
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

This paper explores the potential for professions involved in post-disaster reconstruction to influence the way reconstruction is governed, in order to be more effectively and accountably. Using two well-regarded references to identify policy issues, the paper concludes that crisis situations require that the practice of many professions should differ from normal practice; by gaining special knowledge and skills related to that difference, these professions can contribute to the ongoing professionalization of humanitarian relief. Project managers constitute a critical force in all reconstruction, thus they can have great impact, provided that the profession continues to adapt its practices.

1         Introduction

1.1    Intention

Professions involved in post-disaster reconstruction may have considerable influence on the way reconstruction is governed, making reconstruction more effectively and accountably. Governance of disaster management has advanced greatly since 1990 when UN introduced the decade for natural disaster reduction, and especially since the Indian Ocean Tsunami, which triggered so much international response and academic interest. And yet both practitioners and critics see the need for major changes in the way in which nations and the international community prepare themselves for recovery from future disasters.

The paper uses two references to identify issues of governance of post disaster situations: the World Bank’s valuable handbook for reconstructing after natural disasters, Safer Homes Stronger Communities (Jha et al, 2010), and CDA Collaborative Learning Projects’ Time to Listen (Anderson et al, 2012). It then discusses a number of professions involved in reconstruction, noting how their professional practice should adapt under crisis conditions, and suggests changes within the professions that will affect the governance of post-disaster reconstruction. Particular attention is given to project managers, as they have the most opportunity to adapt and have the most opportunity to impact change. Other professions discussed are accounting, quantity surveying (cost engineering), land-use planning, and environmental planning, crisis informatics, building industry groups and politicians.

When these professions develop special knowledge and skills related to the differences needed in disaster reconstruction, they can contribute to the ongoing professionalization of humanitarian relief. While the paper focusses on reconstruction (ie long-term recovery), some of the professions discussed are involved in immediate and intermediate response; further discussion on this topic may deserve coverage of both response and recovery, and inclusion of other professions involved primarily in response.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

owen-podgerflag-australiaflag-indonesiaOwen Podger

Bali, Indonesia

Owen Podger began his career as an architect at Taronga Zoo in Sydney, studied urban design at UCLA and construction management at UNSW. After a career in urban development in Australia and Indonesia, and in academia in Singapore and Papua New Guinea, he has advised the Indonesian government on reforms since the downfall of Soeharto. He was planning adviser to the Aceh and Nias Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Agency (BRR), and supported the Aceh Government in establishing its special autonomy. More recently he has advised the Indonesian Senate on drafting laws on local government, the office of the Vice President of Indonesia on effectiveness of government, and Indonesia’s national planning agency on urban development policy and programs. Owen is an independent consultant, currently living in Badung Bali, Indonesia.  He can be contacted at [email protected] and [email protected].

3D Work Breakdown Structure method

FEATURED PAPER

By Jean-Yves Moine 

France
________________________________________________________________________

  • 1.   Introduction

After more than fifteen years of consulting on different kinds of projects, I propose a new vision of Work Breakdown Structure (WBS): the 3D WBS concept.

Since the beginning of my career, the tree structures have always been in the heart of my thoughts. I had to find a way to build schedules and budget decompositions well and quickly. Many tree structures exist; they are described in books like the PMBOK Guide from PMI and others books. These structures include:

  • GBS (Geographical Breakdown Structure),
  • PBS (Product Breakdown Structure),
  • SBS (Systems Breakdown Structure) or FBS (Functional Breakdown Structure),
  • ABS (Activity Breakdown Structure),
  • OBS (Organization Breakdown Structure),
  • RBS (Resources or Risks Breakdown Structure),
  • CWBS (Contract Work Breakdown Structure),
  • etc.

The question was: how all these structures are mixed?

One day, during one mission on a huge railway project in Qatar I realized that for the construction phase, activities (ABS) were deployed on products (PBS) and products were constructed somewhere (ZBS).

There were three dimensions and the WBS could be represented by one cube under the construction phase.

Hence, there was one cube under other phases: basic design, detail design, procurement, construction and commissioning, knowing that phases are the level #1 of the ABS.

Later, I understood that there was the same cube under each phase. Finally, there was only one WBS cube to describe the project.

The 3D WBS model was born.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

flag-francejean-yves-moineJean-Yves Moine

France

Project management consultant, Jean-Yves Moine has been working in project control for more than fifteen years, in prestigious French companies, on more and more huge and complex projects, in different sectors in France and abroad.  Knowing that the Work Breakdown Structure is the heart of the project control, during his different missions he developed an approach to structure quickly and well the schedules: the 3D WBS model. Most of his add value is to establish it in the beginning of the project and then create a system to manage costs and time linked together, taking in account the risks.

He has a good knowledge of the project management theory, he has already written four books, published by the French Normalization Association (AFNOR). He has just finished another book about “3D project management – the project cube” published in mars 2012.  He used to write some articles which are published in the project management workbooks of the AFNOR and in the AFITEP (French project management association) magazine.

Because he practiced in a lot of grand companies, he also has a good knowledge of project management tools like PRIMEVERA P6, MS PROJECT or TILOS.  A Specialist in project management (especially time, costs and risks), he likes to transmit his knowledge, to train and to manage these elements.  The more the project is huge and complex, the more he can add value.

Jean-Yves Moine can be contacted at [email protected]

Do Private Sector Small To Medium Sized, Entrepreneurial General Contractors Comply With ANSI 748? If yes, how, if not, why not?

FEATURED PAPER

Dr. Paul Giammalvo, CDT, CCE, MScPM, MRICS 

Jakarta, Indonesia
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION- 

Over the past year or two, there have been many debates, some of them quite heated, on one or more LinkedIn Forums as to whether the private sector, small to medium sized contractors, working on firm fixed price contracts using the traditional “Design>Bid>Build” delivery method do or do not use Earned Value in full or at least substantial compliance with ANSI 748, in accordance with the NDIA Intent Guide. (To be clear, “compliance” as used in this paper means “to comply with the [agency’s] implementation of ANSI 748”)  How private sector contractors use earned value management is sometimes derisively referred to as “Earned Value Lite”, but what this paper hopes to demonstrate that there are only a few differences in HOW the private sector contractors use earned value management (small letters) but how we use Earned Value Management is important to understand for those at the state or federal levels trying to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Earned Value Management (capitalized).

The theme underlying many of these debates, is there are some (many?) of us who believe that the way the US Government uses earned value is too bureaucratic and focused on audits rather than on being proactive in managing the project, which is how entrepreneurial contractors use earned value. And given the rather abysmal failure rate of projects funded by local, state and federal government and given that save for Ben Bernanke’s printing presses, the US Government would be technically bankrupt, the premise of these debates and the rational for this paper is by looking at the differences between the way the Federal Government mandates the use of Earned Value Management compared to the way entrepreneurial contractors use earned value management, it MAY offer some ideas to the Federal and State governments on how better to use EVM as an effective project planning and execution management tool? And to be clear, the author fully understands and appreciates that “the public sector is not driven by the same financial motivation that drives behavior in the commercial world” but that doesn’t preclude the possibility that the way the private sector, entrepreneurial contractors use EVM cannot or will not provide ideas on how the public sector can or should be doing it. While contractors have a fiduciary obligation to our shareholders, government officials should have a fiduciary obligation to the taxpayers.

The author also realizes and recognizes that there are examples where the government has been flexible in their interpretation of ANSI 748 and the NDIA Guidelines to accommodate some of the suggestions being made in this paper.  But the point being made here is that some numbers of technocrats DO take the NDIA Guidelines literally and that there needs to be a scalable model and not just a one size fits all approach.

This paper is also not intended to be an attack on any person, agency or organization. The USA is in serious financial difficulty and “Business as Usual” is no longer an option. Clearly, what we are doing now is NOT working. This paper is written as a call to action by a concerned citizen to recognize there are problems and to look at the private sector entrepreneur’s for possible solutions.

For the purposes of this paper, “Small to Medium Sized” contractor is defined as companies with no single project valued at more than 20 million dollars and gross annual revenues of less than 100 million dollars.  Companies falling just short of the ENR top 400.  These companies were chosen because tend to be very entrepreneurial, often family based organizations.  They are not yet large enough to have created levels of bureaucracy or fiefdoms within their organizations.  Every process has a purpose and every process must be optimized to provide a return sufficient to pay for or offset the expense. Failure to do this will result in the contractor quickly being driven out of business.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author       

PAUL-GIAMMALVO-bioflag-italyflag-usa-indonesiaDr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE, MScPM, MRICS

Jakarta, Indonesia

Dr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE (#1240), MScPM, MRICS, is Senior Technical Advisor (Project Management) to PT Mitratata Citragraha. (PTMC), Jakarta, Indonesia. www.build-project-management-competency.com.

For 20+ years, he has been providing Project Management training and consulting throughout South and Eastern Asia, the Middle East and Europe.  He is also active in the Global Project Management Community, serving as an Advocate for and on behalf of the global practitioner. He does so by playing an active professional role in the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International, (AACE); Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) and the Construction Management Association of America, (CMAA). He also sat on the Board of Directors of the Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards (GAPPS), www.globalpmstandards.org, Sydney, Australia and is active as a regional leader in the International Guild of Project Controls. http://www.planningplanet.com/guild

He has spent 18 of the last 35 years working on large, highly technical international projects, including such prestigious projects as the Alyeska Pipeline and the Distant Early Warning Site (DEW Line) upgrades in Alaska.  Most recently, he worked as a Senior Project Cost and Scheduling Consultant for Caltex Minas Field in Sumatra and Project Manager for the Taman Rasuna Apartment Complex for Bakrie Brothers in Jakarta.  His current client list includes AT&T, Ericsson, Nokia, Lucent, General Motors, Siemens, Chevron, Conoco-Philips, BP, Dames and Moore, SNC Lavalin, Freeport McMoran, Petronas, Pertamina, UN Projects Office, World Bank Institute and many other multi-national companies and NGO organizations.

Dr. Giammalvo holds an undergraduate degree in Construction Management, his Master of Science in Project Management through the George Washington University and was awarded his PhD in Project and Program Management through the Institute Superieur De Gestion Industrielle (ISGI) and Ecole Superieure De Commerce De Lille (ESC-Lille- now SKEMA School of Management) under the supervision of Dr. Christophe Bredillet, CCE, IPMA A Level.  Paul can be contacted at [email protected].

Where did the Misuse of the names Gantt and PERT Originate?

COMMENTARY

By Patrick Weaver 

Melbourne, Australia
________________________________________________________________________

Following on from the publication of my paper Henry L Gantt, 1861 – 1919: Debunking the myths, a retrospective view of his work [1] in the December 2012 edition of the PM World Journal, a number of discussions with colleagues has raised the questions:

  • Why are barcharts so often referred to as Gantt Charts?
  • Why are network diagrams (ADM or PDM) so often referred to as PERT charts?

My research, outlined in this paper, demonstrates that Gantt’s supposed influence on project management (outside of his involvement in Taylor’s ‘scientific management’) is an invention of the recent past. Looking back at my project management training in the early 1970s, and reading through mainframe and mini-computer manuals and early PC system manuals from the 1970s and 80s, the term ‘bar chart’ predominates, and is used uniformly in both UK and USA documentation.

Similarly, the term PERT was primarily concerned with the calculation of the probability of completing the PERT critical path by a particular date. And by the 1970s PERT was seen to be a suboptimal process for determining this probability, rapidly being replaced by Monte Carlo simulation (for more on PERT and the misuse of the name see: http://www.mosaicprojects.com.au/WhitePapers/WP1087_PERT.pdf).

When the terms PERT and Gantt Chart were used in the 1970s these terms were generally used to accurately describe the documents and processes the names were originally coined for: Gantt Charts for production control tools in factories, PERT for the calculation of probabilities using standardised formula.

Note: The conclusions in the paragraph above are based on fairly limited resources. I would be very interested to hear from colleagues if there are examples of the wide spread use of the terms from this period – all emails will be responded to.

A possible source of the current misuse of the terms.

Around 1984/5 Microsoft Project was launched and it used the term ‘Gantt Chart’ for its bar chart view and ‘PERT chart’ for its PDM (or CPM) network diagram.  Both terms are ‘wrong’ form a purist perspective, but the increase in the usage of both terms seems to correlate with the rise to dominance of Microsoft Project over many competing PC scheduling tools.

[1] Read the December paper: https://pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/PMWJ5-Dec2012-WEAVER-Henry-Gantt-Debunking-Myths-Featured-Paper.pdf

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

flag-australiapatrick weaverPatrick Weaver       

Author                                

Patrick Weaver, PMP, PMI-SP, FAICD, FCIOB, is the Managing Director of Mosaic Project Services Pty Ltd, an Australian project management consultancy specialising in project control systems and a PMI Registered Education Provider.  Patrick is also the business manager of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd. He is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Building, Australasia (FCIOB) and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (FAICD). He is a member of the PMI College of Scheduling, and the PMI Melbourne Chapter (Australia), as well a full member of AIPM, APM (UK) and the College of Performance Management.  Patrick has over 35 years experience in Project Management.  His career was initially focused on the planning and managing of construction, engineering and infrastructure projects in the UK and Australia. The last 25 years has seen his businesses and experience expand to include the successful delivery of project scheduling services and PMOs in a range of government, ICT and business environments; with a strong focus on project management training.  His consultancy work encompasses: developing and advising on project schedules, developing and presenting PM training courses, managing the development of internal project control systems for client organisations, and assisting with dispute resolution and claims management.  He is a qualified Arbitrator.  In the last few years, Patrick has sought to ‘give back’ to the industry he has participated in since leaving college through contributions to the development of the project management profession.  In addition to his committee roles he has presented papers at a wide range of project management conferences in the USA, Europe, Asia and Australia, has an on-going role with the PMOZ conference in Australia and is part of the Australian delegation to ISO TC258.  Patrick can be contacted at [email protected] or at www.mosaicprojects.com.au.

Advanced Multi-Project Management

BOOK REVIEW

advanced-multi-project-managementBook Title:  Advanced Multi-Project Management

Author:  Gerald I Kendall, PMP and Kathleen M. Austin

Publisher:  J. Ross Publishing

List Price:   $69.95

Format:  hard cover; 448 pages

Publication Date:   2013

ISBN: 978-1-60427-080-8

Reviewer:      John W Smyder

Review Date:              February 2013


Introduction to the Book

This book covers a lot of ground and will not be a single read. Before I had completed reading the book I was referring back to previous sections to harvest ideas to help mitigate things happening in my current role. Needless to say, I have this sitting close at hand for quick reference.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book very nicely lays out the typically fundamental problems with many multi-project environments as a starting point. From there the authors move you to the high level solution areas. And finally, they move to specific areas of focus, providing practical methods to improve your multi-project execution.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

This is not so much new as it is that few will “speak it aloud” and that is the recognition that in a multi-project environment the contention for resources (both human and capital) is a major source of failure.

Recognizing the restrictions imposed by that contention and managing it in a practical manner makes tremendous sense.

Highlights: What I liked!

I like how the book was separated into Parts with the Chapters as sub-sections. I find this makes it easier to refer back to and locate areas that I might want to refocus on in “my time of need”. In addition the questions at the end of each chapter can become a quick reference guide for you if you take the time to answer them. 

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

flag-usaJohn-SmyderJohn Smyder 

John Smyder has been working as a Project Manager managing software and hardware projects from the proposal stage to customer acceptance and is now embarking on the role of Program Manager with Tier 1 customers of his employer.  He has twenty plus years designing, building and integrating highly technical systems and software for government and commercial applications.   John is experienced in requirements analysis, hardware/software integration, test requirements development and project management for government and commercial projects, as well as in the full life cycle of product development.  John Smyder can be contacted at [email protected].

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]. 

Project Management Concepts, Methods, and Techniques

BOOK REVIEW

project-management-conceptsBook Title:  Project Management Concepts, Methods, and Techniques

Author:  Claude H. Maley

Publisher:  CRC Press

Format:  Hard cover; 453 pages

Publication Date:   2012     List Price: $69.95

ISBN: 978-1-4665-0288-8

Reviewer:  Nazanin Mehrooz, PMP

Review Date:              March 2013


 Introduction to the Book

This book is a comprehensive guide to develop and improve project management skills. It covers PM concepts, skills, tools, techniques and ways to improve performance.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book contains 9 chapters:

  1. Introduction to Project Management
  2. Project Initiation
  3. Project Planning
  4. Project Scheduling
  5. Risk Management
  6. Procurement Management
  7. Project Implementation
  8. Project Closeout
  9. Project Leadership Skills

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

  • Plenty of details, diagrams and graphics to ease comprehension of material
  • There is adequate explanation of business reasons behind the material covered
  • The book is aligned with PMI Body of Knowledge

Highlights: What I liked!

The level of details in each chapter adequately covers the topics.  There are plenty of sample templates, examples, exercises and solution to help absorb the concepts.  

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

flag-usaNazanin-MehroozNazanin Mehrooz, PMP 

Nazanin Mehrooz was born in Iran and migrated to the USA where she studied software engineering and worked in both defense and telecom industries.  For the past decade, her focus has been IT Application Support, Operations and Service Delivery Management.  Nazanin is an active volunteer for the Dallas and Ft Worth PMI chapters.  She can be contacted at nazi_mehr[email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Entrepreneurship and Ethics in Ancient Rome – The Management Lessons of Pliny the Younger

BOOK REVIEW

enterpreneurship-and-ethicsBook Title:  Entrepreneurship and Ethics in Ancient Rome – The Management Lessons of Pliny the Younger

Author:  Robert C. Lerner

Publisher:  Multi-Media Publications

Format:  Soft cover; 222 pages

Publication Date:   2013     Price: $29.95

ISBN: 978-1-55489-131-3

Reviewer:  Nazanin Mehrooz, PMP

Review Date:              March 2013


Introduction to the Book

This book is intended for business and IT professionals who are looking for inspiration and guidance from historical case studies.  Letters written by a successful grape producer during ancient Rome are reviewed by the author to demonstrate sound business practices.  These serve as useful lessons learned on how to manage complex business issues which are very applicable in current times.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book contains 7 chapters:

  1. Introduction
  2. Pliny’s Epistle 8.2
  3. Pliny’s Business Problem
  4. Pliny’s Constraints
  5. Pliny’s Solutions
  6. Pliny’s Outcomes
  7. Pliny’s Lessons

Appendix A-H

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

  • Historical examples of ethics, relationship management and best practices
  • Application of complex business practices which pass the test of time
  • The anecdotal approach of sharing business lessons was inspiring

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

flag-usaNazanin-MehroozNazanin Mehrooz, PMP 

Nazanin Mehrooz was born in Iran and migrated to the USA where she studied software engineering and worked in both defense and telecom industries.  For the past decade, her focus has been IT Application Support, Operations and Service Delivery Management.  Nazanin is an active volunteer for the Dallas and Ft Worth PMI chapters.  She can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Quality Improvement Through Planned Experimentation, 3rd Edition

 

BOOK REVIEW 

quality-improvement-through-planned-experimentationBook Title:  Quality Improvement Through Planned Experimentation, 3rd Edition

Author:  Ronald D. Moen, Thomas W. Nolan, Lloyd P. Provost

Publisher:  McGraw-Hill

List Price:   US$125.00  Format:  hard cover; 476 pages

Publication Date:   2012   ISBN:    978-0-07-175966-3

Reviewer:      Ruthiann Frazier

Review Date:              February 2013


 Introduction to the Book 

Quality Improvement Through Planned Experimentation is an expansion on the Deming theory of Quality.  The book is an excellent example of the Deming theory and is a good refresher for project managers experienced in Quality controls.

The foreword is written by Edward Deming in 1990 and provides a very good overview of what to expect from this book.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Foreword written by Edwards Deming in 1990.  This foreword has appeared in all editions of this book.

Book is set up as a teaching tool with each chapter ending with Exercises and References for further research on the touched upon subject.

Chapter 1   – Improvement of Quality

Chapter 2   – Principles for Design and Analysis of Planned Experiments

Chapter 3   – Experiments with One Factor (General Approach)

Chapter 4   – Experiments with One Factor (Factorial Designs)

Chapter 5   – Reducing the Size of Experiments

Chapter 6   – Evaluating Sources of Variation

Chapter 7   – Sequential Experimentation – A Case Study (Improving a Milling Process)

Chapter 8   – Using a Time Series Response Variable (new chapter)

Chapter 9   – Experimentations with Factors at More Than Two Levels

Chapter 10 – Applications in Health Care (new chapter)

Chapter 11 – New Product Design (new chapter)

Appendix A – Evaluating Measurement Systems

Glossary

Index

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

The new materials in this third edition of the book are contained in Chapters 8, 10 and 11.   Additional graphs and diagrams were added to every chapter in this third edition.

Chapter 8 contains updated materials for sequential experimentation by using time series for the response variable.  A sequence of PDSA (Plan Do Study Act) cycles can be run for experiments from previous chapters utilizing the information contained in Chapter 8. 

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

flag-usaRuthiann Frazier, PMP 

20+ years of international project management experience in wide variety of industries including IT, Telecommunications, Construction, Finance, Insurance, Publishing, Manufacturing, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare.  Was introduced to project management accidentally when a senior manager was looking for someone to take on a project and was the first face he saw.  That was over 20 years ago and my career as a project manager has lead to places and experiences that I would never have imagined but have enjoyed tremendously.  My most enjoyable assignment was working as a Program Director on failing international projects with young/new project managers.  It was gratifying to help the young/new project managers turn their projects around and to see them complete their assignments successfully.

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].