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“Lean Agile” for Project and Portfolio Management (PPM) Efficiency[1]

SECOND EDITION

Sethuraman Kalyanakrishnan

Capgemini Financial Services USA Incorporated

Texas, USA
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Abstract

Innovation in today’s fast paced business environment is driven by the critical need to ‘learn’ and ‘respond’ to Customer requirements ‘rapidly’. Organizations continuously try to increase focus on the Customer and Market and stay competitive by exploring and implementing Software development methodologies and principles that deliver continuous ‘value’ and vigorously ‘eliminate’ anything that is not adding value.

The new age Software development has been transformed by ‘Agile’ development methods. In Agile methods, instead of building the whole product, a smallest possible useful part is built and given to users in two to four weeks leading to rapid feedback, testing and adjustments. In addition, functional software is available much sooner compared to traditional development cycles. Agile has much similarity with ‘Lean’ which comes from Lean Manufacturing and is a set of principles for achieving quality, speed & customer alignment. Lean says to relentlessly eliminate anything that isn’t adding value and only work on what we absolutely need to be doing at this moment in time.

This white paper provides an insight to how we can adapt the Lean and Agile principles successfully to increase the efficiency of Project and Portfolio Management (PPM) processes within the Organization. We discuss the implementation approach, the challenges and the lessons learnt.  The paper also provides guidelines and recommendations on the Lean and Agile tools that can be used by organizations to improve their approach to implement IT PPM solutions and enhance their success.

Introduction

Innovation in today’s fast paced business environment is driven by the critical need to ‘learn’ and ‘respond’ to Customer requirements ‘rapidly’. Organizations continuously try to increase focus on the Customer and Market and stay competitive by exploring and implementing Software development methodologies and principles that deliver continuous ‘value’ and vigorously ‘eliminate’ anything that is not adding value.

The new age Software development has been transformed by ‘Agile’ development methods. In Agile methods, instead of building the whole product, a smallest possible useful part is built and given to users in two to four weeks leading to rapid feedback, testing and adjustments. In addition, functional software is available much sooner compared to traditional development cycles. Agile has much similarity with ‘Lean’ which comes from Lean Manufacturing and is a set of principles for achieving quality, speed & customer alignment. Lean says to relentlessly eliminate anything that isn’t adding value and only work on what we absolutely need to be doing at this moment in time.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note:  Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 7th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2013.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and UT Dallas.


About the Author

flag-usapmwj16-Nov2013-kalyanakrishnan-AUTHOR IMAGESethu Kalyanakrishnan 

USA 

Sethu Kalyanakrishnan, ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt, Certified Scrum Master, CSQA, ITIL is a Lead Consultant at Capgemini USA. Sethu has over 14 years of experience in Information Technology serving customers in the Financial, Manufacturing and Energy sectors. Sethu has a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from National Institute of Technology (NIT), India. Sethu is currently an Engagement Manager in the Project and Portfolio Management practice (PPM) of Capgemini, USA. He coaches teams on Lean Six Sigma and Agile methodologies. He also is a process and functional consultant on CA Clarity PPM v13.  Contact: +1-847-660-8485; email: [email protected]


[1] Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 7th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2013.  It is republished here with the permission of the author and UT Dallas.