SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Getting Through the Agile Maze

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Steve Boronski

Agile, PRINCE2 & P30 Lead Trainer, ILX Group

United Kingdom


Abstract

Agile project and programme management methods, once the preserve of software development teams, are increasingly popular with organisations that need to be flexible and responsive as the pace of change continues to accelerate in business. Against a backdrop of recent changes in certification options for agile practitioners, however, there is growing confusion about which approach represents Best Practice and which certifications are of most value.

Getting through the agile maze

Agile methodologies have taken the project management world by storm. No longer confined to software development, the agile approach is popular with organisations that need to be flexible and responsive as the pace of change continues to accelerate in business. Against a backdrop of the increasing popularity of agile, however, there is growing confusion about which approach represents Best Practice and which certifications are of most value.

Since the Agile Manifesto was first published in 2001 there have been a number of incarnations of the approach. Essentially, the iterative and incremental nature of agile allows organisations to keep their eyes on the prize – the product or services they are looking to launch – while allowing development teams to adapt their approach as they go. Typically two-to-four week ‘sprint’ work cycles, culminating in a review of progress made so far before the next phase of development, contrast sharply with timescales for traditional project management that stretched into months and even years. Frequently this resulted in the end product being obsolete before it was ready.

Growing popularity of agile

In a recent Benchmark Report based on a survey of 2,000 project managers confirmed the growing popularity of agile. In 2015 25% of the respondents indicated that they use agile methods and techniques in their day-to-day roles, while 60% have some exposure to agile and only 15% indicated no exposure. This is a 10% increase from the response provided by UK-based practitioners 12 months previously.

Agile started life as software development’s baby and still has the highest usage rates in that sector compared with any other – 65% of software developers responding to the survey use agile day to day. However, the retail and government sectors also now indicate strong rates of daily usage (34% and 31%).

As agile grows in popularity, both organisations and individuals are increasingly keen to develop their skills and knowledge in the methodology and ideally achieve certification that they have reached a good standard. Yet just 12% of the UK-based practitioners say that they have some form of accreditation, mostly variants of Scrum.

AgilePM or PRINCE2 Agile?

There are two main options for organisations and individuals looking for formal agile development and accreditation. APMG-International AgilePM® Foundation and Practitioner training or certification, based on the DSDM Agile Project Management Framework, aims to ‘provide the ability to deliver agile projects in organisations requiring standards, rigour and visibility around project management, while at the same time enabling the fast pace, change and empowerment provided by AgilePM’. Until recently this was the go-to certification for agile.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Boronski-PHOTOSteve Boronski

ILX Group plc
United Kingdom

flag-uk




Steve Boronski
is Agile, PRINCE2 and P3O Lead Trainer at ILX Group plc. He is also an MSP Registered Advanced Practitioner and trainer. He is a highly experienced trainer with many years of practical project and programme delivery, and continues to help projects around the world to succeed. Recent public and private sector clients include Etihad Airways, Deloitte Zurich, Astra Zeneca and Gemini Observatory.

Steve can be contacted at [email protected]