SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Building Information Modelling-Based Projects in Nigeria

FEATURED PAPER

Evidence from Eko Atlantic City

By Oluseye Olugboyega

Ile-Ife, Nigeria


ABSTRACT

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a global digital construction technology that is being deployed in every country in the world. Several case studies of BIM-based projects have been reported globally, such as, Sutter Medical Centre in the United States, Research Laboratory at University of Colorado-Denver in the United States, Cathay Pacific Cargo Terminal in Hong Kong, Heathrow Airport in the United Kingdom, and Capitol Theatre in Alberta. This study aimed to investigate BIM-based project in the Nigerian construction industry using Eko Atlantic City as a case study. The study focused on BIM adoption indices, and found that the level of development of the geometries and the structural systems of the city and its buildings were made possible by the usage of BIM. The information models were integrated, and collaboration took place among the primary stakeholders. Also, it was found that BIM was also used to develop animation of districts, water supply and drainage design model, and simulation of sea wall construction for the city.

Keywords: Eko Atlantic City, Building Information Modelling, BIM Adoption Indices

1.0 Introduction

Modern buildings are complex edifices and the design, construction and commissioning of a new building is a long complicated process that involves input from a number of parties (Aina and Wahab, 2011). The dynamic nature of human needs and development has caused the construction processes to undergo a great deal of metamorphosis (Mosaku et al., 2006). Traditional process of communication and exchange of information is responsible for about two-thirds of construction problems and has led to the proliferation of adversarial relationships between the parties to a project (Nuria, 2005; Chen and Kamara, 2008; Smith, 2013).

To address these problems, Bhargav (2014) argued that the built environment is not two-dimensional and should no longer be represented in two-dimensional (2D) drawings but in three-dimensional (3D) with models. The adoption of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a way of representing building information in 3D and other obtainable dimensions has ushered the construction industry into a new digital construction renaissance, where projects are being built twice, once in the computer and then once flawlessly on site (Building Information Modelling Guide, 2013). Around the globe, BIM is significantly altering the way that the Construction Industry creates and cares for its assets; mostly because it allows organizations to identify and resolve issues before they actually happen, optimize outcomes and reduce process waste, especially rework. Her Majesty’s Government (2012) explained BIM as the first truly global digital construction technology and predicted that the technology will soon be deployed in every country in the world. The study noted that the UK Government has embedded BIM into the UK Construction Sector and the initial estimated savings to UK Construction and its clients is £2billion per annum through the widespread adoption of BIM and is therefore a significant tool for government to reach its target of 15-20% savings on the costs of capital projects by 2015.

Several case studies of BIM-based projects have been reported globally. For example, Sutter Medical Centre in the United States, Research Laboratory at University of Colorado-Denver in the United States, Cathay Pacific Cargo Terminal in Hong Kong, Heathrow Airport in the United Kingdom, and Capitol Theatre in Alberta. Sabol (2005) studied the adoption of BIM in Australia using Sydney Opera House as a case study. The study observed that BIM provides a unified digital repository of all building components, and as a full 3D model, it is capable of displaying views with a clarity that are typically eludes users not schooled in interpreting standard 2D building drawings. The study also noted that in the U.S Federal Government, BIM is a requirement for projects at General Services Administration, the U.S Army Corps of Engineers, and the Department of State. The study found that BIM is an appropriate and beneficial approach enabling storage and retrieval of integrated building, maintenance and management information for construction projects. BIM has been identified as a key agent for economic growth in both domestic and international markets; and as a tool that construction exporting countries can use BIM to compete in construction (MacLeamy, 2012). Staub-French and Khanzode (2007) reported the case studies of Camino Medical Center and Sequus Pharmaceuticals Pilot Plant Facility in California. The finding of the studies showed that BIM has the potential to significantly improve design coordination and construction execution.

The aim of this study is to investigate BIM-based project in the Nigerian construction industry using Eko Atlantic City as a case study with a view to enhancing widespread adoption of BIM for construction projects by the Governments of Nigeria and construction firms in Nigeria.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

160916-olegboyu-photo
Oluseye OLUGBOYEGA

Ile-Ife, Nigeria

flag-nigeria

 


Oluseye Olugboyega
is a first class graduate of the Department of Building at Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-ife, Nigeria. He obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Building and Master of Science degree in Construction Management. He is currently a lecturer in the Department of Building, Obafemi Awolowo University and a member of the Nigerian Institute of Building. He can be contacted at [email protected].