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ESEI Stakeholder Management – Series Conclusion

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Dr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia


This series of 14 articles has looked at applying the Effective Stakeholder Engagement Initiative (ESEI™ – pronounced easy) to create an organisational culture focused on achieving success based on mutually beneficial stakeholder engagement.

The Stakeholder Circle® methodology supported by a range of practical analytic and engagement tools underpins ESEI; offering organisations a range of options to build their stakeholder relationship maturity from an ‘ad hoc’ initial use of some processes to ‘Level 5’ in the SRMM® maturity model where measurements of the attitude of the stakeholder community are used for health checks, predictive risk assessment and management.

The two components of ESEI stakeholder management were covered:

  • Ways to undertake a thorough assessment of your stakeholder community to identify who in the community is really significant at this point in time, so appropriate engagement activities can be planned.
  • Effective communication management to implement the planned stakeholder engagement activities and monitor their effectiveness, both at the individual level and across the whole stakeholder community.

Both elements of the ESEI stakeholder management approach need to be routinely reviewed and adapted to optimise the effort being expended on stakeholder engagement and maximise the probability of a success. The ESEI approach to stakeholder management supports Ed Freeman’s ‘Stakeholder Theory’, an organisation’s commitment to GRI Sustainability Reporting Guidelines and ISO 26000, and offers a cost effective way to enhance the probability of project, program and organisational success. If the balance is right, the ‘cost of stakeholder engagement is free’! These elements were covered in:

The core processes for identifying, prioritising and managing your stakeholder engagement were the focus of articles:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.         

 


 

About the Author

pmwj34-May2015-Bourne-PHOTO2

Dr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

The SRMM® model for stakeholder management maturity and governance

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia


This series of articles focused on ESEI stakeholder engagement has set out a framework for organisations to use in the effective management of their stakeholder community and has clearly demonstrated the benefits of proactive engagement over an ad hoc reactive approach to ‘crisis management’. However, it is impossible to transition from an unorganised ad hoc approach to the management of stakeholders to a balanced proactive engagement with stakeholders overnight. Organisations need to plan and implement the changes needed to transition to their desired level of capability and maturity in a structured way.

The Stakeholder Relationship Maturity Model (SRMM®) has been designed to facilitate this transition. The SRMM model is free to use and can be applied using any sophisticated approach to stakeholder engagement.

SRMM® Defined

As with all ‘maturity models’, the level of ‘readiness’ or maturity described in SRMM® simply defines the starting point for planning the implementation of process improvements to enhance the effective management of ‘stakeholder engagement’ within and around projects (or the organisation). In developing this concept a number of levels of organisational ‘readiness’ have been described that link organisational willingness to engage proactively in developing and maintaining relationships with stakeholders, to techniques or processes that can assist in achieving those objectives.

Recognising which level of readiness an organisation is closest to defines the starting point for these process improvements. Applying SRMM® then enables the most effective and pragmatic implementation of various stakeholder management and engagement practices within an organisation. It achieves this outcome by offering a framework for progressively building capability, in alignment with organisational maturity, towards proactively managing stakeholder relationships.

The process model used in this paper is the Stakeholder Circle® methodology and supporting tools, simply because it has been the basis of the author’s research program, and data is readily available to support the on-going development of the SRMM® concept. However it is important to note that SRMM® is independent of any particular methodology, the only requirement to use SRMM® effectively is to use a structured series of processes (repeatable and measurable) that can be built into ‘the methodology’ used by an organization.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Bourne-PHOTO
Dr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

 

Stakeholder Management is no longer optional

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia

________________________________________________________________________

 

Apart from the practical consideration that projects are done by people for people and that people are stakeholders who will decide if your project is successful or not; the regulatory and political environment is changing. In many situations effective stakeholder management is becoming a mandated necessity.

Two standards that are increasingly used to benchmark ‘effective stakeholder engagement’ are ISO 26000 and GRIG4 – this article looks at their consequences.

International Standard, ISO 26000:2010, Guidance on social responsibility

Each ISO International Standard represents a global consensus on the state of the art in the subject of that standard, ISO 26000 is no different. It is intended to assist organisations in contributing to sustainable development by encouraging them to go beyond mere legal compliance and actively support the communities in which they operate to the benefit of the community and the organisation. ISO recommend that in applying ISO 26000, it is advisable that an organisation take into consideration societal, environmental, legal, cultural, political and organisational diversity, as well as differences in economic conditions, while being consistent with international norms of behavior.

ISO 26000 provides guidance on:

  1. Concepts, terms and definitions related to social responsibility
  2. Background, trends and characteristics of social responsibility
  3. Principles and practices relating to social responsibility
  4. Core subjects and issues of social responsibility
  5. Integrating, implementing and promoting socially responsible behaviour throughout the organization and, through its policies and practices, within its sphere of influence
  6. Identifying and engaging with stakeholders
  7. Communicating commitments, performance and other information related to social responsibility.

The perception and reality of an organization’s performance on social responsibility can influence, among other things:

    • Competitive advantage
    • Reputation
    • Ability to attract and retain workers or members, customers, clients or users
    • Maintenance of employees’ morale, commitment and productivity
    • View of investors, owners, donors, sponsors and the financial community
    • Relationship with companies, governments, the media, suppliers, peers, customers and the community in which it operates.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.     

 


 

About the Author

150114-pmwj31-new-bourne-PHOTO

Dr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 


Dr. Lynda Bourne
is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

Communicating for Effect

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia

 


 

There is no point in communicating with anyone if you do not want an effect; you are wasting their time and yours! Communication is the way we influence other people’s thoughts and actions, therefore every communication should be focused on achieving a desired effect on the person’s attitude or behaviour. The effect may be:

  • To prevent any deterioration in a currently satisfactory attitude;
  • To improve a currently unsatisfactory attitude;
  • To stop or reduce damaging or negative actions or behaviours;
  • To ensure or encourage supportive actions or behaviours.

The challenge is knowing which effect you need to create, and then based on the priority of the stakeholder and the importance of the change (from the perspective of both timing and significance) choosing the optimum communication approach.

In earlier articles I’ve discussed the relationship between stakeholder perceptions and project success and the three types of stakeholder communication. Project Relations (PR) and ‘reports’ cover off the needs of most of the stakeholders who are not critical at this time, with minimum effort. This article is focused on the ‘directed communication’ needed to change the attitude or behaviour of the small group of critical stakeholders who need to be doing something differently to support the successful delivery of your project.

Each directed communication is focused on one stakeholder to achieve a desired change in their attitude, behaviour, or both. Maybe a functional manager needs to stop obstructing your project and actively support the loan of some key resources for critical work, or the sponsor needs to approve some additional funding.

The first step in this process is defining precisely what you need from the stakeholder. You also need to prioritise these communications so you focus most of your effort on the most important changes you need at this time.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.         

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj34-May2015-Bourne-PHOTODr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

Communication Planning

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia


To plan without acting is futile. To act without planning is fatal!

Communication planning is an essential element in crafting a communication strategy that will work to support the success of the project or other activity being managed. Inadequate planning may lead to problems such as delays in message delivery, the communication of information to the wrong audience, insufficient communications activities, and misunderstanding or misinterpretation of the messages communicated.

To avoid these problems and facilitate the development (and then implementation) of an effective communications plan people with the following knowledge and skills are needed:

  • Understanding the politics and power structures in the organization and the wider stakeholder community, including customers and sponsors;
  • Knowledge of the environment and culture of the organization and the key stakeholders;
  • Knowledge of the industry and type of project deliverable;
  • Knowledge of communications technologies;
  • Knowledge of corporate policies and procedures regarding security, legal and other requirements affecting communications.

Communication RequirementsBefore developing the communications plan, it is important to analyse the information needs of the project and its stakeholders. Sources of information used to develop the project communication requirements include:

  • Stakeholder information and communication requirements derived from the analysis of the stakeholder community and documented in the stakeholder register and stakeholder engagement plan;
  • Organizational charts (for the customer, the performing organisation and the project) and stakeholder responsibilities, relationships and interdependencies;
  • The range of technical disciplines, departments, and other specialties involved in the project;
  • Logistics of how many persons will be involved with the project and at which locations;
  • Internal information needs (e.g., when communicating within organizations);
  • External information needs (e.g., when communicating with the media, public, or contractors);
  • Legal and regulatory requirements (eg, mandated stakeholder consultations).

Based in this information, the project’s communication requirements are developed by combining the type and format of information needed with an analysis of the value of that information, and how the communication supports the project’s objectives. Project resources should be focused on communicating information that contributes to the success of the project or where a lack of communication can lead to project failure. Factors to consider during the planning process include, but are not limited to:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Bourne-PHOTODr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

 flag-australia

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

 

The three types of stakeholder communication

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia


Stakeholders are a very wide and diverse group, some supportive and useful, others negative and obstructive and all with different needs and aspirations. Depending on the type of project, between 50% and 90% of the risks in the risk register are associated with stakeholders. People are a major source of uncertainty, both opportunities and threats (and sometimes both), and consequently need managing. But unfortunately, it is impossible to ‘manage’ most of the stakeholders that matter, the only tool available is communication, focused on engaging effectively with the various members of your stakeholder community.

Effective stakeholder engagement = effective stakeholder communication.   But what does effective mean? There is probably not a lot of point in communicating if you do not want an ‘effect’; but there is never sufficient time and resources available to focus an intense communication effort on every stakeholder.

The whole point of the ESEI approach to stakeholder engagement is to analyse the overall stakeholder community and then determine who is important at this point in time. After using the techniques discussed in the earlier articled in this series, you will know who’s important, but you cannot ignore all of the other stakeholders (if you do you are creating problems for the future). A strategic approach to communication is the key, deploying the three general classes of communication; reporting, project relations and directed communication at the right times, to influence the right stakeholders in the best way to assist in achieving a successful outcome.

Directed communication

Directed communication is hard work and needs to be focused on the important stakeholders (both positive and negative) with whom you need to cause a specific effect. This includes providing direction to your team members and suppliers and influencing the attitude or expectations of other key stakeholders.

Directed communication needs to be planned, which means you need to know precisely what effect you are seeking and then work out how to achieve the effect. This usually means you want the stakeholder to start to do something, do something differently or stop doing something. Some of the tactics that can be used to make your communication effective include:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Bourne-PHOTODr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

 

Monitoring the ‘health’ of your stakeholder community

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia

________________________________________________________________________


Management involves dealing with change, stakeholder management is no different! Mapping and assessing your stakeholder community and implementing communication plans to maintain or change the attitudes of key stakeholders towards the ‘work’ is only the beginning of a successful stakeholder management strategy. Over time you need to measure the effectiveness of your communications, and make adjustments as needed, and also look for the emergence of unexpected changes in the stakeholder community.

Every project’s stakeholder community is dynamic and effective management means staying one step ahead of as many changes as possible. Some of the drivers for change include:

  • Stakeholder’s perceptions, expectations and requirements change over time;
  • People and organizations come and go, or their power and influence changes;
  • The stakeholders the project needs to work with change based on the current phase; the group of stakeholders that are critical during the initiation / planning phases of a project may be quite different to those that are critical during implementation / roll out.

Whilst some stakeholders change, others may remain constant. The challenge facing every project team is to determine the right stakeholders to engage at the right time during the project’s lifecycle, and what form that engagement should take to optimise project success. Determining this requires a regular review of the project’s stakeholder community, at key change points in the project and/or at regular intervals; ideally at a maximum interval of three months.

The reassessment is essentially a reappraisal of the processes discussed to date in this series of articles.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.
  



About the Author


pmwj35-Jun2015-Bourne-PHOTODr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

Assess Your Stakeholders’ Attitudes

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia

________________________________________________________________________

Some stakeholders will love your project and be happy to provide the support you need, others will hate it and many will simply ignore it. Successful project delivery requires three key steps; for all of the ‘important stakeholders’ you need to:

  1. Assess their current attitude towards the work.
  2. Determine a realistically desirable attitude to expect of the stakeholder that will optimise the chance of success.
  3. Work out what needs to be done to shift stakeholders from their current state to the desired state.

Attitudes can range from actively supportive of the work through to active opposition to the work, and the stakeholder may be willing to engage in communication with you (even if they hate the work) or refuse to communicate (even if they support the work).

Both measures are important; to change a stakeholder’s attitude, you first need to be able to communicate with them! In fact, the only ethical tool you have to support or change stakeholder’s attitude towards the work is various forms of communication. Even if you only want to maintain a stakeholder’s current level of support communication is essential to monitor the situation and avoid nasty surprises.

The Stakeholder Circle methodology separates this critical assessment of ‘attitude’ from the prioritisation of stakeholders based on power, urgency and proximity to deal with the full spectrum of attitudes a typical project is confronted with.

The first step in the ESEI approach to assessing attitudes involves identifying the level of receptiveness and support of each stakeholder. The ranges are:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.

 

About the Author

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Bourne-PHOTODr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/