Welcome to the March 2018 PMWJ

From a Different Angle: Competitive Projects, Winning, Not Losing and… Welcome to another edition of the PM World Journal

 

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the March 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 68th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 37 original articles, papers and other works by 40 different authors in 15 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, as another political season gets underway in the United States and other countries (and as Democracies and Democratic institutions seem to be under attack in so many places), I have been thinking about the role of project management in politics.  Or more correctly, in political campaigns!  Aren’t political campaigns projects, with concrete end goals, schedules, budgets, stakeholders and many other characteristics of projects? I started thinking about the contribution that professional project management might make to the campaign of someone running for political office, at the local, state or national level.  I discussed it with my wife, how might I help our favorite candidate for US senate this year?

Then I realized that the opposition candidate’s political campaign might well be using their own expert project management resources, and how all candidates for political office either win or lose elections.  That led to thoughts about project management in sports and other competitive industries and situations, including in many businesses.  There is much written and discussed these days about project successes and failures; how do those discussions relate to projects in politics and sports where there are so many losers.  Are those projects failures?  It occurred to me that it’s not so straightforward and perhaps there are different ways to think about all of this.  So here goes.

Political Campaigns as Projects and Programs

At first glance, a political campaign looks like a classic project, with beginning and end, scope of work, schedule, budget, resources, risks, contracting and procurement requirements and many leadership, stakeholder and team building issues.  Classic project planning and management techniques would seem applicable, with agility also required in today’s fast paced environment.  On closer examination though, we can see some unusual and complicating factors.  For example, a majority of the project (campaign) team members will be temporary participants, with many external resources and volunteers.  In addition, the campaign management (project/program) team will need knowledge and experience that many project managers may not readily have – fund raising, legal and regulatory knowledge, leading/coordinating volunteers, experience with other political campaigns, political and economic knowledge, governance and policy knowledge, marketing and social networking experience, etc.  That said, it still looks like a project, at least for campaigns for local elections.

On political campaigns for statewide or national offices, things get more complex in a hurry. Larger campaigns take more of everything – more people, more money, more knowledge and experience, and usually much more time. A campaign for a state-wide election will more closely resemble a program, with multiple projects related to volunteers, ICT, marketing, events (both physical and on media), financing (events, campaigns, other), stakeholders (events, communications, analysis), research (issues, stakeholders, voting trends, opinion polls, opposition and competitive research).  Voter registration issues will be more important, along with campaign-related regulations, laws, policies or issues.

Campaigns for national office are major programs, with sub-programs, portfolios of projects and multiple project teams.  In the United States and most other countries, a national campaign requires ballot registration in every voting district or state, office and volunteer mobilization in every state (50-100 in the USA), massive fund-raising initiatives, multiple multi-media marketing projects, multiple research projects, information and knowledge about a wide range of issues.  And national campaigns take a long time, often over several years. If a candidate is proposing significant policy change, then the program will resemble an organizational change program and may require changes in the conditions or environment surrounding the campaign itself.  For example, laws and regulations may need to change independent of the campaign itself; public opinion might need to be influenced; impact on other factors may need to be considered, planned for or incorporated into the campaign.

While politicians and campaign managers could well benefit significantly from deeper project management knowledge, that is nowhere near enough…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the February 2018 PMWJ

Gone and Back Again, the Rise of Regional Project Management Conferences, and… Welcome to the February edition of the PM World Journal

 

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the February 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 67th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 37 original articles, papers and other works by 39 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important or interesting trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, I want to mention a trend that I’ve wanted to talk about for some time but found other topics somewhat higher priority – the increasing number of local and regional conferences around the world.

1980s and my first Conference Experiences

I began my professional career in 1976, learning project cost and schedule control at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) working on a large nuclear safety project.  Five years later I was working on a large defense program for a division of GTE, wandered into their corporate library and discovered an Encyclopedia of Associations in which I found a listing for the Project Management Institute (PMI®).  I contacted PMI, learned that they had a chapter nearby (I was living in Northern California at the time), attended some meetings and started to learn more about both PMI and the project management profession.  I learned that PMI had more chapters around the USA and that their biggest event was an annual conference called “Annual Seminars/Symposia”.

Five years later I was back in Idaho, having advanced to a leadership position and helping develop an enterprise-wide project management planning process covering hundreds of projects and 5,000+ employees.  By 1986, with an MBA in hand, I decided to author a paper for presentation at a project management conference.  I was 10 years into my project management career and wanted to share my recent experience with our successful initiative at the INL.  I discovered that PMI chapters in Seattle, Portland and Vancouver BC had launched an annual Pacific Northwest Regional Project Management Conference.  So I submitted an abstract to the next regional conference in Seattle and presented a paper there, my first conference presentation.  I followed that with a presentation the next year at the Northwest Regional PM Conference in Vancouver, BC.

By that time I was leading a new PMI chapter; I attended my first PMI Seminars/Symposia in Milwaukee in 1987.  At that time, I knew about the regional conferences in the Pacific Northwest and the big annual PMI conference, which was mostly attended by PMI members in the United States and Canada, but few outside North America.  The only way we learned about project management events was by reading PMI publications; this was long before the Internet and email.  I knew nothing about PM conferences in other countries.  I attended PMI’s annual Seminars/Symposia in 1988, 1989 and 1990. Then things changed for me.

1990 – 2000: Dominance of Big International Events

By 1990 I was living in Dallas, Texas, working on a massive science project, the Superconducting Super Collider.  That year I was also invited to assume the presidency of the PMI Dallas/Ft. Worth chapter, a young and still struggling chapter.  In 1990 I also attended two international conferences, both of which I learned about through PMI.  In June 1990, I travelled to Vienna, Austria to present a paper at the INTERNET’90 World Congress on Project Management.  It was a new and eye-opening experience.  I learned for the first time about INTERNET (the International Project Management Association, which later changed its identity to the IPMA) and its member associations in various European countries.  I became familiar with APM in the UK (actually joining APM in 1991), the Austrian PM Association and a few others. I also learned that some of those member associations conducted annual local conferences, for example in Finland and Germany.

In October 1990, I attended PMI’s annual conference (PMI’90) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where I again met PMI leaders from around North America but also from South Africa (PMI’s largest chapter outside of North America).  I also met IPMA’s representative, David Mathie, who was attending the PMI conference under a cooperation agreement between PMI and IPMA and was there to promote the next IPMA congress in Florence, Italy.

In 1990, I also visited Russia and Ukraine for the first time, where I met professional leaders in those countries. I participated in project management conferences in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia in 1993 and 1995.

From 1991-2000, I attended every annual PMI conference around North America and IPMA congresses in Florence (1992), Oslo (1994) and Paris (1996).  Those were the big international events in the PM World.  By 1995 I had been elected to the PMI Board of Directors.  In October 1995, at PMI’95 in New Orleans, I organized and managed an event called the Global Project Management Forum, to which were invited leaders of other PM associations around the world for a meeting to discuss global cooperation.  About 20 such professional organizations were represented, primarily from Europe but also Brazil, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, South Africa and a few others.

In Paris in 1996, I met Brian Kooyman from Sydney who was representing the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM).  I learned about AIPM’s history, activities and annual conferences.  I was invited to both Brazil and South Africa in 1999, speaking at the PMI Sao Paulo chapter’s big conference and a bi-annual national conference in Johannesburg organized by PM South Africa.  By that time, I knew of regional conferences in the Nordic countries (annual events called NORDNET), Russia, India, Australia, Brazil and South Africa.  A few PMI chapters in North America had grown large and were starting to organize their own annual conferences.  But by and large, the two big international events organized by PMI and IPMA dominated the conference schedule.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the January 2018 PMWJ

Global Citizens, Project Earth Revisited (again), Solving Global Problems and… Welcome to the January edition of the PM World Journal


By David Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the January 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 66th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This issue contains 34 original articles, papers and other works by 39 different authors in 14 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  Last month, we launched the first Editor’s Choice Awards for outstanding articles and papers published in the PMWJ in 2017.  This month I go even bigger picture, solving global problems. What are we as project management professionals, either individually or as professional organizations, doing to help address pressing global problems?  Sometimes I think that is asking too much; how can we make a difference when the issues and problems seem so great? Now as I approach the end of my career, I am asking myself why I did not try to do more.

Recent Context

In September, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey which devastated the Texas coast, I led an initiative in partnership with the Dallas and Fort Worth Texas PMI chapters to help PMI members affected by that category 4 storm.  Because PMI and its various chapters in the USA are not registered as charities, we were restricted from raising money or providing financial assistance to individuals.  I explored options for creating a new charity for helping those in the PM field recover from natural disasters, but the legal and bureaucratic barriers were significant.  Instead, over three months we collected just over $2,000 worth of gift cards to grocery stores, restaurants and hardware stores, shipped to PMI chapter leaders in the Houston areas for distribution to PMI members whose homes were damaged by the hurricane.  Needless to say, those who received the gift cards, as small as they were, were extremely grateful. At least we did something! [1]

In November, APM published a remarkable report authored by Prof Peter Morris, one of the world’s most respected experts on modern project management. The report was titled “Climate Change and What the Project Management Profession Should be Doing about It: A UK Perspective.”  As stated in the report’s introduction: ‘Research on climate change has so far been led predominantly by physical scientists, but addressing how to mitigate and adapt to it will also require management and social science skills. Those expert in the world of projects and their management should have a significant role in this. This essay by Professor Peter Morris provides an initial scoping of where and how project management as a profession might address the implications and consequences of climate change.’ Peter ends the report in section 8.4, “So what should project management be doing?”, with suggestions for actions at the individual, enterprise, international and professional levels. [2]

Over the years, I have been involved with many discussions and a few initiatives to address some global problems; I’ve written some papers.  I decided to do something more this month.  But first, a little more context!

Global Citizens

Over the last few months, I have noticed television ads on CNN, NBC and a few other media channels in the United States by an organization called “Global Citizen”.  Founded in 2008 by three bright guys in New York who decided to try to make a difference, Global Citizen is now a major social action platform for those who want to help solve the world’s biggest challenges. Global Citizen is headquartered in New York, with offices in Canada, Australia and the UK. On their platform you can learn about issues, take action on what matters most and join a community committed to social change. Through their mix of content and events, grassroots organizing and extensive reach through digital channels, Global Citizen is building the world’s largest movement for social action. They organize massive global campaigns to amplify the actions of Global Citizens from around the world.  With millions of members and the support of many high-profile celebrities, they have organized concerts and events in New York’s Central Park and other places worldwide in recent years. [3]

Global Citizen is not the only group or global initiative underway, launched by concerned and motivated individuals worldwide.  While politicians have argued, made global agreements, established goals, and committed support and money, it often seems like they have done little to actually solve the problems.  It seems that individuals and online communities are now doing more and having a greater impact.  The message to me was “just do something”.

Project Earth Revisited (Again)

Believe it or not, “Project Earth” was the name of an initiative within the project management professional world launched in 1990 in Calgary, Canada following a keynote speech by Dr. Frank King, former chair of the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympic Games, at the PMI’90 Global Congress (The event was called Seminars/Symposium at that time).  In his dramatic presentation, Dr. King painted a dire picture of the damage being done to the planet by humans in recent years.  While global warming and climate change were not yet so front-and-center, significant environmental problems were well publicized and visible worldwide.  Dr. King challenged us as individuals and as a profession to do something about it.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the December 2017 PMWJ

The First Annual PMWJ Editor’s Choice Awards, and… Welcome to the December edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the December 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 65th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 33 original articles, papers and other works by 36 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, we are announcing the first annual PMWJ Editor’s Choice Awards, a selection of top papers and articles published in this journal during 2017. Over the last 12 months we have published 340 original works in the PMWJ, including 75 featured papers and 83 articles (series, advisories, commentaries). All of the works we publish are seriously written; some are by authors for whom English is a second language so occasionally contain grammatical mistakes.  All of our authors are well-educated and serious professionals.  Many of the works are outstanding and deserve to be read multiple times.  A few are absolutely fantastic, clarifying important topics, simplifying issues or breaking entirely new ground.

In the spirit of celebrating the end of another good year, I wanted to showcase some of the papers and articles that I really liked and want others to read again (or for the first time if you are new to this publication.)  The papers were selected from among ‘featured papers” only, even though we have published excellent student papers and second editions.  The PMWJ featured papers each month are original works.  The articles noted below were also original works, shorter in nature but enlightening and useful to program and project managers worldwide.  The authors of these papers and articles deserve recognition.  These are my choices, totally subjective. If you have time, please go read their works once more.

            2017 Editor Choice – Featured Papers

The following papers have been selected to receive the 2017 PM World Journal Editor’s Choice Award.  They are not ranked; they are however my favorite top seven.

Gender Issues in Project Planning and Management, by Ujeyo Margaret Stella (Busitema University), Kisige Abdu (Al-Mustaf Islamic College), Nabunya Kulthum (Makerere University), and Prof Peter Neema-Abooki (Makerere University), Kampala, Uganda (June 2017) – one of the most important papers we published this year, the authors take gender equality to an entirely new level.  Gender equality is not only a project management issue, but should be considered in project requirements and design as well as project outcomes, benefits and impacts.  If you are female, you will never forget reading this paper.

Deliberate and emergent strategies and origins of projects, by Alan Stretton, Sydney, Australia (November 2017) – Alan Stretton’s monthly contributions are all worth reading and rereading, many addressing topics of critical importance to both practicing project managers, executives and researchers.  His decades of experience drive his selection of topics; his vast knowledge and active research continue to spur new perspectives and understanding. This favorite is one of his most recent.  In this paper, Alan distills decades of theories and papers on strategic planning to a simple spectrum, a perspective that should help everyone more clearly understand where both strategies and projects come from and how programs and projects should link to strategy. This is a great paper.

Complexity in Large Engineering and Construction Programs, by Bob Prieto, Florida, USA (November 2017) – Also the latest paper that we have published by Bob Prieto, one of the world’s most experienced and respected experts on very large engineering and construction programs and projects. Yes, complexity seems to be a common theme and topic of discussion everywhere. In this paper, Bob removes our blinders regarding just how massive the complexity issue is on large programs.  His discussion of “perturbations” is enlightening.  If you think you know a lot about risk and complexity, I suggest you read this paper to learn even more.

Voluntary Usage of Earned Value Management on Projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, by Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo, Warri, Nigeria (August 2017) – As Lucky stated in his opening sentence of this landmark paper, “Given the compelling array of benefits that can be derived from the application of earned value management (EVM), it is of great concern that this methodology is not practiced as much as it should be in modern day project management practice in Sub-Saharan Africa.”  His message: “.. the potential lurking in the conscientious application of EVM in curbing corruption and curtailing Illicit Financial Flows (IFFs) and capital flight in sub-Saharan Africa cannot be overlooked..”  Since I started my career nearly 40 years ago in the EVM field, I love this paper.

Collaboratism: A Solution to Declining Globalisation and Rising Protectionism, by Prof Dr Pieter Steyn, South Africa and Dr Brane Semolic, Slovenia (March 2017) – The authors take on some global naysayers about globalization and technology, pointing to a different collaborative model for planning and managing international programs and projects.  I liked the discussion of big picture issues, global themes, future trends.  Collaboration is a proven approach to reducing risks; it has many other benefits as the authors point out.

Increasing Business Agility through Organizational Restructuring and Transformation, by Badri N. Srinivasan and Chandan Lal Patary, Bangalore, India (September 2017) – In this excellent paper, the authors attack one of the most current and important topics in modern organizational change – how to increase organizational agility.  They state “In today’s VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) world, every organization has to reorient itself on account of the changing business landscape… Organizations must explore opportunities to minimize waste, reduce handovers, improve transparency, reduce bureaucracy, and empower people.” Based on their experience at Societe Generale, the authors explain the issues and provide a model for achieving real organizational agility.

Framework for Creating a Building Information Modelling Environment in Architectural, Engineering and Construction Firms and Projects, by Oluseye Olugboyega, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (June 2017) – Many organizations now recognize the value of BIM, but how is it successfully implemented?  In this detailed and well organized paper, Oluseye describes the requirements and issues associated with creating a BIM framework including: BIM authoring software technologies, BIM hardware, BIM contents library, BIM standards and BIM platform. Well researched and with links to important resources, this is a good primer for any organization anywhere in the world that is planning to implement BIM technology.  If you are working on a project in the built environment, read this paper; BIM is now also an important resource for project planning, project controls and project management on all large construction projects.

2017 Editor’s Choice – Articles

The following seven articles have been selected for the 2017 PM World Journal Editor’s Choice Award.  They are not ranked; they are all among my favorites this year.

What did Taylor ever do for us? Scientific and humane management reconsidered, By Prof. Darren Dalcher, University of Hertfordshire, UK (April 2017) – Darren takes on Frederick Taylor, one of the founders of ‘scientific management’ and long considered responsible for some of the first scheduling techniques for both projects and operations.  One of my favorite passages in this article: “Many organisational psychologists despair of Taylor’s legacy. In his endeavour to maximise manual efficiency, Taylor abandoned the nuances and strengths of human nature and capability, displaying psychological illiteracy. Indeed, a key criticism of Taylor’s approach was that he treated people as machines.”  For some great history and historical perspective, this article is a classic.  Everyone in the project management profession should read it, especially those in leadership positions. (Frankly, all of Darren’s articles are worth rereading; he continues to contribute thought-provoking articles on a monthly basis).

Are Projects and Project Managers Fragile, Robust or Anti-Fragile? By Prof Tony Bendell, Nottingham, UK (June 2017) – Do we as individuals and organizations break under the weight of risks realized, project problems and complexity, or do we learn, grow and become more resilient? Based on his book ‘Building Anti-Fragile Organizations’ published by Gower in June 2014, Prof Bendell examines the shortcomings of conventional risk analysis, the impact of Black Swans, and the strategic, cultural, process and people requirements for the development of systems and organisations that get stronger from being stressed.  This was a great Advances in Project Management series article facilitated by Darren Dalcher.

Improve Your Diversity Intelligence: Identify your Blind Spots, by Paul Pelletier, Vancouver, BC, Canada (January 2017) – Paul may be better known for his great writing and speaking about bullying in the workplace, but his diversity article is a classic.  His Diversity Iceberg illustration is memorable; his message is clear.  We are all different, with different experiences, capabilities and characteristics.  The best leaders embrace diversity as a strength on teams.  This article helps us all find our blind spots in order to become better leaders.

On the Road to Project Society – A Swedish Story, by Torbjörn Wenell, Eskil Ekstedt and Rolf A. Lundin, Stockholm, Sweden (January 2017) – The first article in the series on Managing and Working in Project Society describes many of the topics in their award winning book of the same title.  They describe “the ‘projectification’ process in this country essentially building on his experiences starting in the 60’s with how international industrial companies in Sweden (like Volvo, Saab and Ericsson) developed and increasingly became supported by advanced projects to the present time when we have seen a diffusion of projects and project thinking to all parts of society today.”  It’s a fascinating, entertaining and enlightening article.

Managing Programme Benefits, by Andrew Hudson, UK (February 2017) – Another Advances in Project Management article coordinated by Prof Darren Dalcher, this long article provides an excellent primer on benefits realization management (BRM). Quoting Andrew: “There is no other purpose in doing a programme than to deliver value and realize benefits. This is the true measure of a programme’s success…. This article explains how being more effective at managing programme benefits can accelerate performance improvement and better enable organizations to achieve their strategic objectives. It explains common benefits management practices and explores reasons for programme benefit success and failure.” If you want to learn more about BRM, read this article based on Andrew’s chapter in the Gower Handbook of Program Management.

Crisis in Your Customer Project? Try Benefit Engineering, by Oliver Lehmann, Munich, Germany (October 2017) – The 3rd article in Oliver’s PMWJ series on Project Business Management, this article looks at benefits management from a whole new perspective.  Per the introduction, “A traditional approach to resolve monetary problems in customer projects is ‘Cost engineering’. This article describes an alternative solution named ‘Benefit engineering’, which can be more effective and leaves a customer with increased happiness, while the contractor’s problems are resolved.”  This is another great article about benefits management, from a practical perspective; reading this article may not only help save your project but your relationship with your customer.

Managing Strategic Initiatives, by Terry Cooke-Davies, PhD, UK (July, 2017) – Another Advances in Project Management series article, this article captures some of the research and insights that Terry has been providing in the programme and project management field for several decades.  Focusing on four “strands of thinking”, he points us to smart processes focused on the delivery of value, engaged people, flexible navigation of inevitable complexity and capable and knowledgeable leadership.  Simple, not so much! But necessary to stop the cycle of project failures.  Read this article!

Thank you to all 2017 Authors

We published many very good works this year.  I want to thank all of our authors and encourage them, and you, to keep the articles and papers coming.  Send your original works to me at [email protected]  To see all works in previous editions of the PMWJ, go to https://pmworldlibrary.net/pmworld-journal-archives/

Now – This month in the Journal

This edition of the PMWJ is full of good works from around the world, agreat way to end the year.  We begin with five featured papers. Dr. Pavel Barsegyan has contribute the first of several papers on the topic of “Elements of the Mathematical Theory of Human Systems”.  His paper is over my head; for management scientists, the equations and logic should be new and fascinating.  Alan Stretton is back with an extension of his paper from last month on strategic planning, this one titled “An organizational strategic framework, and project and other contributions to achieving strategic objectives.”  Alan is expanding our understanding of how, when and why projects are created.  Martin Smit in South Africa has contributed a paper on a related topic titled “Development of a project portfolio management model for executing organisational strategies: a normative case study.”  The two remaining papers discuss earned value analysis and critical factors hindering success on projects in Nigeria and the Sahel region of Africa. Featured papers are serious works that contribute to the global PM body of knowledge, so please give them a look and a possible reading.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the October 2017 PMWJ

The Proverbial 8 Ball, Unmet Deadlines, De-scoping… and Welcome to the October edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the October 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 63rd uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 20 original articles, papers and other works by 22 different authors in 12 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, I want to discuss a common issue on projects of all types and sizes, and one that has affected me personally again this month.  That is, the inability to meet an important deadline.  In my case, this edition of the journal should have been published a week ago.  As is often the case, procrastination and unexpected events led to this situation.  How many of you have experienced this problem?

Behind the Proverbial 8 Ball

In the game of pool (billiards), one’s cue ball occasionally ends up directly behind the 8 ball.  You are not supposed to hit the 8 ball directly with the cue ball, and having the cue ball hidden behind the 8 ball very frequently makes it impossible to make another good shot. This situation can often lead to losing the game.  In the United States, the term “behind the 8 ball” has come to mean being in a difficult or even impossible situation.  Missing a deadline often feels this way.  That’s how I felt this week as I struggled to find the time to complete and publish the PMWWJ.  A sudden death in the family required three days of travel; another family emergency took days to resolve; a government contract required attention.  As a friend stated some time ago, life intervened.  I should have planned better; I should have done the work sooner; perhaps I could have found more help.  One result: this edition contains fewer contents than any other this year.

Unmet Deadlines, What now?

What should you do when it becomes apparent that you or your team cannot meet an approaching deadline or milestone? Too often, the answer includes schedule slippage and/or reducing the scope of work, reducing the number of deliverables or otherwise de-scoping the project.  I have to now be honest with you, I don’t have time to discuss this in any more detail but instead want to refer you to the article this month by Oliver Lehmann titled “Crisis in Your Customer Project? Try Benefit Engineering”.  This is a brilliant article, focusing on delivering customer benefits rather than just traditional project performance measures.  As Oliver suggests, admit and confront the problem, study the impact on the benefits your project delivers, discuss it with the customer and figure out how to maximize benefits under the current conditions.  This might not be easy, but it’s probably better than being penalized, deteriorating relations with the customer (and/or other stakeholders), or even losing a contract (or future business).  That’s my two cents in the little time I have today. Maybe I can take up this issue again in the future if it is of interest to readers.

Now – This month in the Journal

This is a smaller edition of the PMWJ, with only 20 original works when our normal volume is more than 30. Nevertheless, this month’s edition includes some major works and important ones.  Several dig into risk management from various perspectives, industry and otherwise. The three series articles address a like topic, project management in the commercial world where survival also means keeping the customer happy while making a profit.  But please study the table of contents yourself and decide those of interest.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected] 

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the July 2017 PMWJ

Five Years, Vision and Value Revisited

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the July 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 60th monthly edition. This five year anniversary edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication: 30 original articles, papers and other works by 34 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several international advisors, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month, however, on the occasion of the publication’s five year anniversary, I wanted to reflect on some of the original objectives for the journal, perhaps the most important of which I was reminded about by Neil Robinson in his letter to the editor this month. That is, where can professionals share their experiences and knowledge? In the paragraphs below, here are the main reasons WHY the PMWJ was and is published.

Reason 1: So professionals can get published more easily

When I was about 10 years into my professional career, I began to consider authoring a paper for presentation at a PMI conference. By then I had worked on several large energy and defense projects, initially as a project controls analyst using earned value management systems and processes, then as the manager of a company-wide project management improvement program. My motivation for authoring a paper was to advance my career; this was common practice then. Published papers could go onto one’s professional CV. Publishing was also to share knowledge and to contribute to the PM profession. No one authored a paper to receive professional development units (PDUs).

At that time, PMI (Project Management Institute) offered three primary options for anyone to publish a paper about project management: at their annual seminars/symposium (now called global congress), in the Project Management Quarterly (PMQ – now their monthly PMNetwork Magazine), and through PMI chapters (newsletters and local/regional events). That was 30+ years ago.

There were other options at the time, of course, including through the American Association of Cost Engineers (AACE – now the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International, AACEi) and the Performance Management Association (PMA – now the College of Performance Management, CPM). In Europe, there were opportunities to publish or present an article or paper in publications or at events sponsored by APM in UK, INTERNET (now the International Project Management Association, IPMA) in Europe, AIPM in Australia, and several others.

So I started authoring papers in 1985 for presentation at PMI conferences, first regional events in Seattle and Vancouver, BC, then at the big annual PMI Seminars/Symposium, then at INTERNET congresses beginning in 1990. I continued to author papers and make presentations for the next 15 years.

For the last 10 years, however, the opportunities for beginning or mid-career professionals to publish an article or paper seem to have dried up, have many strings attached or have hoops to jump through. PMI has turned to professional writers for PMNetwork; opportunities to author papers at global congresses have required forms, formats and compliance (and may actually be ending completely); publishing on pmi.org or projectmanagement.com is promoted for PMI members or for obtaining PDUs. APM in UK still offers great opportunities for APM members via specific interest groups and national publications. AACEi offers opportunities for AACEi members, etc. There are also many blogs and commercial websites looking for content, but the real or implied association with the promoter can be problematic.

AACEi, AIPM, APM and other conferences still offer good opportunities to author a paper but often require sometimes expensive registration, travel and attendance at the conference. Regional conferences such as the annual UT Dallas PM Symposium also offer opportunities for publication, although conference proceedings are not always widely distributed or available after the event.

The PMWJ provides a simple way for professionals at any level to share knowledge, experience and information, and to get published. You don’t have to be a member of AACE, APM, IPMA, PMI or any other organization; you can be located anywhere in the world. And the process is simple. Just email your article or paper to me; if written professionally, without commercial intent/content and without too many grammatical errors, we will normally publish it.

Reason 2: So researchers can publish their works more easily

Several years ago I was referred to a paper in which the author declared “the death of refereed journals.” The future, he declared, was open-source journals, posting on websites and freely sharing research results. No more submitting papers to academic journals, waiting weeks or months for acceptance, then waiting weeks or months for publication…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

Welcome to the January 2017 PMWJ

EDITORIAL

Farms, Food and Project Management, the Trend that Isn’t and Welcome to the January 2017 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the January 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 54th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 28 original articles, papers and other works by 35 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I want to discuss the lack of a trend, what I see as a major shortfall in the project management professional world – the lack of attention to projects and project management in basic industries. Where are the case studies, models and bodies of knowledge for project management in agriculture, food production, housing, healthcare, education, security, transportation and other such industries? Many will argue that projects in those industries are covered by the general and generic project management models and standards produced by AIPM, APM, IPMA, PMI and other leading international bodies. In my opinion, that’s not good enough. And there’s another problem…

Farms, Food and Project Management and the Trend that Isn’t

My grandfather was a dairy farmer, working hundreds of acres, herds of cattle, multiple barns, farm equipment, seasonal changes and many projects. As a child, I visited his farm many times. I loved it! We also lived in a small town in the northwestern United States, actually just outside of town where we had some land, gardens, cows, chickens, horses, barns and work to do. We too had many projects, although I don’t ever remember them being called projects. It was just work to do. I left home for university at 18 and never returned to living in my home town. But I’ve never forgotten my background or my grandfather’s farm. In recent years, I’ve thought a lot about the types of projects that farmers have, especially in developing countries where agriculture is so important (and where international development banks continue to invest millions in agriculture).

My father was a school teacher, teaching elementary school for 30+ years. As a child, I also spent many hours with him at the school, both during and in between school hours. Over the years, I became familiar with class types and sizes, curricula, facilities maintenance, school buses (he also drove a bus – it was a small town), teacher salaries and benefits (or lack thereof), administrative issues, sports and extracurricular activities, homework, grading and many other school-related issues. Here again, as I got older and learned about project management, I often thought about education-related projects. Since education is a common topic in all towns and cities, especially now in the United States where public education is in generally poor condition, I’ve often wondered how project management could contribute more.

One uncle worked my grandfather’s farm, then worked for a local refinery. One uncle was a horse rancher, another was a logger, another joined the Air Force and became an expert computer-based missile systems mechanic. I’m one of the few in the family to go to college, to graduate with multiple degrees. Most members of my immediate and extended family have lived all their lives in small towns. Now it has occurred to me that little of what I’ve learned about project management is very useful to those family members and others with similar occupations or working in industries and enterprises based in rural areas. There’s probably not a single member of my family who knows what project management is, what a PMP certification means, what a PMO is, what the difference between a project and program is, or anything else that we spend all of our time in the PM profession talking about. And they don’t care!

During 2016, we saw a very tumultuous presidential campaign and election in the United States during which a majority of the population living in small towns, rural America, voted for a candidate who disparaged traditional government institutions and leaders as “elites”, trashed the media and more educated (and knowledgeable) leaders, and promised solutions for the people “left behind” by the global economy and the information age. Now it has also occurred to me that we in the project management profession may have also left those stakeholders behind. What do we do, say, publish or teach that benefits those living in small towns, on farms, in rural communities where big corporations don’t hire programmers, engineers and project managers? Where work and projects are in fields, barns, garages, schools, clinics and small businesses!

Sure, many of the projects are small, even micro-projects in many cases. But let’s back up a little; let’s consider projects or programs involving multiple farms, multiple schools, multiple hospitals, multiple roads and shops, multiple small businesses. What about programs or projects to help entire communities change, create jobs, improve lives? What about projects to transform entire industries? In America or in Europe, maybe not so common; in many African and Asian countries, these are the programs and projects that really matter.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the December 2016 PMWJ

The Potential Impact of Disruptive Political Events and Welcome to the December 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the December 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 53rd edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 24 original articles, papers and other works by 27 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor.  This month I return to an issue that I first explored in 1998 in a paper for that year’s PMI congress; the paper was titled “Global Tides of Change: Significant Recent Events Affecting Globalization of the Project Management Profession”.  I presented an update to that paper in South Africa in 1999, then touched on the topic again in a June 2009 article on “Global Business Intelligence for Managers of Programs, Projects and Project-oriented Organizations” which I also presented at an IPMA conference in Finland.  I returned to the topic in earnest in a September 2009 editorial titled “Disruptive Events: Are you, your project or your organization prepared? This was also the topic of my keynote presentation at the PM South Africa conference in 2010.  Because of recent unexpected but dramatic political events in the UK and USA, it’s time to return to the subject of…

The Potential Impact of Disruptive Political Events

In the papers referenced above, significant political events are only one of several categories of disruptive change that can impact programs, projects, organizations and project managers.  The categories that I previously studied include extreme weather and natural disasters, manmade disasters, human health and social factors (i.e. pandemics), economic disruptions (i.e. 2008 global financial meltdown), disruptive political or governmental changes, international geo-political events (i.e. wars, disputes), disruptive technology developments, industry or market disruptions, and legal/regulatory changes.  Of course, this last category is often directly related to political changes, but not always. A new law can be quite disruptive. Disruptive events in any of these categories should be considered during the risk planning process by many teams and organizations.

The thing about political changes though is, they can often be seen coming. Elections happen on a regular basis, with the outcomes having measurable probabilities. Nevertheless, many organizations and leaders do not factor such risks into their programs or projects.  This is a mistake, as some political changes can be quite unexpected and very disruptive.

Which brings us to today’s world.  What was the impact of the “Brexit” vote in the UK to leave the European Union on 23 June 2016?  Who saw it coming, or the subsequent fall in the value of the Pound?  What was the immediate and long term impact on projects in the UK or investment in projects outside UK by British organizations? Which companies factored these potential outcomes into their risk management plans and took appropriate mitigation actions?

What was the impact of Donald Trump’s election to the U.S. Presidency on 8 November 2016?  Which industries or organizations may benefit or suffer? What will be the impact on regulations, federal government agency policies and structures, federally-funded programs and projects?  It seems clear to me that the Trump election may in fact be very disruptive, not only in the U.S. but in many other countries where U.S. organizations have influence.  It is still early in the transition process, but opportunities and threats are already visible.  There will be winners (oil & gas, power plants, financial services, military, property developers) and most likely losers (renewable energy, healthcare, outsourcing, public education among others).

What will be the impact on organizations and projects in Brazil or South Korea if their presidents are impeached in coming weeks, as now appears likely? What will be the impact of presidential elections in France on 23 April 2017 or in Germany later in the year?  If existing leaders are ousted, then there will be major changes, and those changes will impact many industries, organizations, programs and projects.  How are those threats and opportunities being factored into risk plans?

What will happen in Cuba since Fidel Castro died on 25 November 2016 at the age of 90? While it might not happen immediately, his death will most likely affect investment in Cuba, regulations, foreign trade, local access to modern electronics and technologies, and other factors in tourism, building, energy, agriculture and other industries.  The impact of Castro’s death is probably already being felt by every program, project and project manager in Cuba.

What will happen in Zimbabwe when Robert Mugabe dies?  Perhaps it will be similar as in Cuba, but Zimbabwe seems in worse shape economically than Cuba.  The impact could be even more dramatic.  What if another world leader suddenly passes?  Unlike elections, the death of political leaders is less predictable; nevertheless, everyone dies, so planning for such disruptive political changes in many places seems wise.

Another point, if we work in service organizations where our projects are performed under contracts to others, we need to consider the impact of disruptive changes on our customers, not just our own organizations.  Impacts of political changes can be either indirect (from changes to policies, regulations, leadership) or direct (federal budgets for programs or organizations such as defense, energy, infrastructure, IT).

Obviously, I cannot mention every possible recent or future political change.  There are elections held around the world each year that impact organizations and projects in those countries, and often with international repercussions.  But it should be obvious to everyone in the PM field that more risk planning should consider the impact of significant disruptive changes – and political changes like those we have seen this year in America and Britain are good examples.  Regardless of our personal political opinions (or votes), we need to factor significant potentially-disruptive political events (and changes), including state and local political changes, into our program and project risk planning.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today.  He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Leapfrogging in Project Management

And Welcome to the November 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the November 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 52nd edition again reflects the international nature of this publication; 29 original articles, papers and other works by 37 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. The primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, so please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I discuss an issue that I thought I recognized about a year ago; now I think it is a very real trend and perhaps an opportunity for those new to project management and those in developing economies. But it also introduces new risks.

Leapfrogging in Project Management

Leapfrog is a very old children’s game whereby a child bends over while another spreads his legs, places hands on the bending child’s back and leaps forward over the bending child. Then the one who leaped bends over and the original bending child leaps over the new bending child. I played this game when I was very young and actually do not remember the objective; I think it was to cross a yard or space faster, perhaps in a race.

Leapfrogging as a verb, however, has come to symbolize jumping over something in order to move ahead faster, for example, leapfrogging a generation or older technology. The best example that I have seen in recent years is the leapfrogging of old telecoms technology in Africa whereby countries decided not to invest in networks of landline-based telephones but rather went straight to mobile phones. Rather than spending huge sums and years to implement land lines, these countries promoted and supported cellular mobile phone systems, companies, technologies and networks, thereby “leapfrogging” decades of telecoms technologies and investment. The result can now be seen across the continent where anyone with a mobile phone can connect to the internet and communicate with anyone in the world, often as easily as anyone in a fully developed economy.

I now see signs of the same thing happening in the project management world, most apparently in academia in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Where it has taken decades for major universities in North America and Western Europe to introduce project management into undergraduate and graduate degree programs, universities in many developing countries have recognized the importance of programs and projects to economic development (and global competition) and have introduced project management courses and degree programs. There may now be more project management degree programs in Nigeria and Pakistan, for example, than in any European country other than the United Kingdom. Project Management degree programs are widespread in South Africa and Turkey, among others, with becoming more visible in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Panama, Peru and others. This trend seems to be accelerating.

Academic research in developing countries also seems to be more aggressive, more practice oriented and increasing. The research that I’ve seen from Kenya and Nigeria, for example, is aimed at solving local problems, improving local industry performance or addressing national/regional issues – all from a project management perspective. (See Alan Stretton’s paper in the October PMWJ for some perspective on this topic.)

More developing countries also seem to be recognizing program/project management as a national competence, with more government bodies embracing enterprise project management, maturity models, centers of excellence and project management offices. It has taken decades for American government agencies to reach this point (many are still not there); organizations in Africa and Latin America are leapfrogging to OPM best practices in one generation. (See my 2009 paper on this topic, republished this month as a Second Edition)

You can also see this among individuals and organizations in many countries with their very visible interest in project management certifications. The number of Project Management Professionals (PMPs) and PRINCE2 certified professionals around the world has exploded in recent years. There are hundreds of certified PM professionals now in countries where the PM profession itself is only a few years old.

Leapfrogging is also happening with P/PM concepts and approaches in Europe and North America. The topic of “agility” for example has captured the attention of executives in many organizations; it’s no longer acceptable to take years or even months to implement organizational changes or PM best practices. Executives want improvement faster. Agile methodology is moving from IT project management to organizational change management to mainstream programs and projects; learning and changing must happen faster everywhere. Other examples include resilience, sustainability, reference class forecasting, and value management.

At the highest levels of P/PM research and experience in Europe, I think there is a growing appreciation for the role of human psychology, economics, statistics (think big data) and politics in the success or failure of projects (and project management). Top down approaches to program risk management have led to leapfrogging; I believe the Scandinavian School of project management has this concept at its heart. Such concepts as the Successive Principle (Lichtenberg 2016) and self-organizing teams will soon move to the forefront of advanced project management.

Similar trends occur with P/PM tools and technologies, with new cloud-based solutions introduced almost monthly in many countries. This has been happening in the United States for many years, really beginning with the introduction of the personal computer in the 1980s and accelerating with internet-based solutions in recent years. Every project manager wants a better tool; every organization wants to “leapfrog” to the latest and greatest technology.

Leapfrogging in project management carries significant risks however. If organizations embrace the latest tools and concepts without some resident knowledge of fundamental project management topics such as project lifecycles, cost/resource planning, scheduling, risk management, stakeholder engagement and other “PMBOK topics”, there will be project failures. If those planning and managing large projects know nothing about earned value, those projects will most likely fail. If there is no knowledge of project portfolio management, the wrong projects will be financed with time and money wasted.

Discussion of any of the topics above could be vastly expanded. These paragraphs were just to introduce this topic. Those new to project management and those in developing economies should carefully assess current topics, recognize good practices, determine what is most beneficial, and embrace the newest and best. Be aware of the risks, but neither should you nor your organization reinvent the wheel. Leapfrog ahead!

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works. Six featured papers are included this month, on some very important topics. Alan Stretton has contributed another good paper, sharing his decades of experience and knowledge about project management. Isaac Abuya and his co-authors have contributed another important paper about conditions on orphan support projects in Kenya, the topic of Isaac’s PhD research at the University of Nairobi. Tororiro Chaza in Zimbabwe has authored a very important paper on how to fight corruption with project governance. Dr. Chima Okereke in UK has authored an important paper on how PPM can be a “silver bullet” for advancing development in emerging economies (including his homeland of Nigeria). David Tain in Canada and professors Abu Dief, Aly Kotb and El Beheiry in Saudi Arabia has contributed papers on strategic alliances and arbitration/claims management for major international construction projects. These are all excellent contributions to the P/PM literature.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the October 2016 PMWJ

AI, Thinking Machines and Project Management, and Welcome to the August 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the October 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 51st edition again reflects the international nature of this publication; 26 original articles, papers and other works by 31 different authors in 13 different countries are included this month.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

In July I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents.  Several readers then suggested that I use this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor.  This month I discuss an issue that I think really is new for those in our field to consider, the impact of artificial intelligence and thinking machines on program/project management.

AI, Thinking Machines and Project Management

In August at the 10th UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, I attended a very interesting paper presentation by Schenita Floyd of the University of North Texas titled “Do Machines Hold a Key to Business Success?” (Her paper is republished in the PMWJ this month; don’t miss it.)  In her presentation (and paper), Ms. Floyd described some history and recent developments in artificial intelligence (AI) and the rapid rise of robots and “thinking machines” in various industries.  While her discussion was somewhat general, a light bulb came on for me with regards to the potential impact of this whole topic on the project management field (which I immediately shared with PMI founder Jim Snyder, who was sitting next to me.)

We have all recently seen numerous media stories, and technical and scientific reports, about new developments in AI, including the national commitment and investments occurring in the field of robotics (especially in Japan). This was highlighted during the closing ceremonies of the recently completed Rio Olympic Games during which the 2020 Tokyo Olympics were promoted along with the role that robotics and technology are expected to play there.

But as Ms. Floyd points out, there are many applications of AI already in use in such industries as automotive, defense, manufacturing, health and medical treatment, meteorology, mining, online services, personal services, security and other fields.

With regards to “thinking machines”, computer chips and “smart” applications are embedded in many new consumer and industrial products today, nearly all appliances, much equipment, most machinery, and many new materials used in construction and manufacturing.  The “internet of things” is widely understood and discussed; it is already here and expanding rapidly.  And just this week, the nobel prize in chemistry was awarded to “Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Scottish-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard “Ben” Feringa for making devices (machines) the size of molecules, so tiny that a lineup of 1,000 would stretch about the width of a human hair.” The miniaturization of technology has accelerated these developments.

As I sat listening to Ms. Floyd in August, I thought, “Wow, this is important!  It could change the entire resource planning equation for many programs and projects around the world.  And I have seen nothing in the project management profession or literature about this.”

In addition to the resource planning implications, as Ms. Floyd discusses in her paper, how do we deal with such topics as work planning, communications, leadership, team building and teamwork when teams consist of both humans and machines? How will teams of humans and machines avoid conflicts, maximize productivity, minimize risks (and costs), meet deadlines and accomplish complex tasks together?  Maybe it’s not so complicated today but what about in 5,10 or 20 years?  And if you look at programs and projects in locations that are dangerous or inhospitable to humans (radioactive conditions, natural disasters, under water, deep underground, in outer space, etc.), a majority of team members in the future will probably be robots or thinking machines.

New developments in micro-computing, smart materials and communications technologies are leading to some spectacular opportunities for smart buildings, smart roads, smarter systems and smarter solutions, especially related to energy efficiencies.  I think it’s exciting.

These developments will have a dramatic impact on the world of projects and project management – in all industries where technology, equipment, machinery and materials are used.  Project executives, managers and professionals will need to consider thinking machines as resources for performing things that machines are good at – physical labor requiring certain capabilities, remembering details, processing data, analyzing scenarios, and much more.  They will need to consider AI, thinking machines, miniaturization and smart materials for both creating new products and for how those products will live, act and perform over their life cycles.

I am not offering any great solutions here, just raising these topics as something that the PM profession now needs to consider.  How will project planning, and resource planning in particular, be affected?  What about supply chains and procurement processes?  What is the impact on project teams? These are challenging and exciting Questions!  They are also already here.  Read Ms. Floyd’s paper in the journal this month; then let us both know what you think about this topic.

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works.  Eight featured papers are included this month, on some very important topics. The research papers from academic leaders in Nigeria this month are outstanding, related to PPP projects in developing countries, corruption in the construction industry and the use of BIM for engineering and design.  The papers from Kenya and Zimbabwe discuss the application of PM in important social contexts, orphanages and general social work.  Emils Pulmanis’ paper discusses problems with the national eHealth rollout in Latvia. Joseph and Mario Kossman review game technology applications for validating the design of a healthcare project in Cameroon.  And Alan Stretton offers some perspective on just how useful or useless much current research published by project management academic journals seems to be.  These are the kinds of papers that we are looking for, those that share ideas, experience and knowledge that can help make the world a better place. Please check out these good papers this month.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj35-Jun2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today.  He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

 

Welcome to the September 2016 PMWJ

and Buy your Team a Lunch

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the September 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 50th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; it contains 30 original articles, papers and other works by 33 different authors in 15 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

In July I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents. Several readers have now suggested that I use this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I reflect on a recent conversation with a colleague who described a situation in his office that, I think, raises some issues for project teams and some good ideas.

Buy your team a lunch

Over an afternoon coffee a few weekends ago, I asked my friend how things were going with his projects. He’s working at a technology company that has both internal and external IT and web-related projects. He is working on some website enhancement projects; others are working on projects for customers. The company specializes in HR and training support software, tools and services and is apparently growing rapidly. Although they are adding staff, current employees are working long days, some evenings and partial weekends. There are 20-30 people there now, maybe more.

He told me that over the last month, he has taken some snacks into the office, put them in a glass bowl on his desk and people have been stopping by for something to nibble on during long afternoons. The previous week the CEO of the company came by, noticed the snack bowl, then announced that he was buying everyone lunch on Mondays, starting the following week. “On one condition,” he stated. “You have to eat in the cafeteria on the first floor with co-workers. You cannot bring your lunch back to your desk.”

My friend told me, “Hey, it’s a free lunch! I guess I’ll take it, start eating lunch again.” I immediately thought, Wow, that was a great idea, and probably not too expensive for a growing, profitable company or an executive. And it could produce some positive, even powerful results. I immediately thought this could be a good idea for many project managers or team leaders.

Here are some things that came to mind from this simple move – buying the team a lunch:

  • It could improve morale, increasing positive attitudes towards the company and leadership;
  • It forces people up off their chairs, walking, getting away from work for 30+ minutes – widely recognized as healthy for both mind and body (think health improvement, mindfulness)
  • It facilitates and promotes interaction, communication and networking (think team building, teamwork, problem resolution, etc.) – also with potential benefits to body and mind.

We know the benefits from celebrating successes, well established practice on Agile teams and in many project offices. But this move came from a CEO with no background in project management. It was simply a good leadership move, people-friendly, and widely appreciated. The application to project leadership was obvious to me, but we should also recognize that we can learn a lot from good managers and leaders whoever and wherever they might be. And some things like being kind to others, or buying the team a lunch, can generate some really positive results.

Maybe this was not a big new project management idea but I thought it was great and just wanted to pass it on.

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works. Six featured papers are again included. Frank Parth and Paul Giammalvo are back with papers that continue their recent themes or major program management and project management roles defined, respectively. Four other serious papers are included from researchers in Indonesia, Netherlands, Nigeria and Pakistan. Three very good series articles are included again this month, along with three useful advisory articles. Prof Sampietro has authored a fascinating Commentary article bout Britain’s Olympic success and how project management concepts played a major role in the UK’s success in Rio. Please check out these good articles and papers.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL
Addison, Texas, USA

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://pmworldjournal.net/article/scaling-agile-adoption-local-agile-centers-excellence/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the August PMWJ

Welcome to the August 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

and

The Resurgence of Experience & Wisdom

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the August 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 49th edition continues to reflect our efforts to attract more authors and readers internationally; it contains 31 original articles, papers and other works by 42 different authors in 17 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Last month I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should be formatted differently, should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents. Alan Stretton in Australia responded (see his letter to the editor this month) that I might better use the opportunity to mention any new trends or important issues that I’ve seen recently as journal editor. So this month I take a shot at that, taking my liberty to very briefly discuss a topic that is meaningful to me and, I think, important to the project management profession.

The Resurgence of Project Management Experience and Wisdom

I agree that innovation and the energy of young and new ideas, technologies, people and organizations are important, for positive change, growth and transformation. I agree that education, training, certifications and qualifications are also important for the project management profession, and especially for young and those new to the PM field. However, none of those things are so interesting to me without context and perspective. I learn from younger leaders and professionals, but nowhere near as much as I learn from older, more experienced and wiser experts. And recently, that knowledge is reflected in articles published in this journal.

Perhaps it is because I am older now myself, but when I attend PMI meetings or project management conferences, visit project management blogs and websites, or read many articles and papers, I learn too little. When I read an article, paper or book by Alan Stretton, Russ Archibald, Peter Morris, Hiroshi Tanaka, Rolf Lundin and other older project management experts and former leaders (many of whom are in their 80s or 90s), I learn something in every paragraph, often in every sentence. For example, read Alan’s series article this month (and every month over the last few years, for that matter) and the second edition paper by Russ Archibald and Steen Lichtenberg.

Over the last ten years, I’ve had opportunities on some high-level program management consulting assignments to work with Wayne Abba, Miles Shepherd and Russ Archibald. Wayne and Miles are in their early 70s; Russ is 94. All three have decades of program and project management experience and I learn something new and valuable every time we are together. They and other older experienced professionals understand important news, developments or changes when they see them, and what is less important. They understand the context and potential impact of change (or potential change) – on both organizations and the PM profession. Russ has 60+ years of experience and is still researching new topics and writing papers and books. He’s inspirational, but also producing some really good stuff!

I appreciate the growing recognition that “competence” is important, and should be part of the qualification process for project managers. But I also think that there is a growing recognition that true competence can only be proven with experience, and that experience is really valuable. In many industries, project managers are the most experienced leaders in an organization – for example, in engineering, construction, petrochemicals, automotive, aerospace, mining, energy and many others, even many involving advanced technologies. The same is true of the project management profession. Former PM leaders are still experts. Like retired generals, older and retired project managers and PM experts are a wealth of knowledge. We need more of them to share their experience, knowledge and wisdom with the rest of us.

I don’t mean to disparage or discount the value of younger project managers, researchers or leaders, but for me, I’m just saying…

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal, which again contains some interesting and outstanding works…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj35-Jun2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL
Texas, USA

flag-usa




David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

Welcome to the July PMWJ

Welcome to the July 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the July 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). With this 48th edition, we celebrate the 4th year anniversary of the Journal with 30 original articles, papers and other works by 36 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We think the international content of the PMWJ sets it apart; we hope you agree.  The primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, so please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever they may be.

The above is my standard introductory paragraph each month.  But lately I have been wondering if I should return to editorials in which I take on some global or professional issue as I once did when editing the PM World Today publication.  Or should I write something simpler, a one page summary of the current edition without trying to mention each author and new work?  I’m somewhat torn.  I want to recognize contributors; some of their articles and papers are important new additions to the overall body of project management literature. What do you think?  Is this welcome article worthwhile or useful?  Should I shorten and summarize it?  Meanwhile, I will continue this month as I have over the last 4 years, briefly mentioning the new contents by category.  So here is…

This month in the Journal

We start with another Featured Interview conducted by our correspondent in Istanbul, Ms. İpek Sahra Özguler.  Ipek has conducted an interesting interview with Olfa Hamdi, founder of the Advanced Work Package Institute in the United State.  Who knew such an organization existed?  What’s it for?  How does it related to project management? Read the interview this month.

5 Featured Papers by authors in four countries are included in the July edition. Frank Parth in California has authored another paper titled “Successful Program Delivery Starts Long Before the Program Does – Part 1.”  Frank will be following up soon with part 2 on managing mega programs. Paul Giammalvo in Indonesia has authored an interesting research paper titled “Cost Estimatore/Quantity Surveyor Defined – A Key Word Analysis of Current Job Descriptions as the Basis for Exam and Competency Assessment Scoring Models.” This is a follow on to his paper last month on “Project Planner/Scheduler Defined…” as Paul examines some important project management support roles around the world.

Bilal Khan, Saif ul Amin, Muhammad Shakil Ahmad and Abdul Wahid in Pakistan have contributed a paper titled “Effects of Project Manager Leadership Style on Employees’ Job Satisfaction in Construction Projects in Pakistan KP Region.” Ali Haider Khan, Junaid Aftab, Uxma Anjum and Saif ul Amin are co-authors of “Impact of Organizational Justice Perceptions on Employees’ Performance Behaviour in Project Oriented Organizations in Pakistan.”  Badri N. Srinivasan and Chandan Lal Patary have authored “Exhibiting Rebus Leadership in the Complex Domain.”  These are striking papers exploring core organizational issues underlying leadership challenges.  Featured papers are serious works, generally of conference quality; please take some time to read them, now or later.

Series authors David Hillson (UK), Ann Pilkington (UK), and Darrel Hubbard and Dennis Bolles (USA) are back with good new articles in their respective series – risk, communications and enterprise PMOs. Ann comments on the recent Brexit vote in UK, suggesting some communication lessons learned for project managers. David wraps up his Risk Doctor Briefings on “Effective Risk Facilitation”, this month dealing with “handling difficult people.” Darrel and Dennis continue their sharing of lessons learned and good practices related to the “enterprise project business management office (PBMO).”

Prof Darren Dalcher (UK) has authored another interesting introductory article for Louise Hart’s Advances in Project Management series article; both authors offer new perspectives on project contracting.  Prof Marco Sampietro at SDA Bocconi in Milan has provided a 6th instalment in his series on “Project Management for Team Members” with “Project Team Members and Change Requests.” And we launch a new three-part series by Alan Stretton this month on “Project Integration, Interfaces and Context Management.” His first article tackles “Project Integration”. Series articles are by global experts so please read these important new contributions this month.  The articles are also very interesting!

One Commentary article is included, “Brexit: Threat or Opportunity,” by Dr. David Hillson in UK, in which the author relates the Brexit vote and aftermath to basic risk management concepts.  This certainly seems appropriate now, continuing…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.

David has more than 35 years of project management related experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars.  His experience has been in both government and private sectors.  He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

 

Welcome to the May 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the May 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 46th edition of the Journal contains 34 original articles, papers and other works by 44 different authors representing 20 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We think the international content of the PMWJ sets it apart; we hope you agree. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever they may be.

This month in the Journal

This is another full edition with some excellent contributions from around the world. We start with a featured Interview with Professor Semih Bilgen, Yeditepe University in Istanbul, the 2016 Program Committee Chair for the Turkish Natonal Software Engineering Symposium (UYMS) being held in Çanakkale on October 24-26. The interview was conducted by İpek Sahra Özgüler, PM World’s international correspondent in Istanbul. The interview includes discussion of the importance of software engineering for project managers. Read this interesting interview.

Four Featured Papers are included this month on some interesting topics. Dr. Lev Virine, Michael Trumper and Eugenia Virine in Canada have authored another highly interesting (and entertaining) paper titled “How to Process Project Information.” Isaac Abuya in Kenya has contributed another important paper for project professionals and political leaders in his country titled “Development Projects as Mechanism for Delivery of Public Services in Kenya.” Essam Lotffy in UAE has authored a new paper titled “Progressive Elaboration of Project Management Processes” in which he discusses some basic principles. Finally, “Supply Chain Management and Construction Project Delivery: Constraints to its Application” is a research paper by Benedict Amade, Prof Edem Akpan, Dr. Emmanuel Ubani and Prof Uzoma Amaeshi at the Federal University of Technology in Uwerri, Nigeria. Featured papers are serious works that contribute to the P/PM body of knowledge.

Series authors Alan Stretton (Australia), David Hillson (UK), Marco Sampietro (Italy), Ann Pilkington (UK), and Darrel Hubbard and Dennis Bolles (USA) are back with good new articles in their respective series. Prof Darren Dalcher (UK) has authored another interesting introductory article for Peter Taylor’s Advances in Project Management series article, both offering new perspectives on the “social project manager”. Alan wraps up his series on “increasing project management contributions to helping achieve broader ends.” Dr. Hillson provides another Risk Doctor Briefing on “Effective Risk Facilitation”. Prof Sampietro offers more good advice for project team members, this month related to “Project Team Members and Project Meetings.” Dennis and Darrel discuss the important role of “the Enterprise PMO in Operations Business Management.” Ann reflects on “communicating in crisis”, something all project managers should be prepared for. Series articles are by global experts so please read these important new contributions this month.

Four Advisory articles are included this month by authors in Egypt, India and the USA. All provide useful information, solutions to common problems facing project managers. If you don’t have time to read all of these, assign someone on your team to do so. Perhaps one person can read each article and report back to the team if there is anything useful. Hopefully all four articles this month will help someone.

Four Commentary articles are also included. The first is another article by Paul Pelletier in Canada on project management and bullying in the workplace. Paul is both a PMP and an attorney; read his articles. He’s an expert on this topic. The second commentary is by Lisa Hodges in Ohio who reflects on some of the issues she sees among companies trying to implement project management processes. It seems that PMBOK-based systems are not always successful; she recommends combining PMBOK with PRINCE2. What do you think? The third commentary is from Monica Gonzalez in Argentina, responding to Paul Pelletier’s recent paper on bullying; Monica suggests using “sustainability principles” to help create a bully-free workplace. The fourth article in this category is by PMI Fellow Rebecca Winston in Idaho titled “Check Your Stress for Your Health and Your Career.” The title makes the important point; read the article and send us your reaction.

Another interesting Case Study is included this month. “The Complexities of Programme Management: Case Study of Trans-ASEAN Gas Pipeline” is by Anton Setiawan, Alya Shahroom, Ting Huang and Noor Zahidah. The co-authors are recent graduate students at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, United Kingdom and originally hail from Hong Kong, Indonesia and Malaysia. It’s a good paper, especially worth reading by anyone interested in the ASEAN region.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 



About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Pells-PHOTO
DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Texas, USA

 flag-usa


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.

David has more than 35 years of project management related experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. His experience has been in both government and private sectors. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

 

Welcome to the April 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the April 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 45th edition of the Journal contains 24 original articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 29 different authors in 13 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We think the international content of the PMWJ sets it apart; we hope you agree. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever they may be.

What in the world is going on?

In an effort to add some context to this month’s edition, I want to reflect for a few moments on some of the big issues facing the world, some big trends and situations in some important places. Here in the United States, we are in the midst of another presidential campaign; what does that mean if anything to professional project management? Maybe nothing in the USA, but the outcome could affect many industries, especially those involving international trade, global business, virtual teams and supply chains. Whether you favor free trade or not, your program or organization may be affected by the outcome of the US presidential elections. As I pointed out in my 1998 “Global Tides of Change” paper, significant political changes can affect programs, projects and organizations. Be prepared!

In Asia, the big news includes the slowing of the Chinese economy, the North Korean nuclear threat and political changes in Myanmar, among other places. The impact of the slowing economy in China has now led the IMF to predict economic headwinds worldwide this year. We will all feel the impact. But economics and politics are often intertwined, as they are related to North Korea. Sanctions against the North will lead to famine again on the Korean Peninsula, probably leading to more aggression by the North Korean leadership. This in turn will lead to more defensive moves by both South Korea and Japan, with serious regional implications. A military buildup is underway now in and around the South China Sea. What are the implications for the economies, projects and organizations in Southeast Asia, and for organizations doing business there?

India’s economy continues to grow, leading the BRIC countries. But India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and other countries in the region seem to be in political turmoil. This in turn leads to serious international security concerns. Again, economies, politics and social trends are intertwined. Do you know how your stakeholders (customers, employees, suppliers, team members) in the region are being affected?

The Middle East and North Africa remain volatile, with extremism seemingly entrenched, natural resource markets depressed, and political instability growing again. While ISIS remains a major problem, regional geopolitical instability and competition will remain long term issues with serious global implications. What should those countries, and the rest of the world, do about the combination of population growth, unemployment, economic disparities, social unrest and political uncertainty?

Europe seems to be coming apart at the seams. The recent refugee crisis and terrorist attacks are leading to a reversal of some of the unifying elements of the European Union and Eurozone. German economic growth has slowed and European financial markets are down this week. In Britain, the looming “Brexit” vote in June could further destabilize the continent (and a possible “Grexit” is in the news again this week). The economic impact on the UK is debatable, but the political ramifications seem clear. Britain’s relations with the rest of the world will be changed if the UK leaves the EU. How will this affect programs, projects and organizations?

Africa is a mix, with pockets of corruption, violence and political instability. But many countries have growing economies and political stability. The African Development Bank is having a positive impact, the way forward for Nigeria and other large countries is becoming more clear, and professional project management organizations are visibly growing. This is great news! This month’s edition of the journal contains four good papers from Nigeria and Kenya reflecting these trends.

The best news in my opinion is related to Latin America. Political crises in Brazil notwithstanding, positive changes are underway in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Paraguay, Peru and elsewhere. I could argue that when the Petrobras scandal is finally resolved in Brazil, that country will emerge stronger politically and economically. I certainly hope so. I also think that the increased visibility of corruption in more countries is a good thing, providing an opportunity for good governance, political stability and economic growth to emerge. More of those trends will have a positive impact on programs and projects everywhere, even here in the US of A.

Now off my soap box and on to this month’s journal, where authors often address the challenges of managing projects in the dynamic environments and conditions mentioned above. (I apologize to our readers in Australia, Canada, Croatia, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine and other countries not mentioned above, but just no more time this month.)

This month in the Journal

Seven Featured Papers are again included this month on a variety of interesting topics. Paul Pelletier in Canada is back with a deeper treatment of bullying in the workplace and how it affects project management. Prof Debashish Sengupta in India has authored an interesting research paper on the happiness of younger generations, with young project managers in mind. Allan Michael in Kenya, professors Kevn Okolie, Victor Okorie and Felix Ikekpeazu in Nigeria, and Nigerian Dr O. Chima Okereke in UK all discuss important topics affecting their countries. Bob Prieto in the USA takes on “assumption infatuation in large complex projects” in his paper, while Moshfaqur Rahman tries to change our perspective on natural disasters in Bangladesh. Read featured papers; they are seriously authored works that contribute to the body of knowledge in the P/PM field.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.

David has more than 35 years of project management related experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. His experience has been in both government and private sectors. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

 

 

Welcome to the March 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


 

Welcome to the March 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 44th edition of the Journal contains 26 original articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 33 different authors in 15 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

Speaking of knowledge sharing, we invite you to share your experience and research related to program and project management. A wide variety of original works are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for yourself and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Calls for Papers and review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected]. The PMWJ is not a refereed journal; however we can publish your work quickly for sharing with our thousands of readers around the world and for immediate reference.

This month in the Journal

Seven Featured Papers are included this month on a variety of interesting topics, including PM as a profession, project failure, constructability tools, PM in the public sector, and fuzzy logic-based leadership evaluation. Two papers are also included on topics of critical importance in developing economies, and perhaps to the world at large: the “PM Profession as a catalyst for economic development”, by Isaac Chaza in Zimbabwe and “PM for Peace” by Monica Gonzalez in Argentina. Please review these good contributions to the growing project management body of knowledge.

Series authors Alan Stretton (Australia), David Hillson (UK), Marco Sampietro (Italy), Ann Pilkington (UK), and Darrel Hubbard and Dennis Bolles (USA) are back with the latest articles in their respective series. Prof Darren Dalcher (Herfordshire, UK) has authored another interesting introductory article for Michel Thiry’s Advances in PM series article on “New Developments in Program Management.” These are all very interesting articles.   Series articles are by global experts, so please consider reading these important new contributions this month.

One Advisory article is included this month by Anil Seth and Prashant Sinha at Fluor India on the topic of “When the Executor turns Manager.” They offer some perspective and advice on an important transition that occurs in many technical organizations – when a technical expert is assigned PM responsibilities. We can all relate to this dilemma, either first or second hand.

Three Commentary articles are again included this month, on three interesting and important topics – bullying at work, practical risk management and innovation. Paul Pelletier in Vancouver (Canada) describes the serious problem of bullying at work and what the trends mean for project managers. Dr. Robert Chapman in UK discusses “the Commercial Imperative” with regards to risk management and the bottom line. Ivan Calamani in Italy describes an innovative graphical approach developed for managing hundreds of projects during the run-up to EXPO 2015 in Milan last year. Please give these articles a read and let the author know your reaction.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj34-May2015-Pells-PHOTO2
DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 flag-usa

 
David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor for the globally acclaimed PMForum.org website and of the PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs and global organizations. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]orldjournal.net.

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit https://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.

 

 

Welcome to the February 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David L. Pells

Managing Editor
PM World Journal

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the February 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 43rd edition of the Journal contains 24 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 26 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

Speaking of knowledge sharing, we invite you to share your knowledge and experience related to program and project management. A wide variety of original works are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for yourself and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Calls for Papers and review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month with one Letter to the Editor, Sushil Sharma in Nepal commenting on David Hillson’s second edition paper last month. The Featured Interview of immediate past PMI board member Deena Gordon Parla was conducted by Sertug Yilmaz in Turkey. So we start with a very international flavor as these two contributors corner PM experts in the UK and US.

Four Featured Papers are included this month. Two interesting papers deal with “resilience”, the subject of our latest Call for Papers – two different aspects by very experienced authors in India and Italy. On the other side of that question, Adam Alami in Australia is back with another interesting paper on “why do projects fail?” Professors Pieter Steyn (South Africa) and Brane Semolic (Slovenia), both academic advisors to this journal, have authored an interesting research paper related to managing projects in today’s collaboration-based networked economy. Don’t miss these serious new works by authors in five countries.

Series authors Lynda Bourne (Australia), Marco Sampietro (Italy), and Darrel Hubbard and Dennis Bolles (USA) are back with the latest articles in their respective series on “Stakeholder Engagement”, “Project management for team members”, and “project business management and the PMO”. Regular series author Alan Stretton (Australia) offers the first article in a new series on “Increasing project management contributions to helping achieve broader ends”. Magda Stepanyan of Risk Society (Netherlands) has authored the Risk Doctor Briefing this month on “Risk Landscape and International Development.” And we launch a new series this month by Ann Pilkington (UK) on project communications titled simply “Communicating Projects”, the title of her book of the same title published by Gower.   Series articles are by global experts, so please consider reading these important new contributions to the P/PM body of knowledge.

Two Advisory articles are included this month on two very different topics. Jeff Furman, teacher of PMP prep courses around the USA, has authored a short article to provide last-minute guidance for PMI members preparing to sit the PMP exam. Wayne McPhee (Canada) proposes a new sustainability measure for construction and other projects in “Introducing the Social Incident Frequency Rate.”

The three Commentary articles are on fascinating topics, all worth debate in PM circles. Ron Look (USA) recommends “resiliency as a PM tool”, while Amela Torkić (Bosnia and Herzegovina) addresses the linkage between project management and entrepreneurism. Sharon De Mascia (UK) argues that women may be better suited to project leadership than men. Are these authors right? Send us your reactions.

A wonderful case study is included this month, by Raju and Subhashini Rao in Chennai, India – about their daughter’s wedding in December that was planned like a project. When a major rain storm with massive flooding hit on wedding weekend, however, project risk management had to kick in. The outcome was surprisingly positive. Read this interesting personal story this month.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO

 

DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit https://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.

 

 

Welcome to the January 2016 PMWJ

Welcome to the January 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the January 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 42nd edition of the Journal contains 28 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 31 different authors in 12 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge related to program and project management (P/PM), please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of original works are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for yourself and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers and review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

The four Featured Papers this month explore important but very different topics including project talent management (Goff/USA), global teams (Alami/Australia), avoiding project failure (Wagner/Germany) and national energy policies (Okereke/Nigeria). The authors offer new, different and sometimes brilliant perspectives on these important subjects; please read them.

The Series articles again include important new contributions by Alan Stretton, Lynda Bourne and Darren Dalcher, and a guest article by Martin Price on behaviours for success. We are also launching two new series this month on “Project Management for Team Members” (Prof Marco Sampietro/Italy) and “Project Business Management and the PMO” (Dennis Bolles and Darrel Hubbard/USA). Our series articles are by global experts (or P/PM ‘thought leaders’ as some like to describe them), so please consider reading these important new contributions to the P/PM body of knowledge. Then look forward to more articles by these authors in future editions.

Two Advisory articles are included this month on quite different but very interesting topics – agile and conflict management. These are very good pieces by practicing project management professionals, so should be useful to many readers. Take a look. The Commentary article by German Bernate in Bogota is entertaining. The two Second Edition papers, by Caccamese and Damiano in Italy and David Hillson in UK, were previously presented at PMI congresses and are thus conference quality (and highly interesting!). Read what you like, but if you like what you read, please let the authors know.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view original works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit https://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.

 

Welcome to the December 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

 

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the December 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 41st edition of the Journal contains 30 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 37 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge related to program and project management (P/PM), please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of original works are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for yourself and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers and review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

This month I am changing my approach to this editorial. Rather than review the contents, I would like to share my view on the works included this month. We begin with an interesting interview of PMI chair-elect Antonio Nieto-Rodgriguez, provided by our correspondent in Istanbul, Ms. İpek Sahra Özgüler. This is our second interview in a row of a PMI board member from Turkey, demonstrating a certain interest in the opinions of PMI leaders by readers in that country.

The five Featured Papers this month are all focused on advanced topics aimed at organizational leaders – such topics as benefits, maturity, strategy and value. Interestingly, the authors are in five different countries suggesting that such advanced topics are now permeating the profession worldwide. This is a positive trend, also suggesting that professional project management is gaining acceptance in more countries. It’s great that the PMWJ is now reflecting those developments.

Our series authors continue to address important aspects of P/PM; their works this month are again educational, informative and valuable. So please read them. Most have been in the P/PM field for decades and really are thought leaders in our profession. Each month their works contribute significantly to the project management body of knowledge.

Advisory and Commentary articles are contributed by individuals who have knowledge, experience or opinions to share. They are often focused on specific issues or tools, and this month is no exception. Advice is offered related to strategic information processing, agile methodology, balancing PRINCE2 with PMBOK processes, and two fascinating career related topics.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO

DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 flag-usa


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit https://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.

 

Welcome to the November 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

by David Pells,

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the November 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 40th edition of the Journal contains 27 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 30 different authors in 12 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge related to program and project management (P/PM), please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of articles, papers, reports, book reviews and news stories are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for you and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers and review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month’s edition with one Letter to the Editor from Crispin (Kik) Piney in France “On the Subject of Walt Lipke’s article in the October PMWJ on the To Complete Performance Index”. Walt’s response and Kik’s answer to that response are also included. Interesting reading if earned value management is used in your organization.

A Featured Interview with Victoria Kumar, current member of the PMI Board of Directors, has been provided by Petek Kabakci in Turkey. Petek’s interview was conducted last month on behalf of the PMI Turkey Chapter; it is republished in the PMWJ this month at the request of Petek and PMI Turkey.

3 Featured Papers are included this month, by authors in three different countries. Ashwani Kharola in India is the author of a paper titled “A Hybrid ANFIS Technique for Effective Performance Evaluation.” Ramaz Issa in Dubai, UAE is the author of “Influence of Cultural Diversity on Teach Integration in Organizations.” Timur Narbaev in Kazakhstan is the author of “An Assessment of Project Management Maturity in Kazakhstan.” Featured papers are seriously researched and authored papers by academic researchers or project management professionals, so read them carefully. If you have recently researched a project management topic, let us publish your results. Contact [email protected] or email an article or paper to me for consideration.

5 Series Articles are included this month by authors in Australia, Iceland and the UK. Project management pioneer Alan Stretton, PhD (Hon) in Australia is back with the 5th article in his 7-part “Series on general management functions and activities, and their relevance to the management of projects.” His article this month is titled “Management Staffing Function and Activities.” Don’t miss this new article and series by one of the world’s leading project management experts.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO

DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit www.pmworldjournal.net and www.pmworldlibrary.net.