Welcome to the March 2018 PMWJ

From a Different Angle: Competitive Projects, Winning, Not Losing and… Welcome to another edition of the PM World Journal

 

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the March 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 68th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 37 original articles, papers and other works by 40 different authors in 15 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, as another political season gets underway in the United States and other countries (and as Democracies and Democratic institutions seem to be under attack in so many places), I have been thinking about the role of project management in politics.  Or more correctly, in political campaigns!  Aren’t political campaigns projects, with concrete end goals, schedules, budgets, stakeholders and many other characteristics of projects? I started thinking about the contribution that professional project management might make to the campaign of someone running for political office, at the local, state or national level.  I discussed it with my wife, how might I help our favorite candidate for US senate this year?

Then I realized that the opposition candidate’s political campaign might well be using their own expert project management resources, and how all candidates for political office either win or lose elections.  That led to thoughts about project management in sports and other competitive industries and situations, including in many businesses.  There is much written and discussed these days about project successes and failures; how do those discussions relate to projects in politics and sports where there are so many losers.  Are those projects failures?  It occurred to me that it’s not so straightforward and perhaps there are different ways to think about all of this.  So here goes.

Political Campaigns as Projects and Programs

At first glance, a political campaign looks like a classic project, with beginning and end, scope of work, schedule, budget, resources, risks, contracting and procurement requirements and many leadership, stakeholder and team building issues.  Classic project planning and management techniques would seem applicable, with agility also required in today’s fast paced environment.  On closer examination though, we can see some unusual and complicating factors.  For example, a majority of the project (campaign) team members will be temporary participants, with many external resources and volunteers.  In addition, the campaign management (project/program) team will need knowledge and experience that many project managers may not readily have – fund raising, legal and regulatory knowledge, leading/coordinating volunteers, experience with other political campaigns, political and economic knowledge, governance and policy knowledge, marketing and social networking experience, etc.  That said, it still looks like a project, at least for campaigns for local elections.

On political campaigns for statewide or national offices, things get more complex in a hurry. Larger campaigns take more of everything – more people, more money, more knowledge and experience, and usually much more time. A campaign for a state-wide election will more closely resemble a program, with multiple projects related to volunteers, ICT, marketing, events (both physical and on media), financing (events, campaigns, other), stakeholders (events, communications, analysis), research (issues, stakeholders, voting trends, opinion polls, opposition and competitive research).  Voter registration issues will be more important, along with campaign-related regulations, laws, policies or issues.

Campaigns for national office are major programs, with sub-programs, portfolios of projects and multiple project teams.  In the United States and most other countries, a national campaign requires ballot registration in every voting district or state, office and volunteer mobilization in every state (50-100 in the USA), massive fund-raising initiatives, multiple multi-media marketing projects, multiple research projects, information and knowledge about a wide range of issues.  And national campaigns take a long time, often over several years. If a candidate is proposing significant policy change, then the program will resemble an organizational change program and may require changes in the conditions or environment surrounding the campaign itself.  For example, laws and regulations may need to change independent of the campaign itself; public opinion might need to be influenced; impact on other factors may need to be considered, planned for or incorporated into the campaign.

While politicians and campaign managers could well benefit significantly from deeper project management knowledge, that is nowhere near enough…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the February 2018 PMWJ

Gone and Back Again, the Rise of Regional Project Management Conferences, and… Welcome to the February edition of the PM World Journal

 

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the February 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 67th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 37 original articles, papers and other works by 39 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important or interesting trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, I want to mention a trend that I’ve wanted to talk about for some time but found other topics somewhat higher priority – the increasing number of local and regional conferences around the world.

1980s and my first Conference Experiences

I began my professional career in 1976, learning project cost and schedule control at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) working on a large nuclear safety project.  Five years later I was working on a large defense program for a division of GTE, wandered into their corporate library and discovered an Encyclopedia of Associations in which I found a listing for the Project Management Institute (PMI®).  I contacted PMI, learned that they had a chapter nearby (I was living in Northern California at the time), attended some meetings and started to learn more about both PMI and the project management profession.  I learned that PMI had more chapters around the USA and that their biggest event was an annual conference called “Annual Seminars/Symposia”.

Five years later I was back in Idaho, having advanced to a leadership position and helping develop an enterprise-wide project management planning process covering hundreds of projects and 5,000+ employees.  By 1986, with an MBA in hand, I decided to author a paper for presentation at a project management conference.  I was 10 years into my project management career and wanted to share my recent experience with our successful initiative at the INL.  I discovered that PMI chapters in Seattle, Portland and Vancouver BC had launched an annual Pacific Northwest Regional Project Management Conference.  So I submitted an abstract to the next regional conference in Seattle and presented a paper there, my first conference presentation.  I followed that with a presentation the next year at the Northwest Regional PM Conference in Vancouver, BC.

By that time I was leading a new PMI chapter; I attended my first PMI Seminars/Symposia in Milwaukee in 1987.  At that time, I knew about the regional conferences in the Pacific Northwest and the big annual PMI conference, which was mostly attended by PMI members in the United States and Canada, but few outside North America.  The only way we learned about project management events was by reading PMI publications; this was long before the Internet and email.  I knew nothing about PM conferences in other countries.  I attended PMI’s annual Seminars/Symposia in 1988, 1989 and 1990. Then things changed for me.

1990 – 2000: Dominance of Big International Events

By 1990 I was living in Dallas, Texas, working on a massive science project, the Superconducting Super Collider.  That year I was also invited to assume the presidency of the PMI Dallas/Ft. Worth chapter, a young and still struggling chapter.  In 1990 I also attended two international conferences, both of which I learned about through PMI.  In June 1990, I travelled to Vienna, Austria to present a paper at the INTERNET’90 World Congress on Project Management.  It was a new and eye-opening experience.  I learned for the first time about INTERNET (the International Project Management Association, which later changed its identity to the IPMA) and its member associations in various European countries.  I became familiar with APM in the UK (actually joining APM in 1991), the Austrian PM Association and a few others. I also learned that some of those member associations conducted annual local conferences, for example in Finland and Germany.

In October 1990, I attended PMI’s annual conference (PMI’90) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where I again met PMI leaders from around North America but also from South Africa (PMI’s largest chapter outside of North America).  I also met IPMA’s representative, David Mathie, who was attending the PMI conference under a cooperation agreement between PMI and IPMA and was there to promote the next IPMA congress in Florence, Italy.

In 1990, I also visited Russia and Ukraine for the first time, where I met professional leaders in those countries. I participated in project management conferences in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia in 1993 and 1995.

From 1991-2000, I attended every annual PMI conference around North America and IPMA congresses in Florence (1992), Oslo (1994) and Paris (1996).  Those were the big international events in the PM World.  By 1995 I had been elected to the PMI Board of Directors.  In October 1995, at PMI’95 in New Orleans, I organized and managed an event called the Global Project Management Forum, to which were invited leaders of other PM associations around the world for a meeting to discuss global cooperation.  About 20 such professional organizations were represented, primarily from Europe but also Brazil, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, South Africa and a few others.

In Paris in 1996, I met Brian Kooyman from Sydney who was representing the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM).  I learned about AIPM’s history, activities and annual conferences.  I was invited to both Brazil and South Africa in 1999, speaking at the PMI Sao Paulo chapter’s big conference and a bi-annual national conference in Johannesburg organized by PM South Africa.  By that time, I knew of regional conferences in the Nordic countries (annual events called NORDNET), Russia, India, Australia, Brazil and South Africa.  A few PMI chapters in North America had grown large and were starting to organize their own annual conferences.  But by and large, the two big international events organized by PMI and IPMA dominated the conference schedule.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the January 2018 PMWJ

Global Citizens, Project Earth Revisited (again), Solving Global Problems and… Welcome to the January edition of the PM World Journal


By David Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the January 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 66th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This issue contains 34 original articles, papers and other works by 39 different authors in 14 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  Last month, we launched the first Editor’s Choice Awards for outstanding articles and papers published in the PMWJ in 2017.  This month I go even bigger picture, solving global problems. What are we as project management professionals, either individually or as professional organizations, doing to help address pressing global problems?  Sometimes I think that is asking too much; how can we make a difference when the issues and problems seem so great? Now as I approach the end of my career, I am asking myself why I did not try to do more.

Recent Context

In September, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey which devastated the Texas coast, I led an initiative in partnership with the Dallas and Fort Worth Texas PMI chapters to help PMI members affected by that category 4 storm.  Because PMI and its various chapters in the USA are not registered as charities, we were restricted from raising money or providing financial assistance to individuals.  I explored options for creating a new charity for helping those in the PM field recover from natural disasters, but the legal and bureaucratic barriers were significant.  Instead, over three months we collected just over $2,000 worth of gift cards to grocery stores, restaurants and hardware stores, shipped to PMI chapter leaders in the Houston areas for distribution to PMI members whose homes were damaged by the hurricane.  Needless to say, those who received the gift cards, as small as they were, were extremely grateful. At least we did something! [1]

In November, APM published a remarkable report authored by Prof Peter Morris, one of the world’s most respected experts on modern project management. The report was titled “Climate Change and What the Project Management Profession Should be Doing about It: A UK Perspective.”  As stated in the report’s introduction: ‘Research on climate change has so far been led predominantly by physical scientists, but addressing how to mitigate and adapt to it will also require management and social science skills. Those expert in the world of projects and their management should have a significant role in this. This essay by Professor Peter Morris provides an initial scoping of where and how project management as a profession might address the implications and consequences of climate change.’ Peter ends the report in section 8.4, “So what should project management be doing?”, with suggestions for actions at the individual, enterprise, international and professional levels. [2]

Over the years, I have been involved with many discussions and a few initiatives to address some global problems; I’ve written some papers.  I decided to do something more this month.  But first, a little more context!

Global Citizens

Over the last few months, I have noticed television ads on CNN, NBC and a few other media channels in the United States by an organization called “Global Citizen”.  Founded in 2008 by three bright guys in New York who decided to try to make a difference, Global Citizen is now a major social action platform for those who want to help solve the world’s biggest challenges. Global Citizen is headquartered in New York, with offices in Canada, Australia and the UK. On their platform you can learn about issues, take action on what matters most and join a community committed to social change. Through their mix of content and events, grassroots organizing and extensive reach through digital channels, Global Citizen is building the world’s largest movement for social action. They organize massive global campaigns to amplify the actions of Global Citizens from around the world.  With millions of members and the support of many high-profile celebrities, they have organized concerts and events in New York’s Central Park and other places worldwide in recent years. [3]

Global Citizen is not the only group or global initiative underway, launched by concerned and motivated individuals worldwide.  While politicians have argued, made global agreements, established goals, and committed support and money, it often seems like they have done little to actually solve the problems.  It seems that individuals and online communities are now doing more and having a greater impact.  The message to me was “just do something”.

Project Earth Revisited (Again)

Believe it or not, “Project Earth” was the name of an initiative within the project management professional world launched in 1990 in Calgary, Canada following a keynote speech by Dr. Frank King, former chair of the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympic Games, at the PMI’90 Global Congress (The event was called Seminars/Symposium at that time).  In his dramatic presentation, Dr. King painted a dire picture of the damage being done to the planet by humans in recent years.  While global warming and climate change were not yet so front-and-center, significant environmental problems were well publicized and visible worldwide.  Dr. King challenged us as individuals and as a profession to do something about it.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the December 2017 PMWJ

The First Annual PMWJ Editor’s Choice Awards, and… Welcome to the December edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the December 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 65th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 33 original articles, papers and other works by 36 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, we are announcing the first annual PMWJ Editor’s Choice Awards, a selection of top papers and articles published in this journal during 2017. Over the last 12 months we have published 340 original works in the PMWJ, including 75 featured papers and 83 articles (series, advisories, commentaries). All of the works we publish are seriously written; some are by authors for whom English is a second language so occasionally contain grammatical mistakes.  All of our authors are well-educated and serious professionals.  Many of the works are outstanding and deserve to be read multiple times.  A few are absolutely fantastic, clarifying important topics, simplifying issues or breaking entirely new ground.

In the spirit of celebrating the end of another good year, I wanted to showcase some of the papers and articles that I really liked and want others to read again (or for the first time if you are new to this publication.)  The papers were selected from among ‘featured papers” only, even though we have published excellent student papers and second editions.  The PMWJ featured papers each month are original works.  The articles noted below were also original works, shorter in nature but enlightening and useful to program and project managers worldwide.  The authors of these papers and articles deserve recognition.  These are my choices, totally subjective. If you have time, please go read their works once more.

            2017 Editor Choice – Featured Papers

The following papers have been selected to receive the 2017 PM World Journal Editor’s Choice Award.  They are not ranked; they are however my favorite top seven.

Gender Issues in Project Planning and Management, by Ujeyo Margaret Stella (Busitema University), Kisige Abdu (Al-Mustaf Islamic College), Nabunya Kulthum (Makerere University), and Prof Peter Neema-Abooki (Makerere University), Kampala, Uganda (June 2017) – one of the most important papers we published this year, the authors take gender equality to an entirely new level.  Gender equality is not only a project management issue, but should be considered in project requirements and design as well as project outcomes, benefits and impacts.  If you are female, you will never forget reading this paper.

Deliberate and emergent strategies and origins of projects, by Alan Stretton, Sydney, Australia (November 2017) – Alan Stretton’s monthly contributions are all worth reading and rereading, many addressing topics of critical importance to both practicing project managers, executives and researchers.  His decades of experience drive his selection of topics; his vast knowledge and active research continue to spur new perspectives and understanding. This favorite is one of his most recent.  In this paper, Alan distills decades of theories and papers on strategic planning to a simple spectrum, a perspective that should help everyone more clearly understand where both strategies and projects come from and how programs and projects should link to strategy. This is a great paper.

Complexity in Large Engineering and Construction Programs, by Bob Prieto, Florida, USA (November 2017) – Also the latest paper that we have published by Bob Prieto, one of the world’s most experienced and respected experts on very large engineering and construction programs and projects. Yes, complexity seems to be a common theme and topic of discussion everywhere. In this paper, Bob removes our blinders regarding just how massive the complexity issue is on large programs.  His discussion of “perturbations” is enlightening.  If you think you know a lot about risk and complexity, I suggest you read this paper to learn even more.

Voluntary Usage of Earned Value Management on Projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, by Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo, Warri, Nigeria (August 2017) – As Lucky stated in his opening sentence of this landmark paper, “Given the compelling array of benefits that can be derived from the application of earned value management (EVM), it is of great concern that this methodology is not practiced as much as it should be in modern day project management practice in Sub-Saharan Africa.”  His message: “.. the potential lurking in the conscientious application of EVM in curbing corruption and curtailing Illicit Financial Flows (IFFs) and capital flight in sub-Saharan Africa cannot be overlooked..”  Since I started my career nearly 40 years ago in the EVM field, I love this paper.

Collaboratism: A Solution to Declining Globalisation and Rising Protectionism, by Prof Dr Pieter Steyn, South Africa and Dr Brane Semolic, Slovenia (March 2017) – The authors take on some global naysayers about globalization and technology, pointing to a different collaborative model for planning and managing international programs and projects.  I liked the discussion of big picture issues, global themes, future trends.  Collaboration is a proven approach to reducing risks; it has many other benefits as the authors point out.

Increasing Business Agility through Organizational Restructuring and Transformation, by Badri N. Srinivasan and Chandan Lal Patary, Bangalore, India (September 2017) – In this excellent paper, the authors attack one of the most current and important topics in modern organizational change – how to increase organizational agility.  They state “In today’s VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) world, every organization has to reorient itself on account of the changing business landscape… Organizations must explore opportunities to minimize waste, reduce handovers, improve transparency, reduce bureaucracy, and empower people.” Based on their experience at Societe Generale, the authors explain the issues and provide a model for achieving real organizational agility.

Framework for Creating a Building Information Modelling Environment in Architectural, Engineering and Construction Firms and Projects, by Oluseye Olugboyega, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (June 2017) – Many organizations now recognize the value of BIM, but how is it successfully implemented?  In this detailed and well organized paper, Oluseye describes the requirements and issues associated with creating a BIM framework including: BIM authoring software technologies, BIM hardware, BIM contents library, BIM standards and BIM platform. Well researched and with links to important resources, this is a good primer for any organization anywhere in the world that is planning to implement BIM technology.  If you are working on a project in the built environment, read this paper; BIM is now also an important resource for project planning, project controls and project management on all large construction projects.

2017 Editor’s Choice – Articles

The following seven articles have been selected for the 2017 PM World Journal Editor’s Choice Award.  They are not ranked; they are all among my favorites this year.

What did Taylor ever do for us? Scientific and humane management reconsidered, By Prof. Darren Dalcher, University of Hertfordshire, UK (April 2017) – Darren takes on Frederick Taylor, one of the founders of ‘scientific management’ and long considered responsible for some of the first scheduling techniques for both projects and operations.  One of my favorite passages in this article: “Many organisational psychologists despair of Taylor’s legacy. In his endeavour to maximise manual efficiency, Taylor abandoned the nuances and strengths of human nature and capability, displaying psychological illiteracy. Indeed, a key criticism of Taylor’s approach was that he treated people as machines.”  For some great history and historical perspective, this article is a classic.  Everyone in the project management profession should read it, especially those in leadership positions. (Frankly, all of Darren’s articles are worth rereading; he continues to contribute thought-provoking articles on a monthly basis).

Are Projects and Project Managers Fragile, Robust or Anti-Fragile? By Prof Tony Bendell, Nottingham, UK (June 2017) – Do we as individuals and organizations break under the weight of risks realized, project problems and complexity, or do we learn, grow and become more resilient? Based on his book ‘Building Anti-Fragile Organizations’ published by Gower in June 2014, Prof Bendell examines the shortcomings of conventional risk analysis, the impact of Black Swans, and the strategic, cultural, process and people requirements for the development of systems and organisations that get stronger from being stressed.  This was a great Advances in Project Management series article facilitated by Darren Dalcher.

Improve Your Diversity Intelligence: Identify your Blind Spots, by Paul Pelletier, Vancouver, BC, Canada (January 2017) – Paul may be better known for his great writing and speaking about bullying in the workplace, but his diversity article is a classic.  His Diversity Iceberg illustration is memorable; his message is clear.  We are all different, with different experiences, capabilities and characteristics.  The best leaders embrace diversity as a strength on teams.  This article helps us all find our blind spots in order to become better leaders.

On the Road to Project Society – A Swedish Story, by Torbjörn Wenell, Eskil Ekstedt and Rolf A. Lundin, Stockholm, Sweden (January 2017) – The first article in the series on Managing and Working in Project Society describes many of the topics in their award winning book of the same title.  They describe “the ‘projectification’ process in this country essentially building on his experiences starting in the 60’s with how international industrial companies in Sweden (like Volvo, Saab and Ericsson) developed and increasingly became supported by advanced projects to the present time when we have seen a diffusion of projects and project thinking to all parts of society today.”  It’s a fascinating, entertaining and enlightening article.

Managing Programme Benefits, by Andrew Hudson, UK (February 2017) – Another Advances in Project Management article coordinated by Prof Darren Dalcher, this long article provides an excellent primer on benefits realization management (BRM). Quoting Andrew: “There is no other purpose in doing a programme than to deliver value and realize benefits. This is the true measure of a programme’s success…. This article explains how being more effective at managing programme benefits can accelerate performance improvement and better enable organizations to achieve their strategic objectives. It explains common benefits management practices and explores reasons for programme benefit success and failure.” If you want to learn more about BRM, read this article based on Andrew’s chapter in the Gower Handbook of Program Management.

Crisis in Your Customer Project? Try Benefit Engineering, by Oliver Lehmann, Munich, Germany (October 2017) – The 3rd article in Oliver’s PMWJ series on Project Business Management, this article looks at benefits management from a whole new perspective.  Per the introduction, “A traditional approach to resolve monetary problems in customer projects is ‘Cost engineering’. This article describes an alternative solution named ‘Benefit engineering’, which can be more effective and leaves a customer with increased happiness, while the contractor’s problems are resolved.”  This is another great article about benefits management, from a practical perspective; reading this article may not only help save your project but your relationship with your customer.

Managing Strategic Initiatives, by Terry Cooke-Davies, PhD, UK (July, 2017) – Another Advances in Project Management series article, this article captures some of the research and insights that Terry has been providing in the programme and project management field for several decades.  Focusing on four “strands of thinking”, he points us to smart processes focused on the delivery of value, engaged people, flexible navigation of inevitable complexity and capable and knowledgeable leadership.  Simple, not so much! But necessary to stop the cycle of project failures.  Read this article!

Thank you to all 2017 Authors

We published many very good works this year.  I want to thank all of our authors and encourage them, and you, to keep the articles and papers coming.  Send your original works to me at [email protected]  To see all works in previous editions of the PMWJ, go to https://pmworldlibrary.net/pmworld-journal-archives/

Now – This month in the Journal

This edition of the PMWJ is full of good works from around the world, agreat way to end the year.  We begin with five featured papers. Dr. Pavel Barsegyan has contribute the first of several papers on the topic of “Elements of the Mathematical Theory of Human Systems”.  His paper is over my head; for management scientists, the equations and logic should be new and fascinating.  Alan Stretton is back with an extension of his paper from last month on strategic planning, this one titled “An organizational strategic framework, and project and other contributions to achieving strategic objectives.”  Alan is expanding our understanding of how, when and why projects are created.  Martin Smit in South Africa has contributed a paper on a related topic titled “Development of a project portfolio management model for executing organisational strategies: a normative case study.”  The two remaining papers discuss earned value analysis and critical factors hindering success on projects in Nigeria and the Sahel region of Africa. Featured papers are serious works that contribute to the global PM body of knowledge, so please give them a look and a possible reading.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the November 2017 PMWJ

Complexities, Size Matters, the Death of Simple Project Management, and… Welcome to the November edition of the PM World Journal

By David L. Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the November 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 64th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 26 original articles, papers and other works by 28 different authors in 16 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this opportunity to discuss important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, I want to discuss complexity, not in depth but from my perspective.  Increasing complexity in programs and projects has been a major topic in project management for the last ten years. It has been the subject of many papers and conferences, and is now mentioned by the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in various standards and white papers.  Nevertheless, I think there are still some doubters that complexity is anything new, perhaps especially in the project controls field where estimators, planners, schedulers and earned value management professionals have been working on complex programs and projects in aerospace, defense, energy and other industries for decades.

Complexity itself, however, is not a simple topic.  It has many dimensions, changes and increases with the size and nature of a project, and has led to new perspectives on the nature of project management.  This in turn is leading to some fundamental changes in the project management field.

Complexities – some dimensions and perspectives

Consider complexity related to a few major topics in PMI’s PMBOK Guide and most other standards, guides and books on project management – just for single projects.

Scope management complexities – Project scope management has long been associated with complexity.  Yes, technical complexity is real and has been an important aspect of scope management for decades, in some industries more than others.  But today there are two trends magnifying the complexity: rapid rates of change in most technologies, and the increasing amount of information technology (IT) on nearly every project.  Since IT is one of the most rapidly changing technologies in the world, these two trends alone can multiply complexity on many projects. Longer term planning is more difficult.  And supply chains, contracts and organizational relationships can be affected, all in turn affecting scope. Complexity is also compounded by the digitalization of projects.  Every element of a project, including tasks, materials, components, software, suppliers, resources, designs, responsibilities and everything else has a digital record.  Every project of any size creates massive databases that must be managed; every project now includes IT, database administration and cybersecurity both as additional scope and resource requirements.  And these digital records and databases must be planned, administered and managed, either by specialized experts or by project team members. It can all get complicated in a hurry.

Contracting and procurement complexities – Most projects involve contracts, and procurement of materials, equipment, services or other resources.  Large organizations have procurement departments to deal with contracts, procurement processes and supplier relations.  But every project manager is responsible for identifying and planning the contracts and purchases needed for her or his project.  How many of you prepare your own contract documents, or read every line in those prepared by your contacts department. Now consider the entire supply chain for a project, the contracts and legal issues involved, and the potential impact on your project if issues arise.  And then consider international supply chains, different laws and regulations in different countries or jurisdictions, translation issues, disputes and claims by sub-contractors or suppliers (anywhere in the supply chain).  What could possibly go wrong?

Leadership, human factors complexities – One of the primary topics in the PM field for decades, leadership of teams may be the most important aspect of successful project or programme management.  But combine leadership with  psychology, emotional intelligence, cultural intelligence, virtual teams, multiple generations, multiple primary languages, multiple work schedules and time zones, multiple organizations and organizational relationships, multiple personal and group communication issues, etc.  And how do such complexities need to be addressed in different locations and cultures, on cross-border projects, with truly complex mixtures of teams and human resources. You get the picture.

Stakeholder complexities – It seems difficult enough sometimes dealing with a single stakeholder. Today, projects stakeholders are generally defined as any person or organization that can have a negative or positive impact on the progress or outcome of a project.  Typical project stakeholders include senior management, customers (internal or external), employees, contractors and suppliers, regulators and often the general public or external groups.  Effective stakeholder engagement generally requires a project manager to identify key stakeholders, determine (and understand) both their interests and potential impact on the projects, and plan an appropriate engagement strategy for each.  And engagement means more than one-way communication; it can include meetings, discussions, media relations, legal and political considerations, and often executive actions. For large (or even many small) public projects, and certainly any involving public services, stakeholder engagement can be complicated, time consuming and important. For many project teams, this process is neither easy nor much fun.

Logic, interfaces, schedule complexities – We are all familiar with critical path planning, project logic, activity networks and resultant project schedules. Complexities and unintended consequences can arise from many aspects of planning and scheduling, including the experience, knowledge and capabilities of project planners, capabilities and capacities of software systems and tools, planning assumptions, information available, external factors and other issues.  Perhaps the biggest issue related to schedule complexity (and risk) however is related to coupling in project networks and potential perturbations. Bob Prieto addresses these complexities and risks in detail in his latest paper [1].  He describes nine categories of couplings: control, co-dependent, assumption, constraint, external, stakeholder, message, temporal and uncoupling. According to Prieto, “The greater the coupling between activities, the greater the complexity and the likelihood of propagating disruptions…” [1] These are significant complexity measures (issues) that are almost entirely overlooked in most projects, in my opinion. The underlying complexities and risks associated with second and third order coupling is often completely unknown.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the October 2017 PMWJ

The Proverbial 8 Ball, Unmet Deadlines, De-scoping… and Welcome to the October edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the October 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 63rd uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 20 original articles, papers and other works by 22 different authors in 12 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, I want to discuss a common issue on projects of all types and sizes, and one that has affected me personally again this month.  That is, the inability to meet an important deadline.  In my case, this edition of the journal should have been published a week ago.  As is often the case, procrastination and unexpected events led to this situation.  How many of you have experienced this problem?

Behind the Proverbial 8 Ball

In the game of pool (billiards), one’s cue ball occasionally ends up directly behind the 8 ball.  You are not supposed to hit the 8 ball directly with the cue ball, and having the cue ball hidden behind the 8 ball very frequently makes it impossible to make another good shot. This situation can often lead to losing the game.  In the United States, the term “behind the 8 ball” has come to mean being in a difficult or even impossible situation.  Missing a deadline often feels this way.  That’s how I felt this week as I struggled to find the time to complete and publish the PMWWJ.  A sudden death in the family required three days of travel; another family emergency took days to resolve; a government contract required attention.  As a friend stated some time ago, life intervened.  I should have planned better; I should have done the work sooner; perhaps I could have found more help.  One result: this edition contains fewer contents than any other this year.

Unmet Deadlines, What now?

What should you do when it becomes apparent that you or your team cannot meet an approaching deadline or milestone? Too often, the answer includes schedule slippage and/or reducing the scope of work, reducing the number of deliverables or otherwise de-scoping the project.  I have to now be honest with you, I don’t have time to discuss this in any more detail but instead want to refer you to the article this month by Oliver Lehmann titled “Crisis in Your Customer Project? Try Benefit Engineering”.  This is a brilliant article, focusing on delivering customer benefits rather than just traditional project performance measures.  As Oliver suggests, admit and confront the problem, study the impact on the benefits your project delivers, discuss it with the customer and figure out how to maximize benefits under the current conditions.  This might not be easy, but it’s probably better than being penalized, deteriorating relations with the customer (and/or other stakeholders), or even losing a contract (or future business).  That’s my two cents in the little time I have today. Maybe I can take up this issue again in the future if it is of interest to readers.

Now – This month in the Journal

This is a smaller edition of the PMWJ, with only 20 original works when our normal volume is more than 30. Nevertheless, this month’s edition includes some major works and important ones.  Several dig into risk management from various perspectives, industry and otherwise. The three series articles address a like topic, project management in the commercial world where survival also means keeping the customer happy while making a profit.  But please study the table of contents yourself and decide those of interest.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected] 

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the September 2017 PMWJ

Hurricane Harvey, Floods, Disaster Relief for Project Managers… and Welcome to the September edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA



Welcome to the September 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 62nd uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 33 original articles, papers and other works by 44 different authors in 20 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, in light of the recent hurricane that hit the Texas coast, I want to discuss disaster relief and recovery for project managers and those in the project management profession. I want to discuss these issues from human, personal and professional perspectives.

But first some context.  Here it is the 8th of the month, the latest this journal has been published, and still I am just now getting to this editorial and welcome article.  The issue for me is that I took on a new initiative early last week, to help lead a disaster relief initiative for the PMI Dallas Chapter in response to the record breaking floods along the Texas coast resulting from Hurricane Harvey.  Three PMI chapters in the region with over 5,000 members where affected.  Many PMI members had homes flooded, lost cars and other possessions, and had their lives uprooted. PMI Dallas chapter leaders wanted to help and have launched an initiative to do so; some details are below.  So I apologize to our authors and readers for late publication this month, but…  there’s been a lot going on.

Hurricane Harvey devastates the Texas coast

Hurricane Harvey hit the south Texas coast near the town of Corpus Christi on Friday evening, 25 August 2017.  Just to set the stage, here is a short intro from Wikipedia.  Hurricane Harvey was the first major hurricane to make landfall in the United States since Wilma in 2005, ending a record 12-year drought in which no hurricanes of Category 3 intensity or higher made landfall in the country. In a four-day period, many areas received more than 40 inches (1,000 mm) of rain as the system meandered over eastern Texas and adjacent waters, causing catastrophic flooding. With peak accumulations of 51.88 in (1,318 mm), Harvey is the wettest tropical cyclone on record in the contiguous United States. The resulting floods inundated hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced more than 30,000 people, and prompted more than 17,000 rescues. [1]

Hurricane Harvey near Texas coast on 25 August 2017

According to ABC News in the United States on 1 September 2017, Harvey’s torrential rain, devastating winds and widespread flooding have so far cost at least 39 lives, driven over one million people to evacuate their homes in Texas and caused extensive destruction that will likely make it one of the costliest storms in U.S. history. Here is a look at the storm’s historic devastation, by the numbers:

More than 20 trillion gallons: That’s the total amount of rain that fell across Texas and Louisiana, a staggering deluge that represents enough water to supply New York City’s needs for over five decades.

$125 billion: Texas Gov. Greg Abbot said his state will need federal relief money “far in excess” of that total. Moody’s Analytics has estimated $97 billion in destruction alone and some $108 billion in total damages counting lost output.

51.88 inches: The amount of rain recorded at Cedar Bayou on the outskirts of Houston in just under five days, marking a new record for the heaviest rainfall for a storm in the continental U.S., according to the National Weather Service.

3: The number of times Harvey made landfall– twice as a hurricane in Texas and once more as a tropical storm in southwestern Louisiana.

185,149: Homes estimated to be damaged or destroyed by Harvey, according to Friday’s data from the Texas Division of Emergency Management.

364,000: People who have registered for assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as of Friday, August 31, according to FEMA.

42,399 : People in shelters as of Friday, according to the Texas governor.

10,000: People rescued by federal forces as of Thursday, 30 August, FEMA said, plus countless other Good Samaritan rescues.

200,000: Customers without power on Thursday, according to the Energy Department.

120,000: Residents without water in Beaumont, Texas, on Thursday.

10: Gulf Coast region refineries that remain shut down by Harvey. Together they account for over 3 million barrels per day of output, or nearly 17 percent of the total U.S. refining capacity, according to the Energy Department. [2]

More…

To read entire article, click here



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the August 2017 PMWJ

The Missing Link, Benefits Realization Management… and Welcome to the August edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor
PM World Journal

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the August 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 61st uninterrupted monthly edition. This edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 27 original articles, papers and other works by 33 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several international advisors, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month, I want to discuss benefits realization management, a topic that most of you may not be knowledgeable enough about. That was true for me before I launched some serious research on the topic about two months ago. As a 35 year practitioner of professional project management, with many years of experience as a professional leader, I thought I knew all I needed to know about program and project management. I’ve had to rethink that assessment.

The missing link between the strategy and results

In recent years, a number of significant papers have been written about the importance of both the front end and the back end of the project life cycle. In particular, current project management bodies of knowledge and standards have been criticized for lack of enough attention to the pre-investment stage of projects and the post-delivery and operational stages after projects are ‘completed’. Some excellent papers on these topics that I am familiar with include recent works by Alan Stretton and Russ Archibald:

  • The Six-Phase Comprehensive Project Life Cycle Model Including the Project Incubation/Feasibility Phase and the Post-Project Evaluation Phase, by Russell D. Archibald, Ivano Di Filippo and Daniele Di Filippo; December 2012 [1]
  • Involving program/project managers in organizational strategic planning?, Stretton, July 2011 [2]
  • A further note on involving program/ project managers in organisational strategic planning, Stretton, October 2013 [3]
  • Project Outputs and Customers Outcomes, Stretton, February 2016 [4]
  • Organizational strategic plans, projects, and strategic outcomes, Stretton, April 2016 [5]
  • Adding value to project clients, Stretton, December 2016 [6]

In my opinion, benefits realization management (BRM) can successfully link program and project outcomes (and stakeholder benefits) to organizational strategies; BRM might be the missing link in managing the program and project lifecycle. Perhaps this is misunderstood because of the generic nature of the word “benefit”; more likely it is due to its incorporation only into program management standards and guides, not in those addressing project management. Perhaps it is also due to the widely accepted notion that strategies and strategic planning are the responsibility of senior executives, not project managers.

This understanding misses the critical link: strategies should flow from desired outcomes and benefits, programs and projects then flow from strategies to achieve those benefits. Programs and projects must deliver the desired benefits in order to be successful. Traditional project performance measures no longer suffice. We’ve heard many times that successful outcomes depend on doing the ‘right projects right’, but doing the right projects depends on having the right strategies, and that in turn requires strategies aimed at achieving “benefits”. Successful programs and projects are those that deliver full benefits (creating the desired ‘value”); delivering projects on budget and schedule matters little if benefits are not delivered.

Program and project managers need to not only fully understand organizational strategies, they need to understand and embrace the desired outcomes and benefits to be achieved. Identifying, defining, tracking, implementing and measuring benefits provide the long missing link between organizational strategies, programs, projects, outcomes and value. Unfortunately, this is not all so easy as it seems.

The light bulb: Benefits in program(me) management

In April, I delivered a briefing on PMI’s Standard for Program Management to executives of a major U.S. government program office in Washington, DC. That standard is organized around five core “domains”: strategy alignment, benefits management, stakeholder management, governance and life cycle management. The leaders in the room were all well versed in traditional project management concepts and easily grasped the points about strategy, stakeholders, governance and life cycle. They were however interested in learning more about program benefits management and requested another in-depth briefing on this topic. Over the last the last few months, I have researched program benefits management, not only in the USA but in several other countries. The results have changed my perspective on not only program management but also on project and portfolio management…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author



David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the June 2017 PMWJ

Five Disruptive Trends affecting Projects and Project Management, maybe more – and Welcome to the June 2017 PMWJ

David L. Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the June 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 59th edition contains 35 original articles, papers and other works by 44 different authors in 19 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We are proud of the range and diversity of works and authors published in this journal each month. Since the primary mission of the PMWJ is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several editorial advisors, I have used this space to mention significant trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month I want to mention five such trends, in the context of a panel I will be moderating at the 11th annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in August. The theme for this year’s conference being held on the UTD campus in Richardson, Texas during 17-19 August is “Disruptive Leadership”. The panel discussion that I will moderate is titled “Disruptive Trends affecting Project Management”. I thought it might be interesting to discuss these trends here this month.

Disruptive Trends

According to Collins online dictionary, “disruptive” means to prevent something from continuing or operating in a normal way. [1] According to Wikipedia, A “disruptive innovation” is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leading firms, products and alliances. [2] According to the online Cambridge English Dictionary, a “trend” is a general development or change in a situation or in the way that people are behaving. [3] I think most definitions of these terms will be consistent, regardless of the source. A disruptive trend then might be defined as a general change in the way people or things normally operate.

How does this relate to or matter to project management, or projects for that matter? The answer should be obvious to most. Disruptive trends or changes can affect the conditions, environment and context of most projects. A disruptive change might mean that the product of a project will be obsolete or less useful to customers. It might mean a major new risk or opportunity for an organization. It might mean that new information, training, tools or technologies will be needed. Trends can affect individual projects, project managers, teams, stakeholders and organizations, or even entire markets, industries and professions. I believe it is critical that we as professionals monitor trends affecting our work and our profession. And awareness of disruptive trends is absolutely required if we are to survive.

The Five Trends

Based on Google searches on “disruptive trends”, there seems to be no shortages of opinions regarding trends in technology, various industries and at various times. New ones are announced each year by big consultancies, publications, media outlets and others. The environment for projects of all kinds keeps changing, with regards to technologies, markets, economies and especially the organizational context. Some environmental changes and trends seem more disruptive than others, seem to be disrupting the project environment, the application of traditional and proven project management processes, and even the project management field itself. Here are the five trends that were selected to discuss in the August panel. In each case, some questions are posed. Each topic deserves more attention, in my opinion.

Agility – The popularity of Agile project management, which has been growing now for about 15 years, has stimulated a distinct move towards more “agile” management decision-making at all levels. Agile project management brought distinct advantages to software development projects. The idea of achieving incremental benefits/value rather than waiting for the traditional project planning, design and build cycle to play out has appealed to managers in many organizations, not just in software or information technologies. Executives and customers want results faster and faster. Is this a good idea? Does “Agile Project Management” itself need to evolve? Do traditional project change control processes need to change? Are there industry-specific variations, risks and opportunities related to agility that need to be explored and defined? Have you seen these issues emerge? I certainly have.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the May 2017 PMWJ

Death of the Country Manager: Geopolitics Revisited, Country Risk – – and Welcome to the May 2017 Edition of the PM World Journal

David L. Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the May 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 57th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 21 original articles, papers and other works by 20 different authors in 12 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several international advisors, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month I return to a topic that has been of personal interest to me for many years – international “geopolitics”.

When I was an undergraduate studying business many years ago, I read case studies involving large American corporations such as IBM, IT&T, Standard Oil and others. In many cases, those large companies had a ‘country manager’ in each country where they did business, to both represent the company as well as oversee business development and operations in country; that is no longer the case. In the 1990s when I was running around Russia and pursuing projects in multiple countries on behalf of some U.S. companies, I became familiar with ‘country risk’, a concept used by the U.S. Export-Import Bank and other financial institutions to determine whether and how they would provide financing for equipment sales and/or overseas projects.

Over the last ten years or so, I have followed a global geopolitical think tank, a private intelligence company based in Austin, Texas called Stratfor. The company, founded by George Friedman, one of America’s preeminent experts on national security, international affairs and the intelligence business, provides regular analyses and briefings on trends and events occurring in various parts of the world. [1] My editorial this month was stimulated by an April article by Stratfor’s Mike Rosenberg titled “Closing the Gap Between Business and Geopolitics.” [2]

Death of the Country Manager

According to Mr. Rosenberg, “Not long ago, most international companies had people in place to oversee operations at the national level… These country managers were widely respected in their firms for local knowledge… Much like ambassadors, country managers played a two-way role, representing their firms in the country while also explaining the nation’s environment to their organization’s personnel. And in many cases, executives from the country itself filled the country manager role, further cementing the flow of information in both directions…”[2]

As Mr. Rosenberg goes on to describe, “starting in the 1980s, this classic structure of business was gradually replaced by the matrix structure, which typically comprises global business units, global corporate functions and giant geographical areas of responsibility.”

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at mailto:[email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the April 2017 PMWJ

A Devil’s Advocate: Agile from a distance, the big waterfall world, and Welcome to the April 2017 PMWJ

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the April 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 57th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 20 original articles, papers and other works by 23 different authors in 12 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several international advisors, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month I want to discuss agile project management, one of the hottest topics in the project management professional field, and especially within PMI and its large segment of membership in information systems, software and technology industries.

Last month in this space I discussed the growing relevance of categorization, context and typology of projects – that is, the importance of fully understanding one’s project in order to apply the most appropriate project management principles, processes and expertise.  In my opinion, nowhere is that context more relevant than in the application of agile approaches.

It seems to me that agile is often presented as a general alternative to more traditional (waterfall) project life cycle-based processes. I have recently also been informed that “agile” will permeate many sections of the next edition of PMI’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide).  If this is true, the implications and potential impact are significant.  But is this a good idea?  Are the interest in and applicability of Agile as widespread as it is made out to be? What has been heard on the topic from those in organizations and industries where traditional “waterfall” project life cycles and project management approaches, methods and processes are widely used?

A Devil’s Advocate

According to Wikipedia, the Advocatus Diaboli (Latin for Devil’s Advocate) was formerly an official position within the Catholic Church: one who “argued against the canonization (sainthood) of a candidate in order to uncover any character flaws or misrepresentation of the evidence favoring canonization”. In common parlance, the term devil’s advocate describes someone who, given a certain point of view, takes a position he or she does not necessarily agree with (or simply an alternative position from the accepted norm), for the sake of debate or to explore the thought further. [1]

I believe that “devil’s advocate” is one of the most important concepts in program risk management and governance.  It may often be the only way to protect against “groupthink”.  Again referring to Wikipedia: Groupthink is a psychological phenomenon that occurs within a group of people in which the desire for harmony or conformity in the group results in an irrational or dysfunctional decision-making outcome. Group members try to minimize conflict and reach a consensus decision without critical evaluation of alternative viewpoints by actively suppressing dissenting viewpoints, and by isolating themselves from outside influences. [2]

I learned the value of these concepts during my second term on the PMI board of directors in 2002 when I saw fellow board members sometimes voting with the majority without fully debating an issue or decision.  I found myself playing devil’s advocate simply to raise questions and force more discussion, when I thought a pending decision might be important.  At the time, there was even a policy that PMI board members must “speak with one voice”, which I found both disheartening and even somewhat frightening.  Rather than empower leaders, there was a tendency to silence dissent (or criticism).

Now playing devil’s advocate again, are the PM professional world, academic researchers, organizations and many in the field of project management getting carried away with the “Agile” concept?  Is it as widely applicable or used as implied in the many articles and papers on the topic?  How important is the move towards Agile, how many executives care and in how many organizations and industries does it really apply?  Why are those who do not use Agile so silent on this topic?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today.  He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

What Exactly is Your Project?

Welcome to the March 2017 PMWJ

The Growing Importance of Categorization, Context and Typology in Project Management – – and Welcome to the February 2017 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the March 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 56th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 32 original articles, papers and other works by 41 different authors in 21 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several respected advisors, I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I want to discuss an emerging set of nagging questions: if every project is truly unique (Most definitions of a project seem to include the word “unique”), how practically useful are general bodies of knowledge, standards and qualifications? How real or applicable are “best practices” in project management (PM)? Why aren’t the now acknowledged millions of people working on projects around the world flocking to PM education, certifications and organizations? Why don’t more senior executives jump on the PM band wagon when so many of their projects are of real strategic importance?

When I first entered the PM field in the 1970s, I learned about the work breakdown structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary (scope), critical path planning (schedule), resource estimating and planning (cost), and quality (this was on a nuclear power plant). Risk was addressed with contingencies and reserves; communication, leadership and soft skills were just part of the job, with managers attending some internal courses. I knew the type of project was different from those in other industries and organizations, but these were not considerations we worried about.

In the 1980s I got involved with the Project Management Institute (PMI), joining a chapter, then founding and serving as a chapter president. We brought people from various organizations and projects together to share information. I bought into a common PM body of knowledge, terminology, standards and certifications. During the 1990s I was in the forefront of PMI’s specific interest group (SIG) initiative as a SIG founder and chair. I began to recognize some differentiation for projects and project management as PMI members with different interests began to congregate and collaborate. New standards emerged for some industries, for example, construction and information technology (IT). Still, the commitment to a common set of concepts, principles and standards remained the rule.

Now in the 21st century, as the PM professional field has grown worldwide while the failure rate of projects has remained relatively constant, there seems to be an emerging realization that the “one-size-fits-all” approach may not be enough. Diversity seems to be emerging as the rule rather than the exception in the PM world. Just as there are vast numbers and types of projects around the world, there are vast numbers of unique differences. Project categories, either industry, geography or other distinctions, and project types are receiving new emphasis for describing and studying projects and programs. Context is also growing in importance.

What exactly is your project?

I now think that the word “unique” deserves more attention, and a better understanding of unique project factors may hold the secret to achieving more project success. Understanding the category, type and context of one’s project could dramatically improve the ability to plan, identify critical risks and success factors, avoid pitfalls and create value.

Below are a few comments about these three aspects of project characterization, not in depth as there’s not enough space here – others have already addressed these topics much better than I can. Also included are some comments about Situational Project Management, a topic introduced by Oliver Lehmann in his good recent book. [6]

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

 


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

The Big Reverse


The Big Reverse: Politics, Anti-leadership and the Looming Threat to Professionalism – and Welcome to the February 2017 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the February 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 55th edition truly reflects the international nature of this publication; 39 original articles, papers and other works by 47 different authors in 19 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several respected advisors, I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. Following the 2016 presidential election in the United States, the topic of my short December editorial was the potential impact on programs, projects, industries and organizations of “disruptive political change”. It was a topic that I have written about before and, I think, was relatively well received; at least I heard from a few people (see the letter to the editor from Oliver Lehmann in Germany this month, for example.)

The December editorial focused on the changes in policies that frequently accompany political changes, policies that affect funding, regulations and other actions that can impact programs and projects. That impact is now being felt in the United States as the president has already signed executive orders benefiting large corporations, big banks, the oil and gas industry and Wall Street; science, environmental protection, national parks, foreign trade (and relations) and other industries may be negatively affected. But those changes and impacts are not unexpected. If new policies, laws and regulations are enacted in fair and reasonable ways, there may actually be some positive results.

However, after only a few weeks, it has become clear to me that there is another much bigger potential problem associated with the new administration. It has to do with the much publicized dawn of the “post-truth” era and the use of “alternative facts” by the president and his team – in other words, the apparent broad acceptance of dishonesty in leadership. I was advised not to “go political”, but this is just too important…

The Big Reverse: Politics, Anti-leadership and the Looming Threat to Professionalism

Politics as Context

Politics is a normal aspect of civilized society; like economics, it is part of the environmental context within which organizations, programs and projects operate. According the Oxford dictionary, Politics includes “The activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate between parties having power” and “A particular set of political beliefs or principles”. The Oxford online definition also includes “Activities aimed at improving someone’s status or increasing power.” [1]

Merriam-Webster (M-W) defines politics as 1. the art and science of government; the art and science concerned with guiding or influencing government policy; the art and science concerned with winning and holding control over a government; 2. political actions, practices or policies; 3. political affairs or business; 4. the political opinions or sympathies of a person; and 5. the total complex of relations between people living in society. [2] The M-W citation also states “Politics is a multifaceted word. It has a set of fairly specific meaning that are descriptive and nonjudgmental (such as ‘the art and science of government’ and ‘political principles’), but it can and often does carry a negative meaning closely related to these (‘political activities characterized by artful and often dishonest practices’), and it not uncommon for the word to have multiple related meaning that run the connotative gamut from good to bad.”

In other words, politics is a common and normal aspect of government – at the local, regional, state, national and international levels. Because government plays such an important role in most lives, of both individuals and organizations, their activities, administration and control are vitally important to many stakeholders. It is the control aspect that brings us to now, where political opinions and parties are deeply dividing the populations of many countries – especially in the United States and Western Europe. Politics has sharply divided the right from the left, the liberals from the conservatives, the Democrats from the Republicans.

Those divisions sometimes seem crazy. How can citizens of the same country or state argue and fight to such a degree that they express hatred for each other, they call each other “the enemy”, and representatives of each side or party oppose the other in congress en masse? This seems to be the situation in the USA now following the divisive 2016 presidential campaign and election. And now the administration seems to be making matters worse. Real and positive leadership is needed, but that’s not what I see.

So why does this matter to project managers and the PM profession? Because this political environment is where our programs, projects and project teams now exist! Because political control of governments can influence or dictate policies and actions that affect industries, organizations and projects (as we are already experiencing in America and UK)! Because political affiliations, principles and attitudes can affect organizations, teams, relationships, careers and lives (more on this below)! Politics and political conditions represent one of the most important aspects of “context” for us all. If you don’t believe this, please read on.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

 

Welcome to the January 2017 PMWJ

EDITORIAL

Farms, Food and Project Management, the Trend that Isn’t and Welcome to the January 2017 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the January 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 54th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 28 original articles, papers and other works by 35 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I want to discuss the lack of a trend, what I see as a major shortfall in the project management professional world – the lack of attention to projects and project management in basic industries. Where are the case studies, models and bodies of knowledge for project management in agriculture, food production, housing, healthcare, education, security, transportation and other such industries? Many will argue that projects in those industries are covered by the general and generic project management models and standards produced by AIPM, APM, IPMA, PMI and other leading international bodies. In my opinion, that’s not good enough. And there’s another problem…

Farms, Food and Project Management and the Trend that Isn’t

My grandfather was a dairy farmer, working hundreds of acres, herds of cattle, multiple barns, farm equipment, seasonal changes and many projects. As a child, I visited his farm many times. I loved it! We also lived in a small town in the northwestern United States, actually just outside of town where we had some land, gardens, cows, chickens, horses, barns and work to do. We too had many projects, although I don’t ever remember them being called projects. It was just work to do. I left home for university at 18 and never returned to living in my home town. But I’ve never forgotten my background or my grandfather’s farm. In recent years, I’ve thought a lot about the types of projects that farmers have, especially in developing countries where agriculture is so important (and where international development banks continue to invest millions in agriculture).

My father was a school teacher, teaching elementary school for 30+ years. As a child, I also spent many hours with him at the school, both during and in between school hours. Over the years, I became familiar with class types and sizes, curricula, facilities maintenance, school buses (he also drove a bus – it was a small town), teacher salaries and benefits (or lack thereof), administrative issues, sports and extracurricular activities, homework, grading and many other school-related issues. Here again, as I got older and learned about project management, I often thought about education-related projects. Since education is a common topic in all towns and cities, especially now in the United States where public education is in generally poor condition, I’ve often wondered how project management could contribute more.

One uncle worked my grandfather’s farm, then worked for a local refinery. One uncle was a horse rancher, another was a logger, another joined the Air Force and became an expert computer-based missile systems mechanic. I’m one of the few in the family to go to college, to graduate with multiple degrees. Most members of my immediate and extended family have lived all their lives in small towns. Now it has occurred to me that little of what I’ve learned about project management is very useful to those family members and others with similar occupations or working in industries and enterprises based in rural areas. There’s probably not a single member of my family who knows what project management is, what a PMP certification means, what a PMO is, what the difference between a project and program is, or anything else that we spend all of our time in the PM profession talking about. And they don’t care!

During 2016, we saw a very tumultuous presidential campaign and election in the United States during which a majority of the population living in small towns, rural America, voted for a candidate who disparaged traditional government institutions and leaders as “elites”, trashed the media and more educated (and knowledgeable) leaders, and promised solutions for the people “left behind” by the global economy and the information age. Now it has also occurred to me that we in the project management profession may have also left those stakeholders behind. What do we do, say, publish or teach that benefits those living in small towns, on farms, in rural communities where big corporations don’t hire programmers, engineers and project managers? Where work and projects are in fields, barns, garages, schools, clinics and small businesses!

Sure, many of the projects are small, even micro-projects in many cases. But let’s back up a little; let’s consider projects or programs involving multiple farms, multiple schools, multiple hospitals, multiple roads and shops, multiple small businesses. What about programs or projects to help entire communities change, create jobs, improve lives? What about projects to transform entire industries? In America or in Europe, maybe not so common; in many African and Asian countries, these are the programs and projects that really matter.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

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David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the December 2016 PMWJ

The Potential Impact of Disruptive Political Events and Welcome to the December 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the December 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 53rd edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 24 original articles, papers and other works by 27 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor.  This month I return to an issue that I first explored in 1998 in a paper for that year’s PMI congress; the paper was titled “Global Tides of Change: Significant Recent Events Affecting Globalization of the Project Management Profession”.  I presented an update to that paper in South Africa in 1999, then touched on the topic again in a June 2009 article on “Global Business Intelligence for Managers of Programs, Projects and Project-oriented Organizations” which I also presented at an IPMA conference in Finland.  I returned to the topic in earnest in a September 2009 editorial titled “Disruptive Events: Are you, your project or your organization prepared? This was also the topic of my keynote presentation at the PM South Africa conference in 2010.  Because of recent unexpected but dramatic political events in the UK and USA, it’s time to return to the subject of…

The Potential Impact of Disruptive Political Events

In the papers referenced above, significant political events are only one of several categories of disruptive change that can impact programs, projects, organizations and project managers.  The categories that I previously studied include extreme weather and natural disasters, manmade disasters, human health and social factors (i.e. pandemics), economic disruptions (i.e. 2008 global financial meltdown), disruptive political or governmental changes, international geo-political events (i.e. wars, disputes), disruptive technology developments, industry or market disruptions, and legal/regulatory changes.  Of course, this last category is often directly related to political changes, but not always. A new law can be quite disruptive. Disruptive events in any of these categories should be considered during the risk planning process by many teams and organizations.

The thing about political changes though is, they can often be seen coming. Elections happen on a regular basis, with the outcomes having measurable probabilities. Nevertheless, many organizations and leaders do not factor such risks into their programs or projects.  This is a mistake, as some political changes can be quite unexpected and very disruptive.

Which brings us to today’s world.  What was the impact of the “Brexit” vote in the UK to leave the European Union on 23 June 2016?  Who saw it coming, or the subsequent fall in the value of the Pound?  What was the immediate and long term impact on projects in the UK or investment in projects outside UK by British organizations? Which companies factored these potential outcomes into their risk management plans and took appropriate mitigation actions?

What was the impact of Donald Trump’s election to the U.S. Presidency on 8 November 2016?  Which industries or organizations may benefit or suffer? What will be the impact on regulations, federal government agency policies and structures, federally-funded programs and projects?  It seems clear to me that the Trump election may in fact be very disruptive, not only in the U.S. but in many other countries where U.S. organizations have influence.  It is still early in the transition process, but opportunities and threats are already visible.  There will be winners (oil & gas, power plants, financial services, military, property developers) and most likely losers (renewable energy, healthcare, outsourcing, public education among others).

What will be the impact on organizations and projects in Brazil or South Korea if their presidents are impeached in coming weeks, as now appears likely? What will be the impact of presidential elections in France on 23 April 2017 or in Germany later in the year?  If existing leaders are ousted, then there will be major changes, and those changes will impact many industries, organizations, programs and projects.  How are those threats and opportunities being factored into risk plans?

What will happen in Cuba since Fidel Castro died on 25 November 2016 at the age of 90? While it might not happen immediately, his death will most likely affect investment in Cuba, regulations, foreign trade, local access to modern electronics and technologies, and other factors in tourism, building, energy, agriculture and other industries.  The impact of Castro’s death is probably already being felt by every program, project and project manager in Cuba.

What will happen in Zimbabwe when Robert Mugabe dies?  Perhaps it will be similar as in Cuba, but Zimbabwe seems in worse shape economically than Cuba.  The impact could be even more dramatic.  What if another world leader suddenly passes?  Unlike elections, the death of political leaders is less predictable; nevertheless, everyone dies, so planning for such disruptive political changes in many places seems wise.

Another point, if we work in service organizations where our projects are performed under contracts to others, we need to consider the impact of disruptive changes on our customers, not just our own organizations.  Impacts of political changes can be either indirect (from changes to policies, regulations, leadership) or direct (federal budgets for programs or organizations such as defense, energy, infrastructure, IT).

Obviously, I cannot mention every possible recent or future political change.  There are elections held around the world each year that impact organizations and projects in those countries, and often with international repercussions.  But it should be obvious to everyone in the PM field that more risk planning should consider the impact of significant disruptive changes – and political changes like those we have seen this year in America and Britain are good examples.  Regardless of our personal political opinions (or votes), we need to factor significant potentially-disruptive political events (and changes), including state and local political changes, into our program and project risk planning.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today.  He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Leapfrogging in Project Management

And Welcome to the November 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the November 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 52nd edition again reflects the international nature of this publication; 29 original articles, papers and other works by 37 different authors in 15 different countries are included this month. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. The primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, so please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since August I have been using this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I discuss an issue that I thought I recognized about a year ago; now I think it is a very real trend and perhaps an opportunity for those new to project management and those in developing economies. But it also introduces new risks.

Leapfrogging in Project Management

Leapfrog is a very old children’s game whereby a child bends over while another spreads his legs, places hands on the bending child’s back and leaps forward over the bending child. Then the one who leaped bends over and the original bending child leaps over the new bending child. I played this game when I was very young and actually do not remember the objective; I think it was to cross a yard or space faster, perhaps in a race.

Leapfrogging as a verb, however, has come to symbolize jumping over something in order to move ahead faster, for example, leapfrogging a generation or older technology. The best example that I have seen in recent years is the leapfrogging of old telecoms technology in Africa whereby countries decided not to invest in networks of landline-based telephones but rather went straight to mobile phones. Rather than spending huge sums and years to implement land lines, these countries promoted and supported cellular mobile phone systems, companies, technologies and networks, thereby “leapfrogging” decades of telecoms technologies and investment. The result can now be seen across the continent where anyone with a mobile phone can connect to the internet and communicate with anyone in the world, often as easily as anyone in a fully developed economy.

I now see signs of the same thing happening in the project management world, most apparently in academia in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Where it has taken decades for major universities in North America and Western Europe to introduce project management into undergraduate and graduate degree programs, universities in many developing countries have recognized the importance of programs and projects to economic development (and global competition) and have introduced project management courses and degree programs. There may now be more project management degree programs in Nigeria and Pakistan, for example, than in any European country other than the United Kingdom. Project Management degree programs are widespread in South Africa and Turkey, among others, with becoming more visible in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Panama, Peru and others. This trend seems to be accelerating.

Academic research in developing countries also seems to be more aggressive, more practice oriented and increasing. The research that I’ve seen from Kenya and Nigeria, for example, is aimed at solving local problems, improving local industry performance or addressing national/regional issues – all from a project management perspective. (See Alan Stretton’s paper in the October PMWJ for some perspective on this topic.)

More developing countries also seem to be recognizing program/project management as a national competence, with more government bodies embracing enterprise project management, maturity models, centers of excellence and project management offices. It has taken decades for American government agencies to reach this point (many are still not there); organizations in Africa and Latin America are leapfrogging to OPM best practices in one generation. (See my 2009 paper on this topic, republished this month as a Second Edition)

You can also see this among individuals and organizations in many countries with their very visible interest in project management certifications. The number of Project Management Professionals (PMPs) and PRINCE2 certified professionals around the world has exploded in recent years. There are hundreds of certified PM professionals now in countries where the PM profession itself is only a few years old.

Leapfrogging is also happening with P/PM concepts and approaches in Europe and North America. The topic of “agility” for example has captured the attention of executives in many organizations; it’s no longer acceptable to take years or even months to implement organizational changes or PM best practices. Executives want improvement faster. Agile methodology is moving from IT project management to organizational change management to mainstream programs and projects; learning and changing must happen faster everywhere. Other examples include resilience, sustainability, reference class forecasting, and value management.

At the highest levels of P/PM research and experience in Europe, I think there is a growing appreciation for the role of human psychology, economics, statistics (think big data) and politics in the success or failure of projects (and project management). Top down approaches to program risk management have led to leapfrogging; I believe the Scandinavian School of project management has this concept at its heart. Such concepts as the Successive Principle (Lichtenberg 2016) and self-organizing teams will soon move to the forefront of advanced project management.

Similar trends occur with P/PM tools and technologies, with new cloud-based solutions introduced almost monthly in many countries. This has been happening in the United States for many years, really beginning with the introduction of the personal computer in the 1980s and accelerating with internet-based solutions in recent years. Every project manager wants a better tool; every organization wants to “leapfrog” to the latest and greatest technology.

Leapfrogging in project management carries significant risks however. If organizations embrace the latest tools and concepts without some resident knowledge of fundamental project management topics such as project lifecycles, cost/resource planning, scheduling, risk management, stakeholder engagement and other “PMBOK topics”, there will be project failures. If those planning and managing large projects know nothing about earned value, those projects will most likely fail. If there is no knowledge of project portfolio management, the wrong projects will be financed with time and money wasted.

Discussion of any of the topics above could be vastly expanded. These paragraphs were just to introduce this topic. Those new to project management and those in developing economies should carefully assess current topics, recognize good practices, determine what is most beneficial, and embrace the newest and best. Be aware of the risks, but neither should you nor your organization reinvent the wheel. Leapfrog ahead!

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works. Six featured papers are included this month, on some very important topics. Alan Stretton has contributed another good paper, sharing his decades of experience and knowledge about project management. Isaac Abuya and his co-authors have contributed another important paper about conditions on orphan support projects in Kenya, the topic of Isaac’s PhD research at the University of Nairobi. Tororiro Chaza in Zimbabwe has authored a very important paper on how to fight corruption with project governance. Dr. Chima Okereke in UK has authored an important paper on how PPM can be a “silver bullet” for advancing development in emerging economies (including his homeland of Nigeria). David Tain in Canada and professors Abu Dief, Aly Kotb and El Beheiry in Saudi Arabia has contributed papers on strategic alliances and arbitration/claims management for major international construction projects. These are all excellent contributions to the P/PM literature.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the October 2016 PMWJ

AI, Thinking Machines and Project Management, and Welcome to the August 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the October 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 51st edition again reflects the international nature of this publication; 26 original articles, papers and other works by 31 different authors in 13 different countries are included this month.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

In July I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents.  Several readers then suggested that I use this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor.  This month I discuss an issue that I think really is new for those in our field to consider, the impact of artificial intelligence and thinking machines on program/project management.

AI, Thinking Machines and Project Management

In August at the 10th UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, I attended a very interesting paper presentation by Schenita Floyd of the University of North Texas titled “Do Machines Hold a Key to Business Success?” (Her paper is republished in the PMWJ this month; don’t miss it.)  In her presentation (and paper), Ms. Floyd described some history and recent developments in artificial intelligence (AI) and the rapid rise of robots and “thinking machines” in various industries.  While her discussion was somewhat general, a light bulb came on for me with regards to the potential impact of this whole topic on the project management field (which I immediately shared with PMI founder Jim Snyder, who was sitting next to me.)

We have all recently seen numerous media stories, and technical and scientific reports, about new developments in AI, including the national commitment and investments occurring in the field of robotics (especially in Japan). This was highlighted during the closing ceremonies of the recently completed Rio Olympic Games during which the 2020 Tokyo Olympics were promoted along with the role that robotics and technology are expected to play there.

But as Ms. Floyd points out, there are many applications of AI already in use in such industries as automotive, defense, manufacturing, health and medical treatment, meteorology, mining, online services, personal services, security and other fields.

With regards to “thinking machines”, computer chips and “smart” applications are embedded in many new consumer and industrial products today, nearly all appliances, much equipment, most machinery, and many new materials used in construction and manufacturing.  The “internet of things” is widely understood and discussed; it is already here and expanding rapidly.  And just this week, the nobel prize in chemistry was awarded to “Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Scottish-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard “Ben” Feringa for making devices (machines) the size of molecules, so tiny that a lineup of 1,000 would stretch about the width of a human hair.” The miniaturization of technology has accelerated these developments.

As I sat listening to Ms. Floyd in August, I thought, “Wow, this is important!  It could change the entire resource planning equation for many programs and projects around the world.  And I have seen nothing in the project management profession or literature about this.”

In addition to the resource planning implications, as Ms. Floyd discusses in her paper, how do we deal with such topics as work planning, communications, leadership, team building and teamwork when teams consist of both humans and machines? How will teams of humans and machines avoid conflicts, maximize productivity, minimize risks (and costs), meet deadlines and accomplish complex tasks together?  Maybe it’s not so complicated today but what about in 5,10 or 20 years?  And if you look at programs and projects in locations that are dangerous or inhospitable to humans (radioactive conditions, natural disasters, under water, deep underground, in outer space, etc.), a majority of team members in the future will probably be robots or thinking machines.

New developments in micro-computing, smart materials and communications technologies are leading to some spectacular opportunities for smart buildings, smart roads, smarter systems and smarter solutions, especially related to energy efficiencies.  I think it’s exciting.

These developments will have a dramatic impact on the world of projects and project management – in all industries where technology, equipment, machinery and materials are used.  Project executives, managers and professionals will need to consider thinking machines as resources for performing things that machines are good at – physical labor requiring certain capabilities, remembering details, processing data, analyzing scenarios, and much more.  They will need to consider AI, thinking machines, miniaturization and smart materials for both creating new products and for how those products will live, act and perform over their life cycles.

I am not offering any great solutions here, just raising these topics as something that the PM profession now needs to consider.  How will project planning, and resource planning in particular, be affected?  What about supply chains and procurement processes?  What is the impact on project teams? These are challenging and exciting Questions!  They are also already here.  Read Ms. Floyd’s paper in the journal this month; then let us both know what you think about this topic.

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works.  Eight featured papers are included this month, on some very important topics. The research papers from academic leaders in Nigeria this month are outstanding, related to PPP projects in developing countries, corruption in the construction industry and the use of BIM for engineering and design.  The papers from Kenya and Zimbabwe discuss the application of PM in important social contexts, orphanages and general social work.  Emils Pulmanis’ paper discusses problems with the national eHealth rollout in Latvia. Joseph and Mario Kossman review game technology applications for validating the design of a healthcare project in Cameroon.  And Alan Stretton offers some perspective on just how useful or useless much current research published by project management academic journals seems to be.  These are the kinds of papers that we are looking for, those that share ideas, experience and knowledge that can help make the world a better place. Please check out these good papers this month.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj35-Jun2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today.  He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

 

Welcome to the September 2016 PMWJ

and Buy your Team a Lunch

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the September 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 50th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; it contains 30 original articles, papers and other works by 33 different authors in 15 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

In July I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents. Several readers have now suggested that I use this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor. This month I reflect on a recent conversation with a colleague who described a situation in his office that, I think, raises some issues for project teams and some good ideas.

Buy your team a lunch

Over an afternoon coffee a few weekends ago, I asked my friend how things were going with his projects. He’s working at a technology company that has both internal and external IT and web-related projects. He is working on some website enhancement projects; others are working on projects for customers. The company specializes in HR and training support software, tools and services and is apparently growing rapidly. Although they are adding staff, current employees are working long days, some evenings and partial weekends. There are 20-30 people there now, maybe more.

He told me that over the last month, he has taken some snacks into the office, put them in a glass bowl on his desk and people have been stopping by for something to nibble on during long afternoons. The previous week the CEO of the company came by, noticed the snack bowl, then announced that he was buying everyone lunch on Mondays, starting the following week. “On one condition,” he stated. “You have to eat in the cafeteria on the first floor with co-workers. You cannot bring your lunch back to your desk.”

My friend told me, “Hey, it’s a free lunch! I guess I’ll take it, start eating lunch again.” I immediately thought, Wow, that was a great idea, and probably not too expensive for a growing, profitable company or an executive. And it could produce some positive, even powerful results. I immediately thought this could be a good idea for many project managers or team leaders.

Here are some things that came to mind from this simple move – buying the team a lunch:

  • It could improve morale, increasing positive attitudes towards the company and leadership;
  • It forces people up off their chairs, walking, getting away from work for 30+ minutes – widely recognized as healthy for both mind and body (think health improvement, mindfulness)
  • It facilitates and promotes interaction, communication and networking (think team building, teamwork, problem resolution, etc.) – also with potential benefits to body and mind.

We know the benefits from celebrating successes, well established practice on Agile teams and in many project offices. But this move came from a CEO with no background in project management. It was simply a good leadership move, people-friendly, and widely appreciated. The application to project leadership was obvious to me, but we should also recognize that we can learn a lot from good managers and leaders whoever and wherever they might be. And some things like being kind to others, or buying the team a lunch, can generate some really positive results.

Maybe this was not a big new project management idea but I thought it was great and just wanted to pass it on.

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works. Six featured papers are again included. Frank Parth and Paul Giammalvo are back with papers that continue their recent themes or major program management and project management roles defined, respectively. Four other serious papers are included from researchers in Indonesia, Netherlands, Nigeria and Pakistan. Three very good series articles are included again this month, along with three useful advisory articles. Prof Sampietro has authored a fascinating Commentary article bout Britain’s Olympic success and how project management concepts played a major role in the UK’s success in Rio. Please check out these good articles and papers.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL
Addison, Texas, USA

 flag-usa

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (https://pmworldjournal.net/article/scaling-agile-adoption-local-agile-centers-excellence/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Welcome to the June PMWJ

Welcome to the June 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells
Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the June 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 47th edition of the Journal contains 30 original articles, papers and other works by 44 different authors representing 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We think the international content of the PMWJ sets it apart; we hope you agree. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever they may be.

This month in the Journal

This is another full edition with some excellent and interesting contributions from around the world. We start with a Letter to the Editor from UAE where a reader takes issue with a paper in the May PMWJ.

This edition contains a record 10 Featured Papers by authors in nine countries. Dr. Lev Virine, Michael Trumper and Eugenia Virine in Canada have authored another highly interesting (and entertaining) paper titled “What to do about risk.” If you think you’ve read all there is to know about risk, you might want to reconsider and read this paper. Emils Pulmanis in Riga has authored another paper titled “Project Management Application in the Port Development Project in Latvia.” Emils is fast becoming an expert on project management in development; this paper reflects his increasing knowledge and experience. Isaac Abuya in Kenya is back with another important paper with relevance for project managers in his country and many others, titled “Project Fraud: Conceptualization, Determinants and Schemes.” Many of us have seen some of these schemes on real projects.

Amna Shahid, Saif ul Amin and Asiya Sohail in Pakistan have contributed a paper titled “An Investigation into the Relationship between Horizontal Violence and Project Success: Emotional Intelligence Mediating Role.” Samuel Omojola Oludare and Olugboyega Oluseye in Nigeria are the authors of “Quality management practices among construction firms in Lagos State, Nigeria.” Abid Tabassum in Canada has authored a similar paper, “Life Cycle Cost Analysis and Cost Savings for Road Projects.” While many readers may not see the relevance of these papers for their projects, we provide an important publishing vehicle for project management experts, researchers and practitioners everywhere to share their work. If it helps someone somewhere, we think these works are well worth publishing.

The other four featured papers this month are by authors who are well known to PMWJ readers. Alan Stretton has authored another important work titled “Some consequences of having two co-existing paradigms of project management.” If you are interested in the big picture, the global project management profession, read Alan’s latest contribution. Paul Giammalvo in Indonesia has authored an interesting research paper titled “Project Planner/Scheduler Defined – A Key Word Analysis of Current Job Descriptions as the Basis for Exam and Competency Scoring Models.” This turns out to be useful information, for both employers and professionals. Walt Lipke, earned value and earned schedule expert in the USA, has authored “The Probability of Project Recovery.” So you think your project can recover from cost overruns and schedule slips; probably not! O. Chima Okereke, PhD (Nigeria/UK) has authored another important paper to help his country titled “Developing and Implementing a national strategic change management framework towards the eradication of corruption in Nigeria.”

Series authors David Hillson (UK), Ann Pilkington (UK), and Darrel Hubbard and Dennis Bolles (USA) are back with good new articles in their respective series – risk, communications and enterprise PMOs. Prof Darren Dalcher (UK) has authored another interesting introductory article for Martin Hopkinson’s Advances in Project Management series article, both offering new perspectives on business cases, benefits and value. Martin takes us all back to school with a reminder that net present value analysis really works. Series articles are by global experts so please read these important new contributions this month.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTO
DAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

 

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David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.

David has more than 35 years of project management related experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. His experience has been in both government and private sectors. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

 

Welcome to the August 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

 

Introduction to and Overview of the Current Edition

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the August 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 37th edition of the Journal contains 35 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 41 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge and information related to program and project management (P/PM), please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of articles, papers, reports, book reviews and news stories are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for you and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers in the news section of the PMWJ this month; if interested in submitting works for publication, review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month with one Letter to the Editor – from Russ Archibald in Mexico “On the subject of Marco Sampietro’s paper on Project Team Member’s Perspective in the July edition”. If you have a reaction to something in this month’s edition and won’t mind sharing it with others, please send it in an email to [email protected].

We start this month’s edition with a wonderful Featured Interview with Debbie O’Bray, PMI Fellow and Former Chair of the PMI Board of Directors. Debbie has been an active PMI leader for 25 years, has traveled and spoken widely on behalf of the Institute and has a great personal story to tell. Debbie is also a global advisor for the PMWJ. Don’t miss this interview, captured by PMWJ managing editor (me) via email. (Of course, I’ve known Debbie for twenty years, so I knew what questions to ask!)

7 Featured Papers are included this month, by 12 authors in six different countries. Lev Virine, Michael Trumper and Eugenia Virine in Calgary, Alberta (Canada) have authored a new paper titled “Emotions in Project Management.” Building on their theme of ‘choice engineering’, they describe how both positive and negative emotions can affect management decisions often to the detriment of project success.

Beyond Buildability: Operability and Commissioning of Industrial Facilities” is a featured paper by Maurini Elizardo Brito, Raphael de Oliveira Albergarins Lopes, Luiz Rocha and Prof. Eduardo Qualharini in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. These authors, who work together in support of IPMA Brazil, rightly focus on the value delivery of projects, after the project has officially ended. After all, a facility must be fully operational as planned after construction.

Hareshchandra Thakur, an executive with Wartsila India in Mumbai, has authored “Determinants of Project Success in a Multicultural Environment – a Project Team’s Perspective” in response to our call for papers on leading multicultural teams. His paper is based on experience at Wartsila working with a wide variety of stakeholders. According to Mr. Thakur, “… once we act with mindfulness, apply the principles of leadership and consciously work with higher EI (emotional intelligence), we find that not only the efficiency and effectiveness is enhanced, but also working is more of a pleasure and is purpose driven.” This paper contains some astute insights gained over numerous programs and projects.

Emils Pulmanis, our correspondent in Riga, Lativa and an active project management leader in multiple organizations there, is the author of the featured paper this month titled “The Investment Plan for Europe and European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI): New project management challenges.” According to Emils’ introduction, “During the Latvian presidency of the EU council, The European Commission approved a € 315 billion Investment Plan to get Europe growing again and get more people back to work… This paper analyzes the new EU Investment plan and shows different opinions and problems that might arise during its implementation…” If you live or work in Europe, you need to read this paper.

David Hulett, PhD, one of the world’s leading project scheduling and risk management experts based in Southern California, has authored “What Should We Do with Unknowns in Schedule Risk Analysis.” Dr. Hulett concludes with “This paper presents four different concepts of knowns and unknowns and shows how they are, or could be, represented in a schedule risk model using uncertainty, risk events and confidential interviews.” Dr. Hulett doesn’t stop at traditional schedule risks, rather drawing on the work of Ed Merrow, Bent Flyvbjerg, John Hollmann and others on major project failures to assess the impact of underestimating costs and resource requirements on projects.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 



About the Author


pmwj36-Jul2015-Pells-PHOTODAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

Texas, USA

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David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit https://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.