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Welcome to the February 2018 PMWJ

Gone and Back Again, the Rise of Regional Project Management Conferences, and… Welcome to the February edition of the PM World Journal

 

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the February 2018 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 67th uninterrupted monthly edition.  This edition contains 37 original articles, papers and other works by 39 different authors in 17 different countries.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

For the past year I have used this space to discuss important or interesting trends or issues that I see as journal editor.  This month, I want to mention a trend that I’ve wanted to talk about for some time but found other topics somewhat higher priority – the increasing number of local and regional conferences around the world.

1980s and my first Conference Experiences

I began my professional career in 1976, learning project cost and schedule control at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) working on a large nuclear safety project.  Five years later I was working on a large defense program for a division of GTE, wandered into their corporate library and discovered an Encyclopedia of Associations in which I found a listing for the Project Management Institute (PMI®).  I contacted PMI, learned that they had a chapter nearby (I was living in Northern California at the time), attended some meetings and started to learn more about both PMI and the project management profession.  I learned that PMI had more chapters around the USA and that their biggest event was an annual conference called “Annual Seminars/Symposia”.

Five years later I was back in Idaho, having advanced to a leadership position and helping develop an enterprise-wide project management planning process covering hundreds of projects and 5,000+ employees.  By 1986, with an MBA in hand, I decided to author a paper for presentation at a project management conference.  I was 10 years into my project management career and wanted to share my recent experience with our successful initiative at the INL.  I discovered that PMI chapters in Seattle, Portland and Vancouver BC had launched an annual Pacific Northwest Regional Project Management Conference.  So I submitted an abstract to the next regional conference in Seattle and presented a paper there, my first conference presentation.  I followed that with a presentation the next year at the Northwest Regional PM Conference in Vancouver, BC.

By that time I was leading a new PMI chapter; I attended my first PMI Seminars/Symposia in Milwaukee in 1987.  At that time, I knew about the regional conferences in the Pacific Northwest and the big annual PMI conference, which was mostly attended by PMI members in the United States and Canada, but few outside North America.  The only way we learned about project management events was by reading PMI publications; this was long before the Internet and email.  I knew nothing about PM conferences in other countries.  I attended PMI’s annual Seminars/Symposia in 1988, 1989 and 1990. Then things changed for me.

1990 – 2000: Dominance of Big International Events

By 1990 I was living in Dallas, Texas, working on a massive science project, the Superconducting Super Collider.  That year I was also invited to assume the presidency of the PMI Dallas/Ft. Worth chapter, a young and still struggling chapter.  In 1990 I also attended two international conferences, both of which I learned about through PMI.  In June 1990, I travelled to Vienna, Austria to present a paper at the INTERNET’90 World Congress on Project Management.  It was a new and eye-opening experience.  I learned for the first time about INTERNET (the International Project Management Association, which later changed its identity to the IPMA) and its member associations in various European countries.  I became familiar with APM in the UK (actually joining APM in 1991), the Austrian PM Association and a few others. I also learned that some of those member associations conducted annual local conferences, for example in Finland and Germany.

In October 1990, I attended PMI’s annual conference (PMI’90) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where I again met PMI leaders from around North America but also from South Africa (PMI’s largest chapter outside of North America).  I also met IPMA’s representative, David Mathie, who was attending the PMI conference under a cooperation agreement between PMI and IPMA and was there to promote the next IPMA congress in Florence, Italy.

In 1990, I also visited Russia and Ukraine for the first time, where I met professional leaders in those countries. I participated in project management conferences in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia in 1993 and 1995.

From 1991-2000, I attended every annual PMI conference around North America and IPMA congresses in Florence (1992), Oslo (1994) and Paris (1996).  Those were the big international events in the PM World.  By 1995 I had been elected to the PMI Board of Directors.  In October 1995, at PMI’95 in New Orleans, I organized and managed an event called the Global Project Management Forum, to which were invited leaders of other PM associations around the world for a meeting to discuss global cooperation.  About 20 such professional organizations were represented, primarily from Europe but also Brazil, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, South Africa and a few others.

In Paris in 1996, I met Brian Kooyman from Sydney who was representing the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM).  I learned about AIPM’s history, activities and annual conferences.  I was invited to both Brazil and South Africa in 1999, speaking at the PMI Sao Paulo chapter’s big conference and a bi-annual national conference in Johannesburg organized by PM South Africa.  By that time, I knew of regional conferences in the Nordic countries (annual events called NORDNET), Russia, India, Australia, Brazil and South Africa.  A few PMI chapters in North America had grown large and were starting to organize their own annual conferences.  But by and large, the two big international events organized by PMI and IPMA dominated the conference schedule.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012).  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide.  David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Cruise from Personal Agility to Organizational Agility


FEATURED PAPER

By Raji Sivaraman, M.S, PMI-ACP, PMP, PMO-CP
Principal of ASBA LLC, Singapore/USA,
Adjunct Professor, Feliciano School of Business, Montclair University, USA,

and

Michal Raczka, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMP, CISA
IT Strategy Vice Director at mBank S.A.
Warsaw, Poland

 



Abstract

The aim of this paper is to show how the authors’ Personal Agility (PA) Lighthouse model; PA Lighthouse ™ is most germane in terms of the entrepreneurial and organizational element.  Specialist focus on practice regimes, planning and psychology of effective skills development relevant to self-evaluation and self-reflection alter courses as and when appropriate. Techniques relevant to resolution, negotiation and identity expansion for growth into the organizational agility space are touched in this paper. From a philosophical and practical perspective, the authors’ explore how the PA Lighthouse ™ might foster an approach to the idea and practice of professionalism. Whilst drawing from the agile mindset to inform aspects of preparation and practical skills development, the authors cruise through general extensions of motivation and building flexibility as the voyage travels from Personal Agility (PA) to Organizational Agility (OA). The authors’ journey implies the methods and approaches to go from where you are to where you want to be as the deliverable.

Keywords:  Personal Agility, Organizational Agility, Cruise, OKR, R&D, IDL

Introduction

The authors are going to attempt to guide the readers through a cruise from Personal Agility (PA) to Organizational Agility (OA). The business imperatives to attain organizational goals in the authors’ mind is when multi-faceted competencies are instituted. These alone according to the authors may not suffice. Exhibit 1 from the 2017 Baltic Project Management conference (Raji and Michal, 2017)i shown below illustrates the seven agility flavors to gain competitive advantage.

The authors have pondered over the ‘whys’ for the bumpy ride of the transformations in the agile/digital paradigm shift. McKinsey’s Aaron De Smet and Chris Gagnon (McKinsey & Company, 2017)ii explain what is driving organizational agility, why it matters, and what to do in their article “Going from fragile to agile”. They talk about value, integrity, collaboration and excellence. All of these are true indicators for convergence of markets as is a well-designed personal agility that needs to flow through to organizational agility. Therefore, if you want to make any kind of transformation in your company it is a good idea to reach a state of organizational agility and this can be made possible through the honing of the seven Personal Agility model at all levels.

Education Agility

In the authors’ context, education agility is to do ‘role-playing in companies’ (Etu.ie, 2017)iii, getting the feel of the pain points of the person sitting in a different chair and doing the roles that does not necessarily fall into your daily routine. Organizations learn and feel the new trends of business models in order to disrupt themselves. The question then is; what your core business (daily routine) is, and what could disrupt your core business? Does an organization have the ability to adapt? Put your organization into a disruptor’s shoes. Does an organization have the ability to experiment with new business models or innovate them? Thus when simple questions such as these get answered, then organizational agility is originated from the ability to adapt to changing environments or the ability to disrupt businesses. Especially now that it is very valid when the “digital era,” will soon replace the information age as quoted in the Disrupt or get disrupted by the “digital era”! (Forbes.com, 2017)iv

All industries are affected. Innovative breakthroughs in technology, medicine, transportation, machine learning are transforming, will all continue to transform the world we live and work in. Organizations and leaders when prepared can easily adapt to the “digital era”. Getting the feel of the pain points on a personal level can be achieved through mentoring with people who already exist where we want to be. On an organizational level this can be achieved using benchmarking with already disrupted industries in the current playing field. At another personal level we should also be aware of T-shaped (Wladawsky-Berger, 2017)v people. At an organizational level it can be achieved through networking with other industries or creating subsidiaries to learn the new business models. We could call it the T shaped Organization!

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Authors


Raji Sivaraman

Singapore / USA




Raji Sivaraman
, MS, PMI-ACP, PMP, PMO-CP, Principal of ASBA LLC, a Singapore citizen, helps USA/Singapore companies with strategic planning/overseas startups. She speaks several languages. Worked in Singapore, Thailand, India and the USA. She helps fortune 50/500 companies with CSR/BSR projects. She is a Consultant, Director, Strategic Advisor and an Advisory Board member for non-profit organizations. She has worked in IT, publishing, financial, standards and logistics industries. She is an Adjunct Professor at Montclair University, USA. She is a Researcher, Author, Contributor to Project Management books, published articles, research and white papers internationally. She is a global facilitator, keynote speaker, discussant. An Academic chair, Moderator CXO Forum and a panelist. She is an Agile practitioner with a Master of Science Degree in Project Management. She has held leadership positions with the Project Management Institute at the chapter/global level and conducts workshops around the world. In a nutshell, she is a Pracademic..LinkedIn: /raji-sivaraman ; Twitter: @RSNOLA;  Website: http://agilitydiscoveries.com;  Email: [email protected]

 


Michal Raczka

Warsaw, Poland

 

 

Michal Raczka, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMP, PSPO, AgilePM, CISA, is a project management expert, experienced in new technologies & digital leadership fields. Currently, he is the IT Strategy and Project Management Vice Director at mBank S.A. He is also a project management lecturer at the Executive MBA programs. He has conducted several organisational changes involving the optimisation of project management methods and agile transformations. Always keeps Team in the centre. Value and results focused with lean and agile approach. Individual with proven achievements in project & business management, process improvement and team leadership. Experienced in managing geographically distributed, multi-disciplinary projects and customer teams. Experienced in project excellence awards assessments. Conference speaker. Strategic Advisor. Lecturer. Volunteer. Mentor.  Follow Michal at LinkedIn: /mraczka; Twitter: @mraczka; About Me: /michal.raczka;  Website: http://agilitydiscoveries.com

Email:  [email protected]

 

 

Compensatory Damages in Employment Discrimination

How much is it worth?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Robin Grimonprez

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Many people in their life face Employment Discrimination. During or after it happens, they need to know what is the best thing to do to perceive the compensatory damages they deserved.  Over the past decades, the number of complaints linked to employment discrimination has increased and many people are still afraid to complain depending on the context. This paper analyzes all the different alternatives using a multi-criteria decision analysis method. The author suggests that the best solution for a person who is a victim of employment discrimination is to seek the help of an independent investigator. Thanks to his experiences and knowledge, he can give his opinion and decide what the best decision to do is – either talk informally to the employer or make an official complaint to the court.

Key words – Damages, Discrimination, Employment Law, Breach of Contract, Monetary Regulations, Personal Injury

INTRODUCTION

If I speak to you about employment discrimination, you would probably say that nowadays in rich, educated and developed countries, it tends to go down. The reality is different, and we see that employment discrimination stagnates or even increases over the years. For instance, with the help of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), $525 million was perceived by victims of employment discrimination in 2015 in the United States.

Employment Discrimination happens when there is a difference in treatment between two equally qualified individuals. This can be based on several aspects such as gender, race, religion, disability, age, sexual orientation, national origin or gender identity. An employment discrimination practice can take many forms and it can occur in many aspects of employment from the refusal to hire to the termination. It can also be seen during the employment with disciplinary actions, denial of training, failure to promote, demotion or harassment.

A person who is a victim of employment discrimination can go to court and ask his employer to pay compensatory damages. These Damages can be asked when there is any form of injury. The injury can be physical or emotional. The victim is paid for the expenses caused by the discrimination like medical expenses but also for the emotional harm suffered.

In our case, we will especially look at the emotional injury and emotional distress. This kind of injury can happen after being discriminated at work and it can lead to depression, inability to control anger or other emotions, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, inability to sleep or loss of appetite.

Nowadays, Employment Discrimination is a well-known problem that can occur frequently, in any kind of profession. The law and contracts may be unclear on this subject for some people, so it is important to make it clear and try to help people who suffer from it.

How can you prove that you are a victim of employment discrimination? What is the best thing to do to solve your problem? Must you face it alone or with the help of an independent expert?

In this paper, we will look at employment contract and compensatory damages and try to see what a person who is a victim of employment discrimination can do during and after it happens. To do that, we will consider a specific situation and then we will generalize our approach.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Robin Grimonprez

SKEMA Business School
Lille, France

 

 

Robin Grimonprez is an MSc student in SKEMA Business School on the French campus of Lille, with a major in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). He is graduated from the Catholic University of Lille and has already obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Economy and Finance.  His academic career took place in France, England and Brazil. During his studies, he has worked for French companies like “La poste”, “Decathlon” or “Patrival” as finance assistant and for an English company “The French Oven” as Manager Assistant.

He lives in Lille, France, and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Adapting a literary work in France

A real challenge

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Jean-Maxime Feutry

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Since the birth of the cinematographic industry, producers and authors have taken inspiration from another form of art: literature. The adaptation of books is still today a very common practice. But the author’s rights are something to consider with great attention before starting any procedure. It is important to be aware of the various situations that can occur and how to deal with them. We will try to define the proper process to adapt a literary work, using the Multi-Attribute Decision Making method (MADM). Out of the three solutions studied in this paper seems to be the more adapted: to buy the rights to the right’s owner, as other solutions are too restrictive or risky. This solution might be the most expensive one, but it is the safest and it guarantees fidelity to the original work.

Key words: Contract, Literature, Audiovisual adaptation, Cinema, Option, Adaptation rights, Author, Fidelity

INTRODUCTION

In 2018, a new TV Show will start on the French channel Canal +: Vernon Subutex, the adaptation from the book trilogy by the famous French Novelist Virginie Despentes. The success of the book, which you can see almost every day in the hands of people in the Parisian subway, has seduced the production companies Tetra Media Fiction and 27.11. Its success as a book guarantees several spectators for the TV Show.

Since the birth of the cinematographic industry in the early 20th Century, cinema took inspiration from other media, and especially books, graphic novels and comics. As a new art, it was indeed easy to rely on arts that had been here for decades or centuries. Also, the public was interested by the idea to see on a screen what they could only imagine from the books. At first, there were no rights concerning the adaptation on screen because no similar situation existed before. From the birth of cinema, so approximately 1891 with the very short movie (15 seconds) Dickson Greeting to 1913, if a movie recreated something from a book, it was considered as pantomime.

We can for example think about the short-movie Barbe-Bleue (1901) or Gulliver’s Travels Among the Lilliputians and the Giants (1902) both directed by Georges Mélies, one of the most important French directors from the beginning of the century, and both adapted from books.

But in 1913, after the reproduction of the adventure of Michel Strogoff, a character invented by French novelist Jules Verne, it was illegal to do so without any rights and the author could ask for compensation. The years that followed confirm this idea, and today, if someone, a director or a producer, wants to adapt a novel on screen, he must search for possible adaptation rights that need to be acquired.

Step 1: Problem recognition, definition and evaluation

From that point, many different situations are possible. The book rights can be free or in the possession of other people, the author or the editor mainly. The rights are released from the author 70 years after his death, but it doesn’t mean automatically that the rights are free because they might have been sold before, to an editor or to another production society. That’s why it is important to study with much care the situation of the literary work we want to adapt and act accordingly.

The question we will try to answer next is: What is the proper process to adapt a literary work?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Jean-Maxime Feutry

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Jean-Maxime Feutry
is a 23 years old French student at SKEMA Business School, based in Paris, France. After studying general knowledge about management, accounting, marketing and law during his first two years in the business school, he is now specializing in Project Management in the Master of Science « Project and Programme Management and Business Development ». He will graduate in 2018. He received this year the accreditations AgilePM and Prince2. He also studied for one semester at NC State University, based in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America. Before SKEMA, he took a two-year course preparing for competitive exam, called Hypokhâgne and Khâgne B/L, specializing in sociology, economics and literature, in Lille, north of France.

He is planning to work in the cinematographic industry, and more specifically in a production company. He has already made a few internships in this sector, first in one the biggest movie theater of France, the Kinepolis of Lomme, as assistant to the content manager and then in two production companies based in Paris. He was responsible, as a Production Assistant and then as a Development Manager, of the subvention strategy, the elaboration of the subvention files and of the estimates and financing plans. He worked on animated or live short and feature films, which encountered success in festivals. He was also for one year (in 2015) the president of the student association “7eme Art”, which promoted cinema in SKEMA Business School. As the president, he was responsible of the management of a team composed of twenty individuals who were divided in team dedicated to specific tasks. He was also in charge of the organization of premieres and internal screenings, the writing of articles and reviews for the association’s blog and the administrative work related to the functioning of a student association.

Jean-Maxime can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

eSports Players Status

Myth or Reality?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Nicolas Diaz

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

eSport, competitive video games, is a recent phenomenon that hasn’t stop growing for the last couple of years. However, the growth was so that some aspects are still very amateur and especially players support and contracts. Becoming a pro-player, now is the dream of thousands of children around the world but only a few has the capabilities to make it through, only a few can live of it, because today, it’s still a very unsafe path. That is why in this document, the aim will be finding possible and viable solution to make eSport Athletes status more recognized and safer, using Multi-Attribute Decision making, to compare and evaluate them. The main expectation is to find viable and durable solutions to this problem, and it should also show how new, unique and complex is the eSport ecosystem, and what other aspects need to be developed to not only help eSport players but the whole industry.

Key Words: eSport, Sport, Contracts, Organizations, Players, Ecosystem, Professionals, Amateurs, Competition, Innovation

INTRODUCTION

From bedrooms to stadiums! This is the path of gamers for the last 4 decades. Today eSport, live or online video games competitions, gather millions of players, among which the bests want to become professional and real eSport Athletes, millions of viewers online (70M for the finals of Worlds on League of Legends in November 2017) and involves more and more economical actors like media, event organizations, teams, and now investors from different horizons. In fact, recently, companies like Cleveland Cavaliers, Houston Rockets or Airbus bought spots in different leagues on several games. The video game industry which already is a big one (25.2 billion in 2010 according the Entertainment Software Association) doesn’t stop growing, and eSport could push it to the next level.

2011: League of Legends Worlds – season 1 Finals

2012: League of Legends Worlds – season 2 Finals

2013: League of Legends Worlds – season 3 Finals – Staples Center – Los Angeles

However, as the industry of eSport is growing really fast right now, it appears that it suffers from its youth and kind of lack of experience. And the consequences of this situation are many and on different level. The first victims are the professional players. Back in when the competitions were amateur, 15-20 years ago, players competed for 100€ or for keyboards, and had to manage themselves, creating their own team, and going to events by themselves. But during the last decade, professional structures appeared (Fnatic, G2 Esports, TSM, CLG…) and started managing the players giving them contracts, and working with sponsors. Even though it became more professional, issues still appear very often concerning, Visa, the legal status of eSport athlete from a country to another, revenues, and the value of an eSport contract overall.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Nicolas Diaz

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Nicolas Diaz
is 22 years old student in Skema Business School, on Paris Campus. Currently in Msc Project & Program Management, he had the opportunity to travel to the United States, at NC States for a full semester, and is globally attracted by travelling, discovering and experiencing new cultures. French, with Peruvian origins, he grew up in a mix culture that brought him a lot, and spent whole his youth in Franconville, not far from Paris. With previous experience has intern, in PSA Peugeot Citroen, he is more attracted by eSport, the New Big Thing, by the competition and the ecosystem itself.

 

 

A Power Struggle in the Taxi Industry

A Challenge for Uber and Lyft regarding their Service Clauses

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Anne Jacquet

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

The term « Uberization » is generally used to describe the phenomenon by which a startup or a new model linked to digital economy can threaten an old model of the “traditional” economy[1]. Uber is the company behind this recent term and is bringing about a revolution on the sharing economy. However recent companies start occupying more and more importance in the taxi industry, such as Lyft in America, or Didi Chuxing in Asia, putting shadow on both traditional taxi companies and the current leader in the industry, namely Uber. In this paper, we will focus on main attributes of each company to analyze if one would be able to dethrone the American taxi platform.

Key Words: Taxi industry, pricing war, service clause, vehicle types, mobile app, customer support.

INTRODUCTION

It is 3 in the morning; no more subways, or bus available to take you home. Going home by foot? No conceivable, it is more than 5 kilometers far. You are thinking of your colleague, 2 days ago, who talked about two “great mobile phone applications” which enable you to hire a private driver to pick you up and take you to the destination you want. One is called “Uber”, the other “Lyft”.

Launched in San Francisco in 2009, Uber has become “the most recognized alternative to traditional taxi cabs”[2]. The company is valued at $62.5 billion, and the number of rides “raised by 150% from 2015 to 2016”[3], ranking the company as the leader of the alternatives to taxi cabs. These new economic actors claim sharing and solidarity values, and the creation of social link between citizens. Nevertheless, these companies based their service on a platform, so do not need to pay for any shop. They are often accused of unfair competition with traditional taxi companies.

Recent scandals tarnished the Uber’s image, in particular the price of the rides and the payment of the drivers. In opposition, its main recent American competitor “Lyft” created in 2012 -proposing similarly the same service- starts gaining ground on the market share with its $5.5 billion valuation. We can also discover that “Lyft is now doing over 1 million rides per day”[4], and has 325,000 drivers in the United States.

At first sight, both companies have the same goal: putting riders in contact with private drivers via a mobile phone application. Those without smartphones -a percentage of the population that shrinks each year- will prefer calling for cabs. For the rest, the decision to choose one company from the other looks to be subjective or may be based on unfounded arguments. Nevertheless, recent data and surveys show us that Lyft starts being chosen by more users after the evaluation of different criteria detailed in their Service clauses. These clauses “comprise mobile applications and related services, which enable users to arrange and schedule transportation, logistics and/or delivery services and/or to purchase certain goods”[5].

This paper is going to look at the position of the two American companies -Uber and Lyft- and the possible newcomers that could disrupt the leader position of Uber, Lyft and the traditional services proposed in the taxi industry. Then an analysis of the rank of these characteristics will be realized in order to know which one is the most important for users.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Anne Jacquet

Paris, France

 

 


Anne Jacquet
 is a French student in Paris, specializing in a MSc Project and Programme Management and Business Development at Skema Business School. After getting her A-level, Economic option, passed with honors, she studied two years in Preparatory classes for competitive entry to business schools with also an Economic Specialization. Her first year License spent in Lille at Skema Business School enabled her to enter the Norwegian School of Economics for one year.

She is now doing her second year Master’s degree in Paris. To further pursue and improve his knowledge on the project management topic, she trained and successfully passed 2 professional Certifications: Prince2 Foundations and AgilePM Foundations. She began a first experience in January 2018 as an assistant project manager during a 6-month-internship at Webhelp in Paris, a company leader in business process outsourcing.

Anne can be contacted at [email protected]

 

[1]  Bathelot, B. 2016, “Uberisation”, Definitions Marketing, < https://www.definitions-marketing.com/definition/uberisation/ >

[2] Gil, P. 2017, “How Uber Works and The Pros and Cons”, Lifewire <https://www.lifewire.com/how-does-uber-work-3862752>

[3] “Uber : le chiffre d’affaire bondit’’, 2017, Le Figaro <http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-eco/2017/08/23/97002-20170823FILWWW00329-uber-a-encore-perdu-645m-au-t2-mais-les-reservations-augmentent.php >

[4] Welch, C. 2017, “Lyft is now doing 1 million rides per day”, The Verge <https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/5/15923610/lyft-1-million-daily-rides-announced>

[5] UBER, CGU, “U.S Terms of Use”, 2017, <https://www.uber.com/fr/legal/terms/us/>

 

 

Analysis & Benchmarking of the SAQ contract for wine importation


STUDENT PAPER

By Victorine Leturgez

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

When it comes to consumption many people would think that this is something that we are doing in a totally free manner. However, even if we are living in the 21th century, it still exists places where buying a product is a complex process because of very specifics contracts that rules the behavior of the consumers. It is the case in Québec with the contract for wine importation and so, consumption. Here, this paper will be designed to research, analyze and answer the reasons why private importation might be threaten by studying specialized articles, interviews, research papers in the wine sector in different countries with the use of a Multi-Attribute Decision Making method. The expectations from this paper are to point out what are the main failures of this contract, such as price, management and efficiency issues. This paper may help the SAQ to understand that it acts like an obstacle for the wine market in Québec.

Key words: Wine, importation, SAQ, Québec, service, contract, order

INTRODUCTION

SAQ (Société des Alcools du Québec) is one of the most powerful state society in the world. The creation of this contract between consumers and the state dates back to the prohibition in the United States in the early 1920s. Canada has followed the example and almost all the provinces have now a strict control of the importation, distribution and the sale of alcohol. This paper will be focused on the wine sector in Québec with the SAQ as it is one of the most important. In 2016, the SAQ net profit has reached 1,067 billion dollars, fully paid to the government of Quebec.

However, the state’s monopoly through the SAQ has been, over the past years, a real issue. For most people, it is no longer justified to have this entity that dictates alcohol consumption. Still, nothing has changed and it is impossible to know if there will be a liberalization one day, as a lot of people seems to hope.

The SAQ has developed a new way of importing wine in Québec: the private importation. Consumers and restaurateurs can now import wines that are not proposed in SAQ throughout specialized agencies. In 2016, there were 16 000 products in private imports and 11 500 general products in SAQ shops. The contract specified that they must follow specific rules to import these wines in line with the SAQ process which will be detailed later in this paper.

Even if the market is still growing and new specialized agencies in wine importation are created, the future of private imports is seriously questioned. Thus, this paper aimed in pointed out the limitations of the private importation contract in Québec:

  1.  First, the pricing issue will be discussed to show that there is a real difference in price because of the contract in private importation.
  2. Secondly, that this way of working between the SAQ, the consumers, the agencies and the suppliers, results in problem of management.
  3. Thirdly, all the specificities of the private importation contract will be examined to reveal an efficiency concern.

Regarding these three main points, does the wine private importation contract in Québec have a future?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Victorine Leturgez

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 

 

Victorine Leturgez is a French student in Skema Business School. She is actually doing a specialized master degree in Project Management & Business Development. Previously, she did a 6 month internship in one of the biggest agencies in wine importation in Montréal. Victorine has worked with the Canadian wine market. She has experience in project and business development, in communicating, analyzing but also in the wine area and more precisely in Québec. She lives in Paris, France and can be reached at [email protected].

 

 

Adaptation of Standard Contract Documents in Chinese Construction

(FIDIC, AIA, EJCDC, Consensus Docs)

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Shanshan Li

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Since China has been devoted to realizing the modernization completely before 2025, it occurs evermore that many construction projects are carried through without standards. Construction contracts as the first guarantee to ensure the success ongoing of the project, therefore have the duty to be formed properly. As China develops slowly in the Contract Law, the contracts we use today don’t match to the current constructions anymore. To make the contracts applied appropriately, this paper will develop which standard contracts such as Fédération Internationale Des Ingénieurs Conseils (FIDIC), American Institute of Architects (AIA) is better to be adapted to make up the defects in the Chinese construction contracts by adopting Dominance method and the Additive Weighting Technique to analyze. Based on the result, it’s suggested to adopt the FIDIC contracts as it has large advantages in most of the aspects of which Chinese contracts is shorting. This paper may help to make improvements to the Chinese construction contracts and create an orderly environment for Chinese construction industry.

Key words: Chinese Construction, Construction Contracts, Adaptation of Contract, Characteristic of Contracts, Pros of Contracts, Cons of Contracts, Comparative Analysis

INTRODUCTION

China nowadays being second-largest economy plans, is at a rapid speed of development, so is the construction industry. In the recent 5 years, China has built several enormous buildings such as Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge, the longest cross-sea bridge in the world; Danyang-Kunshan Grande Bridge, the longest worldwide bridge; and Beipanjiang Large Bridge which is the highest bridge all over the world. These are all thrilling achievements in the construction field.

With the ongoing of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, China has set her new direction which is to keep open to these international companies in order to realize the globalization. However, she is faced with many difficulties among which the Chinese standards varying from the popular international standards is a significant problem to deal with. Concerning the construction industry, the standard of contract that China has adopted limits Chinse construction companies’ scope of business.

It is urgently needed to make some reformation to the construction contract to get more suitable to the international criterion. There are mainly four types of contracts widely adopted to the field of construction which are: Fédération Internationale Des Ingénieurs Conseils (FIDIC), American Institute of Architects (AIA), Consensus Docs Construction Contracts (Consensus Docs) and The Engineers Joint Contract Documents Committee (EJCDC). These four types of construction contracts focus on different aspects resulting in their different characteristics. In another words, though used worldwide, some defaults still exist in these four popular construction standard contracts. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to discuss how to adopt these four popular standard contracts to the Chinese construction contracts by analyzing the issues as followed:

  • What are the characteristics of construction contract management in China?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of the standard construction contracts (FIDIC, AIA, EJCDC and Consensus Docs)?
  • Which is the best mode for Chinese construction contracts?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Shanshan Li

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 



Shanshan Li
is a student in SKEMA Business School (Paris), with major in Project Management and Business Development (PPMBD). She graduated from Wuhan University of Technology, and holds a bachelor degree of engineering in engineering management. In 2016, she started her study in France and had one year’s study in ECOLE SPECIALE des TRAVAUX PUBLIC (ESTP). In June 2017, she had her internship as a incidents analyst in the Xiaohepengpeng Technology Ltd., Company. In September 2017, she started to study in SKEMA. She lives in Paris, France now, and can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Green Street Art

Innovation to reach legality and limit pollution

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Laure Matran

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Although graffiti has earned its reputation for a long time already in some people’s hearts, some refractory persist to say that it is illegal pollution on the walls of raging strangers’ properties. Indeed, the law makes no differentiation between graffiti and tags. It will be ideally necessary to reach agreements of such clauses within contracts for helping prevent further visual pollution and defend real street art in our environment.

This paper analyzes all the different alternatives using a multi-criteria decision analysis method. The author suggests that the best solution for graffiti artists who want to be seen as real art makers is to start creating green street art masterpieces. However, the possibility of stimulating people to sustainable art ensure a win-win approach towards starting a legalization process thanks to contracts allowing the sharing of public places between green spray-painted masters and individuals supporting sustainability.

Key Words: Sustainability, Art, Public, Protection, Pollution, Commission, Control

INTRODUCTION

The greatest crimes in the world are not committed by people breaking the rules but by people following the rules. It’s people who follow orders that drop bombs and massacre villages.”[1].

Banksy may be right, for instance, according to French law, graffiti is criminal. Condemned by the law, it is considered a deliberate degradation or deterioration of property belonging to another. Graffiti writers who are caught in the act are liable to a fine ranging from 1500 € up to 30 000 € and 2 years of imprisonment in case of heavy damage.

Indeed, in several countries, the law makes no differentiation between authentic performances suspended in museums and those spray-painted on raging strangers’ properties. Nevertheless, for concerned individuals, there is a difference:  commissioned artworks are graffiti” and illegally implanted images are “tags. Who says true and who says false? Although graffiti has earned its reputation for a long time already in the heart of certain circles, some refractory persist to show that it is an illegal act that pollutes the walls of all neighborhoods and it is even called “metastasis”. According to them, graffiti would have a depraved, abandoned visual aspect and would be a sign of mismanagement on the part of the authorities. Moreover, letting graffiti artists perform where and how they wish would be a sign of neglecting, also indicating a lack of interest in one’s own fellow citizens.

Finally, it is less the physical form of the graffiti which disturbs; except if tags are included; that the subjectivity which it lets guess: the individual arrested by graffiti can give free course to his imagination and his anxieties to draw the portrait of his author. Thus, graffiti contributes to the feeling of insecurity that affects urban centers. However, one thing is certain: it is not because graffiti is able to find a place in art exhibitions that it will disappear from the walls and buildings of cities.

To ensure the urban artists and the protecting citizens have a win-win approach towards having public spaces aesthetically spray-painted with masterpieces, it will be ideally necessary for both parties to reach agreements of such clauses within contracts for helping prevent further visual pollution and art critics into our environment.

STATED PROBLEM

How contracts can allow artists to practice in public places without being considered as visual polluters?

FEASIBLE ALTERNATIVES

  1. Develop and highlight the concept of “Reverse graffiti”
  2. Start the legalization process with “legal” graffiti spots
  3. Sensitize artists and public to green street art

DEVELOPMENT OF THE OUTCOMES

  • Develop and highlight the concept of “Reverse graffiti”

Reverse graffiti, also named clean graffiti, is a method of creating temporary images or message on surfaces by removing dirt from it. Cloths or high-power washers can be used to remove dirt on a larger scale. This usage has been controversial and its legality depends on jurisdiction.

Nevertheless, reverse graffiti has been used many times as a form of advertising by businesses. For the marketing team of those businesses, it is a new and sustainable way to bring attention to their products, launch new ones, highlight future events or just increase brand awareness. There are strong benefits to create reverse graffiti: highly targeted geographical placement and lack of competing media in the same space. Even though it is not real art, it can also be done by removing dust with the fingertip from windows or other dirty surfaces, such as writing “Wash me” on a dirty vehicle.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Laure Matran

Lille, France

 



Laure Matran
 is an MSc student in SKEMA Business School, major in Project and Programme Management & Business Development (PPMBD). This MSc is ranked 3rd in the Eduniversal 2017 rankings of the best Masters, MS and MBA. Previously, she graduated from the Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accounting of the University of Lille 2 and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Management. She already has some experiences in Project Management especially thanks to an internship in ADEO Services, in Ronchin, France. Adeo is the 3rd largest group of sales of consumer goods for DIY and decorating. It includes various brands present in 12 countries: Leroy Merlin, Bricoman, ZODIO, Weldom, Brico Center, Aki, Kbane, HomesUp, Tikamoon etc. A Project Manager to be…

Laure can be contacted at [email protected] or https://www.linkedin.com/in/laure-matran-a17b2088/

[1]  Banksy (2006).Wall and Piece. Retrieved October 21, 2017 from https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/28811.Banksy

 

Ensure biomimicry Incremental Innovation

The New Mission of Intellectual Property Contracts

 

STUDENT PAPER

Betty Menuet

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 



ABSTRACT

Biomimicry is the imminent new way to create sustainable innovations in the future. Its ontology is that Nature’s observation can bring us a large amount of innovative solution to face engineering design problems.  As biomimicry is changing the rules of the traditional innovation process, Intellectual Property (IP) contracts shall do the same. But it is easier said than done. Biomimicry project tends to have true advantages on the front end of innovation, in terms of performance innovation improvement and sustainability, that IP contracts don’t manage to protect efficiently yet. This paper will show that IP contracts must be adapted to the incremental and iterative upfront innovation process of biomimicry projects. If owners and contractors desire to make safe and fruitful these biomimetic innovations, they should both accept incremental and iterative modification of their property contracts and adopt a sustainable vision for a more efficient sustainable patent system.

Key Words: Innovation, Sustainable, Change, Biomimicry, Intellectual Property, Patent.

INTRODUCTION

Human progress in terms of innovative technology and products is getting bigger every single day. However, sometimes even the cleverest expert, engineer, or scientist cannot come up with THE appropriate solution and the project concerned by the issue can be negatively impacted. Biomimicry is a new discipline, assuming that the simple Nature’s observation can bring us a large amount of innovative solution to face engineering design problems.

The famous proverb “Nature knows best” is the first principle of biomimicry. Studying the process of nature, for instance, designs and shapes of the environment or how an animal’s metabolism supports natural selection, enable to find and adapt ergonomics solution in our man’s world. In short, biomimicry draws its inspiration from nature to find sustainable alternatives.

The implementation of biomimetic technology has already allowed us to face a great number of engineering issues that we couldn’t solve before. Among them, the Japanese bullet train redesigned observing the kingfisher’s beak or the painless syringe copying mosquito’s sting.  (Photos by Hiromi Okano/Corbis; West Japan Railway)

A recent research realized at GOJO Inc, with the biomimicry Ph.D. program of Akron’s University demonstrates that the biomimicry is changing the rules of how goes an innovation. Indeed, the report affirms that biomimicry “can potentially expand intellectual property, increase energy savings and accelerate product innovation2. Each of these advantages has to be protected and taken into account in the Intellectual Property (IP) contracts established between the owner and the contractor on a given project. But it is easier said than done.

Moreover, the biomimicry project tends to have true advantages on the front end of innovation, in terms of performance innovation improvement and sustainability. And here is the decisive difference with historical or traditional projects.  In fact, the latter type of project set up the Intellectual Property landscape in the front end process, and potential innovations are only generated afterward, combining elements taking part in the same technological paradigm. On the contrary, biomimicry projects require to prioritize the solution discovery’s approach and then adapt the Intellectual Property contracts in order to protect the best we can this incremental and iterative process of innovation.

The biomimicry is a difficult topic to work on because there are not many data and studies for now on the subject. Our research will try to prove that Intellectual Property contracts should adapt quickly to the innovative biomimicry projects,  which could be the coming new main way to innovate in the future.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Betty Menuet

Lille, France

 




Betty Menuet 
is a 21-year-old French woman, currently involved in the Master of science ‘Project and Programme Management and Business Development in SKEMA Business School. She has been the co-founder and President of HOPE (Humanitarian Association Promoting Equity), leading a team of 90 people and 5 projects simultaneously in Vietnam, Cambodia, Senegal and France. Passionate about the discovery of multicultural environments, she travels in countries such as Colombia, The Netherlands, Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia or England. She also fulfilled of a 2-month humanitarian mission in Vietnam, near to 6 orphanages in Kon Tum’s region.  Betty can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

Managing Request for Change in IT Projects

A Challenge from the Contractors Perspective

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Jérémy Metier

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

Projects have existed for centuries and even now are used by companies to develop new products. In the Information and Technology sector, contracts between an owner who wants a project realized and a contractor who will do the work are often used. Seeing that a project is realized in an environment that may change from different factors, managing request for changes in a contract are quite the challenge for the contractor who needs to realize a work required by the owner. This document aims to identify and analyze the reasons why request for change in IT contracts is a challenge from the contractor’s perspectives, by analyzing scientific papers and interviews about change management in the IT contracts sector with the Use of a Multi-Attribute Decision making. We can expect to see emerge from this paper that the main reasons why conflict may arise between a contractor and an owner is the quality of information of a request for change. It will be developed later that this quality of information is, as well what is the most challenging aspect of a request for change for the contractor. This paper may help the Owner understand the position they put their contractors in when requesting changes.

Key Words: Request for change, contractors, change, challenge, conflict, disputes, Information technology, projects

INTRODUCTION

Since the late twentieth century, the world is experiencing impressive technological advances that change the habits of citizens.

The environment in which people are evolving is changing through the development of new technologies. These changes in the way people interact with each other, work, or live their lives are becoming more and more important, as the technologies continue to evolve and improve.

These continuous influxes of new technologies are developed by companies which, in order to keep a competitive advantage on the market, have to become more and more innovative.

In order to bring these technologies to life, numerous projects in the Information and Technology (IT) sector are undertaken by these companies, be it to develop new product or to change the way they are working.

In a perfect world, these projects would deliver successful products and create a lot of benefits without issues in the process of doing the project, however the market, especially in the IT sector, is full of competition and therefore constantly evolving, which make realizing projects without managing changes to the environment next to impossible.

In addition to these external factors, when a contract is signed between a company owner and a contractor to realize a project, changes to the scope of the project may happen from the involved stakeholders under the form of request for change.

  1. Problem definition

Managing these requests is the role of the contractor. Changes become, then, a true challenge for the contractor to realize what he is hired for, without going too far from his original scope. However, in contract management it is often the owner who has the last word about these requests for change which can lead to conflicts about what the contractors is really supposed to do.

This document aims at, first defining what a request for change is, and then to identify and analyze, from the contractor’s perspective, how managing request for change can be a challenge.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Jérémy Metier

Paris, France

 





Jérémy Metier
, a student with a Master 2 degree specialized in Information Technology, is currently enrolled in SKEMA Business School in France, pursuing a second specialization in “MSc Project and Program Management and Business Development”.  To further pursue and improve his knowledge on the Project management topic, he trained and successfully passed 2 professional Certifications: Prince2 Foundations and AgilePM Foundations.

With this double academic specialization, he will be able to lead future projects linked to the development of digital technology in a business. Passionate about technology, IT and project management, he has worked in ENGIE, an energy providing company as a consultant on their IT projects.

Jérémy can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Raleigh designing its future with “Bélib”

Electric car plug-in stations

 

STUDENT PAPER

Camille Schweitzer

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

In a world of constant evolution toward a sustainable environment, the electric car plug-in stations are becoming a common solution. In this paper, the objective is to design a hypothetical contract between Raleigh and Belib company. Therefore, the Compensatory method defined in the Multi-attribute method is shaped to define which solution is the best between doing nothing, creating plug-in stations with a solar panel, creating plug-in stations without solar panel, creating wall chargers or creating Portable chargers. According to the results, it appears that doing nothing is completely erased from the solution statement. Finally, the paper suggests two solutions which are creating plug-in stations with a solar panel, the preferred solution, and creating plug-in stations without solar panel.

Key Words: Stations, design, change, contract, electric cars, area, risks, plug-in stations

INTRODUCTION

According to some studies, sustainable environment is a problem that must be taken care of in order to preserve and enhance the future of this world. The different approaches about this concern are extremely divided and disputed. Points of view on the human impact on climate change are widely questioned. This leads us to the Paris Agreement that set some rules countries need to follow in order to change the future climate tendency. One hundred and ninety-five countries signed off this paper on December 12th 2015. Only two countries did not sign this document, the United States and Syria. United States decision to fallback in this agreement is highly discussed and it splits the citizen’s opinions in two. The main goal of this meeting is to, in the future, sustain the world temperature increase of two degrees Celsius by setting a general thread. The different countries are not pushed by this agreement but they are encouraged to follow its rules. No one is left behind and that is why the most influent ones are lead to help the developing countries.

Those rules are constraints for the citizen and the goals to reach must not create problems for them. Following this agreement, many French cities took steps forward and developed some key tools that will help their citizen to change their habits and take part in this change. Paris decided to deploy the concept of electric car self-service and increase the frequency of the public transportation.

Today, a new level of sustainable energy has been reached by the self-service plug-in stations. They are designed for both professional and private use. People who want to benefit from this service will need to buy a card for fifteen euros and then pay the electricity they will consume at the station. The cost will depend both on the timeframe and on the hour people plug-in their car.

All those tools will give a range of new possibilities for people who want to participate in the global environment change. There is still no viable plug-in station in Raleigh. This situation leads this paper to create a hypothetical contract between Belib and the city of Raleigh in order to help this city to adapt itself to this new world.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Camille Schweitzer

Paris, France

 

 

Camille Schweitzer is a Msc student in Skema Business School Paris campus, major in Project Program Management and Business Development. He graduated from Skema Business School, Sophia Antipolis, France and holds a Bachelor’s degree in International Business Development in 2016. He holds a Certificate for participation in the International Cultural Leadership project from North Carolina State University in Raleigh in 2014. He holds Agile PM certification and Prince2 certification. His Bachelor studies lead him one year in Raleigh in the United States and one year in Suzhou in China. He holds TOEFL with a grade of five hundred and seventy-three out of six hundred seventy-seven. He worked as Activities Coordinator within the Thérèse Roméo School for the city of Nice in France in 2009. His work was to supervise children from 6 to 10 years old, monitor and supervise children in and out of school, establish and implement educational projects and organize educational and sports games. He worked as customer reception during one month at Banque Populaire office in Nice in 2012. His work was to greet and advise clients, answer to telephone inquiries, handle clients to be dealt with their advisor, cash check for customers, fill folder and translate documents for English speaker customers.

Camille also worked one month at Banque Populaire office in Paris in 2012. His work was to greet and advise clients, answer telephone inquiries, handle clients to be dealt with their advisor and cash check for customers. He worked four months at Animalbox company in 2016 as User Experience and Service. His work was to answer customer questions, manage conflicts, gather and summarize customer information, monitor and improve conversion and retention rates, make quantitative and qualitative analysis of customer satisfaction data, manage new functionalities and new business procedures, and do some telemarketing processes. He can be contact by email at [email protected].

 

 

The Business of Portfolio Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The Business of Portfolio Management: Boosting Organizational Value Through Portfolio Management
Author:  Iain Fraser, PMP, PMI Fellow
Publisher:  Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price:   $44.95
Format:  Hardcover, 166 pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN:  9781628253726
Reviewer: Marta Santos, PhD
Review Date:   January 2018

 



Introduction

Writing a book review is no easy endeavor when a reviewer wants to honor the book’s content, the author’s experience, and the value of shared knowledge. Reviewing The Business of Portfolio Management by Iain Fraser was no exception. I will therefore be as succinct as possible, as an attempt to drive the reader to pursue an in depth learning experience from the manuscript.

Overview of Book’s Structure

While introducing the main theme of the book, the author revisits classic aspects of business organization and takes a closer look into talent management, risk, maturity and the Ps to success. It is all presented with a new flare, and thus worth reading.

In agreement with the theme of ‘change’, that seems to be gaining momentum in the present time, the books emphasizes the need for change by pointing out key areas, types, and the drivers of change. Also, that is accompanied by clear guidelines on how to deliver transformation that comes with impact and profits.

Highlights

In his book, Iain Fraser guide’s you through an approach towards efficient portfolio management by using a value management framework. Trying to explain it here might not do justice to the original writings and therefore, it would be wise to the reader to set aside some time to learn directly from the source.

Fraser’s approach has been applied to real business which most of us are very familiar with and thus his framework wasn’t designed for philosophical debate, exclusively. Rather, it is was built for realizing results that can drive organizations ahead. Portfolio management is not about structure. As mentioned by the author, it is “a way of doing business”. Whether it be an action or milestone, it needs to be considered from the portfolio perspective and with the value management framework in mind. That is key to success.

Highlights: What I liked!

I currently support the Portfolio Management Metrics and Reporting efforts of a global organization. Given the focus on portfolio and a section dedicated exclusively to portfolio metrics and reporting, I find Fraser’s book as if written for me! It is the ultimate guide to reporting what distinct audiences need most, in a format suitable to them…

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Marta Santos, PhD,
CAPM, LSSGB

Texas, USA

 



Marta Santos
currently serves on a global Cybersecurity Transformation Program as a Project Coordinator – IT Security. She previously served on a global IT Infrastructure Refresh Project after transitioning from a productive career in the Life Sciences as a Research Scientist and author on major scientific journals. She is looking forward to growing in and contributing to the Project Management profession. This is her second book review for the PM World Journal.

Naturalized American from Brazil, Marta currently lives in the Dallas area.

Email address: www.linkedin.com/in/martabsantos 

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Leadership Agility

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Leadership Agility: Developing Your Repertoire of Leadership Styles
Author:  Ron Meyer and Ronald Meijers
Publisher:  Routledge
ISBN: 978-1-138-06510-9
List Price:   $90.00 (hard cover); $35.00 (soft cover); $31.50 (eBook)
Format:  Hard Cover, Soft Cover, eBook; 264 pages
Publication Date: September 2017 (© 2018)
Reviewer: Edward Raibick, PMP
Review Date: Jan 2018

 



Introduction

The book titled Leadership Agility: Developing Your Repertoire of Leadership Styles introduces the reader to ten leadership styles used to influence teams and organizations in achieving successful results. The book discusses the qualities and pitfalls of each leadership style as well as organizational behaviors and symptoms of extreme usage of a specific style. The reader, equipped with the knowledge of each of these styles, can objectively analyze and manage personal and organizational changes to optimize businesses and teams.

Overview of Book’s Structure

  • Chapter 1 discusses the nature and misconceptions of various types of leaders.
  • Chapter 2 discusses the practices and styles and roles of various types of leadership.
  • Chapter 3 introduces interpersonal steering and the qualities and pitfalls of facilitative and supervisory leadership styles.
  • Chapter 4 introduces the encouraging and demanding leadership styles.
  • Chapter 5 dives into organizational leadership, analyzing unity, diversity, integrative and federative styles.
  • Chapter 6 discusses democratic vs autocratic leadership styles.
  • Chapter 7 dives into strategic leadership styles, reviewing visionary vs pragmatic leadership styles.
  • Chapter 8 reviews entrepreneurial vs executive leadership styles.
  • Chapter 9 dives into value-driven vs virtue-driven leadership.
  • Chapter 10 discusses sovereign vs servant leadership styles.
  • Chapter 11 discusses reflective vs proactive leadership styles.
  • Chapter 12 reviews consistent vs reactive leadership styles.
  • Chapter 13 dives into leadership agility and tailoring your personal leadership style
  • Chapter 14 concludes with mastering leadership agility and combining styles to fit the organizational environment and objectives.

Highlights

Leadership Agility: Developing Your Repertoire of Leadership Styles is a valuable resource for leaders that have a critical need to manage in various types of environments and situations. The mindful analysis of the various leadership styles and the resulting behavioral impact, aids the knowledgeable leader in maneuvering through difficult business situations.

Highlights: What I liked!

One of the things I really enjoyed about the book is that each group of chapters addressed a different dimension of leadership; interpersonal leadership, organizational leadership, strategic leadership, leadership and mission, leadership and self. The final chapters focused on leadership development…

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Edward Raibick, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 

Edward Raibick, PMP is a Security Project Mamagement consultant with extensive experience with software engineering, managerial and IT Project Management experience. Edward holds a Master’s degree in Information Technology with a concentration in Internet and IT security, a Bachelor’s degree in Information Technology, and an Associate in Specialized Technology degree in Electronics. His career includes over 10 years with the IBM Corporation and over 15 years with Texas Instruments. Edward is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter, having acquired his PMP certification in 2011.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Extreme Teams

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Extreme Teams: why Pixar, Netflix, AirBnB, and other cutting-edge companies succeed where most fail
Author:  Robert Bruce Shaw
Publisher:  American Management Association
List Price:  $27.95/15.37      Format:  hardback/e-book
Publication Date:   2017      ISBN: 978-0-8144-3717-9
Reviewer:     Femi Fakinlede, PMP
Review Date:   January 2018

 



Introduction

EXTREME TEAMS, ET for short, is a well-organized and thorough analysis of cutting edge firms that exist today.  More specifically, it’s about AIRBNB, WHOLEFOODS, PIXAR, NETFLIX, PATAGONIA and ALIBABA.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book highlights the reasons why these firms are so cutting edge. From the Teams working within the company to the philosophy adopted at the top of the company.  ET describes why and how these firms stand the test of time, deal with competition and manage to keep the employees and teams empowered through the policies adopted or not adopted.

ET is a book that gives great insight for companies looking to maximize their footprint in their respective industry.  It also gives ideas for those firms and teams that would like to hire the best employees and motivate them to perform at the highest level they can.

Highlights

A company’s philosophy and culture are ways that sustain a company.  For Patagonia, the company that specializes in making gear for outdoor enthusiast, they market to the “Dirt bag” individual.  This individual loves the outdoors and doesn’t mind getting dirty.  Their gear is durable and long-lasting and made with great quality.

Whole Foods has really developed the ultimate Team dynamic.  They take serious attention to the teams that make up the store, both at the local/neighborhood level also at the corporate level.

These Extreme teams believe in creating an individual Culture of their own.  A culture that is not copied but one that is created from within.  It speaks of Culture as originating from a Cognitive angle and from an Emotional angle.  Team members are thought of as being both Result and Relationship driven.  There exists a deep passion for the work they do, some would call somewhat obsessive compassion.  What makes a company of cutting edge caliber is the unified passion that is demonstrated.

Highlights: What I liked!

Will this person be a good FIT? This is a question ET asks.  While most mediocre firms/teams look to hire and make sure that each position remains filled, cutting edge firms seek to only bring in individuals who fit within their culture.  If there is no fit, they will not be hired.  This is because of 2 reasons, first, this person will ultimately not contribute in the long run and secondly, the team will end up lagging behind.  In a scenario where Teams are rewarded based on performance metrics, this is the way in which they remain competitive.  Eventually, only hiring individuals that make a good fit leads to quite a homogeneous group, some will say they all behave in a Clone-like manner.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Femi Fakinlede

Maryland, USA

 




Femi Fakinlede
 is a PMP certified government consultant.  A trained accountant who holds the CGFM certification and brings to the table 20 years of experience in financial management. He is also a data analytics professional specializing in data extraction and mining, process development and root cause analysis. He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

The Inspiration Code

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The Inspiration Code: How the Best Leaders Energize People Every Day
Author: Kristi Hedges
Publisher:  American Management Association
List Price:   $24.95           Format:  Hard cover, 288 pages
Publication Date: 2017       ISBN: 978-0-8144-3789-6
Reviewer: Tiziana Barrow
Review Date:   November 2017

 



Introduction

As a speaker and coach who concentrates on persuasion and exercising influence, I am fascinated on what motivates people, and drives them to change or act. I was drawn to “The Inspirational Code” because I am always open to learn and explore new techniques. Kristi Hedges’ book is an inspiration, where she introduces her Inspire Path model. Given that inspiration takes place during conversations, Kristi breaks down the elements and uncovers the subtleness that injects light, and spark inspiration into any conversation. The book is broken down into 4 parts:

  • Present: the gift of attention
  • Personal: putting yourself into it
  • Passionate: bringing heart and energy
  • Purposeful: spotlighting meaning

Overview of Book’s Structure

The Inspiration Code is well written and well organized. As a result, it is both enjoyable and easy book to read. Kristi framed key concepts throughout the chapters by bolding and underlining text. She has clearly labeled “Concept in Action” sections and each chapter end with a “Takeaways” page summarizing key concepts.

She is an exceptional storyteller and uses examples to explain concepts. The book is well researched and contains significant research data. Kristi references numerous other books where concepts/topics are further developed in detail and provides recommendations as to next steps.  My personal copy of the book has been turned into a workbook because I have highlighted sections and comments that I will be referring to in years to come.

Highlights

Being an inspirational person means to be a catalyst for a spark to take place. The trigger might be a person, an idea or an experience. The individual receives both an insight as well as the drive to move into action: “It is both an insight and an energetic push.”

Highlights: What I liked!

This is the first business book I’ve read that addresses the importance and use of energy when communicating and influencing others.  “Energy is a tool we can harness and cultivate to great effect. To do so, first know what gives you energy about your message, synch that up with your audience, and display your passion verbally and nonverbally.”

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Tiziana Barrow

Washington D.C. USA

 


Tiziana Barrow
is a Change Agent Coach. She has spent the last 20+ years of her career in the High-Tech Industry in positions such as Project manager, Principal Marketing Consultant, and Director of Marketing. As a consultant she has led people through change management and as a result, she is a student of resistance, conflict and ultimately has made a science out of it. She has launched a program for women to step into their power because she has personally struggled with it and was repeatedly frustrated by losing control and giving up her own power. By opening the discussion with re-defining power for women, understanding the embodiment of power, she is creating a community of powerful ladies, that desire to become more effective leaders.

Tiziana Barrow is people focused, world traveled and compassionate.  Born and raised in Italy she has since lived in the UK, the Netherlands and across the USA. She is a “change agent coach” helping executives to step into their power and exercise influence.

She can be contacted at: [email protected] 

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Silver Spring Maryland Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Silver Spring Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Silver Spring Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for February 2018

Updates on Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Finland Centennial; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail project

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 



INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 individual and 200 organizational members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project Days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. Last year the Project Days conference took place on 31.10. – 1.11.2017 in the Helsinki Expo and Convention Centre. Please navigate to www.3pmo.fi , www.projektipaivat.fi and www.pry.fi/en for further information on PMAF and its main events.

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland has a tradition of organizing an annual conference in the spring. This year the conference will take place on May 17th, in Otaniemi, Espoo, with an overarching theme “Grow!”. Please navigate to www.pmifinland.org and www.conference.pmifinland.org for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its main events.

OLKILUOTO 3

The 1 600 MW Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, originally contracted to be built by consortium comprising of Areva and Siemens for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto, announced a further delay from the previously agreed time schedule in last October.  The previously agreed time schedule estimated for the plant to be on line at the end of 2018 – nine years behind original time schedule. Due to the latest delay, the plant will not be on line before May 2019 – full ten years behind the original time schedule. Once completed – ten years behind original time schedule and over 5 500 M€ over budget – Olkiluoto 3 will be the largest nuclear power plant in the world. TVO is understandably very disappointed about the latest delay – and the fact that the plant is well over 100 % over original budget and 10 years behind the original time schedule.

The contract for building the Olkiluoto 3 power plant was signed in 2003 for 3 000 M€, and construction began in 2005, targeting completion in June 2009. Due to numerous challenges during the planning and construction phases, the target date has been pushed forward several times, finally to 2018 – nine years in total. According to Areva, the delays have pushed the total cost up to 8 500 M€. Areva and TVO have conducted negotiations regarding the delay and related penalties, with TVO demanding 2 300 M€ from Areva, and Areva 3 500 M€ from TVO: Areva claims TVO has not carried out its contractual duties, and is therefore accountable for the costs of the string of delays. TVO claims Areva has failed to construct the plant according to contractual schedule.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 


Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

February 2018 UK Project Management Round Up

Carillion Collapse, Classic Cars, Research Projects Abandoned, Speculative Engineering, Oil and Gas Looking Up, Short Reports and Changing of the Guard

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 



INTRODUCTION

Some years start slowly as befits the weather and people’s mood after the holiday period but 2018 has come in with a bang!  The major news this month has been the collapse of a major company with consequent job losses, contract implications and concerns about the validity of its auditing.  Other newsworthy items include takeover battles for a major UK defence contractor, an upswing for off-shore oil and gas, disappointing news on the drugs research front and a changing of the guard at the major PM research journals.  Needless to say, all this and more will be covered in this month’s report.  On with the show!

CARILLION COLLAPSE

Readers may know that Carillion plc was a major facilities management and construction company.  It was listed on the London Stoc Exchange (LSE) and is the second largest UK construction company with some 43.000 employees world-wide including about 20,000 in UK.  Reports of financial problems emerged last year (see my report of August 2017) and the firm has rarely been out of the financial news since autumn 2017.  On 15 January, Carillion went into compulsory liquidation.

Carillion has government contracts to supply services ranging from catering in hospitals and prisons, managing the Ministry of Defence housing estate, and a wide range of Private Finance Initiative schemes.  It also has HS2 contracts and is involved with the revamp of Battersea Power Station.  The impact on the day to day businesses has varied with some work continuing after local and national government support but many projects, including a newly awarded contract for High Speed 2 (HS2) have been affected.

The collapse also hits many suppliers as many of the 30,000 firms affected will not have any insurance cover to off-set defaulting payments.  The position of individuals is also dramatic as the 28,500 pensioners may have problems being paid in both the long and short term.  Nor are these problems confined to UK as four Canadian subsidiaries have also been forced to file for bankruptcy protection.

Warning bells were sounded in July last year when Carillion warned of a £845 million impairment charge in its construction services division.  At this stage, many observers felt that the firm was too big to fail and It’s relationship with successive Governments through PFI schemes made it seem unlikely to default.  Then in September, the acting CEO Keith Cochrane, claimed that the firm had accepted too many projects which had turned out unprofitable and income did not reflect the work done.

Needless to say, the politicos are having a field day with Her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition blaming the current Government for the collapse and the BBC reminding these doom-sayers that it was their party that introduced PFI and similar contracts during the reign of the sainted Tony Blair.  MPS and other politicos are good at criticizing others, ignoring their own responsibilities and being wise after the event.  It will be project managers who will have to sort out this mess.  What s quite clear is the need to learn many lessons from this debacle.  For many observers, the main issue is one of governance, or rather, lack of it.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Miles Shepherd

Salisbury, UK

 

 

Miles Shepherd
is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World Journal in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently a Director for PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and is immediate past Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

February 2018 Report from Spain

The PMI Madrid Chapter is still growing and is now launching a Chapter Branch in Asturias (Cantabria)

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain

 


 

The PMI Madrid Chapter never stops. They never end promoting the profession, they have been working very hard more than two years to achieve a new Branch launching in the North of Spain, in Cantabria.

On February 1st, 2018 the first PMI Asturias Branch event will happen in Gijon (Asturias). PMI (Project Management Institute) is the biggest Project Management worldwide organization with Headquarters offices in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania – USA) and it is counting more than 430.000 members in 207 countries and more than 800.000 PMP® (Project Management Professional) certified. Through that PMI Branch in Asturias they want to offer closer and closer volunteer services to add Project management value to local firms and foster project management best practices among them.

At this first event we will count on the following keynote speakers:

  • Mr. Fernando Milla
  • Mr. Zaqueo Azcona
  • Mr. José Moro.

The event agenda is as follows:

  • 18:15 a 18:30 Welcome and reception
  • 18:30 a 18:45 Introdución of PMI Asturias
  • 18:45 a 19:15 Innovating projects in a uncertain environment by Mr. Milla
  • 19:15 a 19:45 Interim Management, a PM opportunity by Mr. Azcona
  • 19:45 a 20:15 Binomium Project – Contract Management by Mr. Moro

Mr. Moro, will do a brief introduction about PMI Asturias Branch and the scheduled activities for 2018. Mr. Milla will talk about how to use new tools and methodologies to manage Project uncertainty in innovation projects, where business hypothesis can be validated in a faster way, more agile and with lowest possible investment. Mr. Azcona will talk about the opportunities that Interim Management can offer to Project Managers, because those profiles are the most demanded to execute Interim Management at the current organizations.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 



About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011.  Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

How to Get Executives to Act for Project Success


ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Michael O’Brochta

President, Zozer Inc.

Maryland, USA

 



Even world-class project managers will not succeed unless they get their executives to act for project success. The trap of applying best-practice project management only to have the project fail because of executive inaction or counteraction can be avoided. According to the latest PMI Pulse of the Profession report (PMI, 2017), “actively engaged executives continue to be the top driver of whether projects met their original goals and business intent.” Increasing numbers of project managers are trying to deal with this reality.

This is a how-to paper. It describes how project managers can get their executives to act, and it identifies executive actions most likely to contribute to project success. This paper explores why the evolving and expanding definition of project success and why the expanding complexity of projects have led to an environment in which the project manager is ever more dependent on the executive. It draws upon recent research about top-performing project managers, about why executives fail, and about why new products fail, to identify the basis for a strong mutual partnership between project managers and executives. A central theme is that project managers are empowered to extend their influence beyond the immediate project boundaries, not only to get their executives to act, but also to help implement the actions as well.

THE PROBLEM

Project managers who continue doing what used to work by focusing within the bounds of the project are now finding success more difficult to achieve. The problem is that project success is dependent, to an increasing degree, not only on the efforts of the project manager, but also on the efforts of the executive, as depicted in Figure 1.


George, a project manager who is trying to apply some recently acquired knowledge, related how frustrated he was after learning about the best practice technique of writing a project charter. He spoke enthusiastically about how such a document could help him establish and maintain his authority, an aspect of his job with which he was consistently having trouble. Then, he lamented that he could never use such a document because the part of the organization he worked in had not, and surely would not, adopt such a technique.

Figure 1 – Problem


This explains why three-quarters of the employees surveyed by the Towers Perrin organization(Towers Perrin, 2008) in a large global study said, “their organizations or senior management don’t do enough to help them fully engage and contribute to their company’s success.” And, it explains why when U.S. federal government project managers were asked about executive support for a study conducted by the Council of Excellence in Government (COE, 2008) 80% responded that they were not getting what they needed. In addition, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC, 2012) conducted their 2012 global survey on the state of project management, they found that “lack of executive sponsorship was the second largest factor that contributed to poor project performance.” Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric, is reported to have gone so far as to have said, “If you can’t get top management to support your program, don’t even try.”

For the purpose of conveying the concepts in this paper, I have adopted a broad definition for the executive as a person responsible for the administration of a business or department. This executive may be an individual or a function performed by more than one individual such as a board or committee. It could even be a Project Management Office. On an organization chart, the executive appears above other individuals and functions, including the project manager. The executive could be the project manager’s boss, a sponsor, a senior stakeholder, a business or department head, or a vice president. Ultimately, the executive is someone with more authority and power then the project manager.

This compelling need for executive actions for project success is being driven by changes in the project environment. Gone, for the most part, is the one-dimensional definition of project success; it worked. Gone too is the triple constraint definition where project managers focused on time, cost, and quality. These days, the definition of project success has expanded to the point where customer acceptance, organizational and cultural impact, and strategic business objectives must be included. For NASA, former President Bush used this type of success gauge in 2004 when he declared that America chooses to explore space because doing so “improves our lives, and lifts our national spirit.” The way I see it, lifting national spirit is a huge expansion in the definition of project success, one that I am certain cannot be achieved without getting executives to act for that project success.

Increases in project complexity are also changing the project environment. Projects are more interconnected, more interdependent, and more interrelated than ever before. So too are the businesses in which projects are being conducted; they now have complex alliances with strategic suppliers, networks of customers, and partnerships with allies and even with competitors. The result is that business systems are significantly more complex than in the past. Gone are the days where the typical project deliverable is a stand-alone product used by a single customer; instead, systems are being delivered for groups of stakeholders with diverging needs.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 



About the Author


Michael O’Brochta, PMI-ACP, PMP

Virginia, USA

 




Michael O’Brochta
has worked in project management for over thirty years at the CIA where he led the development of highly complex top secret projects, programs and systems, and where he led the development of their project management and systems engineering training and certification program to mature practices agency-wide. As founder of Zozer inc., he helped develop and implement the new government-wide Federal Acquisition Certification for Program and Project Managers; through his consulting engagements, he is helping organizations raise their level of project management maturity. Mike recently served at the PMI corporate level as Chair of the Ethics Member Advisory Group. He is a sought after speaker, and he has been featured in issues of PMI Today, PM Network, ProjectManagement.com, CIO Magazine, Information Week, and Government Executive Magazine. Mike writes and speaks extensively about project management, and since his climb of another of the world’s seven summits, he has been exploring the relationship between project management and mountain climbing.

Michael O’Brochta can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Mr. O’Brochta, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/michael-obrochta/