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Welcome to the July 2017 PMWJ

Five Years, Vision and Value Revisited

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 



Welcome to the July 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 60th monthly edition. This five year anniversary edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication: 30 original articles, papers and other works by 34 different authors in 14 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several international advisors, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month, however, on the occasion of the publication’s five year anniversary, I wanted to reflect on some of the original objectives for the journal, perhaps the most important of which I was reminded about by Neil Robinson in his letter to the editor this month. That is, where can professionals share their experiences and knowledge? In the paragraphs below, here are the main reasons WHY the PMWJ was and is published.

Reason 1: So professionals can get published more easily

When I was about 10 years into my professional career, I began to consider authoring a paper for presentation at a PMI conference. By then I had worked on several large energy and defense projects, initially as a project controls analyst using earned value management systems and processes, then as the manager of a company-wide project management improvement program. My motivation for authoring a paper was to advance my career; this was common practice then. Published papers could go onto one’s professional CV. Publishing was also to share knowledge and to contribute to the PM profession. No one authored a paper to receive professional development units (PDUs).

At that time, PMI (Project Management Institute) offered three primary options for anyone to publish a paper about project management: at their annual seminars/symposium (now called global congress), in the Project Management Quarterly (PMQ – now their monthly PMNetwork Magazine), and through PMI chapters (newsletters and local/regional events). That was 30+ years ago.

There were other options at the time, of course, including through the American Association of Cost Engineers (AACE – now the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International, AACEi) and the Performance Management Association (PMA – now the College of Performance Management, CPM). In Europe, there were opportunities to publish or present an article or paper in publications or at events sponsored by APM in UK, INTERNET (now the International Project Management Association, IPMA) in Europe, AIPM in Australia, and several others.

So I started authoring papers in 1985 for presentation at PMI conferences, first regional events in Seattle and Vancouver, BC, then at the big annual PMI Seminars/Symposium, then at INTERNET congresses beginning in 1990. I continued to author papers and make presentations for the next 15 years.

For the last 10 years, however, the opportunities for beginning or mid-career professionals to publish an article or paper seem to have dried up, have many strings attached or have hoops to jump through. PMI has turned to professional writers for PMNetwork; opportunities to author papers at global congresses have required forms, formats and compliance (and may actually be ending completely); publishing on pmi.org or projectmanagement.com is promoted for PMI members or for obtaining PDUs. APM in UK still offers great opportunities for APM members via specific interest groups and national publications. AACEi offers opportunities for AACEi members, etc. There are also many blogs and commercial websites looking for content, but the real or implied association with the promoter can be problematic.

AACEi, AIPM, APM and other conferences still offer good opportunities to author a paper but often require sometimes expensive registration, travel and attendance at the conference. Regional conferences such as the annual UT Dallas PM Symposium also offer opportunities for publication, although conference proceedings are not always widely distributed or available after the event.

The PMWJ provides a simple way for professionals at any level to share knowledge, experience and information, and to get published. You don’t have to be a member of AACE, APM, IPMA, PMI or any other organization; you can be located anywhere in the world. And the process is simple. Just email your article or paper to me; if written professionally, without commercial intent/content and without too many grammatical errors, we will normally publish it.

Reason 2: So researchers can publish their works more easily

Several years ago I was referred to a paper in which the author declared “the death of refereed journals.” The future, he declared, was open-source journals, posting on websites and freely sharing research results. No more submitting papers to academic journals, waiting weeks or months for acceptance, then waiting weeks or months for publication…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (http://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at editor@pmworldjournal.net.

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

July 2017 Finland Project Management Roundup

REPORT

Updates on Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail transit project

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland


INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 individual and 600 organizational members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. 3PMO 2017 focused on Project, Program and Portfolio Management Offices, and took place at Tampere on June 6th 2017. Please navigate to www.pry.fi/en , http://www.3pmo.fi/ , and http://www.projektipaivat.fi/ for further information on PMAF and its main events.

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland has a tradition of organizing an annual conference in spring. This year the conference took place on May 10th, in Helsinki, with the overarching theme “Change!”. Please navigate to http://www.pmifinland.org/ and http://www.conference.pmifinland.org/ for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its main events.

OLKILUOTO 3

The 1 600 MW Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, originally contracted to be built by consortium comprising of Areva and Siemens for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto, is currently proceeding through pre-commissioning trials and preparations, and nearing completion. At the end of May 2017 TVO withdrew its pending lawsuit against Areva, with which TVO sought to ensure Olkiluoto 3 completion by Areva. Regardless of this positive development, TVO has not withdrawn its claim for delay penalties against Areva.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at jouko.vaskimo@aalto.fi. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

July 2017 Update from Chile

REPORT

PMI Santiago Chapter updates; Canadian defense firm wins Chilean Navy contract; Mandalay Resources declares force majeure at flooded Chilean mine

Project Management Report from Santiago

By Jaime Videla, PMP

International Correspondent

Santiago, Chile

 



PMI Santiago Chile Chapter

President of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter resigns

Ms. Lorena Alegre Cordovez has resigned voluntarily and indeclinably, for strictly personal reasons, from the position of President of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter.

In accordance with the bylaws, in its replacement and until the end of its mandate, the board has appointed Mr. Alfonso Barraza San Martín as President of the Chapter.

Mr. Barraza holds a degree in computer science engineering and has over 18 years of experience related to teaching as well as business services.

For more information, please visit http://www.pmi.cl/ ; contact by telephone at +56 2 24814060 or by email to pmi@pmi.cl

PMI Santiago Chile Chapter Workshop

Workshop N°4: “High Performance Teams and Knowmads”

The workshop was led by Enrique Villarroel, a +25 year of professional experience in the Financial Systems.

To manage high performance teams is a critical success factor in order to achieve the goals of any project. Today, a new professional of the future has been identified: the “knowmads”, which imposes a challenge for those who have the responsibility of managing teams of people. The talk presented the different models and approaches that different authors have published in this matter, providing updated information to update their participants.

The workshop objectives were to understand the bases and factors for the management of high-performance project teams. Identify the different generations of workers to establish differentiated leadership and motivation mechanisms. To know the types of professionals that exist today for the project management: I, T and M shaped, and to know the future of work and the new profile of the worker: Knowmad.

Alfonso Barraza, president of the Santiago Chapter of PMI, commented “the workshop was interesting and entertaining. The classification of the professionals in specialists, generalists and person T was very illustrative and allows to take a new model when assigning roles within a project and to find ways to make equipment, as well as some suggestions to encourage motivation in Members of the project team “.

“What is exposed in the workshop is of direct application when it is necessary to form work teams in projects. It was clear that time can play against this purpose, but you can identify the profiles of team members, in this case: specialists, generalists and person T; and then identify and assign them a role in the team where they can exploit more their characteristics and enhance the skills as a team. In turn, the project leaders today face the need to be specialists and generalists in turn so that they can coordinate and maintain the appropriate level of communication between team members and others interested in the projects, “concluded Barraza.

More…

To read entire report click here

 



About the Author


Jaime Videla

Santiago, Chile

 

 


Jaime Videla, PMP
, is the Managing Director for PMOChile a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of Accufast, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 25+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Mexico and Peru. Since 2006 has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects. Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at jvidela@pmochile.com

To view other works by Jaime Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

 

 

 

July 2017 UK Project Management Round Up

REPORT

Good news: The Kraken Oil Field; New extension to the Victoria and Albert Museum; HMS Queen Elizabeth; Bad news: BREXIT update; Grenfell Tower fire in West London and comments on emergency response projects

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 



INTRODUCTION

You will see that this issue of your favourite online PM journal is special. Your editor, David Pells, has brought you fifty-nine editions and this is the sixtieth. My own record is somewhat less and this is the fifty-first report on the PM world from a UK perspective. I will try to make this report a little different from others this year but events in UK are dominated by matters that I have reported over list last year – the General Election, BREXIT and a serious project failure in the aftermath of a devastating fire. Although much depends on your personal perspective, none of this news is good but as always, there is some good news if you look for it. But as project managers, we need to analyse events and learn lessons.

THE GOOD NEWS               

The good news is that several long-term projects have come in more or less successfully. First, the Kraken oil field has begun production. This $2.5 billion development lies to the east of the Shetland Isle, off Scotland’s north coast. The operator, Enquest, reports that the project was delivered on time and at well under the $3.2 billion budget. Experts estimate that Kraken could produce around 5% or the North Sea output by the time it hits peak production sometime in 2019. The field is estimated to hold about 135 million barrels and although first discovered in 1985, was not developed as the heavy oil it holds is more difficult and therefore expensive to extract. However, case the changing price of oil couple with the improvements in extraction techniques resulted in a revised business that shows the field is an economic proposition. Deliver rate is expected to be up to 50,000 barrels per day by 2019 and has an estimated life of 25 years.

Next up is the opening of the new extension to the Victoria and Albert Museum in London’s Exhibition Road quarter. Rising from the ashes of a failed project in 2004, the new extension has come in on time and on budget at £54.5 million. The museum suffered major embarrassment in 2004 when it failed to secure funding of £100 million despite eight years of fundraising. It was unable to implement Daniel Libeskind’s Spiral design which took after the then recently completed Bilbao Guggenheim. The Spiral was a vast tower of tumbling boxes, which some experts considered to be of questionable worth as exhibition space despite its sensational impact.

This may have been a blessing in disguise as the Spiral would have offered a series of fairly small galleries with lots of connecting stairs). The requirement that emerged was a less grandiose extension that provided one very large gallery where temporary exhibitions could be staged. The result opens as I write and consists of a new plaza surmounting a huge underground gallery.

The Sackler Courtyard

The museum lies in a heavily built-up site and is a Grade 1 listed building. The five year project was undertaken while the museum was fully operational. Design was by London-based architect Amanda Levete, the new Sackler Gallery is rated as a game-changing addition to the museum’s arsenal of exhibition spaces.

New underground gallery. Courtesy V&A Museum

The most visible change is the new-look Aston Webb Screen. This masked the old boiler rooms but the old solid fascade has been replaced with a permeable colonnade, based on the architect’s original vision, to create a second entrance to the museum and connect the Science and Natural History Museums on Exhibition Road. The new gates, provide security at night and preserve the memory of the Second World War bombs that dug holes in its façade.

Beyond the grade I listed screen, lies the world’s first “porcelain courtyard” — a link to the V&A’s spectacular ceramics collection. In the Courtyard 11,000 handmade tiles, with red and yellow decoration apparently representing “urban flowers” provide a spectacular open space that is intended to sparkle in the rain and glow in the sun.

While on the subject of history, there is further news of a continuing project in the Stonehenge World Heritage site. Now actually at Stonehenge, but at Avebury some 20 miles away…

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


MILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

 

 

 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently a Director for PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and is immediate past Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at miles.shepherd@msp-ltd.co.uk

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

July 2017 Report from Spain

REPORT

Project Management during crisis times; The last Congress organized by the PMI Madrid Chapter in Madrid on June 20th, 2017

By Alfonso Bucero MSc, CPS, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain

 



We had the opportunity to know the opinion from Luis Chirivella, Manager of Project management at IDOM in Catalunya (Spain). Luis was part of the PMI Barcelona Chapter when we started that Chapter on 2003.

Luis, what is your opinion about the Project management discipline being applied during crisis times?

I believe during crisis organizations and individuals are reinforced… ” Even when it is not exactly that the popular opinion, it’s serving me to give a challenging and optimistic opinion about the interesting stage that people and organizations are living in the South of Europe and other countries worldwide. All crisis generate challenges and opportunities we need to discover and manage and, the Project management sector is totally immerse in this reality; 2009 year was characterized by a decrease on Project Management services demand derived from the construction sector crisis and, especially in the real-state business, what has made necessary that project management services companies to redefine their objectives and change their strategies towards services diversification and look to other countries business.

The European economic situation, and specially the Spanish one, forced the Spanish Government to set up several austerity measures. These measures pointed out to a drastic investment reduction, that may complicate the situation very much. We have been seeing investments cuts, work penalization and, more recently, bidding processes eliminated, and in some cases even when proposals were presented. This panorama seems to be “interesting”, from an optimistic perspective.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 



About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at alfonso.bucero@abucero.com

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Report from IRNOP XIII

Report from IRNOP XIII 2017 Project Management Research Conference in Boston

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 



IRNOP (The International Research Network on Organizing by Projects) XIII
conference was held in Boston, Massachusetts, on June 11 … 14, 2017. The conference, a biennial series started in Sweden in 1994, took place at the Boston University Metropolitan College Charles River Campus, and was organized by Associate Professor Dr Vijay Kanabar, Assistant Professor Dr Stephen A. Leybourne, and Associate Professor Dr Roger D. H. Warburton. The conference theme was The Modern Project: Mindsets, Toolsets, and Theoretical Frameworks. The Boston University Metropolitan College provided an excellent venue for the event, which the participants found appropriately informal and collegial, encouraging active exchange and networking.

Boston University Questrom School of Business (photos courtesy Jouko Vaskimo)

The conference program included plenary sessions with state-of-the-art keynotes, and several parallel tracks with a total of over 80 keynote and paper presentations. The conference was attended by over 170 participants from more than 30 countries, and by some of the most renowned scholars in the field of project management. The conference was organized for faculty and students from universities from all over the world having an interest in projects, temporary organizations, project organizing and project-based organizations. In addition to the official program, the conference offered a social program of dinners and receptions, and a doctoral workshop for PhD students.

The conference was sponsored by Project Management Institute (PMI), International Project Management Association (IPMA) and Boston University Metropolitan College.

In his opening presentation Professor Leybourne welcomed everyone sincerely to the Boston University, and to Metropolitan College Charles River Campus. Professor Leybourne has been involved with the PM academic community since his first PMI Research Conference in Seattle in 2002, and considers at least 50 of the attendees to be friends as well as academic colleagues. Indeed, he mentioned that at his first PM research conference, he had just submitted his PhD, and that the list of 2002 attendees was like ‘walking through the bibliography’ of his dissertation.

Subsequent to the three-day event Professor Dr Leybourne was very happy with the way that the conference progressed. He thanked the participants, the presenters, the keynote speakers, and the Boston University organizing committee – especially the volunteers who made the conference possible. He concluded: “I would like to thank my co-Chairs, the volunteers, and the project team, and would also like to acknowledge the support of our department – Metropolitan College – who allowed us to spend significant time on making this conference a success.”

Professor Dr Leybourne can be contacted at sleyb@bu.edu .

Professor Dr Stephen Leybourne opening the IRNOP XIII conference

The third IRNOP Doctoral Workshop, in which doctoral candidates presented their research to an audience of peers and senior international scholars in a friendly and constructive atmosphere, took place the day before the main conference. On the same day, a welcome reception was organized at the Boston University Questrom School of Business Atrium to welcome the conference participants.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 



About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

 

Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at jouko.vaskimo@aalto.fi. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

Balancing the Speed of Agility with Technical Quality

SECOND EDITION

By Johnny D. Morgan, PhD

General Dynamics Information Technology

Virginia, USA

 



ABSTRACT

The goal of project management is the timely delivery of capabilities that provides value-add to the customer. This paper identifies a series of warning signs of Information Technology (IT) projects under stress and their potential effects on technical quality. It describes how agile software development practices can reduce the causes of these stresses. It then examines the Manifesto for Agile Software Development and how its implementation in six key areas could also result in a reduction in technical quality and provides recommendations for Project Managers to follow to maintain technical quality while executing agile software development practices.

Key Words: Manifesto for Agile Software Development, Technical Debt, Tailoring, Customer Definition, Architecture Communications, Documentation, Self Organizing Teams

This paper is based on empirical observations, current literature, limited trails, and engineering and project management experiences.

INTRODUCTION

The goal of project management is the timely delivery of capabilities that provides value-add to the customer. In 1994, the Standish Group published their first report that measured the delivery of successful projects. In their initial report, they surveyed 365 companies and represented 8380 IT applications. “The Standish Group research shows a staggering 30.1% of projects will be cancelled before they are completed….On the success side, the average is only 16.2% for software projects that are completed on-time and on budget.” They further assessed that 52.7% of IT projects will be completed but will be challenged by being over-budget, over the time estimate and will offer fewer functions than originally specified. The study also concluded that the probability of project success goes down as the size and complexity of the project increases.     (The CHAOS report.1994)

As reported by Alan Zucker in 2016,

“Over the past two decades, there has been very little change in the (Standish) headline results. On average:

  • 29% of projects “succeed” in delivering the desired functionality, on time and on budget
  • 48% of projects are “challenged” and do not meet scope, time or budget expectations
  • 23% of projects “fail” and are cancelled

While there is some year-to-year variability in these scores, the trend line is essentially flat. In other words, we are no better at delivering a project today than we were 20 years ago. However, when you dive into the data, there are some bright spots and markers for improvement:

  • Smaller is better
  • People are the primary drivers of project success or failure
  • Agile projects are far more likely to succeed.” (Zucker, 2016)

Empirical observations by the author of approximately 150 projects over a period of 20 years indicate that troubled projects proceed through a progressive set of warning signs until the project either delivers a capability or is cancelled.

More…

To read entire paper, click here


Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.
This paper was originally presented at the 4th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.



About the Author


Johnny D. Morgan, PhD

Virginia, USA

 


Dr. Johnny Morgan
has 37 years of systems engineering and program management experience. While serving in the United States Navy and then employed with IBM, Lockheed Martin and currently General Dynamics, he has assisted numerous Department of Defense and Intelligence Community customers in the management and execution for their information technology portfolios.   Supplementing his experience, he has received a Bachelor’s degree in Computer and Information Sciences from the University of Florida, a Master’s degree in Systems Management from the University of Southern California, and a Doctorate degree in System Engineering from the George Washington University.   Dr. Morgan has also earned numerous industry certifications including the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Professional and the International Council on Systems Engineering Expert System Engineering Professional certifications. Dr. Morgan can be contacted at johnny.morgan@gdit.com

 

 

Ranking Portfolio Management Maturity

SECOND EDITION

by Susan Hostetter and Sherri Norris

U.S. Census Bureau

Washington, DC, USA

 



Executive Summary

This paper continues the work of developing a maturity model for portfolio management we first presented at the 2016 UMD Project Management Symposium. In this paper, we will present:

  • Discussion of how we created the scorecard and evaluated the maturity model
  • Feedback from professionals involved with portfolio management processes across the U.S Census Bureau
  • Our Implementation Scorecard, a tool designed to measure and rate the maturity of portfolio management programs against the model
  • An updated maturity model

Important topics that emerged from the development of this scorecard and review of different portfolio management programs are:

  • A maturity model should not understate the process development phase.
  • Portfolio management programs come in a variety of structures and usually manage more than one type of investment.
  • Successful movement across the maturity levels is dependent on several universal factors outside the maturity model.
  • Ongoing portfolio management programs will experience positive and negative changes in maturity over time.

Introduction

We introduced a maturity model in the paper, Evaluating and Building Portfolio Management Maturity that we created to be a tool for assessing portfolio management programs in an “apples to apples” format. In this paper, we discuss the scorecard we created for use by portfolio management professionals to assess the performance of their programs against the model and our evaluation of the maturity model and scorecard against a variety of portfolio management programs.

Scorecard Development and Evaluation Participants

In the first paper, we included a list of questions for each portfolio management characteristic section. These questions did a good job framing the scope of each characteristic but proved to function poorly as questions on a scorecard. We found that answering the mostly yes/no questions to be burdensome and did not provide results that allowed us to place a response into a single maturity level. Our solution was to convert the questions into a list of conditional statements, organize them by characteristic and add an instruction for the respondent to select all statements that applied to their portfolio management governance program.

Our next step was to find portfolio management professionals to complete our scorecard and evaluate the maturity model. Since 2012, the Census Bureau has made portfolio management a strategic priority across the enterprise with a few program areas ahead of the enterprise push. This meant that programs have been functioning with varied success for at least 4 years with a few running over 6 years. We interviewed 13 people from eight different governance programs with experience varying from 2 months to over 6 years. We were fortunate to interview people who have seen their programs evolve and change with leadership turnover as well as people who have participated in more than one governance program. Most of our participants managed portfolio management processes from a program management office but some were program managers whom had driven the development of a board or were participating as a board member during its development. We also had broad representation of differing portfolio types and functions and were involved in the following areas:

  • The enterprise level governing board and development efforts.
  • Directorate level programs over hundreds of investments.
  • Division level boards over smaller focused portfolios.
  • A program-level board over large, multiyear, multi-billion dollar investments.

They represented differing governance structures and control over funds and their governing responsibilities included IT projects, operations work, reimbursable work, research projects, large enterprise initiatives, and contracts.

Evaluation of Maturity Model and Scorecard

We selected participants for our evaluation with the intent of getting knowledgeable portfolio management professionals from a variety of areas to fill out the scorecard and provide feedback on the maturity model. We planned a debriefing interview of the participants for after they completed the scorecard to help us evaluate our materials and maturity model. We developed participant instructions, materials, and a script to standardize the debriefing interview. For each scorecard section, we asked if they found the statement relevant, if they could see themselves in the statement and if anything was missing. For the model, we asked for feedback on the maturity levels and the characteristics we included in the model.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.
This paper was originally presented at the 4th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.



About the Authors


Susan Hostetter

Washington, DC, USA

 

 



Susan Hostetter
, PMP, is a project management professional with over twenty years’ experience with Federal Statistical programs. Ms. Hostetter has been instrumental in standing up and managing risk management, project management, portfolio management, strategic planning, and performance management processes for large survey and Census programs. She has a Master’s Degree in Management with a Project Management emphasis from the University of Maryland’s University College, a Master’s Certificate in Program Management from George Washington University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from Mary Baldwin University. Susan can be reached at susan.lynn.hostetter@census.gov

 


Sherri Norris

Washington, DC, USA

 

 


Sherri Norris
is a project management and statistical professional with over twenty years of public policy, project management and operations experience. Ms. Norris has coordinated and implemented schedule, requirements, performance management, and governance processes for survey and Census Programs. She has a Public Policy Master’s Degree in Justice: Law and Society from American University, a Master’s Certificate in Program Management from George Washington University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from University of Delaware. Sherri can be reached at sherri.j.norris@census.gov

 

 

Management of Creative Projects

Challenges and Paradoxes

SECOND EDITION

By Alina Kozarkiewicz and Agnieszka Kabalska

AGH University of Science and Technology

Cracow, Poland

 



Abstract

Nowadays, the importance of creativity for social and economic development, including the development of individuals, organizations as well as sectors or regions, is taken for granted. So called creative industries (e.g. media, advertisement, video-games), seem to play more and more important role in the development of the economy (Banks at al., 2002; Seidel, 2011). What is to be underlined, all these creative industries are project-oriented as projects are the main way of carrying on the activities of enterprises (Simon, 2006; DeFillipi et al., 2007). Moreover, in traditional project-oriented industries, such as construction or IT, the growing expectations as to the novelty and originality of products and management processes seem to increase the interests in creativity of employees and teams (Dawson & Andriopoulos, 2014).

The aim of this paper is to discuss the significance of the creativity in contemporary project management and to indicate the challenges and paradoxes rising from creative ideas and actions. On the basis of literature review the main attributes of creative projects will be demonstrated. In the next part, the most important pressures, challenges and paradoxes of creative project will be presented and discussed.

Key words: project management, creativity, paradoxes

JEL code: M10

Introduction

Although the creativity of an individual or an organization has started to attract attention of the scientists in the beginning of the twentieth century, it seems to be accurate to underline that recently in the management research this interest has been developed into are markable phenomenon. Inquiries on creativity, typical for philosophy or psychology, have become the domain of the researchers in the field of management, and consequently, in a vast number of papers, creativity is demonstrated and analyzed as a source of the growth and success of contemporary enterprises, a key for improving the work environment, and as the basis of R&D and innovativeness (Oldham & Cummings, 1996; Amabile, 1996; Dawson & Andriopoulos, 2014). Moreover, it is noted that creative sectors, such as fashion, advertising, media or computer games, influence in more and more important way the economy of many countries (Banks et al., 2002; Seidel, 2011; Florida, 2005). Their share in the gross domestic product of many European countries grows constantly, resulting in the efforts of many governments to offer the conditions supporting the development of such industries. However, it should be emphasized that a huge diversity in the scope of research on creativity could be observed ‒ the levels of concern include individual and organizational creativity, the creative projects and teams, as well as creative classes, cities, regions or sectors.

Unquestionably, project management does not remain indifferent to the matter of creativity: its significance, sources or paradoxes (Kozarkiewicz, 2016). A project ‒ by its definition ‒ consists in creating the unique product or service. Thus, it results in the lack of the routine and repetitiveness, but in the search of new, original ideas instead. The creative sectors are project-oriented, they carry out their activities through projects. What is equally important, in traditional project industries, such as construction industry, more and more expectations appear in relation to the originality and the innovation, both with the reference to applied technologies or offered products, as well as management processes. It might be stated, consequently, that the management of creative projects constitutes nowadays a meaningful and current research topic.

This article should be regarded as a voice in the discussion described above. The aim of this paper is to make a contribution to the knowledge on creative project by exploiting simultaneously pressures, challenges and paradoxes related to the peculiarity of managing such projects. The paper is structured as follows. After a brief introduction, in the first part of the paper, the characteristics of creative projects are delineated concisely. Thereafter, on the basis of existing literature, the results of the analysis of diverse contingencies, especially the pressures for managers, are demonstrated. These pressures, for example new technological solutions or customers’ expectations, might be considered as the drivers of creativity. Some other pressures, for example the expectations as to the financial effectiveness of the project, however, could also form barriers for creativity in projects. In the next section of the paper, the analysis of creative projects is focused around the concept of the paradox. The research investigates the primary categories of paradoxes of creative projects resulting from the ambiguous expectations towards the product, the management process, or the team composition. As research reveals, in creative projects paradoxes concerning exacting choices between art and business, product functionality or design, schedule or innovation, raise a substantial question not only for the practice of project management, but also for the scientific research focused on description and understanding the phenomenon of creativity.

What should be outlined in the introduction to this paper, the diversity of creative projects frames the complexity of issues connected with managing of such projects. Thus, the description and discussion require some simplifications, synthesis or even brachylogy. In this paper, the systematizing assumption was made deliberately‒seven most important pressures, challenges and paradoxes were identified.

Creative projects and their categories

Indisputably, when defining the concept of creative project it would be impossible to omit even short discussion about the understanding of the term ‘creativity’ and delineating the contexts of some definitions…

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.
This paper was originally presented at the 6th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers



About the Authors


Alina Kozarkiewicz

Cracow, POLAND

 


Alina Kozarkiewicz
awarded her master in management and doctoral degree in management from the AGH-University of Science and Technology, the Faculty of Management in Cracow, Poland. Next, in the year 2013 she awarded her habilitation (post-doctoral degree required in Polish academic system) from the University of Economics in Katowice. Since her graduation she has been working for the AGH-University of Science and Technology in Cracow holding the positions of teaching assistant, assistant professor and, at present, associate professor. She has been co-operating with numerous Polish universities, e.g. Warsaw School of Economics, University of Economics in Katowice, and Medical University in Warsaw. She visited and co-operated with many European universities, e.g. Umea University in Sweden, Dundee University in the UK or Arcada University in Helsinki, as well as University of Maryland, the USA. Her main interests include project management, innovation management and strategic management. She is an author or co-author of six books on project management and project management accounting (all in Polish) and of over hundred scientific papers. She presented her work at numerous conferences in Poland and abroad. Alina Kozarkiewicz can be contacted at akozarki@zarz.agh.edu.pl

 


Agnieszka Kabalska

Cracow, POLAND

 

 


Agnieszka Kabalska
is a PhD candidate with a specialization in strategic management at AGH Faculty of Management. She has gained her M.Sc. in mining geology at AGH Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection. Her scientific interests are focused on value configuration in business models, especially in Polish health resort enterprises. In parallel with scientific work, Agnieszka is professionally involved in the creation and implementation of industrial projects, which are primarily focused on cooperation between the academic and business environment – primarily on creating and implementing innovative ideas and technological solutions for business practice. She also works on market research projects for companies from various industries. Agnieszka is an author and co-author of scientific papers about the subject matter of business models and project management (strategic and creative projects). Agnieszka can be contacted at kabalska@agh.edu.pl

 

 

Integrated Project Delivery

Complicated Collaboration or Improbable Panacea

SECOND EDITION

By William A. Moylan, PhD, PMP

and

Nadia Arafah, ABD

College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University

Ypsilanti, Michigan

 


Abstract

Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is different from traditional construction project delivery methods. IPD requires early involvement of key parties with sharing of decision-making, control and project risks. Removing the associated liability encourages the parties to focus on producing the best, economical design while executing the construction efficiently and effectively. In IPD, the facility owner pays for direct costs and overhead, theoretically striped of profit. The risk of losing money is minimal with the opportunity to share in net budget savings. IPD seems like a panacea; however, skeptics remain. The typical designer and constructor, both pragmatic by nature, are distrustful of unproven methods. IPD seems complicated to those not attuned to creative problem solving. IPD participants must be trusting and trustworthy, able to collaborate and cooperate, and, communicate ethically and sincerely – not common traits of the construction industry. The paper compares and contrasts these positive and negative aspects of IPD.

Introduction

Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) has been touted with both raves and reservation as a construction project delivery method. IPD boasts better buildings thanks to multiparty contracting with trustworthy partners. However, detractors warn that IPD remains as complicated as it is collaborative.

In IPD, project risks are shared equally among the multiparty contract entities and offers subsequent profit sharing from any positive budget balances. Removing the associated liability encourages the parties to focus on producing an economical design and executing the construction activity efficiently and effectively. The IPD project is organized like a business with early involvement of key players with shared team decision-making and control. Orientation [onboarding] is critical because IPD’s approach, process and vocabulary are different from the normal project delivery methods. In IPD, the facility owner pays all contract signatories’ direct costs and overhead, theoretically striped of profit. The team of designers and contractors contribute to a profit pool, based on a target price. The risk of losing money is minimal with the opportunity to share in the net budget savings (i.e., profit). Moreover, IPD offers opportunities for repeat business with trusted partners.

However, skeptics remain. The typical designer and constructor, both pragmatic by nature, has honed their business skills from the school of hard knocks. IPD seems complicated to those not attuned to team-based, creative problem solving. IPD participants must be technically knowledgeable with the requisite business savvy, be good at ‘playing well’ with others, and exhibit good communication skills; not the typical tool-kit of the A/E designer and construction manager.

The paper reviews the background of IPD including requirements, compares and contrasts the positive and negative aspects of IPD, and, suggests recommended practices to ensure the best brick for the buck from IPD.

Background – Constructed Facility Project Delivery

The methods and means by which the Constructor delivers the completed facility [the “how”] based on the design of the Architect / Engineer [the “what”] is important.

Construction Contractual Arrangements

In construction, the contract type will vary over the project life cycle. Typically, reimbursable contracts are used for the conceptual and design work at the beginning of the project, and fixed-price contacts are preferred for the construction work. The following factors affect the selection of the contract type for a specific work package: level of detail available, urgency of the procurement, level of competition desired, level of competition available, and, organization’s risk utility or tolerance.

The major types of construction contracts (PMI, 2008) are as follows:

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.
This paper was originally presented at the 4th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.



About the Authors


William A. Moylan, PhD

Michigan, USA

 




Dr. William A. Moylan
, PhD, PMP, FESD, DTM is an Educator, Consultant, Trainer, Expert Witness and Practitioner in Project Management and Construction Engineering. He is an Associate Professor with Eastern Michigan University and instructs in Construction Management. Dr. Moylan has extensive professional experience in all aspects of program and project management, including over eleven years internationally with the Arabian American Oil Co, and since 1983 has been involved in implementing information technology. Dr. Moylan received his BS in Construction Engineering from Lawrence Technological University; his Masters from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, majoring in Project Management and minoring in International Business, and, his Ph.D. in Organization and Management with a specialization in Leadership from Capella University. Dr. Moylan is active in a variety of professional societies including PMI, ESD ASCE, and Toastmasters International.

 


Naida Arafah

Michigan, USA

 

 


Nadia Arafah
is an experienced and innovative interior designer focused on sustainability. She is a faculty member at Easter Michigan University an allied member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID). She earned her Masters of Science degree in Interior Design from Eastern Michigan and currently working on her PhD in Technology. Her research interest is evolving about sustainable design as a way of creating healthier interior environments.

In her professional practice, Nadia works on projects of all sizes, from renovating and repurposing old buildings to simply helping clients choose the perfect paint colors for their home. Arafah also takes on select commercial projects in addition to her residential design work, and finds helping people feel comfortable and happy in their office space is always rewarding.

Interior design is not just a career for Nadia Arafah – it’s a passion. Nadia loves meeting interesting and eclectic people, and enjoys the variety of experiences a design career provides. She also works to educate her student about the importance of sustainable design approach and guides them towards learning new software to excel their designs. In her free time, you can find Nadia reading, painting, enjoying the outdoors and socializing with her friends and family.

 

 

Stakeholders Communication Approach

A New Era

SECOND EDITION

Damiano Bragantini, PMP®

and

Matteo Licciardi

Megareti SpA

Verona, Italy

 



Abstract

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that as communication must be transparent and clear and democratic, this means know why and with whom we are communicating. Are stakeholders all equal? Do they need the same strategic communication approach?

Throughout a literature review that suggests how to identify the stakeholders and how to manage them, it is proposed a new communication oriented approach as it is established that a two-way communication approach is the business model for the future.

It is suggested to investigate relationship and agreement attributes to help the project manager in categorize the stakeholders from the point of view of communication approach. These attributes are strictly connected with communication strategy as they could be modified through the right communication approach. Also it’s suggested to share the identification phase of the stakeholders with the identification phase of the risks, in order to build risks/stakeholders matrix that should be integrated with relationship and agreement attribute for each stakeholder.

For each stakeholder should be ethical to shape the more appropriate communication approach. By using a new paradigm of the well-known rhetorical triangle, pathos, logos and overall ethos are the constraints to solve to build the right communication approach for each stakeholder.

The results of this study reveals that the application of the new attributes, relationship and agreement throughout the stakeholder shape tool, combined with the re-engineered rhetorical triangle will drive the project manager toward the right communication approach for each stakeholder and a successful communication plan.

Key words: stakeholders, communication, ethics

JEL code: O15, D8

Introduction

In literature there are many definitions on what is a stakeholder, indeed the debate is very open, sometime confuse and contested (Miles, 2012). One of the most accepted definition is by Freeman (Freeman, 1984) “any group or individual who can affect or is affected by the achievement of the organization’s objectives” that is quite similar to the one we find in PMBOK “An individual, group or organization who may affect, be affected by, or perceive itself to be affected by a decision, activity or outcome of the project” (PMI, 2013).

These definitions are, indeed, very widely and without any doubt, to stay alive, the project manager needs to assign attributes to each stakeholder to manage him/her in the best way.

In literature the most used attributes to analyze and prioritize the stakeholders are:

  • power,
  • legitimacy
  • urgency
  • proximity

where (Snauwaert, 2012):

  • “Power is the ability of those who possess power to bring about the outcomes they desire (Salancik & Pfeffer, 1977)
  • Legitimacy is a generalized perception or assumption that the actions of an entity are desirable, proper, or appropriate within some socially constructed system of norms, values, beliefs, and definitions (Suchman, 1995, p. 574)
  • Urgency is the degree to which stakeholder claims call for immediate attention (Mitchel et al., 1997)
  • Proximity is the degree to which stakeholders are closely associated or relatively remote to the organization/ project (Bourne & Walker, 2006)”.

Also, there are different models for classification such as “regulator, controller, partner, passive, dependent and non-stakeholder” (Mainardes et al., 2012).

In the vision of Mitchell et al. (1997), the classification options are: dormant stakeholder, discretionary stakeholder, demanding stakeholder, dominant stakeholder, dangerous stakeholder, and dependent stakeholder.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.
This paper was originally presented at the 6th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.



About the Authors


Damiano Bragantini

Verona, Italy

 


Damiano Bragantini
 is a Civil Engineer with more 15 years of experience in Civil Infrastructure and Information Technology experience. Currently he is working with Agsm Group, an important Italian utility in generation, distribution and supply of electricity and gas. Mr. Bragantini is also a recognized teacher at the University of Liverpool (UK) where he teaches in the online project management MSc program. Mr. Bragantini is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) from the Project Management Institute (PMI). He has been also actively involved with PMI as a final Exposure Draft Reviewer for Project Cost Estimating Standard, Practice Standard for Earned Value and PMBOK sixth Edition and as internal reviewer of PMBOK Fifth Edition. Mr. Bragantini has also been actively involved and is still involved with the local PMI Northern Italy Chapter, where he has been a contributor to some projects. Damiano Bragantini can be contacted at damiano.bragantini@megareti.it

 


Matteo Licciardi

Verona, Italy

 


Matteo Licciardi
 is graduated in Business & Administration at Verona University, Italy. He attended also a college year in Tampere University, Finland. He worked in Verona University, in a multinational corporation working in craftsmanship and transportation sector, and in the biggest financial institution of Verona. After these experiences, he found the opportunity of working in Agsm Group, an important Italian utility in generation, distribution and supply of electricity and gas. He frequently collaborates with IKN Italy (Institute of Knowledge & Networking), an Italian company leader in organization of professional training and development events. Matteo Licciardi can be contacted at matteo.licciardi@megareti.it

 

 

Project Quality Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   Project Quality Management: Why, What and How, 2nd Ed.
Author: Kenneth H. Rose, PMP
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $37.95
Format: Paperback – 224 Pages
Publication Date: 2014     
ISBN: ISBN-13:978-1-60427-102-7
Reviewer:     Paul L. Smith, PMP
Review Date: May 2017

 



Introduction

Kenneth H. Rose anchors Quality using the triple constraint as the background, Time, Cost and Scope. Quality is the 4th element or equal among the other 3 closely related to the “Scope” side of the Triangle. Scope is the attribute that the Customer receives in the end product or service. Time and Cost are important but the activities or Scope drive the direction of the project or product. The Quality foundation is formed into the base of projects through Scope, the 4th element, Quality is planned into the process not inspected in. Thus the title – Project Quality Management – Why, What and How follows as a good title and guide to understanding the driving forces behind Project Management.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book chronologically is well laid out.

Section 1Quality Foundations including the definition and how it fits into project management structure. Includes the history of the pioneers, references to ISO and short explanations of six- sigma and criteria for the Malcom Baldridge National Quality Award.

Section 2Quality Management going deep in the Customer interface with Quality Planning and Quality Assurance defined providing the reader in this section the series of events, Customers, Requirements, Specifications, QA Activities, QA Plan to Quality Control circling back to Specifications. This leads the reader to the ultimate in Kaizen reasoning – Plan, Do, Check, Act and Quality Control.

Section 3Tools for Managing Project Quality, Data collection, charts all the tools one would/could be tested on in the PMP exam. i.e. Pareto charts, Histograms and Scatter diagrams with definitions and detailed explanations. Section ends with analyzing the data, solving project problems then aligning to common project practices.

Section 4Quality in Practice. Starts out (in detail) Dr. Deming’s Red Bead Experiment, in which random workers using a paddle to scoop up beads (avoiding red beads) but the system is set up with 20 % Red Beads and 80 percent white beads (preferred) as stated the worker will try to avoid the read beads but ultimately over 5 attempts fashioned to reflect 5 work days the percentage is at best ~ 10 percent red. The point is to fix the “system” not blame the worker. Plan or fix the System up stream not expect that quality will be inspected into the process while being assembled or worked.

Highlights

Book reads well and has some gems of knowledge and classroom mechanics. At the end of most chapters are 3 closing sections that lend themselves to discussion and classroom interactions. “Points to Ponder” reinforces the reading material with straight forward questions on the concept or teaching in the section example … “What is purpose of cause and effect diagrams?”, a section on “Exercises” to use the tools/learnings and lastly some chapters provide “References” and one will find a tie into the Project Management Body of Knowledge or PMBOK guide.

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About the Reviewer


Paul
L. Smith, PMP

North Texas, USA

 



Paul
L. Smith, PMP recently retired from Abbott Laboratories as a Project Manager supporting Clinical Chemistry Research & Development.  Paul has been involved in project management for over 10 years.  He currently supports the PMI Dallas Chapter’s Educational committee as an instructor for the Scope Team (PM 202) class. Paul can be contacted at psmith0830@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

Project Management the Agile Way

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   Project Management the Agile Way: Making it Work in the Enterprise, 2nd Edition
Author: John C. Goodpasture, PMP
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $59.95
Format: Hardcover, 392 pages
Publication Date:   2015    
ISBN: 978-1-60427-115-7
Reviewer:     Ivan Kotcher, PMP
Review Date: June 2017

 



Introduction

This book is a comprehensive guide to Agile project management, as well as an overview of project management concepts and approaches ranging from Scrum to XP, the Crystal Family, and Kanban. Intended for experienced practitioners who may be unfamiliar with Agile and related methodologies, it contrasts Agile with more traditional methods. Although it can be dense, the structure of the book lends itself to investigating specific topics of interest and provides excellent summaries of major ideas and how Agile can be applied effectively to different aspects of project management.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is structured very much like an academic lecture or textbook, broken down into discrete sections with a consistent structure for each. The author states that the structure is intended to emulate an Agile sprint, with the reader concluding a “release” at the end of each chapter.

Chapters include or more “Modules” that present objectives, summary and takeaway points, and chapter-specific endnotes with definitions and/or references to other sources. In many cases, important definitions or ideas are presented as blocks broken out from the main text. Discussion points are also provided for the reader to think about how the ideas can be interpreted or applied in his or her own context.

The publisher also provides additional free material from its own resource center, accessible through the publisher website.

Highlights

The book is an excellent resource for both experienced practitioners and newcomers to introduce and apply Agile methodology in a real environment. It does an excellent job of explaining how traditional methodology can affect the expectations and participation of multiple stakeholders, and describes how Agile changes the dynamics of a project. Everything from project business cases to planning and scheduling work, to managing teams and value, to facilitating adaptation of an existing company to Agile, is covered.

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About the Reviewer


Ivan Kotcher, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 


Ivan Kotcher
, PMP, is a project and program manager with strategic and operational consulting experience across the full breadth of data center infrastructure management.  He has over 20 years of experience working with telecommunications and application hosting companies ranging in size from global carriers to startups.   He currently works as a Transformation Director with Wipro Technologies, helping customers to evolve business processes and associated supporting technologies to improve cost profiles and service delivery.

Email address:  mailto:ikotcher@ot-partners.com

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

Extreme Teams

BOOK REVIEW

Title: Extreme Teams: Why PIXAR, AIRBNB and Other Cutting-Edge Companies Succeed Where Most Fail
Author: Robert Bruce Shaw
Publisher: www.amacombooks.org
List Price:   $27.95
Format: Hard Cover; 256 pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3717-9
Reviewer: Douglas Dodd, Jr., MBA, PMP
Review Date: June 2017

 



Introduction

This book tackles the lesser-addressed issue of high-performance teams and their critical impact to the success of some of the highest achieving organizations of today. The reader gets a peek inside of the mindset of the organizational founders and their drive to build and keep their corporate culture alive through the use of high-performance teams.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is structured into 7 chapters. They are designed based on the statement “The common approach of the highly successful organizations reviewed in the book is that they (value)”:

  1. Results and Relationships
  2. Foster a Shared Obsession
  3. Value Fit over Capabilities
  4. Focus More, then Less
  5. Push Harder, Push Softer
  6. Take Comfort in Discomfort

Chapter seven then reviews results as proof of their successful utilization of teams:

7. Teams at the Extremes

The remainder of the book is its Acknowledgements, Chapter Notes and Index sections, which come in handy if you wish to dive further into any one of the companies studied.

Highlights

This book takes a very balanced, shockingly brutal look at the benefits, costs and potential pitfalls of utilizing high-performance teams as the cornerstone of your employee alignment model.

For every success, the author is quick to list a noted failure and stresses that the high-performance team approach is not for every organization. For instance, organizations who need to maintain the status quo such as regulatory and various City, County, State and Federal agencies may not utilize high-performance teams as effectively as the private sector. Indeed, high-performance teams may introduce fear and job insecurity in institutions that can’t compete in the compensation market against private sector business and use job security as a major recruiting chip for those people more interested in a work/family balance than at-market salaries.

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About the Reviewer


Douglas Dodd, Jr

North Texas, USA

 




Douglas Dodd, Jr
, MBA, PMP, OCA, Oracle 10g, 11g DBA, Network+, Security+, is a member of the PMI Dallas Chapter and has been involved in project management at multiple levels over the last decade, as a stakeholder, team-member or project manager. He has 20+ years of experience as a Business Analyst, Finance Manager, Financial Information Systems Manager and Business Software Solutions Analyst. He currently works as a consultant in Higher Education at Columbia Advisory Group in Dallas, TX. He is also on the Adjunct staff of Dallas Baptist University in Dallas TX. He currently resides in Wylie, TX with his wife Ava and son Brandon. Douglas can be contacted at ddoddjr@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

Implementing Positive Organizational Change

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Implementing Positive Organizational Change: A Strategic Project Management Approach  
Author: Gina Abudi, MBA
Publisher: J.Ross Publishing
List Price:   $54.95
Format: hard cover, 264 pages
Publication Date:   2017    
ISBN – 13: 978-1-60427-133-1
Reviewer:     Laura P Basurto, PMP
Review Date: June 2017

 



Introduction

Implementing Positive Organizational Change: A Strategic Project Management Approach is a must-read for anyone wanting to implement a change in an organization. It provides you with everything you need to be successful: analyzing the psychology of change and the impact on employees, how to properly engage employees and the (feasible) tools and techniques to do it.

Ms Abudi provides just the right balance of practical, theoretical and real-world experiences to keep the reader engaged and empowered to implement change.

I just participated in a merger between two healthcare systems, and wish I had read this book first as it would have been very helpful during our integration process.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book has a very organized approach to teaching the reader about implementing change in an organization.

I appreciated how the Introduction gave a brief overview of all the chapters so I could anticipate what I would be learning in each one.

Overall, the flow of the book is very engaging. The author gave excellent and pertinent examples of real-life scenarios and also provided templates, checklists, etc. to aid with facilitating change, which are available online. This book is both theoretical and practical, and presented in a very balanced and methodical way.

Highlights

These key points/concepts were most interesting and helpful to me:

  • 80% of employees accept change when their influential non-leaders do.
  • Sample checklists and templates for one to employ in the workplace.
  • Management needs to manage employee concerns on change to prevent failure.
  • The stages of adapting to change (Chapter 2).
  • Importance of Lessons Learned and to continue monitoring the change.
  • When communicating change, it is imperative that the Vision be shared first and continually.
  • Change must be aligned to the culture.

Highlights: What I liked!

The entire book, but these are the highlights:

  • Like the use of the word “transformation” versus “change” as change can sometimes indicate that something is bad or wrong.
  • Advice is very practical to use and employ in the “real world”. For example, in Figure 2.4, it shows the four-step process for engaging others in change, and then in Table 2.5 it tells you how.
  • Appreciate the necessary communications to employees’ checklist in Chapter 1.
  • Developing a Stakeholder Communications Committee.
  • Don’t get complacent about change; importance of being proactive versus reactive.
  • Importance of being honest about the change to employees.   For change to be successful, the employees must be able to trust you.
  • Chapter 5 focusing on the importance and value of people, the importance of a stakeholder analysis, identifying Champions, Resisters and Indifferents, understanding the culture and generational boundaries and generating a team profile.   This all contributes to the creation of the People Change Management Plan in Chapter 7.

Who might benefit from the Book?

This is a go-to book for anyone looking to implement change in their organization. It employs practical and feasible tasks to accomplish the end goal…

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 



About the Reviewer


Laura Basurto, PMP

North Texas, USA

 

 


Laura Basurto
has worked in Project, Program and Product Management for the past 17 years in IT, both in the United States and internationally, namely in the telecommunications, computer and healthcare industries. She holds a BA in Business Administration from Austin College and an MBA in Telecommunications Management from the University of Dallas, Texas, USA.

Laura is PMP & LSSGB certified, and can be contacted at laura.basurto@att.net

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

The Project Manager and the Pyramid

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The Project Manager and the Pyramid
Author: David Hinde
Publisher: Orgtopia
List Price:   UK₤9.99
Format: Soft cover, 220 pages
Publication Date:   2016    
ISBN: 978-0-9955275-0-8
Reviewer:     Donna Aubrey, PMP
Review Date: 6/2017

 



Introduction

The book The Project Manager and the Pyramid is a very easy to read book. It uses a very complex project, building a pyramid, to illustrate the concepts of project management, but it’s told in story form, so it’s very entertaining. There is a cast of characters and enough information about each character to make the story interesting.

While it doesn’t cover all 47 project management processes in the PMBOK, it does cover several processes in each of the 5 process groups.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is broken down into 15 chapters, each covering a project related process. Each chapter tells a part of the story of building this pyramid which relates directly to a project management process. The story is interesting and a helpful way to illustrate the processes rather than just describing each one.

At the end of each chapter is a summary of key learning points, including important definitions and additional examples. I found this to be extremely helpful and would be a good reference in the future. The summary often times included a sample of the document being described. These samples could be used as templates, or at least a starting place for important process documents, such as Scope of Work, End Stage Report, Product Specification and Change Reports.

Highlights

I especially enjoyed some of the tips included in each chapter. For example, in Chapter 2: Defining the Project one of the tips was to negotiate individually with the stakeholders to get closer to consensus prior to the meeting. This is a great idea and one I have used several times since reading the book. It is always worthwhile if you can meet with the stakeholders one-on-one prior to a meeting.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Donna Aubrey, PMP

Plano, TX, USA

 

 


Donna Aubrey
, PMP, has worked as a Program/Project Manager since 1990. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering from Iowa State University, a Master’s Degree in Mathematics from Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville and an Executive MBA from Southern Methodist University. She is currently a Senior Program Manager at Luminator Technology Group in Plano, TX. Donna is a member of the Dallas, TX PMI Chapter.

Donna can be contacted at donnaaubreypmp@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

You’ve got 8 Seconds

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: You’ve got 8 Seconds – Communication Secrets for a Distracted World
Author: Paul Hellman
Publisher: AMACOM
List Price:   $17.95 USA
Format: Soft Cover, 208 pages
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978-0-81443-830-5
Reviewer: Jennifer Arroyo, PMP
Review Date: June 2017

 



Introduction

Author Paul Hellman’s LinkedIn profile has a tag line. “Imagine if everyone got right to the point.” His new book “You’ve Got 8 Seconds: Communication Secrets for a Distracted world” conveys Paul Hellman’s “Express Potential” workshop knowledge and keynote speaker experiences to the reader in a concise, easy-to-follow content format.

We live in a digital device-driven and social media-following modern life with constant disruption to our communication environment. The constant influx of distraction creates a new dynamic and challenges our ability to clearly communicate with someone in a short amount of time.

Throughout this book, Paul engages his readers with practical strategies and tips on how to speak to audiences while maintaining their attention. Paul with an obvious written intelligence and provides many insightful pieces of advice that add to the book’s overall engaging character.

Overview of book’s structure

This book first summarizes the human tendency of “Pretending to listen” and the topic of “the Attention Economy” which was introduced by Nobel Prize-winning economist, Herbert Simon.

Paul divided this book into three main sections based on his 25+ years of knowledge in communication consultation. He uses 3 key strategies with100 tactics to develop new approaches to deliver relevant information through different communication scenarios, all while maintaining a good sense of humor.

The detailed key features delivered by this book in each chapter include:

More…

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About the Reviewer


Jennifer Arroyo, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 


Jennifer Arroyo, MBA, PMP,
Realtor® received her M.B.A. degree in Marketing from State University of New York at Albany.  Jennifer joined PMI’s Dallas Chapter in 2015.

Ms. Arroyo has more than 9 years of project management experience in the Multi-unit Business Marketing, Professional Development, and Financial Services industries. She works as an Associate Broker, affiliated with Keller Williams Realty, specialized in Residential | Commercial & Investment entrepreneurship PPM in Dallas TX. With her diverse international and industry-specific PM leadership experiences, Ms. Arroyo is passionate about helping entrepreneurs and business clients achieve branding goals and ROI Growth.

Keller Williams, the world’s largest real estate franchise by agent count, had the most firms on the REAL trends 500, according to the annual ranking and reporting published by REAL Trends, Inc. Founded in 1983, it grew from a single office in Austin to approximately 700 offices and as of Nov. 2016 with over 150,000 associates worldwide. It’s an Inc.5000 company and has been recognized as one of the highest rated real estate companies by numerous publications, including Entrepreneur Magazine and Forbes. The franchise, collectively, handled more than $178 billion in sales, up 27%, and 645,000 transactions, up 21% over year 2016.

Jennifer volunteered and served as supporting Book Review Coordinator of the professional development and social media marketing initiative. She also facilitates the Early Childhood Bilingual gogosmartmom e-Learning program designed for Homeschooling Moms originating in Taiwan, Republic of China.

Contact Jennifer Arroyo via mailto: referralboxkw@gmail.com  or 972.372.4043

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

Creating A Bar/ Restaurant for the Future

‘Sustainability in the Service Industry’

The Design and Re-model for ‘BARCODE’ Bar and Restaurant in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

PROJECT STORY

By Katharine A. Foley

Northern Ireland

 



Before I even start, let me explain that this whole project was carried out remotely from beginning to end. All correspondence between the clients, architect and myself was carried out using electronic formatting. With the use of email for simple conversation and direction, to Skype for the ongoing screen sharing in regards to the presentation of designs and to clarify and quantify any changes. Therefore, even before we look into what a sustainably built bar looks like, consider there was no paper use or, paper waste from either that of myself as the designer or of the architect assigned to work with me.

I am based in the UK, whilst the architect was based in Columbia, whilst the clients were located in Las Vegas, Nevada, meaning the project work that was carried out existed between three different time zones, Pacific, South America and the UK. There were times throughout the project when the clients were travelling to different states and then beyond to outside the USA, as far as the Indian Ocean. However, at all times open communications between all the parties concerned were honored and respected no matter what part of the world they resided.

For the project brief, the message was simple, just not the solution. I was to create and develop a design concept for four partner clients to include a fully functional space offering excellent balance and form whilst providing a good flow and synergy for traffic for both the interior space and exterior patio area.

Sounds simple right, well add to that the re-design draft of an electrical plan, the provision of a color concept throughout that works in conjunction with the selected materials. Further, I was to advise and assist the clients in sourcing and procuring elements for the space, whilst also being available to them for the installation process. The final part of the brief was to assist with developing a name for their new venue along with a visual graphic design.

Here I had an immediate advantage, as my son is a fantastic artist; therefore I passed this part of the project directly to him. He came up with the name ‘BARCODE’, which the clients loved and immediately agreed upon. This allowed him to create and develop the design graphic which would become the focal point for their project. Approval was given to demolish any interior walls that I felt might cause an obstruction or prevent the design vision reaching the desired end goal.

The original budget for this project was $100,000, however it is worth noting that a further $100,000 funding was awarded to the clients from Budweiser when they (the clients) presented my 3D Design Concept Renders for their new business venue, ‘BARCODE’.

The project timeline was tight, as I was given three months to complete the design concept and hand over all the technical and construction documentation for the project. I began working on the project on the 18th December 2015, just before the Christmas break. With a great deal of good will over the festive period, the design concept was approved and signed off by all four partner clients before we had reached the end of December. This enabled them to make the necessary applications to pull permits required to proceed with other site work such as the electrical scope of works and demolition. Once we had this first milestone in place, we set into the technical documentation and construction files which were successfully completed and then signed off and handed over to the clients on the 27th February 2016. Having reached this phase end successfully and earlier than planned, a contractor was hired and we were ready to begin the process of clearing the site for demolition.

When we started, the clients had no vision whatsoever for a design concept, neither did they have any blue prints for the available working space. One of the first tasks was to arrange someone to go on-site as soon as possible to take the measurements of the entire area; once received, I proceeded to develop and create a brand new floor plan for the existing space.

My first scheduled Skype call with the clients provided me with an opportunity to offer a solution based interior design concept consisting of an industrial/urban theme, whilst introducing sustainable products wherever possible into the design concept. On approval, a full lifecycle analysis was carried out for the purpose of establishing the cradle-to-grave impact of purchasing and installing such fixtures, fittings and equipment. Based on the design concept I convinced the clients that the approach of installing sustainable materials where possible throughout the project would not only benefit them financially but would also add to the aesthetic appeal of the completed design.

During this time, to ensure that we could truly call the project sustainable, consideration was given to relevant socio-economic factors with regards to manufacturing products such as poor working conditions and child labor. The decisions were made once all of these factors had been put into place that all the products and manufacturing would be done locally to also enhance the financial sustainability factor for the region.

More…

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About the Author


Katharine A. Foley

Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

 


Katharine Foley is an Interior Designer and a Certified Project Manager with twenty years of industry experience delivering projects globally for both exclusive VIP and high end clients. Her great flexibility in delivering projects means that no budget is too large or too small as she delivers based on quality not simply on cost.

She has worked as a personal designer/stylist with VIP clientele and also budgeted clients and is extremely experienced in retail interior design & set design.

Katharine has a strong approach to leadership, managing large teams of designers, junior designers, merchandisers and graphic designers on major in-house project work. All her projects are solely client facing and always, from client brief through to hand-over. Whether there is a need for hand holding along the way, or for an eye for detail, Katharine’s continuous approach towards successful delivery has allowed her to make a name for herself within her specialist field. With work experience in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, USA and Europe this has now helped her towards the early stages of setting up her own online interior design business, ‘Imagine Interior Design Studio’, offering design to a global audience.

To learn more about Katharine and her designs visit https://www.facebook.com/imagineinteriordesignstudio/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

 

 

Corruption goes through the big door

COMMENTARY

By Germán Bernate

Bogota, Colombia

 



The new Romanian government chaired by Prime Minister Sorin Grindeaunu, who had been in office only a few months ago, promulgated his first Decree. Decriminalize cases of corruption when the amount stolen is less than $ 50,000 (fifty thousand dollars). That is, it is presented in Society to corruption and is accepted to have its own legitimacy. This decree is new: it legalizes the robbery and exempts from all responsibility those who infringe the Laws.

Many Colombians are surprised by this novel way of governing. Some, ironically, wonder when the Executive will consider these lessons from Romania to proceed in a similar way. Or, maybe, it’s not necessary?

Specialists in Project Management observe the so-called ‘Best Practices’. These include, among others: appropriate training for all stakeholders, information management, generation of ideas for improvement, lessons learned from other projects, comparison with work done in other countries with different cultures, audits, observing standards, and many more .

In parallel there are the so-called ‘Bad Practices’. These are not found in the Procedural Manuals of any company, but all citizens know them well. Among the most famous are some used by sellers: a) lie to the customer with false promises about the benefits of the products and services promoted. B) hide from the client: never appears, refuses to answer phone calls. C) delivering poor quality products. D) non-realistic advertising.

But there are other ‘Bad Practices’ that are also present in Romania: bribery and corruption. These are presented most notably in construction and infrastructure. For the award of contracts mechanisms are designed to present the requirements to the proponents and emphasis is placed on transparency. After the elaboration of the contract comes a mandatory management: the obtaining of authorizations of the most varied requirements. Complex and not always useful operation.

Risk appears. This is an important complement to the project’s governance. This, the Risk, provides a series of ‘Best Practices’ that has the mission to control the action and prevent complex situations. Controls include documentation, monitoring and control, communications, monitoring of contracts, among many.

Risk is generous in its support. Your first contribution is the definition of the corresponding procedure: that is, what should be done and what is not allowed. Then it is in charge of identifying them, understanding what is involved and setting priorities. Qualitative and quantitative analyzes are then performed. This to establish the true impact they have. A guideline is established to know what to respond to each risk and how its management is controlled.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 



About the Author


Germán Bernate    
   

Bogota, Colombia

 

 


Germán Bernate
is an Electronic Engineer (Universidad Distrital – 1962) and Master in Project Management (UCI University of Costa Rica 2009). He worked 31 years for IBM in Colombia in managerial and technical positions. He was work with NCR Colombia and served as Program Manager and Project Manager. Founder and CEO of Almagesto  (2004), a company dedicated to consulting and training in the areas of strategic planning and project management. In 1992 he won the first prize in the fourth edition of Doctor Zumel Literary Contest in Madrid Spain. President of the Board of Teatro Colón for five years (2007-2011). Led the Project Management program at Universidad Piloto August 2008 to December 2009. Parquesoft Director during the period from August 2010 to March 2011. Professor at universities Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas, Nacional, Javeriana, Pamplona, Tecnológica de Bolívar, Andes, Externado, America and Piloto. Co-founder Colombia Chapter PMI (Project Management Institute) and its president for three terms. Co-founder of the Colombian Association ACGePro Project Management IPMA Member Association (International Project Management Association). He has published several books, including ‘El año 2000 al acecho. La crisis del Y2K afectará a su computador, aprenda a controlarla’on the issue of the change of the millennium. In February 2013, published as the book ‘Gerencia de Proyectos: aplicaciones en salud’. Computerworld Editorial Board Member since 1996 and international correspondent for PM World Today eJournal and PMForum.org from 2007-2011. Contact email: gbernate@cable.net.co

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/german-bernate/

 

Zimbabwe Embracing Project Management

COMMENTARY

Zimbabwe slowly embracing necessity of Project Management Training and Certification

By Tororiro Isaac Chaza, PMP

Harare, Zimbabwe

 



Tawanda Kurasa (real name) from Harare Zimbabwe is on cloud 19 having recently certified as a project management professional (PMP). Like many other thousands of professionals worldwide Tawanda has been practicing both locally and abroad for the past 10 years as an Engineer, he has worked in parastatals, private companies and listed companies such as Liquid Telecommunications as a Project Manager, delivering projects worth millions of dollars. In terms of best practice in the field of project management, despite possessing a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering and an MBA qualification, Tawanda was not recognized as a project manager before certification. This is the predicament of thousands of professionals out there not only in Zimbabwe but all over the world.

As the immediate past President of PMZ Mr Henry Mkhwananzi (PMP) puts it, “It is high risk for sponsors in the public and private sector, to entrust large scale projects worth millions of dollars into the leadership hands of uncertified project managers”. PMZ research has shown that the local public sector is fraught with ‘accidental’ project managers as many people are called to undertake project management responsibilities with little or no preparation. These ‘accidental’ project managers are selected for their managerial/technical expertise but lack competency to deliver projects.

In Zimbabwe and, as in most Sub-Saharan African countries the level of project management training and certification is nascent, albeit ominously low, given that these countries undertake massive infrastructural development projects. Hence projects fail due to incompetency in project management and the lack of appropriate project governance thereof, giving rise to opportunistic corruption.

Governments of a number of developed and emerging economies have gone to the extent of mandating enabling policies geared towards the acceleration of project management talent development in the public and private sectors in order to spur economic growth support. A case in point is the UK Government, which innovated by setting up a central Major Projects Authority (MPA) in 2011, by way of a Prime Ministerial Mandate. The reasons for setting up the MPA were cited thus, “There is currently no cross-governmental understanding of the size and cost of Government’s Major Projects portfolio, nor of the cost and viability of the projects within it. This failure will hinder our ability to prioritize and manage these huge costly projects,” (Prime Minister’s Mandate on Major Projects – Gov.uk, 2011). Similar developments have been attested in countries, such as Canada, USA, most EU bloc countries, Pakistan, Bangladesh, etc. where governments have pronounced the setting up of capacity development policies to enhance project management capabilities and attendant governance. Governments are prompting project management implementation to spearhead infrastructure development and innovation for sustained global competitiveness.

Project Management Zimbabwe (PMZ) is the Zimbabwe’s largest association of project managers, among its various mandates, the institute provides guidelines for certification of project managers. There are about 850 000 PMPs worldwide to date, and 50% of this number are in the USA and EU region, while Zimbabwe has less than 100 known PMPs to date. While the PMP certification is the world’s most popular project management credential, there are other equally good qualifications popular in Zimbabwe such as the PGDPM (Post Graduate Diploma in Project Management), CAPM (Certified Associate in Project Management), CPM/DPM (Certificate & Diploma in Project Management) including the PRINCE2.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 



About the Author


Eng. Tororiro Isaac Chaza

Harare, Zimbabwe

 

 

Eng. Tororiro Chaza is one of the handful of PMPs in Zimbabwe. He has over 30 years of experience on projects in the Telecommunications industry, having worked for General Electric Company in the UK, then for the Zimbabwe Posts and Telecommunications Company, and top Cellular Company Econet Wireless. Tororiro was the General Manager of the Project Management Office (PMO) at Econet Zimbabwe for the last 5 years in charge of managing a large portfolio of telecommunications, banking and construction projects of varying complexities. Tororiro is now a full-time project management trainer and consultant.

Tororiro Chaza can be contacted at mailto:tororiro.chaza@torchpmo.com

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase page in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/tororiro-isaac-chaza/

This article provided by Project Management Zimbabwe

Project Management Zimbabwe (PMZ – Project Management Institute of Zimbabwe) is Zimbabwe’s largest Association of Project Managers, with a membership base of over 1000. The institute has a mandate of policing the elevation of project management standards nationally through mentorship and membership services programmes. PMZ is registered and accredited by the Ministry of Higher & Tertiary Education Zimbabwe. For information, visit www.pmiz.org.zw or email: info@pmiz.org.zw