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Welcome to the June 2017 PMWJ

Five Disruptive Trends affecting Projects and Project Management, maybe more – and Welcome to the June 2017 PMWJ

David L. Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the June 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 59th edition contains 35 original articles, papers and other works by 44 different authors in 19 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. We are proud of the range and diversity of works and authors published in this journal each month. Since the primary mission of the PMWJ is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several editorial advisors, I have used this space to mention significant trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month I want to mention five such trends, in the context of a panel I will be moderating at the 11th annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in August. The theme for this year’s conference being held on the UTD campus in Richardson, Texas during 17-19 August is “Disruptive Leadership”. The panel discussion that I will moderate is titled “Disruptive Trends affecting Project Management”. I thought it might be interesting to discuss these trends here this month.

Disruptive Trends

According to Collins online dictionary, “disruptive” means to prevent something from continuing or operating in a normal way. [1] According to Wikipedia, A “disruptive innovation” is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leading firms, products and alliances. [2] According to the online Cambridge English Dictionary, a “trend” is a general development or change in a situation or in the way that people are behaving. [3] I think most definitions of these terms will be consistent, regardless of the source. A disruptive trend then might be defined as a general change in the way people or things normally operate.

How does this relate to or matter to project management, or projects for that matter? The answer should be obvious to most. Disruptive trends or changes can affect the conditions, environment and context of most projects. A disruptive change might mean that the product of a project will be obsolete or less useful to customers. It might mean a major new risk or opportunity for an organization. It might mean that new information, training, tools or technologies will be needed. Trends can affect individual projects, project managers, teams, stakeholders and organizations, or even entire markets, industries and professions. I believe it is critical that we as professionals monitor trends affecting our work and our profession. And awareness of disruptive trends is absolutely required if we are to survive.

The Five Trends

Based on Google searches on “disruptive trends”, there seems to be no shortages of opinions regarding trends in technology, various industries and at various times. New ones are announced each year by big consultancies, publications, media outlets and others. The environment for projects of all kinds keeps changing, with regards to technologies, markets, economies and especially the organizational context. Some environmental changes and trends seem more disruptive than others, seem to be disrupting the project environment, the application of traditional and proven project management processes, and even the project management field itself. Here are the five trends that were selected to discuss in the August panel. In each case, some questions are posed. Each topic deserves more attention, in my opinion.

Agility – The popularity of Agile project management, which has been growing now for about 15 years, has stimulated a distinct move towards more “agile” management decision-making at all levels. Agile project management brought distinct advantages to software development projects. The idea of achieving incremental benefits/value rather than waiting for the traditional project planning, design and build cycle to play out has appealed to managers in many organizations, not just in software or information technologies. Executives and customers want results faster and faster. Is this a good idea? Does “Agile Project Management” itself need to evolve? Do traditional project change control processes need to change? Are there industry-specific variations, risks and opportunities related to agility that need to be explored and defined? Have you seen these issues emerge? I certainly have.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 


David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

Gender Issues in Project Planning and Management

FEATURED PAPER

By Ujeyo Margaret Stella
Busitema University

Kisige Abdu
Al-Mustaf Islamic College

Nabunya Kulthum
Makerere University

Prof Peter Neema-Abooki
Makerere University

Kampala, Uganda

 


Abstract

Gender equality ranks high on international and national development agendas. It has been enshrined in international legal instruments and declarations as well as national constitutions. There has been some gain in ensuring gender equality but glaring gaps still exist in many sectors. Gender equality advocacy has consequently become central in discussions concerning development programmes because such programmes are about eradicating poverty and  promoting human rights. This paper discusses gender in project planning and management. The paper is based on a review of relevant literature on gender in project planning and management. It explains some key terms and discusses the characteristics and importance of considering gender issues in project planning. The paper explains how gender can be mainstreamed in the project cycle before discussing the tools and methods used to do so. In the conclusion the paper reiterates the importance of gender mainstreaming in projects, acknowledging that not many projects have embraced it.

Introduction

Efforts geared towards ensuring gender equality have taken center stage in all spheres of development agendas because gender equality is a human right (European Institute of Gender Equality (EIGE), 2016). It is a requirement by international legal instruments and declarations and enshrined in most national constitutions (European Union (EU), 2010). Governments, Civil Society organizations (CSO), donors and the international community are all keen in assessing gender concerns in different local, national and international laws, policies, programmes and projects. These efforts have however not yielded the results anticipated hence a reason to adopt specific strategies and interventions. A gender sensitive project is a series of activities aimed at bringing about clearly specified objectives and results within a defined time period and with a defined budget while taking into account women and men issues (EIGE, 2016; EU, 2010). Gender equality needs to be mainstreamed at each phase of the project cycle (European Union, 2010), but first an explanation of some concepts that are used throughout this paper.

Key concepts in gender

Sex and Gender

Sex refers to the biological or genetic differences between males and females; that is to say the physical attributes pertaining to a person’s contours, features, hormones, genes and reproductive organs that cannot be naturally changed (EIGE, 2016; Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), 2013).

Gender refers to the social differences between men and women as opposed to biological ones. These differences are learnt over time; they can also change with time and vary from culture to culture (EIGE, 2016; Pacha & Banda, 2013).

Gender role

The roles one is expected to play by virtue of being a woman or a man is a gender role. Gender roles are shaped and defined by several factors including socio-economic, political and cultural ones (EIGE, 2016). Gender roles can change either impromptu or as a result of policies and planned interventions.

Gender relations

Gender relations are relationships of distribution or sharing of power between women and men which characterizes any specific gender system. Gender roles reflect unequal power relation and values between women and men (EIGE, 2016; CDB, 2013).

Gender equality

It means equal treatment of men and women in laws, policies, being accorded equal participation and access to resources within families, communities and society (EIGE, ). It is not about women and men being the same or in equal numbers in all activities but rather having same status within society (EIGE, Pacha & Banda, 2013; Lentisco & Arenas, 2011). It refers to being free to develop personal abilities and make choices without limitations set by strict gender roles. Gender equality cannot be achieved without putting in place equity measures.

Gender inequality (imbalance)

The term refers to unequal access and control over material and non material resources and assets of society. Inequality therefore relates to lack of access to rights, assets, resources and decision making. Women’s role is usually inferior in the power relationship since they do not have equal access to power and decision making structures (EIGE, 2013; Lentisco & Arenas, 2011).

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


About the Authors


Ujeyo Margaret Stella

Busitema University
Uganda

 


Ujeyo Margaret Stella
is a lecturer in the Department of Education in the Faculty of Science and Education at Busitema University. Previously she worked as the Gender Coordinator for Busitema University, participated in gender situational analysis and drafting of the university’s gender policy as well as managing community projects for women groups. Ujeyo holds a Masters’ Degree in Educational Studies from the University of Western Australia and a Bachelor of Arts Education Degree of Makerere University. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Educational Management at Makerere University. Her research interests are in Sustainability Education in Higher Education.

 


Kisige Abdu

Al-Mustaf Islamic College
Uganda

 

 


Abdu Kisige
holds a Master of Arts in Educational Policy and Planning of Makerere University, and is a PhD student of Educational Administration and Management. He has over 5 years of teaching experience at higher education. For the past 5 years, he has been teaching both undergraduates and postgraduate courses in Educational Administration and Management at the Islamic University in Uganda and Al-Mustaf Islamic College-Uganda. He now occupies the Directorate of Research at Al-Mustaf Islamic College-Uganda, helping build and strengthen research capacity.

 


Nabunya Kulthum
 

Kampala, Uganda

 




Nabunya Kulthum
is a PhD Student of Educational Management. She holds a Bachelors degree in Education and a Masters degree in Educational Policy and Planning, both from Makerere University. She has a Certificate in Administrative Law from Law Development Center (LDC) and delights in her knowledge of sign language. Kulthum renders counsel to young married couples and empowers the youth to have a relevant education career. She is the Director of Anwar Baby and Primary School. She doubles as Supervisor Education Operations with Kampala Capital City (KCC) Authority, mainly focusing on Quality Assurance in both Government and Private Nursery and Primary Schools. Email [email protected]     [email protected]

 


Prof Peter Neema-Abooki

Makerere University
Kampala, Uganda

 




Assoc. Prof. Peter Neema-Abooki
holds academic credentials in philosophical and theological disciplines besides a Post Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE); a Masters and a Doctor of Philosophy: both degrees in Educational Management. He is an Associate Professor of Higher Education, including Educational Management and Administration, Human Resource Management in Education, Educational Policy and Planning, and Educational Foundations and Curriculum Studies. He is the Founding Dean, EASHESD, at Makerere University, and co-Editor for Contemporary Issues in Higher Education Management. Earlier, he lectured in Educational Foundations, Educational Administration, and Educational Planning and Management at Kampala University, Kisubi Brothers’ Centre for Uganda Martyrs University, and Kyambogo University.

Dr. Neema-Abooki doubles as External Examiner in several Public and Private Universities, nationally and internationally. Besides being a Reviewer at several International Fora, the Associate Professor has presented academic papers and delivered Key-note addresses at several International Conferences and Summits. The scholarly research of his delves into issues encompassing, but not limited to, managerial disciplines with specific focus on Quality Assurance (QA). He is Editor-In-Chief of the International Journal of Progressive and Alternative Education, and a Member of several International Technical Committees. Neema-Abooki may be contacted at +2567724123184, +256704169214, +250781293741; and via email at [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], or [email protected]

Skype: peter.neema.abooki

 

 

Two plus two equals….?

PERSONAL STORY

By Ruby Tomar

India

 


Well, two plus two was lesser than four for this project that I was assigned for a team of engineers involved in delivering towards a crucial part of the companies’ install base. This paper describes how I have stitched the fabric of the team together and the frameworks used.

The Situation

Tasks were getting ticked off from the To-Do lists, without the knowledge of the Whys, the engineers were delivering on what was requested, with little knowledge of the big picture. There was uncertainty about the future and the group lacked cohesion. There was little motivation to aim for the extraordinary and to put in that extra effort to ensure robustness and scalability of the solution. Mediocrity prevailed and was the norm, most operated safely within their boundaries. There was little merit in developing one’s skills or increasing competency and most focussed toward doing the minimal to survive. The “team” had fragmented into islands of information with no cross-pollination between them.

The Transformation Journey

I started with some understanding of the business and the dynamics of the team. Slowly began to connect with each one individually, beginning with warmth, hearing each one out with a genuine desire to understand. Being sensitive to their current situation, making them feel comfortable in it, accepting them as they were in a non-judgemental way.

Staying attuned to their feelings; acknowledging the emotions they go through so they feel understood and cared for created a mutual comfort level and a sense of belonging towards each other.

Every 1:1 focussed on creating a culture that is transparent and honest; and is focused on rigor and results. Being like a coach taking real interest in what they want form their career and job, rekindled the zeal for putting in their best. Slowly people started to affiliate with each other and I was regarded as a member of their group. [1] [2]

Using the framework laid out in “The 5 dysfunctions of a team” [3] gave a structural approach to solving the problem, especially the personal histories exercise helped bond the group better.

Working together through several workshops we derived a set of shared values and guiding principles which were consistently reaffirmed with every action and decision. Team and individual goals were set acknowledging the current state and sharing the vision of the desired state from “What is” to “What could be”. By making them mutually accountable to one another, and encouraging accountability conversations between peers (especially when one is missing the commitment), interpersonal conflicts reduced as now they shared accountability towards a common goal. They discussed all viewpoints, choose the best one, they may disagree BUT they committed.

Aligning the work done by the team with the larger picture, regularly sharing organizational updates, product roadmaps, and replaying the All Employee Meetings helped connect them to the larger whole and brought pride and meaning to their day to day work.

Converting team meetings into fun activities/learning workshops helped them learn/polish their soft-skills while bonding with each other. Getting team members to facilitate sessions; encouraging healthy debate, creating team rules collectively so that everyone’s voice is heard, helped in creating action plans with everyone’s buy-in.

Saying “I am sorry” when something wasn’t done right by me, apologizing on behalf of my team for a goof up, helped build my credibility with the team, and they started realizing that asking for help taps into the natural human impulse of cooperating with others.[4] Soliciting feedback in 1:1s and anonymous settings helped me correct my course in real-time.

More…

To read entire story, click here

 


 

About the Author


Ruby Tomar

India

 



Ruby Tomar
has worked in the print, automotive, consumer, networking, and telecommunications industries as a Project Manager and is with HP for over 10 years. She is an avid reader of the latest management research and leads various initiatives within and across her organization. With two patents filed and four disclosures to her credit, Ruby is process and technology savvy with a strong inclination towards innovation and process optimization. She can be reached at [email protected]

 

 

Project Management in Extreme Situations

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   Project Management in Extreme Situations: Lessons from Polar Expeditions, Military and Rescue Operations, and Wilderness Exploration
Author: Monique Aubry / Pascal Lievre (Editors)
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   $65.95
Format: Hard Cover, 316 pages
Publication Date:   2016    
ISBN: 978-1-4822-0882-5
Reviewer:     Rudy Rodriguez
Review Date: May/2017

 


Introduction

Project Management in Extreme Situations reviews how project management tools and principles apply in non-business situations. From polar expeditions, to military commando exercises, to climbing Mount Everest, Aubry and Lievre show how project management principles are applied. I was surprised to learn how the project management issues faced in these scenarios are similar to my project management challenges. An interesting perspective on how the tools we learn (both techniques and people skills) are transferrable to all situations.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book has three major sections with multiple chapters per section. Part One is Polar Expeditions, Part Two is Extreme Situations, and Part Three is Lessons to be Learned.

The chapters tell specific stories of how project management principles apply across different scenarios. The authors did an excellent job of describing in detail what the challenges were and how teams approached each challenge. Not all approaches were successful.

Highlights

One of the reoccurring themes in this book is the emphasis on the uniqueness of every project. How you successfully handled similar projects may not work in a different environment. The same type of project you dealt with in the past will have different stakeholders (personalities), different agendas, different funding criteria, different political background, and different timelines. The book reinforces the need to apply your skill set as a project manager differently based on each unique project.

With extreme situations as the backdrop, this book exposes the flaws and successes of applying project management skills. In two different polar expeditions, both achieved their objectives but only one was successful. When a project meets its objectives, you need to identify the definition of success. If the team hates each other but meets the project objective, was it really a success? Being able to reutilize the same resources for new projects is a key success factor. Chapter 12 on The French Special Forces shows how having the same support group enhances the ability to communicate and resolve situations, literally in flight, become essential to success.

Highlights: What I liked!

The major takeaways from this book:

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Rudy C. Rodriguez, PMP

Texas, USA

 

 


Rudy C. Rodriguez
is a highly accomplished PMP Certified Project Manager with extensive experience managing cross-functional teams and providing client service, customer support and software solutions in high-profile financial and healthcare environments. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Southern Methodist University.

Rudy currently works in Dallas for UT Southwestern Medical Center managing projects in the Business Affairs department; collaborating with Financial, IT, HR, and other departmental representatives at all levels to access, initiate, prioritize, refine, and drive technology solutions. He is also involved in Process Improvement projects dealing with both departmental and inter-departmental initiatives. In past endeavors, he has developed and implemented complex technical projects and is experienced in SDLC: Waterfall, Agile, and Hybrid with over 5 years of software development experience. He has extensive experience in Operations, Sales, Customer Service, Risk Management, Scheduling, Cost Control, and Quality Management.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

AGILE SCRUM

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: AGILE SCRUM – Your Quick Start Guide with Step-By-Step Instructions
Author: Scott M. Graffius
Publisher: CreateSpace
List Price:   19.95 USD
Format: Soft Cover
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN-10: 1533370249 | ISBN-13:978-1533370242
Reviewed by: Edward Raibick, PMP
Review Date: May 2017

 


Introduction

The book titled AGILE SCRUM – Your Quick Start Guide with Step-By-Step Instructions is a how-to guide that takes the reader through the ten steps of the Agile SCRUM cycle. The book is an easy read that can be completed in an hour or two of concentrated reading. After completing the book, you will find its illustrations and project tracking tool links to be a handy reference in incorporating and communicating SCRUM methodologies to your team and organization.

Overview of Book’s Structure

  • Chapter 1 introduces the reader to the SCRUM vision and provides an overview of the terms, methodologies and practices.
  • Chapter 2 provides the user with the terms and details of the Product Roadmap and Release Plan that is defined at the beginning of the SCRUM project.
  • Chapter 3 covers the Team Formation members and roles.
  • Chapter 4 introduces the Product Release Backlog of desired functions and features of the end-product.
  • Chapter 5 and 6 discusses Sprint Planning rules and typical time utilizations for these activities.
  • Chapter 7 covers the actual Sprint Execution, tracking and reporting.
  • Chapter 8 discusses the Sprint Review demonstration of the sprint development.
  • Chapter 9 introduces the Sprint Retrospective and SCRUM team review.
  • Chapter 10 discusses Product Release and your project closure with a shippable product.

Highlights

AGILE SCRUM – Your Quick Start Guide with Step-By-Step Instructions is a must-have for a project manager wanting to introduce SCRUM to the organization. The book is a convenient desktop reference that can easily be shared with the whole team. Reference links to additional resources and project tracking tools are provided as well as commonly used terms in the Agile SCRUM lifecycle.

Highlights: What I liked!

This book provides a project manager with the tools needed to get a group up and running in an Agile SCRUM environment in as little as a day. The steps are clearly defined and segregated to provide a clear path towards planning and executing in a SCRUM environment.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Edward Raibick, PMP

North Texas, USA

 


Edward Raibick, PMP
is a Project Management consultant with extensive experience software engineering, managerial and IT Project Management. Edward holds a Master’s degree in Information Technology with a concentration in Internet and IT security, a Bachelor’s degree in Information Technology and an Associate in Specialized Technology degree in Electronics. His career includes over 10 years with the IBM Corporation and over 15 years with Texas Instruments. Edward is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter, having acquired his PMP certification in 2011.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Idea Agent

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   Idea Agent: Leadership that Liberates Creativity and Accelerates Innovation
Author: Lina M. Echeverria
Publisher: AMACOM
List Price:   $27.95
Format: Experiential text
Publication Date:   2013    
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3217-4
Reviewer:     Rick Kimball, PMP
Review Date: 5/26/2017

 


Introduction

Leadership has been written about for decades. The Idea Agent takes the process of leadership from “A to Z” in a highly creative engaging way. This book demands your attention as it digs deep into the innovative world of leadership. Liberating leadership through the development of individuals is the overwhelming theme.

Powerful testimony abounds as our author recounts many instances of team lead selection and personal development.

Idea Agent is a personal journey of those who choose to lead. Technology driven scientists are thrown into the arena of working together in order to solve some of engineering’s biggest challenges.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Lina (our author) wraps her leadership style around the seven passions described as: Into the Ring of Fire, Let the Best Take Flight, Live Values that Liberate Creativity, Demand Excellence and Enrich Lives, create a Culture, structure a Clear organization, and Provide Authentic leadership.

Each passion is explained in detail giving the reader insight of setting the right stage, for the top creative minds to deliver, and discover.

Highlights

Idea Agent is fast paced and explains in great detail how scientific technology teams can succeed in conflicted confrontational environments. The majority of this book describes from Lina’s vantage point how Corning Inc. manages its organization in a demanding (often abrasive) competitive world of technology. Some of the world’s best minds and finest laboratories converge and must thrive in order for new product lines to survive and enter the marketplace.

Understanding personalities, unlocking inner potential, and in some cases, stepping aside are the true marks of a successful leader.

Idea Agent is in effect a blueprint / guide, for top quality management of teams and individuals.

Great leadership, as the book explains, requires a level hand to deliver the rigor when necessary, blended with exact timing to step back, as the team propels forward.

Highlights: What I liked!

Unlocking the individual’s potential, by giving them an open accepting environment is the catalyst to move beyond the ordinary.

In a technological world, all egos are on the sideline paving the way for open debate and real success.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Rick Kimball, PMP

CEO R. F. Kimball Co., Inc.
North Texas, USA

 


Rick Kimball
, CPMR, PMP is owner of the R. F. Kimball Co., Inc. (Manufacturer’s Representative), a fifty-year-old company specializing in the technical sales of electronic products.

In addition to running the R. F. Kimball Co., Inc. Mr. Kimball has also worked for Dale Carnegie Training as their VP of Corporate Solutions.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

McGraw-Hill 36-Hour Course

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The McGraw-Hill 36-Hour Course: Project Management – 2 edition
Author: Helen S. Cooke and Karen Tate
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
List Price:   $21.00
Format: Soft cover, 400 pages
Publication Date:   2011
ISBN: 9780071738279 / 0071738274
Reviewer: Rizwan Hasnie, PMP
Review Date: May 2017

 


Introduction

This book discusses generic Project Management and its strategies. The target readers are those curious about Project Management and those who are doing or are planning to do Project Management.

This is one of the books from “McGraw-Hill 36-Hour Course” series. It is written by two highly accomplished Project Managers who have also been active leaders in the Project Management institute (PMI).

Overview of Book’s Structure

The Book has twelve chapters spread over 326 pages. Each Chapter begins with Overview and Goals for that chapter. There are sections for Summary and Review Questions at the end of each chapter. There are also five Appendices in the book: Process Flowcharts, PM templates, Organizational Assessment, a Case Study and Deliverables’ Life cycle.

The book is aptly punctuated with graphs, diagrams, tables, charts and bullet points that make it easier to understand the material. The placement of the chapters and flow of the book is very logical and methodical.

After finishing the book and chapter quizzes, the reader can take the open book Final Exam. The Final Examination is available online that could be used to achieve Certificate of Achievement.

Highlights

The book starts with defining and justifying Project Management. The evolution of Project Management is addressed in a very interesting and informative way. The book discusses all project phases including inception, execution, and closeout in details with hands-on aspects.

The writers also make a very compelling case for having mature Project Management culture in any company. The pros and cons of several Project Management practices are also addressed.

Historical examples, frontline strategies, meaningful flowcharts and tables, reference templates, etc. are strengths of the book. In a nut-shell, this book basically tries to answer “What”, “Why”, “How”, and “When” of Project Management.

The book does have some shortcomings. For example, the book addresses Risks as “Threats” only and does not deliberate on “Opportunity” aspect of risks. Moreover whereas the contemporary PM practices view constraints with several variables (like scope, schedule, budget, quality, resources and risk), the book emphasizes on the classical, and now somewhat outdated, triple-constraints of schedule, scope and cost.

Highlights: What I liked!

I loved the discussion of the evolution of Project Management and arguments of some famous and ground-breaking projects of the past. I found the historical accounts of projects and undertakings and extraction of Project Management lessons from therein to be both enlightening and entertaining.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Rizwan Hasnie, PMP

North Texas, USA

 




Rizwan Hasnie
has experience of over 20 years in Telecommunications & IT fields. He has worked on projects in USA, Canada, China, South Korea, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia. Currently he works for AT&T in Texas. He has taught professional and technical classes. He achieved his PMP certification in 2013. He also has Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University and has three AWS Cloud certifications.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

Project Management in Practice

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Project Management in Practice, 6th Edition
Authors: Jack R. Meredith, Scott M. Shafer, Samuel J. Mantel (Deceased)
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
List Price: $122.95 (Wiley)
Format: Softcover, 310 pages
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: 978-1-119-29885-4 (PBK) – 978-1-119-29867-0 (EVALC)
Reviewer: Richard Brownjohn, PMP
Review Date: May 2017

 


 Introduction

Project Management in Practice (6th Edition) provides a detailed technical presentation of project management with “real world” examples of projects that are used to highlight and teach the tools and techniques necessary to manage successful projects and the use of projects to achieve the strategic goals of organizations. As the authors state in their preface, “Communication from some instructors in these institutions told us they would like a textbook that was shorter and focuses more directly on the ‘technical’ aspects of project management than those currently available.” The text references an Instructors’ Manual and Learning Objectives which could be utilized in conjunction with a project management education program. The authors include references to the Project Management Institute’s (PMI®) Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), with references throughout the eight chapters. Review and discussion questions, and case studies are provided at the end of each chapter. An Appendix section is also included providing a review of the probability and statistics concepts used within the book.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into 8 chapters as follows:

  1. The World of Project Management
  2. The Manager, The Organization, and The Team
  3. Project Activity and Risk Planning
  4. Budgeting the Project
  5. Scheduling the Project
  6. Allocating Resources to the Project
  7. Monitoring and Controlling the Projects
  8. Evaluating and Closing the Project.

The book covers the Project Life Cycle and Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Project Life Cycle and differences between Project Management and General Management. In addition, it includes a discussion regarding Project Selection, Project Management Office and Project Portfolio. Chapter 2 discusses the role of the project manager, their responsibilities, selection of project manager, and fitting projects within the organization. Chapter 3 includes risk management tools and techniques, and project planning including the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). Chapter 4 outlines budget methods, cost estimating and management of budget uncertainty and inherent risk with suggestions for dealing with them. Chapter 5 outlines Scheduling (project plan) and determining the Critical Path for the project. Chapter 6 deals with resource allocation and Chapters 7 & 8 review Monitoring and Controlling the project and evaluating and closing out the project, respectively.

All chapters include references to PMBOK, Best Practices and Risks as margin notations and at the end of each chapter Case Studies and Review-Discussion Questions are provided. As noted, the authors include case studies and include one study that follows the planning, building and marketing of an assisted living facility. This is a valuable means of assuring that readers/students are referring to previous chapters as part of the review/learning process.    

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Richard Brownjohn, PMP

Dallas, TX, USA

 

 

 


Richard Brownjohn, PMP
has been a project manager for 20 years in the development and construction industry. He currently works for Legacy Partners Development in Dallas, TX. Qualifications include PMP certification and NZCE – Mechanical Engineering.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

The Enterprise Program Management Office

Another Best Practice at the National Nuclear Security Administration

SECOND EDITION

By Jessica Kunkle1, Alma Contreras2, Wayne Abba3, Michael Haase4 and David L. Pells5

1National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. DOE, Washington, DC, USA
2National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. DOE, Washington, DC, USA
3Abba Associates, Niceville, FL, USA
4M-Con Solutions, Washington, DC, USA
5PM World, Inc., Addison, TX, USA

 


ABSTRACT

The project management office (PMO) and in recent years the program management office (PgMO) are recognized best practices in organizations around the world. An Enterprise PMO (EPMO) extends the functions and benefits of a PMO to multiple projects within an organization. An Enterprise PgMO (EPgMO) extends the functions and benefits of a PgMO across multiple programs, portfolios and projects within an organization in the same manner that an EPMO does, but often with a broader scope.

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy maintains and enhances the safety, security, reliability and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear explosive testing; works to reduce global danger from weapons of mass destruction; provides the U.S. Navy with safe and effective nuclear propulsion; and responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the U.S. and abroad. NNSA’s Office of Safety, Infrastructure and Operations (NA-50) is responsible for enabling safe operations, ensuring effective infrastructure and providing enterprise services to NNSA programs and national laboratories, plants and sites around the United States.

NA-50 has established an enterprise-level program management office (EPgMO), one of the first in the US government. A relatively new approach in the program/project management field, the NA-50 EPgMO at NNSA is one of the first of its kind in the US government. This paper will describe the purpose, functions and value of an EPgMO and the related experience to date within NA-50 at NNSA.

INTRODUCTION

The terms project and project management have been in use for many years and are widely understood worldwide. For purposes of this short paper, we assume that readers are familiar with these concepts and terms. The PMO itself is a relatively new concept, but has grown in acceptance and popularity around the world in the last 25 years. It is now widely known and used in many organizations and industries, including government agencies at all levels.

Program Management concepts and terminology have also been used for many years in some industries, especially those associated with government funding such as aerospace, defense, energy, environmental remediation, nuclear research and security, space (NASA) and many public services. The PgMO is less widely used but is growing in acceptance, partially due to its inclusion in The Standard for Program Management first published by the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in 2006.

One of the problems associated with both PMO and PgMO is the proliferation of acronyms that are used by various authors, consultants and organizations. For the sake of this paper, we will stick with PMO, EPMO, PgMO and EPgMO. Another confusing issue has become the relationship of projects and programs to portfolio management, which is somewhat beyond the scope of this paper. In our experience, however, portfolios can consist of both projects and programs, while programs can also consist of portfolios of projects. This latter is the case for NA-50 at NNSA.

THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE

          PMO Defined

PMI’s PMBOK Guide defines PMO as an organizational body or entity assigned various responsibilities related to the centralized and coordinated management of those projects under its domain. The responsibilities can range from providing project management support functions to actually being responsible for the direct management of a project.

The primary function of a PMO is to support project managers in a variety of ways which may include, but are not limited to:

  • Managing shared resources across all projects administered by the PMO;
  • Identifying and developing project management methodologies, best practices and standards;
  • Coaching, mentoring, training and oversight;
  • Monitoring compliance with project management standards, policies, procedures and templates via project audits;
  • Developing and managing project policies, procedures, templates and other shared documentation (organizational process assets); and
  • Coordinating communication across projects. (PMI 2008)

According to Professor Peter Morris, a globally-respected researcher, author and authority on project management in the UK, functions of a PMO can be to:

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.


 

About the Authors


Jessica Kunkle

NNSA, USDOE
Washington, DC, USA

 


Jessica Kunkle
is the Director for the Office of Safety, Infrastructure and Operations’ (NA-50) Program Management Office (PMO) at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).  In this role, she leads a fast-paced, cross-functional team to provide shared, corporate services for eight federal programs totaling approximately $1.6 billion in annual appropriations.  Jessica also serves as the Executive Director for NNSA’s Operations and Efficiencies Board and NA-50’s Program Management Improvement Team.

Ms. Kunkle has held various positions throughout her tenure with DOE/NNSA, including working in NNSA’s Program Executive Office leading management improvements for NNSA; serving as the Budget Officer for the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) overseeing the execution of over $800 million per year; and working as a Contract Specialist supporting NNSA’s vital nuclear nonproliferation mission.

Ms. Kunkle has received a Secretary of Energy Achievement Award (2016) and the National Defense Industrial Association’s (NDIA) Excellence in Enterprise Information Award (2015).  She holds degrees in Marketing, Operations, and International Management from the University of New Mexico.

 


Alma Contreras

NNSA, USDOE
Washington, DC, USA

 


Alma Contreras
is a project manager for Battelle, currently on loan to the NNSA Office of Safety, Infrastructure and Operations (NA-50).  In this role, she acts as the project controls lead for the organization, helping them to organize, execute, and control almost $2B in annual workscope.  Prior to coming to NA-50, Ms. Contreras managed international nonproliferation implementation projects in Europe, Africa and the Middle East.

Ms. Contreras is a qualified project manager, holding both the Project Management Professional (PMP) as well as the Earned Value Management Professional (EVP) certifications.  She has worked for private industry as well as local and federal government, where she has accumulated almost 20 years of project controls/project management experience.  She received her degree in business administration from Washington State University.

 


Wayne F. Abba

Abba Consulting
Florida, USA

 


Wayne Abba
is an independent consultant specializing in acquisition and program management. His clients include US and foreign government agencies and contractors. He also is a part-time Research Analyst at the Center for Naval Analyses, where he co-authored a 2009 study on using the Rayleigh mathematical model for Earned Value Management planning and analysis. From 1999 to 2004, Wayne was the Vice President for Integrated Management Services with Dekker, Ltd., a provider of software solutions and consulting for project management.

For seventeen years before retiring in 1999, Wayne was the senior program analyst for contract performance management in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition & Technology). He was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Meritorious Civilian Service in 1993, 1997 and 1999 for leadership in the acceptance of effectively integrated technical, schedule and cost performance management principles throughout the Department of Defense, the federal government, commercial enterprise, and in the governments and industries of friendly foreign countries. He served on the joint government-industry Integrated Program Management Initiative team that received the Department’s David Packard Award for Excellence in Acquisition.

Wayne has served on numerous Earned Value and Project Management review teams, and has helped industrial clients prepare for such reviews. His US government work included reviews of Army, Air Force and Navy contractors. He also served on an Australian Department of Defense team that reviewed BAE in UK for the Hawk Lead-In Fighter Trainer program. He performs peer reviews on projects for the National Science Foundation and is an independent program management advisor for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

Wayne is a contributing author of the US Government Accountability Office’s “Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide: Best Practices for Developing and Managing Capital Program Costs,” issued in March 2009, and its companion “Schedule Assessment Guide: Best Practices for Project Schedules,” issued in May 2012. He co-authored EVM content in the Project Management Institute’s PMBOK® Guide 4th Edition. He is one of the world’s foremost experts on EVM and related topics. He serves on the editorial board of CrossTalk (the Journal of Defense Software Engineering), on the Graduate School Japan board of directors, and served from 2004-2014 on the governing board of the National Defense Industrial Association’s Integrated Program Management Division.

Wayne holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of the State of New York and a Master of Public Administration degree from The American University. In 1999 his contributions to the advancement of public and private sector project management were recognized by the Project Management Institute’s Distinguished Contribution Award and by the Government of Canada. In 2005 he was awarded an honorary fellowship by India’s Centre for Excellence in Project Management. He is current president of the College of Performance Management, CPM. He can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Wayne Abba, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/wayne-abba/

 


Michael Haase

M-Con Strategic Solutions, LLC
Washington, DC, USA

 


Michael Haase
has over 21 years of experience in Program Management and Strategic Planning. Mr. Haase currently serves as the manager for headquarters support contracts with the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Material Security and the Office of Infrastructure and Operations. Mr. Haase has provided program management and policy support to DOE/NNSA programs for the past 21 years focusing on strategic planning, program management, policy analysis and development, budgeting, and communications planning.

Mr. Haase is currently President of M-Con Strategic Solutions providing program management consulting services to government clients in the area of program management, strategic planning, and project management support including the U.S. Department of Energy. He is leading program management process improvement efforts for the Office of Radiological Security including development of project work plans for over 40 projects; strategic planning, branding, and outreach efforts; and review and update of program management and policy guidelines. Mr. Haase served on an independent project review team that assessed the Office of Global Material Security program management processes and made recommendations to increase efficiencies and integration across the program. Mr. Haase also provided communications planning and strategic planning support to the NNSA Office of Nuclear Materials Integration and program management support to the NNSA Office of Infrastructure and Operations.

Mr. Haase has previously provided program management support to the Office of Global Threat Reduction, which included development of security strategies to enhance the security of nuclear and radiological materials including coordination of response strategies, interactions with local law enforcement, response training program development, and coordination of table top exercises. He served as Vice President of Aquila Technologies where he directed Washington DC-based government and commercial consulting/ technology programs and served as program manager for initiatives with NNSA for program management and technical support in the area of weapons of mass destruction security including remote monitoring technology solutions. Mr. Haase also has experience serving as a Program Manager for Mele Associates, Canberra Industries, and Booz Allen Hamilton.

Mr. Haase also has experience as a federal manager for U.S. Department of Energy nonproliferation program from 1993-2000. Mr. Haase served as a Division Director for the Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation where he managed a $65M U.S. nonproliferation program aimed at securing weapons-grade nuclear material at 20 civilian and military nuclear sites in Russia. Prior to that he was a Foreign Affairs Specialist for the Russia/Newly Independent States Nuclear Material Security Task Force and Office of International Safeguards where he initiated and coordinated national security projects in Russia, Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, Georgia, and Uzbekistan including implementation of nuclear security, control and accounting system projects at over 20 nuclear facilities. Mr. Haase holds a Master of Public Policy from Georgetown University. He can be contacted at [email protected]

To view other works by Michael Haase, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/michael-haase/

 


David L. Pells

PM World Services, Inc.
Addison, Texas, USA

 




David Pells
is the President of PM World Services, Inc., a program/project management (P/PM) services firm based in Texas and of PM World, Inc., a project management information services and publishing firm. He has 40 years of P/PM-related experience in a wide variety of industries, programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, transit, defense, security and high technology, and project sizes ranging from thousands to many billions of dollars. David is a Fellow and past member of the Board of Directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®). He was founder and Chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000) and the American Project Management Forum (1996-1998). Mr. Pells was awarded PMI’s Person-of-the-Year Award in 1998 and highest award, the PMI Fellow Award, in 1999. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (UK), Project Management Associates (India), and Russian Project Management Association. Mr. Pells has a BA in business administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University, USA. He lives in Addison, Texas, USA.

Career highlights include: Program management advisor for major NNSA programs, USDOE; Senior advisor to Sandia National Lab, Los Alamos National Lab, Savannah River National Lab and Oak Ridge National Lab on nuclear security and other programs; Executive advisor on multi-billion $ transit programs in Dallas and Seattle; Member of mobilization team & manager of project management reporting system for Superconducting Super Collider (10-year, $10B+ project for US DOE); Program manager, project management process improvements, and advisor on several of DOE’s largest projects at Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Project controls engineer on large international construction projects; Program controls on two major projects for US Department of Defense; Project controls & project management support for design/construction of nuclear reactor, environmental restoration program, Space Nuclear Reactor Project, New Production Reactor Program, low-level radioactive waste storage program at INL; executive advisor for multi-billion $ nuclear power plant project in Finland; and currently a program management advisor for NNSA. David is also managing editor of the PM World Journal and managing director of the PM World Library. He can be contacted at mailto:[email protected]or [email protected]

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

What to Expect When You’re Expecting

(A Major Organizational Change)

SECOND EDITION

By Amanda Arriaga and Jessica Ballew

Texas Department of Public Safety                 

Austin, Texas, USA                                            

 


ABSTRACT

When new parents are about to have their first child, they do a significant amount of research in order to understand all of the changes that will be coming. There will be changes to them personally, to their home, and of course, to their family.

The same principles are true when an organization is about to undergo a major change. The organization may be nervous about what will happen and what the impact will be for the future.

Much like a parent expecting a baby, being aware of what will happen throughout the major organizational change will help to provide a level of comfort and understanding. Information reduces uncertainty, and this translates into buy-in within the organization.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING

The book, What to Expect When You’re Expecting is the longest running New York Times bestseller, with over 18.5 million copies in print. Why is this? Well it may be because it describes every conceivable issue that new parents would want to know about in order to be fully prepared for the pregnancy, and during childbirth.

For some parents, the book is overkill and a scary game of “What Could Go Wrong?” For others, it helps to ensure proper planning and provides strategies for mitigating the various risks.   The book is organized into trimesters and thoughtfully articulates an answer for every question you may have.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOURE EXPECTING A MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

Unfortunately, there is no corresponding book for what to expect during a major organizational change. You may think that if the CEO of your organization requests the change, the change will magically happen and all will be well. But this is not true. Organizational change needs nurturing and constant support, just like an expectant mother.

Every organizational change is different, and will be handled differently based on the change and the organization. However, the change life cycle of: identifying the change, getting buy in, implementing the change and then reviewing the impact of the change should be constant.

Twinkle in Your Eye – Identifying the Need for Change

When someone in your organization gets the hint of an idea that they would like to implement that is different from the current standard, this is similar to prospective parents determining if they are ready to start a family. During this phase, there are idealistic visions of what the change will be like, once realized. When people say “this change will revolutionize the company”, this is similar to parents talking about how their hypothetical child will win the Nobel Prize, or find a cure for cancer.

And just like not every child grows up to win the Nobel Prize, not every change will have the sweeping benefits that were originally anticipated. What can be anticipated, however, are the reactions that may result from the change. If the change includes a reorganization or a shift in workload or work product, those issues should be addressed and discussed openly and frequently with the staff impacted by those issues.

Researching what to expect, who can help, and identifying information sources that provide insightful strategies and tactics increases the opportunity for a successful change process.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.


 

About the Authors


Amanda Arriaga, JD

Austin, TX, USA

 



Amanda Arriaga
is the Chief Administrative Officer at the Texas Department of Public Safety, overseeing the functions of Human Resources, Facilities, Procurement & Contracts and Enterprise Projects. She is also the co-chair of the Texas Association of State Systems for Computing and Communication (TASSCC) Special Interest Group in Project Management, and Immediate Past President of the Austin Young Lawyer’s Association. Amanda earned her BBA in Management from Texas A&M University and a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law. She has served as Governor Rick Perry’s Special Assistant for Homeland Security and Border Affairs and DPS Chief of Government and Media Relations. Amanda can be contacted at [email protected]

To view more works by Amanda Arriaga, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/amanda-arriaga/

 


Jessica Ballew

Austin, TX, USA

 




Jessica Iselt Ballew
is the Deputy Assistant Director for Policy and Planning at the Texas Department of Public Safety, overseeing enterprise projects, procurements, and contracts.  She is co-chair of the Texas Association of State Systems for Computing and Communication (TASSCC) Special Interest Group in Project Management. Jessica has a B.S. in Communications through Arizona State University.  In addition, she has over 18 years of experience in the planning, development, and delivery of information technology solutions and conducting business and process analysis to achieve operational improvement. Email: [email protected]

To view more works by Jessica Iselt Ballew, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jessica-iselt-ballew/

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for June 2017

REPORT

Updates on Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail transit project

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 


INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, and the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Project days (Projektipäivät in Finnish) in early November, and 3PMO in early June. 3PMO 2017 focuses on Project, Program and Portfolio Management Offices, and takes place at Tampere on June 6th 2017. Please navigate to http://www.3pmo.fi/ , http://www.projektipaivat.fi/ and www.pry.fi/en for further information on PMAF and its main events.

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as place where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland has a tradition of organizing an annual conference in spring. This year the conference took place on May 10th, in Helsinki, with the overarching theme “Change!”. Mr Vesa Koskela, President of the PMI Finland Chapter, opened the event and welcomed the 200 participants to the third annual PMI conference in Finland. In the opening plenary Mr Carl Haglund, Kaidi CEO, delivered his keynote presentation Driving big changes – in society, business and life, and Mrs Jane Morgan, IIL Senior Consultant & Coach, her presentation Change Ourselves! –Becoming more effective Change Agents through our Own Personal Journeys of Change. In the afternoon Mr Jaakko Eskola, Wärtsilä CEO, delivered his keynote presentation A global leader in a changing world. Please navigate to http://www.conference.pmifinland.org/ for further information on the PMI Finland Chapter annual conference, and to http://www.pmifinland.org/ for further information on PMI Finland Chapter.

In the photograph: PMI Finland Chapter annual conference opening plenary.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

June 2017 UK Project Management Round Up

REPORT

Brexit, Crossrail, Airport Projects, Alternative Energy, Cyber Crime, Space Projects and future smiles

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 


INTRODUCTION

There have been two overwhelming topics that dominate events in UK – first came the news that the Government called a snap election. Mercifully the lead time is only six weeks for we are spared some of the interminable ranting from political groups with little new to say. Then came the devastating bombing of the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester. The murder of twenty-two people, mainly young fans, has shocked the Nation and caused intense police activity in the weeks since the attack. These events have overshadowed events in the Project World but there is still some activity to report.

Brexit still looms over the country but there is progress on the CrossRail front as well as on alternative energy programmes, reaction to the cyber attacks, and space projects.

BREXIT

Well, Brexit has not gone away – much as many observers would like. Not surprisingly it features prominently in the run up to next week’s General Election and much of what we hear is little more than hooligans shouting through letter boxes. The only significant comment in the national press is commentary that the effective devaluation of Sterling has not brought with it the expected longer-term boost in export sales. There are also reports from the European Central Bank (ECB) to the effect that BREXIT will not affect eurozone financial stability. The concern has been that a punitive deal for the City of London would impact on Continental dealings, a notion that the ECB has firmly rejected. This is likely to be a long running debate that may well impact on transnational projects and existing Euro contracts.

CROSSRAIL

Progress on Crossrail continues and the project is set to achieve a major milestone shortly. The first of the new trains will enter passenger service on the Transport for London (TfL) Rail route between Liverpool Street and Shenfield. This is the first stage of the phased introduction of the new service that will be named the Elizabeth line when it opens through central London in December 2018.

The Elizabeth line will increase central London’s rail capacity by 10 per cent when it is fully operational, serving 40 stations, with up to 24 trains per hour in each direction. An additional 1.5 million commuters will enjoy better access to jobs and opportunities in London’s major employment centres.

Photo: courtesy of Crossrail

The project is now 83 per cent complete. The work programme continues with construction of stations progressing well across the route. Fitting out of the Tunnels, shafts and portals, ventilation fans and all the communication and signalling systems required to operate the railway is nearing completion

 

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author


MILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

 

 

 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently a Director for PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and is immediate past Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

June 2017 Report from Spain

REPORT

AEDIP at SIMApro; PMI Madrid Chapter Professional Development

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain

 


AEDIP attended and participated in SIMApro

AEDIP participated in SIMApro during May 24th and 25th, 2017, inside the Investment Forum of the Spanish Real-State market. This Forum has had an important growth regarding surface, number of exhibitors and visitors regarding the previous year edition. During two days, they dealt with current subjects about the Spanish Real-State market: investment funds protagonist and SOCIMIs, business reputation, market standards, applied technology to assets management, offices market review, residential, commercial centers, logistics, second residence and hotel.

As an AEDIP representative, Javier García López-Hermoso (TYPSA Manager) participated on the round table dedicated to the review of the logistic Real-State. Ángel Moreno (NAPISA president) was the moderator, and also other professionals, Joan Lacosta (VPG Country Manager), Luis Lázaro (MERLIN PROPERTIES director) and Antonio Roncero (CBR Head of Transactions) participated too. This market, after suffering an abrupt stop on 2008, is living a new construction “boom” of logistic parks since 2015. Real-State investors are really interested in being promotors for new constructions, if they count on external professional services -Project Managers- that allow them to control their investment.

The PMI Madrid Chapter continues developing professional activities

The PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, continues doing professional activities:

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent
Madrid, Spain

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected]

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

A Project Manager’s Personal Agility Sightings

SECOND EDITION

By Raji Sivaraman, M.S, PMI-ACP, PMP
Principal of ASBA LLC, Singapore/USA
Adjunct Professor, Feliciano School of Business
Montclair University, USA

and

Michal Raczka, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMP, CISA
IT Strategy Vice Director at mBank S.A.
Warsaw, Poland

 


Abstract

This paper explores the nuances of different aspects of agility on a personal level of Project Managers honing business/professional agility through Personal Agility (PA) self-assessment. This paper highlights the different flavours of PA that projects and project oriented organization frames need for successful project implementation, whether it is a small/medium/large project in any industry. Agility brings personal value, leadership, navigation, managing the tides of knowledge and putting on the captain’s hat of resilience. The lighthouse of this paper guides you to the safe shores by guiding you through several colours of agility such as emotional, outcome, cerebral, flexibility, adaptability and preparedness. Our PA lighthouse guides you to the secure shores of your personal vision, prepare you to tread the long roads of mergers/acquisitions, use Individual and Collective PA Assessment, which is a vital requisite for managing successful projects in the present fast changing environment. Influencing with PA to work on personal visions (long-term plans) and development sets a Project Manager’s directions, be it right or wrong. Many strong pillars of PA steers you to your goal alignment, paving the way to project agility, getting ready for opportunities and changes when and where all your stakeholders need it. The problem statement is – “why are projects less than 100% successful?”. The aim of our research is to instil in PMs that using our PA methods results in projects reaching the desired outcomes. The findings of our paper are 7 main PA subtleties that are the guiding light to avoiding turbulences.

Key words: Resilience, Healthy procrastination, Project adaptability

 

Introduction

Decision on management mindset and best practices cuts through impact and quality of personal and group knowledge. Take a journey on a Personal Agility Boat to visualize options, alternatives and opportunities. Visualization is the way to your shore’s lighthouse.

Maintaining leadership competence with personal agility means Return on Trust, diplomacy, maintaining and building attributes at all the stages of involvement. Training at the Personal Agility gym is crucial for balance/speed to cope with Project Managers’ business approach and quality and honing of business/organizational agility through personal agility self-assessment. Agility is an amenity. We need to work on our personal and collective habits in order to merit and master Agility.

The quintessential question at hand is; to what changes should we adapt to? There are so many of them. We need to work on our personal thermostat and figure out the right temperature for each entity. We could also say that we live in a VUCA environment, reflecting on the volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity of general environments and circumstances. We can also say that every project sails in a VUCA environment.

Research results and discussion

In this present era, the trend is such that changes in our environment and projects occur at the very high pace. In order to survive we need to learn and adapt at a much faster pace than ever before. This then step up to the Hyper and Hypo factors of crucial and unplanned agents for vigilance, which includes individual and team characteristics as the Personal Agility Lighthouse shown in the Exhibit 1 below:

 

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 6th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers


 

About the Authors


Raji Sivaraman

Singapore / USA




Raji Sivaraman
, M. S, PMI-ACP, PMP, Principal of ASBA LLC, a Singapore citizen, helps USA/Singapore companies with strategic planning/overseas start-ups. She speaks several languages. She has worked in Singapore, Thailand, India and the USA. She helps fortune 50/500 companies with CSR/BSR projects. She is a Consultant, Director, Strategic Advisor and an Advisory Board member for non-profit organizations. She has worked in IT, publishing, financial, standards and logistics industries. She is an Adjunct Professor and visiting specialist at Montclair University, USA. She is a Researcher, Author, Contributor to Project Management books, published articles, research and white papers internationally. She is a global facilitator, trainer, speaker, discussant, chair, CXO moderator and a panellist. She is an Agile practitioner with a Master of Science Degree in Project Management. She has held leadership positions with the Project Management Institute at the chapter/global level and conducts workshops around the world. In a nutshell, she is a Pracademic.

LinkedIn: /raji-sivaraman

Website: http://agilitydiscoveries.com/

 


Michal Raczka

Warsaw, Poland

 

 

Michal Raczka, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMP, PSPO, AgilePM, CISA, is a project management expert, experienced in new technologies & digital leadership fields. Currently, he is the IT Strategy and Project Management Vice Director at mBank S.A. He is also a project management lecturer at the Executive MBA programs. He has conducted several organisational changes involving the optimisation of project management methods and agile transformations. Always keeps Team in the centre. Value and results focused with lean and agile approach. Individual with proven achievements in project & business management, process improvement and team leadership. Experienced in managing geographically distributed, multi-disciplinary projects and customer teams. Experienced in project excellence awards assessments. Conference speaker. Strategic Advisor. Lecturer. Volunteer. Mentor.

Follow Michal:

LinkedIn: /mraczka

Twitter: @mraczka

About Me: /michal.raczka

Website: http://agilitydiscoveries.com/

 

 

Life is a Project

Enabling Life Skills in Cross-Cultural Transitions

SECOND EDITION

By Neil Robinson

London, United Kingdom

 


Abstract

This paper introduces the concept of project management as an enabling skill for individuals in the process of cross-cultural transition. It explores theoretical models of cultural adaptation, research into psychological and socio-cultural impacts of cross-cultural transitions, the challenges of being a non-native English language speaker, the concept of “skills for life” training and studies on the impact of project-based learning in education. The paper provides observations from an experimental exercise in teaching project management skills to a group of non-native English language speakers. It concludes with a view on the merit of project management skills in a cross-cultural context and thoughts on further development of the concept.

Key words: cross-cultural, acculturation, project management, cultural transition, skills for life

JEL codes: J150, L310, M140

 

Introduction

“To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world. You are surrounded by adventure” (Stark, 2011, p.11). Individuals make cross-cultural transitions to new locations for many reasons. Like British travel writer, Freya Stark, they may be motivated by a desire for adventure and discovery. Others undertake these transitions as longer-term sojourns or migration for a variety of economic, political, social and environmental motivations (Dontsov & Zotova, 2013).

These transitions present the newcomer with practical and social challenges which can significantly constrain their well-being and productivity. This conceptual paper provides an introductory exploration of the extent to which the acquisition of basic project management skills, methods and tools may enhance the capabilities of individuals to articulate, analyse, plan and manage “life” projects such as cross-cultural transitions. It explores the extent to which such skills acquisition might serve to release or develop latent capability in “at risk” individuals or groups, and seeks to identify the potential for realising measurable personal, social and economic benefits for the individual and society as a direct result of such capability activation. Academic research on the concept and quantifiable benefits of project management as a “life” skill is limited.

Project management methodologies are mostly commercial-focused. There is great scope for further research to explore the feasibility of this concept, potential social or “life” applications, benefits quantification methods, and the applicability of leading project management frameworks to these “life” projects. This paper presents a novel and introductory exploration of the feasibility and potential benefits of providing adapted project management skills training to assist individuals with one specific example of everyday life, the cross-cultural transition.

Research results and discussion

The challenge of cross-cultural transition

Individuals decide to relocate to foreign countries for many and varied reasons depending on their personal circumstances. The study of Dontsov and Zotova (2013, p.78) identifies standard of living, financial stability, future opportunities, wealth creation, the chance to start a new life, education, employment, security and family reunion as major drivers for undertaking these transitions. In the United Kingdom (House of Commons, 2016, p.14) the primary reasons for migration inflow between 2005 and 2015 have been work, study and family reunion.

The practical challenges of relocation to a new country include the fundamental needs such as finding accommodation, employment, healthcare, transport and financial services. The social challenges include making new friends, developing a support network and adapting to cultural differences. The success of the transition depends on the individual’s ability to overcome these challenges in a process of adaptation and establishment of independence.

Studies have identified that the process of cross-cultural transition can pose significant threats to the psychological well-being of individuals as they attempt to overcome feelings of homesickness, prejudice, loss of self-esteem, anxiety, helplessness, depression, loneliness, stress and sleeplessness (Brown & Holloway, 2008; Ward & Kennedy, 2001). Brown and Holloway (2008, pp. 33-45) describe the international transition process as “one of the most traumatic events in a person’s life”, concluding that almost all of the 13 subjects in their study suffered symptoms of “mental ill health” as a direct result of their relocation. The study of Ramos, Cassidy, Reicher and Haslam (2015) identifies the failure of post-migration experiences to meet pre-migration expectations as a primary cause of “acculturative stress” leading to mental illness. They cite social rejection, prejudice, language difficulties, and cultural differences as the major inhibitors to expectations being met and achievement of well-being in the new location.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 6th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers


 

About the Author


Neil C. Robinson

London, United Kingdom

 



Neil C. Robinson
is an experienced Business and Technology Project Manager, consultant and trainer with global experience delivering complex projects, transformation programmes, and business solutions in diverse geographic locations. His experience as a practitioner includes Senior Programme/Project Management, IT Services, and Operational roles in the private and public sectors. His domain experience includes IT Management and Project Delivery roles in the Aviation, Technology, Oil & Energy, Health, Government, Insurance, and Education sectors. His regional Project Management experience includes on-ground delivery in 20+ countries across the UK, Europe, the Middle East, Australasia, the Americas and Asia. Neil is PMP and PRINCE2 accredited and is currently undertaking research and academic studies in a Masters (Project Management) programme at Salford Business School. He has a special interest in social project management and initiated the “Life is a Project” concept in London, teaching project management life skills to ‘at-risk’ community groups. His further research interests include the roles of motivation and cultural intelligence in international project success.

Neil can be contacted at [email protected] and welcomes global collaboration from practitioners, academics and students in his field of interest.

 

 

Agile Transformation in Project Organizations

Issues, Conditions Challenges

SECOND EDITION

By Pawel Paterek

AGH University of Science and Technology

Krakow, Poland

 


Abstract

Large-sized enterprises provide advanced business services and products to their customers through complex, innovative and unique projects and programs. The strong market competition raised a lot of challenges in complex project and program management. Some of the key challenges in the project and program management are: increasing transparency of project planning, growing predictability of customer’s deliveries, higher overall project efficiency, and reduction of project delivery cycle duration, improving communication and cooperation between business and project teams, improving project and program portfolio management and developing the right organizational culture.

The primary goal of this paper is to present issues, conditions and challenges of an Agile transformation as an organizational change resultant from introduction of a new Agile project management methodology in the context of the contingency theory.

Based on a review of the literature, multiple case study analysis of companies implementing new Agile project management methodology is presented as empirical research. It is focused on comparison of issues, conditions and challenges of the Agile transformation in large-sized enterprises.

As the results of the research showed, the change of the project management methodology significantly impacted the entire project organization. It was a source of extensive organizational changes in technology, methodology, processes, strategy, structure and organizational culture and it allowed for improving the competitive advantage of the organization.

Key words: project management, Agile transformation, organizational change, Agile methodology, contingency theory.

JEL code: M15, O22, O32.

Introduction

Large-sized companies deliver increasingly advanced business services and products to their customers and stakeholders through complex, innovative and unique projects and programs. A strong marketplace competition stirred up a lot of issues and challenges into complex projects and programs management, as well as into projects and programs portfolio management (Cegarra-Navarro et al., 2016; Appelbaum et al., 2017). The top issues and challenges in the contemporary project and program management are: an increasing transparency of project planning, growing predictability of customer’s deliveries, enhancement overall project efficiency, reduction of the time-to-market, increasing innovation and development, improving communication and cooperation among customer, business and project teams, improving effectiveness of project and program portfolio management and development of the right organizational culture.

Agile project management continues its rapid growth in popularity and is being deployed by a number of large-sized organizations through the process called Agile transformation (Gandomani & Nafchi, 2015; 2016; Dikert et al., 2016; Olszewska (née Pląska) et al., 2016). The Agile organization is on the way to become one of the forms of a contemporary organization to cope with marketplace competition by exploring new opportunities and to respond to customers’ expectation in an easy, swift, user-friendly and personalized manner (Denning, 2016a; 2016b). Either Agile deployment process or Agile transformation process is somehow unique to a given organization and therefore there is little of empirical research related to a wide-scale organization transformation (Laanti et al., 2011, p. 276). The research results and conclusions presented in this paper might be valuable for organization management and senior executive to facilitate Agile transformation process with less cost, time and effort and improve performance by considering proactively potential issues and challenges.

The primary goal of the empirical research in this paper is to respond to the research question about issues and challenges, supporting and non-supporting conditions and long-term goals of the Agile transformation as an organizational change in large-sized enterprises resulting from the introduction of new Agile project management methodology in the context of the contingency theory. The empirical research results fill the literature review gap for large-sized enterprises delivering complex IT and ICT projects with Agile methodologies. The research results showed that a change of the project management methodologies may lead to wide, integrated and complex organizational changes in technology, methodology, processes, strategy and organizational culture increasing competitive advantage of the organization.

A literature review and a multiple case study analysis of the companies implementing new Agile project management methodology were applied as research methods. The main limitation of research study analysis is the source of multiple case studies. They are largely based on documents available on the Internet, with a number of successful descriptions of the Agile transformation process and only very few details important from the research perspective. Repetition of the same or similar multiple case studies analysis by several different researchers may lead to interesting comparisons and conclusions as a future research opportunity.

The structure of the paper is as follows: the first part discusses the research results and the second part contains conclusions, proposals and recommendations. The first main part is also divided into subchapters presenting: a review of the existing literature, the methodology approach, the empirical research results and the final subchapter discusses the research results.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 6th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers


 

About the Author


Pawel Paterek

Cracow, Poland

 

 

Pawel Paterek has been working in the telecommunications industry for over 12+ years. He holds master’s degree (M.Sc. Eng.) in telecommunications engineering. He has also completed postgraduate studies in: IT project management, human resources development and finally MBA program. He is currently a PhD student with a specialization in management sciences. The areas of his scientific interests are: IT project management, knowledge management and Agile methods. He has been working as a Project Manager for over 8+ years in the telecommunication software quality assurance projects, both with using waterfall and Agile methodologies. He is the author of several scientific publications.

Pawel can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Performance Management Readiness

How to Assess Your Organization’s Foundation for Performance Management

SECOND EDITION

Susan Hostetter
U.S. Census Bureau
Washington, DC, USA

and

Jim Miller
The MITRE Corporation
McLean, VA, USA

 


Executive Summary

Many organizations create project teams to implement performance management processes and dashboards before they are ready. When is an organization actually ready to put meaningful metrics in place to assess performance and derive the promised benefits? This paper discusses the organizational-level performance management framework needed to implement a well-functioning measurement system and a method for assessing your organization’s foundation for performance management readiness.

The paper covers the role and importance of the following concepts in setting and assessing a foundation for a mature performance management framework for the organization:

  • Executive commitment to improved organizational performance
  • Priority setting for performance improvement
  • Management buy-in for performance improvement
  • Process readiness for managing and controlling scope, schedule, and budget
  • Process readiness for managing resource assignments
  • Process readiness for assessing product quality and customer satisfaction
  • Data readiness for performance measurement
  • Staff passion for being the best at what they do
  • Culture of respect for process, standards, and evidence-based decision-making

Additionally, the paper covers the pre-conditions and processes used for an evaluation, and considerations for an organizational-level performance management implementation roadmap.

Performance Management Readiness

The sidebar at right lists many reasons an organization should implement performance management. All are desirable, such as “improve performance for the future,” and many are common sense, such as “catch mistakes before they lead to other mistakes.” Experienced project managers will tell you, however, that implementing a performance management process is not easy, especially if the benefits are not obvious to the staff, or the data needed to support it is fragmentary or suspect. Many organizations attempt to implement performance management before they are ready. Is it possible to determine when an organization is ready to put meaningful metrics in place and derive promised benefits? In this paper, we share our experience and describe the evaluation process we used for this evaluation.

During the summer of 2016, we assessed the current “AS-IS” state of organizational-level performance management for a division within the U.S. Census Bureau. Our intent was to identify and document existing performance management processes and metrics and establish the AS-IS baseline for a subsequent improvement effort. We knew at the outset of the assessment that this organization, although strong in mission, was weak in performance management. We did not expect to discover, however, that the organization had neither the basic foundational project management and data collection processes needed nor much support for the idea that performance metrics would be useful. We quickly realized that, because of the weakness of the foundation, moving the organization from the AS-IS state directly to a state of generating performance metrics that informed management decisions would be very difficult.

This was the “Aha” moment that became the central idea of our report. Performance management requires a solid foundation composed of an executive vision, robust project management processes, and a good store of current and historical data. Our “Aha” moment suggested that, rather than simply providing an assessment of the current state, we had an opportunity to encourage the organization to build this foundation.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Annual University of Maryland PM Symposium in May 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.


 

About the Author


Susan Hostetter

U.S. Census Bureau
Washington, DC, USA

 

 

Susan Hostetter, PMP, is a Project Manager in the Demographic Survey Methodology Division (DSMD) at the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington, DC, USA. She has spent twenty plus years at the U.S Census Bureau as a data analyst and project management professional. She has been instrumental in standing up and improving risk management, project management, portfolio management, strategic planning, and performance management processes for multiple Census and Survey programs. She received her undergraduate degree in Business Administration and Economics at Mary Baldwin College and her Master’s degree in Project Management from the University of Maryland’s University College. Susan can be contacted at [email protected]

 


James Miller

U.S. Census Bureau
Washington, DC, USA

 


James Miller
is a Program and Project Management consultant with the MITRE Corporation in McLean, VA, USA. He began his career in the 1970s as a Systems Analyst and Database Designer with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and was heavily involved in classified computer security design and implementation through the 1980s. He has provided program and project management support and consulting to a variety of federal civil agencies for the past 26 years. With the MITRE Corporation since 2006, Jim has exclusively supported the U.S. Census Bureau on a wide variety of high profile programs and management initiatives. He received his undergraduate degree in Psychology from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. in 1972. Jim can be contacted at: [email protected]

 

 

Leadership and Change!

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Britta Eremit

Bad Homburg, Germany

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Constantly ChangingWe are constantly invited to adjust the way we cope with change. Managers, leaders and their employees face the daily challenge of dealing with complexity of the job-requirements, expectations, cultural differences, communication styles and values.

What will Never Change People’s will to change and people’s fear of change! Both are essential and have a tremendous impact on our well-being and the preservation of our relationships. Change is an anxious-arousing business, both for the one implementing the change and for those impacted by the change, as Harriet Learner pointed out in her gem of book “The Dance of Fear”.(1)

It’s not only individuals who get anxious – systems (if more than one person is involved we talk about a system e.g. organizations, families, partnership, friendship) become anxious too. Organizational Consultant Jeffrey Miller wrote in his book The Anxious Organization: “… Anxiety is what organizations are made of and what makes them tick … and … Anxiety makes smart organizations do stupid things.”

We are constantly invited to stay open, to grow and to make progress. Change is an essential part in our life, it is indispensable. This can only happen if we are willing to look at things from a different perspective. As George Bernard Shaw pointed out:

“Progress is impossible without change and those who cannot change

their minds, cannot change anything!“ George Bernard Shaw

However, changing our minds and the way we deal with change can provoke unpleasant and harmful consequences. Based on our individual experiences we know that there is no guarantee that change will be automatically linked with pleasant feelings, luck or positive and successful outcomes. Quite the contrary! It is also linked with losing something or someone e.g. financial stability, the job, friends, beloved ones, physical and mental health, cherished beliefs etc. So, how can we find a way to deal constructively with our fear of change?

The Daily Challenges – Most of us are familiar with situations, where organizations decide to cut resources and leaders are ask to restructure the entire organization. Leaders have to find out “What are our best talents supporting us in building the “NEW” – the future?” Leaders have to adjust their own competencies, skills and character as well. Leaders have to align departments, staff and core competencies according to the constantly changing expectations of the organization and what if we, as leaders, are forced to adjust individual cherished beliefs and values as well?

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About the Author


Britta Eremit

BE Change & Company
Bad Homburg, Germany

 

 

Britta Eremit is principle of BE Change & Company and an Executive Trainer & Coach specialized on Change & Strengths – Change Management & Leadership Training & Workshops. BE Change & Company was formed out of the desire to provide CHANGE SOLUTIONS for Organizations, Leaders and Teams, to create sustainability in “Success & Efficiency” and “Engagement & Personal Fulfilment”. The concept focusses on the THREE C’s: CHANGE Competence – CHANGE Excellence – CHANGE Intelligently.

Britta is among the few in Europe who are authorized to provide Strengths Strategy-based training as Germany’s FIRST Strategic Strengths Certified Coach (Certified by Strengths Strategy Inc., USA). She is also Co-Founder of the Institute for Innovative Leadership, “The Change Team“, and founder of BEC2 Coaching & Consulting. More than 20 years hands on experience in different positions in international Financial- and Real Estate Organizations made her aware of that “CHANGE will always come!” and it was the central theme she was involved with permanently – CONTINUOUS CHANGE.

According to Britta: In my positions as leader, team-member and colleague I found out that we have to deal with extraordinary challenges – on business and personal level – in times of change. And additionally, that the key for building up – and still going ahead – with trustworthy relationships in organizations and in the interaction with clients during these times is within here – that dealing with constant CHANGE by creating sustainability and success becomes today’s Organizational Core-Competence. Beside that it is essential and inevitable to establish appreciative communication and a culture of trust. So as a result the core area of my training for the management, teams and leaders is focused on CHANGE – to support you to Co-Design CHANGE effectively and NAVIGATE your organization and people consciously through these times of CHANGE. I‘m deeply convinced that here within is the key for both – organizations & people – to be successful and perform at the best effectively. So I‘m here to support you to develop with you your ROAD-MAP of CHANGE (on Leadership Level & Organizational Level) and to accompany you while taking this journey!

Britta has 20+ Years in International Finance and Real Estate Sector Core area Controlling & Tax Department, Project Management, Client Management, Key Account Management, Head of RFP & Sales Support, Senior Manager Investor Relations & Marketing, Roll out and development of functional relationships between global and local RFP-Teams, strategic and operational issues.

She is additionally author of the specialist book “Individual Development – Growing by Transformation” which has been published from the publishing company Springer Verlag in 2016 in German language http://www.springer.com/de/book/9783658094522.

The English version will be published soon.

My USP – excellent ability to capture very quickly the essential aspects of different circumstances based on an analytical and strategic expertise; exceptional competence of active listening and building trust, connectivity and appreciative cooperation.

My Passion – to work with people with diverse cultural background, bringing teams together, support integration and living mutual appreciation.

TODAY’s CHALLENGES Companies, top executives and employees face the daily challenge of dealing with global change and demographic trends. We constantly have to adjust our skills and behaviors. This requires courage, the willingness to change and the development of new routines.

Britta Eremit / BE Change & Company / Louisenstrasse 89 / 61348 Bad Homburg v.d.H. / Germany / email: mailto:[email protected]/ LinkedIn / Tel.: +49 (0) 163 2016340

 

 

Agile by Incrementalism

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Sharon Herstein

USA

 


With Agile adoption increasingly popular, many companies feel compelled to forego Waterfall for Agile. But, depending on the organization’s goals, complete abandonment of existing processes may not be necessary and a blend or partial transition can bring positive Agile change without drastic disruption. Incremental product development is only part of the Agile story, but it may be all you need.

Fully effective Agile adoption usually involves a culture shift and maybe even a re-shuffling of the organization. These aspects give many companies pause; they make adoption costly and those that attempt it unguided can end up frustrated and unfulfilled. But by setting wholesale Agile adoption aside and putting the focus on shifting product development to an incremental approach, these types of disruptions may be avoided and significant upside provided even without entirely transitioning. While not all of the benefits of Agile would be realized, some benefit is certainly preferable to none.

Applying incrementalism to common business goals can set an organization along its Agile path. It may be sufficient on its own or may eventually, even organically, lead to a fuller Agile adoption. Common drivers of Agile adoption are a desire to gain flexibility, move faster, mitigate risk, improve transparency or increase value and incrementalism can realize any of these goals.

Planning smaller deliverables lessens the impact of changes in scope or priority thereby providing flexibility.

Reducing the scale of each deliverable helps it move faster through the process including delivering more frequently thereby regularly increasing value to customers.

Incrementalism is a natural risk-mitigator because it reduces scope breadth and timeline duration. Deliverables are being produced on a smaller scale with a higher frequency which permits risk to be evaluated more often. This is similarly how incrementalism improves transparency.

There are many frameworks and methods associated with Agile and each one may have its own impact on the role of Project Management. Forgoing the selection of a specific type of Agile and instead embarking on an effort to transform the deliverable itself from one large to several smaller deliverables brings incrementalism into the existing product development process and preserves Project Management. Once aspects of the product are separated it follows that the planning, execution and delivery activities will each be reduced in duration but increase in frequency, providing more opportunities to adapt and change based on succeeding sooner or even failing faster albeit on a smaller scale than the original process provided. The Project Management Process Groups and Knowledge Areas still exist but will have a narrower focus on the newly derived smaller deliverable. Scope still needs definition and planning still occurs but with a newly deliberate focus.

How is incrementalism practiced? Most basically by separating the single, large existing deliverable into multiple, smaller deliverables…

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About the Author


Sharon Herstein

USA

 


Sharon Herstein
is a Web Developer turned Project Manager and has been practicing technical project management across industries for over 10 years. She specializes in creating efficiencies and scalability for start-ups and mature organizations alike; relying upon deep theoretical understanding of both Waterfall and Agile to create practical solutions.

Sharon may be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Effective Risk Management

via Early Warning Signal System and Procedures

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Priti Vaid

India

 


Abstract

At any point in time in any organization there are multiple programs being executed, each one at a different stage of execution and operating at a different level of maturity and proximity to the finish line. To determine the right candidates for review and interventions by the senior management a risk based prioritization model can be effectively established. Not only will this model help divide the senior mgmt. time effectively among those that warrant attention but also help in risk bubbling at the right time towards the right focus areas proactively.

Content

In general Risk Management can be defined as the practice of identification, assessment, and prioritization of risks followed by coordinated effort and resources to minimize, monitor, and control the probability and/or impact of unfortunate events and/or to maximize the realization of opportunities. If the identification is done proactively it can drastically bring down both the resources required to monitor and control and also the probability or impact of the unfortunate event as an outcome.

To identify risks proactively a framework for intercepting “Early Warning Signals” (EWS) based on different dimensions & metrics applicable at each stage of the project has been explained below. These EWS are triggers which point towards potential discontinuities / disruptions to the project progress and hence need to be arrested on priority by means of adequate review and controls.

Risk identification can be done at each phase of the project using a risk profiling tool. This profiling tool is a multiple option questionnaire across several dimensions which help determine the risk exposure of the project. Several in-flight metrics can also be built into the model along with this subjective profiling to determine the risk exposure. Some of the suggested metrics are % deviation in schedule, % deviation in cost, % deviation in effort, team satisfaction score, client satisfaction score, etc.

The output of this profiling tool along with the metrics values can be used to determine a composite risk exposure score and determine the final positioning of the project on the Risk Heat-map. The set of dimensions and metrics available can differ from one phase to another and can have different thresholds for their scores. It is also important to seek views of all relevant stakeholders at each phase to get a 360 degree view of the project.

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About the Author

Priti Vaid

India

 


Priti Vaid
, with close to 17 years of experience in IT industry, has played varied roles with a top IT service provider; globally reputed and founded in India. Apart from software development and program management experience she has keen interest and rich experience in Program delivery Risk Management. She has been one of the key players in design and deployment of a Heat-map based risk identification, analysis and prioritization tool. This tool not only helps to identify risks but also helps to bring to focus the right logical entities requiring additional attention by the senior management. She strongly believes in the statement “The only alternative to risk management is crisis management”.

Priti Vaid can be contacted at [email protected]