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Welcome to the May 2017 PMWJ

Death of the Country Manager: Geopolitics Revisited, Country Risk – – and Welcome to the May 2017 Edition of the PM World Journal

David L. Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA

 


Welcome to the May 2017 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 57th edition continues to reflect the international nature of this publication; 21 original articles, papers and other works by 20 different authors in 12 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Since last August, on the recommendation of several international advisors, I have used this opportunity to mention important trends or issues that I see as journal editor. This month I return to a topic that has been of personal interest to me for many years – international “geopolitics”.

When I was an undergraduate studying business many years ago, I read case studies involving large American corporations such as IBM, IT&T, Standard Oil and others. In many cases, those large companies had a ‘country manager’ in each country where they did business, to both represent the company as well as oversee business development and operations in country; that is no longer the case. In the 1990s when I was running around Russia and pursuing projects in multiple countries on behalf of some U.S. companies, I became familiar with ‘country risk’, a concept used by the U.S. Export-Import Bank and other financial institutions to determine whether and how they would provide financing for equipment sales and/or overseas projects.

Over the last ten years or so, I have followed a global geopolitical think tank, a private intelligence company based in Austin, Texas called Stratfor. The company, founded by George Friedman, one of America’s preeminent experts on national security, international affairs and the intelligence business, provides regular analyses and briefings on trends and events occurring in various parts of the world. [1] My editorial this month was stimulated by an April article by Stratfor’s Mike Rosenberg titled “Closing the Gap Between Business and Geopolitics.” [2]

Death of the Country Manager

According to Mr. Rosenberg, “Not long ago, most international companies had people in place to oversee operations at the national level… These country managers were widely respected in their firms for local knowledge… Much like ambassadors, country managers played a two-way role, representing their firms in the country while also explaining the nation’s environment to their organization’s personnel. And in many cases, executives from the country itself filled the country manager role, further cementing the flow of information in both directions…”[2]

As Mr. Rosenberg goes on to describe, “starting in the 1980s, this classic structure of business was gradually replaced by the matrix structure, which typically comprises global business units, global corporate functions and giant geographical areas of responsibility.”

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

 

 

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (http://www.pmworldjournal.net/) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He occasionally acts as project management advisor for U.S. national laboratories and international programs, and currently serves as an independent advisor for a major U.S. national nuclear security program.

David Pells has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.

Former managing editor of PM World Today, he is the creator, editor and publisher of the PM World Journal (since 2012). David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely and spoken at conferences and events worldwide. David lives near Dallas, Texas and can be contacted at mailto:editor@pmworldjournal.net.

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

May 2017 Report from Spain

REPORT

New AEDIP Board of Directors in Spain, PMI Madrid Chapter represented at the LIM and PMI EMEA Congress 2017 in Rome

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain

 


The New AEDIP Board of Directors in Spain

AEDIP nominated a new Board of directors in Spain. It has been effective since last March 2017. Along March 2017, AEDIP gota organized several professional activities. Their new President, Mrs. Leticia Sauco, started a new stage renewing this professional association and opening the door to establish new collaboration agreements with other professional associations in the professional project management field. An industry that ran into serious business problems to survive in business during the last five years, it seems that is restarting again and pursues a professional excellence path.

 

 

 

 

 

Leticia Sauco Sevilla, Presidente                  


 

 

 

 

Joaquin de Hita Alonso, Consejero  


 

 

 

 

Juan Luis Soucheiron Vidri, Consejero


 

 

 

 

Estrella Giraldo Burgos, Consejera


 

 

 

 

Antonio Capilla Materedona, Consejero

AEDIP represents the common effort from professional society represented by, as in this case, the most recognized companies that are aware of that and are investing to deliver, in Spain and further, a good quality service according to our current business situation. AEDIP has signed off a collaboration agreement with the PMI Madrid Chapter, that was materialized with the past event we reported on our past March monthly report 2017. The PMI Madrid Chapter has created a group of Construction Project management practitioners that are meeting each other periodically and that will continue doing activities for the best development of soft skills for their professionals.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at alfonso.bucero@abucero.com.

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Project Management Update from Chile

REPORT

2017 Cono Sur Tour, Breakthrough telescope project in Chile, Codelco forms Lithium subsidiary (Report from Santiago)

By Jaime Videla, PMP

International Correspondent

Santiago, Chile

 


PMI Santiago Chile Chapter

2017 Cono Sur (Southern Cone) Tour

One of the most interesting events for PMI community is the Southern Cone Tour, which will take place on Wednesday, November 15 at Casapiedra expo and convention facility, Vitacura, Santiago.

Certainly this year will be very special because PMI Santiago Chile Chapter turns twenty years, and this congress, the most important of Chile in Project Management will not be absent from this celebration.

From now on we invite you to participate in this celebration in the Southern Cone Tour, postulating topics in the Call for Paper, attending the congress, participating in the various auspices, promoting your attendance and above all by getting involved with the various activities and benefits that we will continue to communicate According to the development of this great event.

For more information, please visit www.pmi.cl ; contact by telephone at +56 2 2481 4060 or by email to pmi@pmi.cl.

Breakthrough telescope to be built in Chile

Scientists announced this month that a consortium of U.S., German and Canadian academic institutions led by Cornell University will begin construction of Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope-prime (CCAT-p), a unique and powerful telescope capable of mapping the sky at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author


Jaime Videla

Santiago, Chile

 

 

Jaime Videla, PMP, is the Managing Director for PMOChile a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of Accufast, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 25+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Mexico and Peru. Since 2006 has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects. Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at jvidela@pmochile.com.

To view other works by Jaime Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

 

 

 

Project Management Development – Practice and Perspectives

REPORT

Report on the Sixth International Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic Countries

By Emils Pulmanis

PhD.cand., MSc.proj.mgmt

Riga, Latvia

 


The Sixth International Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic Countries was held during 27-28 April 2017 at the University of Latvia in Riga.  The theme of the conference was “Project Management Development – Practice and Perspectives”.  Organizers of the event included the Research Institute of the Project Management of the Faculty of Business, Management and Economics, University of Latvia and the Professional Association of Project Managers, Latvia.

The aim of the conference was to discuss results of scientific research in project management issues, to establish new contacts and networking between professionals involved in project management, and to enhance the capacity of project managers.

The conference programme included opening plenary session, and 4 parallel streams of papers and presentations. All papers were reviewed by two reviewers and papers included in the conference proceedings were double blind reviewed. Detailed conference program you can find here.

Conference keynote speakers for 2017 were Dr. Michael J. Littman (USA), Dr. Csiszárik-Kocsir Ágnes and Dr.Varga János (Hungary) and M.S, PMP Raji Sivaraman (Singapore/USA).

The work of the conference was organized in the 4 parallel sessions:

1.Education, Social Aspects and Personnel in Project Management

Session chairs: Prof. Michael J. Littman, Prof. Andrejs Cekuls

2.New Directions in Project Management

Session chairs: Prof. Arvi Kuura, Prof. Signe Bāliņa

3.Project Risk Management

Session chairs: Prof. Wolfgang Tysak, Prof. Daina Šķiltere

4.Practical Project Management

Session chairs: Prof. Carsten Wolff, Prof. (emer.) Dr.Žaneta Ilmete

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author


Emils Pulmanis

Riga, Latvia

 



Emils Pulmanis
is a member of the board of the Professional Association of Project Managers in Latvia and development project manager at State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia. He has gained a BSc. in engineer economics, a professional master’s degree in project management (MSc.proj.mgmt) and currently is a PhD candidate with a specialization in project management. He has elaborated and directed a number of domestic and foreign financial instruments co-financed projects. He was a National coordinator for a European Commission-funded program – the European Union’s financial instruments PHARE program in Latvia. Over the past seven years he has worked in the public administration project control and monitoring field. He was a financial instrument expert for the Ministry of Welfare and the European Economic Area and Norwegian Financial Mechanism implementation authority as well as an expert for the Swiss – Latvian cooperation program as a NGO grant scheme project evaluation expert. He has gained international and professional project management experience in Germany, the United States and Taiwan. In addition to his professional work, he is also a lecturer at the University of Latvia for the professional master study program in Project management. He has authored more than 45 scientific publications and is actively involved in social activities as a member of various NGO’s.

Emils can be contacted at emils.pulmanis@gmail.com

To view other works by Emils Pulmanis, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/emils-pulmanis/

 

 

Assessment of the Micro-Economical Impact Factors of E-Governance Projects

SECOND EDITION

By Emils Pulmanis

PhD.cand. MSC.proj.mgmt.
State Audit Office of Latvia
Professional association of project managers

Riga, Latvia

 


Abstract

Today ITC plays a crucial role in any economy and its importance is increasing also in the public sector. Nowadays ICT becomes increasingly important for the state and municipal institutions, creating opportunities to automate many manual operations. ICT have an important role in both improvements of services as well as internal and inter-institutional cooperation processes promoting availability and quality of services, facilitating administrative processes for people and entrepreneurs, as well as information availability. In order to improve services for people and entrepreneurs as well as provide the participation in decision-making process, additionally to presence services more and more opportunities are created to claim for and receive services electronically.

The paper looks into different perspectives of the e-governance projects in the public sector. Overall framework and flow of the study are based on author experience and one-month internship of research work in India in 2017. The author has set a limitation for the research based only on micro-economical perspective and impact factors for the project success as there is a wide range of conducted studies on macroeconomic impacts from e-government project implementation and there is no doubt about such project importance to the economy. The study is based on qualitative research methods including Delphi method application, scientific literature analysis, and case studies. The aim of the paper is to stipulate importance of the increasing role of e-government and e-governance projects in the public sector by the analysis of actions undertaken by the public entities and organizations. Case studies are based on Latvian government experience with some comparison of Indian government experience.

Key words: e-government, e-governance, project management.

JEL codes: H43, L86, O33

Introduction

The World Bank (2012) defines E-Government as:

The use by government agencies of information technologies (such as Wide Area Networks, the Internet, and mobile computing) that have the ability to transform relations with citizens, businesses, and other arms of government. These technologies can serve a variety of different ends: better delivery of government services to citizens, improved interactions with business and industry, citizen empowerment through access to information, or more efficient government management. The resulting benefits can be less corruption, increased transparency, greater convenience, revenue growth, and/or cost reductions.

Generally, e-Government is basically the use of Information Communications Technology (ICT) and its application by the relevant government body for the provision of information and public services to the people. In simple terms, e-Government is the use of technology to enhance the access to and delivery of government services to benefit citizens, business partners and employees. It is the use of information technology to support government operations, engage citizens, and provide public services in a more efficient and transparent manner.

The aim of e-Government, therefore, is to provide efficient dissemination and management of information to the citizen; better service delivery to citizens; and empowerment of the people through access to information and participation in public and policy decision-making. E-government can support more streamlined and responsive service, wider public participation, and more cost-effective business practices at every level of government. It ranges in complexity from basic access to official information to radically redesigned public processes.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 6th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2017. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers


 

About the Author


Emils Pulmanis

Riga, Latvia

 



Emils Pulmanis
is a member of the board of the Professional Association of Project Managers in Latvia and development project manager at State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia. He has gained a BSc. in engineer economics, a professional master’s degree in project management (MSc.proj.mgmt) and currently is a PhD candidate with a specialization in project management. He has elaborated and directed a number of domestic and foreign financial instruments co-financed projects. He was a National coordinator for a European Commission-funded program – the European Union’s financial instruments PHARE program in Latvia. Over the past seven years he has worked in the public administration project control and monitoring field. He was a financial instrument expert for the Ministry of Welfare and the European Economic Area and Norwegian Financial Mechanism implementation authority as well as an expert for the Swiss – Latvian cooperation program as a NGO grant scheme project evaluation expert. He has gained international and professional project management experience. In addition to his professional work, he is also a lecturer at the University of Latvia for the professional master study program in Project management. He has authored more than 45 scientific publications and is actively involved in social activities as a member of various NGO’s.

Emils can be contacted at emils.pulmanis@gmail.com

 

 

The Purpose and Methods of Practical Project Categorization

SECOND EDITION

By Russell D. Archibald

Archibald Associates

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

 


Abstract

The objectives of this paper are to discuss the purposes of and need for a project categorization system, to present a recommended approach to the systematic definition of project categorization and classification, and to describe the use of a Purposes/Methods Matrix for Project Categorization to facilitate this systematic definition.

What Drives the Need for a Project Categorization System? The fundamental driver for pursuing the design of an effective project categorizing system is the realization that significant differences exist between the large numbers of projects within:

  • The total spectrum of actual projects in government, business and industry, and
  • The smaller numbers of projects that are being planned and executed within one organizational entity.

Practical experience over many decades in managing the many types (or categories) of projects has led to:

  • Recognition, definition and understanding of the project management/PM principles and practices that are common to all (or at least many) projects in all types of human endeavors and organizations, as documented in the several PM bodies of knowledge and the PM literature in general; and also
  • Recognition (more recently) that the diversity inherent within the many existing and potential projects demands that projects be segregated in several ways for several purposes to continue to improve the ways in which both the buyers (owners) and sellers (contractors or developers) of projects:
    • Strategically and operationally select and prioritize their projects,
    • Operationally plan and execute their projects:
      • individually,
      • within programs, and
      • within project portfolios;
    • Educate and train the managers and specialists involved in projects and PM; and
    • Develop and manage the careers of managers and specialists involved in projects.

Beyond Project Buyers and Sellers: In addition to project buyers and sellers there are at least four other major players in the PM industry worldwide:

  • PM software application developers and vendors (who are often sellers of IT projects),
  • Consultants, educators, and trainers in PM,
  • Universities offering courses, certificates, and degrees in PM, and
  • Professional associations devoted to or interested in PM.

At least some members of each of these groups have also learned that recognizing the differences between various kinds or types of projects can help them continue to improve their offerings to the PM marketplace.

Categorization Versus Classification of Projects: Some dictionaries use these terms interchangeably, but to avoid potential semantic confusion the term categorization is used consistently in this paper to identify a set of items with similar characteristics or properties. An item may be placed in more than one category; in other words, categories are not mutually exclusive. A class is often used more rigorously to denote a set of items that can only be placed within a given class; classes are therefore mutually exclusive, when used in this sense. In this paper it is suggested that projects be classified within categories using specific classification criteria.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the International Project/Program Management Workshop 5, ESC Lille – Lille Graduate School of Management, Lille, France, during August 22 – 26, 2005. The paper was modified by the author in May 28 2007. It is republished here with the author’s permission


 

About the Author


Russell D. Archibald

Archibald Associates
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

 

 

Now 93, with careers spanning more than 70 years, Russ Archibald has had broad international experiences in piloting and designing aircraft, corporate engineering, operations, and program and project management. His three project management related careers have been Military/Aerospace (19 years), Corporate Engineer & Executive (17 years), and Management Consultant (34 years to date). Russ has consulted to a wide variety of large and small organizations in 16 countries, has trained thousands of people in project management, and has resided in the USA, France, Mexico, Venezuela, Panama Canal Zone, and Peru with Marion, his wife of 70 years. For the past 23 years they have resided in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico.

Russ is founding member number 6 of the Project Management Institute/PMI. After presenting the first PMI paper in 1969 he was President of the PMI Southern California Chapter in 1991-2, founding member of the PMI Mexico City Chapter in 1996, and in 2006 was awarded the PMI Jim O’Brien Lifetime Achievement Award. A PMI Fellow and Certified Project Management Professional, he co-authored with Prof. Dr. Jean-Pierre Debourse the 2011 PMI research report Project Managers as Senior Executives. He was also a founding member in 1970 and is an Honorary Fellow of the Association of Project Management (APM/IPMA-UK).In 1967 he was co-author (with Richard Villoria) of Network Based Management Information Systems (PERT/CPM),Wiley, one of the first books to appear on project management.

Russ is co-author with his grandson Shane Archibald of Leading and Managing Innovation-What Every Executive Team Must Know about Project, Program & Portfolio Management(2nd edition CRC Press 2015, 1st edition 2013 also published in Italian, Portuguese and Spanish); author of Managing High Technology Programs and Projects (3rd edition Wiley 2003, also published in Italian, Russian, and Chinese), has contributed chapters to 15 books edited by others, and presented 88 papers at many PMI, IPMA and other conferences in many countries. He holds BS (U. of Missouri 1948) and MS (U. of Texas 1956) degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Russ was awarded an honorary Ph.D. in Strategy, Program, and Project Management from the Ecole Superieure de Commerce de Lille in Lille, France in 2005. See russarchibald.com. Russ can be contacted at russell_archibald@yahoo.com

To view other works by Russ Archibald, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/russell-d-archibald/

 

 

The Calm Before the Storm

COMMENTARY

By Steve Wake

United Kingdom

 


The announcement of the General Election in the UK for June 8 came like a bolt out of the blue.

So now we have to see what happens with:

  • Our Government
  • The Brexit Negotiation
  • The French election
  • Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland
  • Gibraltar
  • International terrorism
  • Climate Change
  • The money markets
  • US foreign policy
  • Russia
  • China
  • Korea
  • Pink Floyd

If you do risk management then some or all of the above will be factors which will affect our daily lives. What we will be waking up to for the foreseeable future.

The world we live in looks like it’s going to change and it could affect our prosperity by which I mean. Your job, your kids future. Where and how you live.

Now the good news is. Is hasn’t happened yet. Although we don’t quite know what yet.

The bad news is that most of the institutions and sources of guidance which inform our opinions and choices don’t know either.

The degree of uncertainty is unparalleled.

However, the sun will continue to rise and those of us with jobs will continue at least for a while.

It is safe to say that there will be projects. There always are. This profession is a good one to be in. Rain or shine.

So whilst we’re waiting, now is a good time to reflect and rehearse what’s coming and what we can do about it.

The PC manifesto (Project Controls) that is.

The Project Profession has to get and maintain its voice.

We the profession kid ourselves if we think that the first person the Prime Minister or members of the Government or those Civil Servants in Whitehall think of is us.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author


Steve Wake

United Kingdom

 


Steve Wake
has worked in the print, automotive, aerospace, defence, insurance and IT industries as a project manager and consultant. He is an internationally acknowledged expert on Earned Value Project Management and has written and presented many times. He was chairman of the Board of the Association for Project Management in the UK steering it to Chartered status whilst pursuing a campaign of Listening, Learning and Leading as a way of being as well as doing Diversity properly.

Steve has also had to become an accomplished event organiser and chair with his own EVA conference in its 22nd year as well as continued close involvement in the high profile PMI UK Synergy events, both productions with a reputation for the unusual and innovative. His long passion for all kinds of music is almost matched by his continued appreciation of silence.

Steve Wake can be contacted at swprojects@blueyonder.co.uk

 

Addressing Risk with VUCA – Prime

SERIES ARTICLE

Risk Doctor Briefing

Dr David Hillson, PMI Fellow, HonFAPM, FIRM

The Risk Doctor Partnership

United Kingdom

 


Many risk practitioners have heard of VUCA as a way of describing an environment which gives rise to risk. VUCA stands for Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity. It was first developed in the 1990s by the US Army War College, but it has become widely used in business as a way of characterising the risky environment in which organisations operate.

  • Volatility occurs when the nature, speed and size of change are unpredictable.
  • Uncertainty arises from lack of knowledge or an inability to determine the course of future events.
  • Complexity is present when the outcome of an action cannot be predicted by simple analysis.
  • Ambiguity means that key characteristics of a situation are not clear, or they can be interpreted in different ways.

Each of the VUCA perspectives has clear parallels in the way risk is understood and managed, and it is possible to structure the identification of risks around these four dimensions. But although VUCA is useful in identifying risks, it does not help us to decide how to respond to them.

Fortunately, a complementary framework has recently been developed which we can use to shape our responses to VUCA risks. This framework was proposed by Bob Johansen in 2007 (*), and it is known as VUCA-Prime. This has four elements, and each one describes a leadership behaviour that addresses one of the VUCA dimensions. Risk practitioners can use VUCA for identifying risks, and they can also use VUCA-Prime to help them respond effectively.

  • Vision rises above Volatility. When things are changing unpredictably, it is vital to keep a clear focus on the overall vision. Knowing where we are heading will ensure that we stay on course when external circumstances are turbulent. The risk practitioner should maintain a relentless emphasis on objectives to ensure that risk responses keep the project or business on track. When things are changing unpredictably around you, keep your eyes on the goal.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author


Dr. David Hillson

The Risk Doctor

 

 

Dr David Hillson CMgr FRSA FIRM FCMI HonFAPM PMI-Fellow is The Risk Doctor (http://www.risk-doctor.com/).  As an international risk consultant, David is recognised as a leading thinker and expert practitioner in risk management. He consults, writes and speaks widely on the topic and he has made several innovative contributions to the field. David’s motto is “Understand profoundly so you can explain simply”, ensuring that his work represents both sound thinking and practical application.

David Hillson has over 25 years’ experience in risk consulting and he has worked in more than 40 countries, providing support to clients in every major industry sector, including construction, mining, telecommunications, pharmaceutical, financial services, transport, fast-moving consumer goods, energy, IT, defence and government. David’s input includes strategic direction to organisations facing major risk challenges, as well as tactical advice on achieving value and competitive advantage from effectively managing risk.

David’s contributions to the risk discipline over many years have been recognised by a range of awards, including “Risk Personality of the Year” in 2010-11. He received both the PMI Fellow award and the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) for his work in developing risk management. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the UK Association for Project Management (APM), where he has actively led risk developments for nearly 20 years. David Hillson is an active Fellow of the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), and he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) to contribute to its Risk Commission. He is also a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and a Member of the Institute of Directors (IOD).

Dr Hillson can be contacted at david@risk-doctor.com

To see other works previously published in the PM World Journal by Dr David Hillson, visit his author showcase at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-david-hillson/

 

 

Project Performance Audit – A Methodology

SERIES ARTICLE

Advances in Project Management Series

Dr. Alexia Nalewaik FRICS CCP CCA

QS Requin Corporation

Pasadena, California, USA

 


It all started on a normal workday, with two seemingly unrelated questions:

  1. Why didn’t this recent audit identify as many findings as the last one?
  2. What can we do to win more audit work?

But they were related … and then, suddenly, I had a PhD.

Management consultants, by the nature of their business, live in a world where winning the work means survival of their firm, and improvements to their salary. Some will do whatever it takes to win the work. Others genuinely care about the service they provide. The two are not always mutually exclusive.

After analyzing over seven hundred audit reports, the answers to the two questions were clear. Work was being won by other firms because they were able to price their services very low. However, in order to do so, they were reducing the scope of the audit to the bare minimum required by law. Their audit reports were, at most, three pages long – and that included the cover page and managing partner’s affidavit. In contrast, a performance audit with broader scope could yield a report 30 to 100 pages long. Second question, answered. As for the first question, that turned out to be a combination of audit team skills and scope (Nalewaik, 2013). And yet, the answers to both questions turned out to be more.

Projects, especially construction projects, typically apply specialized project management techniques to mitigate the volatility, cost overruns, significant delays in completion, and failures with which such projects are often associated. Audit represents one type of independent external oversight often utilized to provide an opinion on current project status and quality of management. However, variability in audit sampling and review techniques, team composition, scope, quality and availability of data, standards, and other factors can impact audit results. Unexpectedly, this research provided a contribution to two spheres: auditing and procurement. After answering the two initial questions, the research goal evolved to define key components in the execution of performance audits, in order to improve performance audit procurement and process, impacting findings and thus their applicability and usefulness as a project and organizational performance improvement mechanism.

The objectives of project performance audit are to: 1) reduce risk; 2) enable transparency and accountability; and 3) create a culture of organizational maturity. Inherent in performance audit are the three concepts of Economy, Effectiveness and Efficiency (Waring & Morgan, 2007). “Economy” emphasizes frugality and reasonability in the use of resources, “Efficiency” focuses on achieving results while minimizing waste, and “Effectiveness” assesses the level of success in attaining the intended results. In evaluating the “three e’s”, project performance audit addresses the intersectional universe of resources (input), results (output), and impact. By significantly reducing the audit scope, the research found that certain performance audits did not deliver the depth and breadth of review promised or even implied. This, in turn, led to an expectations gap, wherein stakeholders had assumed a “performance audit” would truly evaluate stewardship and other concepts (such as equity, legality, fiscal prudence, and rational / justified decision-making), but the reduced audit scope did not really do so.

The research results found that different types and quantities of findings were generated by different audit scopes. Typical audit findings tended to focus on routine procedural, accounting, and controls errors. On average, contract expenditure audits questioned 2.65% of expenditures, and performance audits of large complex programs questioned only 0.04% of expenditures. The majority (72.56%) of the performance audits in the sample yielded no findings or questioned costs whatsoever. When more expenditures and project documents were reviewed, the audit yielded more qualitative findings. Including technical experts on the audit team increased both the percentage of expenditures questioned and the number of qualitative findings. Applying audit standards at first appeared to have a negative impact on the number of audit findings, but it was later determined that the reduced number of audit findings were related to limited audit scope and a lack of technical experts on the audit team. The research concluded that the two biggest factors that impacted audit results were audit scope and the auditor’s depth of project- and industry-specific expertise (Nalewaik, 2013).

Several years later, that research led to the development of a methodology for scoping and procuring performance audits. The predominant guidance available at the time was typically written by governmental audit offices, specifically for their projects, or by consultants eager to sell services; there existed no substantial guidance for the layman or practitioner…

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: The Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in UK and by Routledge worldwide. Information about Routledge project management books can be found here.


 

About the Author


Dr Alexia Nalewaik

California, USA


 

Dr. Alexia Nalewaik, FRICS CCP CCA is a project controls director and management consultant with 25 years of experience in the industry. She is President-Elect 2017-2018 of AACE International, Research Chair and Past-Chair of the International Cost Engineering Council, and the owner of QS Requin Corporation. She holds a PhD in project and program management, an MS in structural engineering, and a BA in physics. Alexia is a certified cost professional, a certified construction auditor, and a chartered quantity surveyor. She is a Fellow of AACE International, RICS, and ICEC.

 

 

Homing in on project performance

SERIES ARTICLE

The long road towards continuous improvement

Advances in Project Management

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management
University of Hertfordshire

United Kingdom

 


Performance measurement does not feature in the professional bodies of knowledge and appears to garner very limited attention in the myriad of textbooks and guides that describe and define the discipline of project management and the profession of project delivery.

While words such as performance metrics, performance parameters, success measures, performance baselines and the status of deliverables appear in the both the APM and PMI bodies of knowledge, albeit primarily, under the monitoring and control of on-going project activities, project performance management is not considered in an organised or integrated fashion in either.

Performance measurement is tasked with evaluating the value delivered by organisational activities, the impact on stakeholders, and the effectiveness of organisational performance. Organisations manage the performance of results, activities, individuals, systems, products, processes, projects, teams, units, sections, departments and indeed, the entire organization.

Given the concern with the performance of projects, and the much-maligned poor track record of successful delivery, it is surprising that the interest in continuous improvement has not brought performance management into a sharper focus.

Measurement is ubiquitous

Our lives increasingly appear to be monitored and measured as data on every transaction, activity and interaction is recorded and stored. Every aspect of our being and every facet we engage with seem to be measured.

Universities record results, grades and credits. Political systems measure polls, attitudes, preferences, opinions and intentions. Credit cards monitor our spending habits, while shops observe spending trends and buying patterns. Financial systems feature currencies, investments, trends, budgets and accounts. We live by calendars and clocks that measure the passing of time, listen to weather forecasts that advise us about temperature, humidity and wind speed and direction and take readings of our own temperature, pulse and blood pressure. Travel is paced by distances, locations and directions; allowing us to monitor fuel consumption and rates of progress. When we escape to the realm of sport, we find that performance is tightly controlled and measures of goals, touchdowns, rushes, wins, assists, passes, interceptions and even possession rates are religiously recorded and monitored to facilitate improvement and determine efficiency.

We live in an era that is characterised by the proliferation of measured data. As a society we generate in excess of 2.5 exabytes of data daily (exabytes is a new term utilised to represent a quintillion bytes of data, that is 18 zeros worth). In real terms, the unprecedented flow of new data translates into 10 million Blu-ray discs stacked to the height of four Eiffel Towers, every single day; or to 250,000 libraries of congress filled with new data daily.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK and by Routledge publishers worldwide. Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower/Routledge Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM. To see project management books published by Gower and other Routledge publishers, click here. Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ.


 

About the Author


Darren Dalcher, PhD

Series Editor
Director, National Centre for Project Management
University of Hertfordshire, UK

 


Darren Dalcher
, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI, SFHEA is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK. He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London.

Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management. Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond.

Darren is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board. Prof Dalcher is an academic advisor for the PM World Journal. He can be contacted at d.dalcher2@herts.ac.uk.

To see other works by Prof Darren Dalcher, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darren-dalcher/.

 

 

Some differences for project managers…

FEATURED PAPER

Some differences for project managers working in supplier organizations and in owner organizations

By Alan Stretton

Sydney, Australia

 


TWO TYPES OF ORGANIZATIONS THAT UNDERTAKE PROJECTS

 From time to time various writers in the project management literature have distinguished between two types of organizations that undertake projects. I have called these project-based organizations, and production-based organizations. I borrowed from Cooke-Davies 2002 in describing them as such, and from Archibald et al 2012 (who use different descriptors) in defining them (e.g. Stretton 2015b)

  • Project-based organizations derive most (if not all) of their revenue and/or other benefits from creating and delivering projects / programs to external customers.
  • Production-based organizations derive most (if not all) of their revenue and/or benefits from producing and selling products and services. They utilize projects to create new, or improve existing, products and services; enter new markets; or otherwise improve or change their organizations.

Other writers have used different descriptors for these, as will be seen in a moment. However, comparatively little has been written about the very substantial differences for project managers who work in project-based organizations on the one hand, and in production-based organizations on the other.

One author who has done so is Taggart 2015. He describes the above two types of organizations as Supplier Organizations (SOs) and Owner Organizations (OOs) respectively. As is indicated in the title of this article, I propose to mainly use Taggart’s descriptors in the following, mainly because of their handy abbreviations.

Another author who has published work in this area is Lehmann 2016, who describes projects undertaken within these two types of organization as “customer projects”, and “internal projects”, respectively. Lehmann has drawn up a table of differences in the environment and the requirements that project managers are facing with these two different kinds of projects, and I will draw on this in the following enquiry about the nature of these differences, and some consequences.

I also note that my own direct experience has been exclusively in Supplier Organizations, and I will be drawing on this experience to some extent in the following. When it comes to Owner Organizations I can only quote other writers.

But first, we discuss an apparent imbalance in the literature regarding materials on these two types of organization.

APPARENT IMBALANCES IN THE LITERATURE

The project management literature tends to focus on OOs

It appears that the focus of the project management literature is primarily on owner organizations. As Taggart 2015 observed,

Conventionally, either directly or by implication, the project management bodies of knowledge focus on the role of the Owner Organization (OO)……

I had been broadly aware of this since the late 1960s, when I first read Cleland & King’s pioneering book on Systems Analysis and Project Management (Cleland & King 1968). This book was obviously highly relevant to defence-acquisition projects, but had little relevance for my organisation, Civil & Civic, which was a supplier organization in the building and construction domain. I remember thinking at the time that this was probably due to the different application areas being considered.

However, when I later read Kerzner’s classic book Project Management: A systems approach to planning, scheduling and controlling (Kerzner 1979), I began to realise that the focus of both books was on the owner organization.

In contrast, Civil & Civic was a supplier organization, so this recognition gave me some (preliminary) understanding of why a good deal of the material in both books was substantially irrelevant to us.

However, there appear be more project people practicing in SOs than in OOs

The following contention by Taggart really caught my eye.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Alan Stretton, PhD (Hon), Life Fellow of AIPM (Australia), is a pioneer in the field of professional project management and one of the most widely recognized voices in the practice of program and project management.   Long retired, Alan is still tackling some of the most challenging research and writing assignments; he is a frequent contributor to the PM World Journal. See his author profile below.


 

About the Author


Alan Stretton, PhD

Faculty Corps, University of Management
and Technology, Arlington, VA (USA)
Life Fellow, AIPM (Australia)

 


Alan Stretton
is one of the pioneers of modern project management. He is currently a member of the Faculty Corps for the University of Management & Technology (UMT), USA. In 2006 he retired from a position as Adjunct Professor of Project Management in the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia, which he joined in 1988 to develop and deliver a Master of Project Management program.  

to joining UTS, Mr. Stretton worked in the building and construction industries in Australia, New Zealand and the USA for some 38 years, which included the project management of construction, R&D, introduction of information and control systems, internal management education programs and organizational change projects. He has degrees in Civil Engineering (BE, Tasmania) and Mathematics (MA, Oxford), and an honorary PhD in strategy, programme and project management (ESC, Lille, France).

Alan was Chairman of the Standards (PMBOK) Committee of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) from late 1989 to early 1992. He held a similar position with the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), and was elected a Life Fellow of AIPM in 1996. He was a member of the Core Working Group in the development of the Australian National Competency Standards for Project Management. He has published over 170 professional articles and papers. Alan can be contacted at alanailene@bigpond.com.au.

To see more works by Alan Stretton, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alan-stretton/.

 

 

Environmental Mitigation Cost for Mining Road Construction in Indonesia

FEATURED PAPER

According to IFC Standard Compliances

By Arif Permana, CCP

Jakarta, Indonesia

 


ABSTRACT

Project and its environment are connected each other, including for mining activities that require land clearing for support facilities area such as access road. For minimizing negative impact from project activities to the environment, it is required regulation from government and financial institution that obligate integration between planning mitigation for environment which refers to available standard compliances with project plan. In this paper the Author described the application of environmental compliance standard published by IFC using project case study for mining road in Indonesia. Cost associated for environment mitigation based on IFC standard compliance presented in estimation process following GAO steps process for order of magnitude comparison with available database.

Keywords: environmental, IFC standard compliances, mining road construction project, dust control, noise control, land use and erosion control, waste water impact and sediment control, GAO cost estimation process, environmental mitigation cost

INTRODUCTION

In many countries, mining activities would affect the environment conditions in their vicinity from exploration to exploitation stage such as land clearing activity for roads, camps, processing plant and other facilities. This impact will have greater influence for forest environment and can’t be avoided since mining industry will take places mostly on this area. Road construction as one of mining key elements, damaging the forest since their location will lies over in length of forest footprint following the design requirements. Good road design will take into account this matter through the design process including additional cost for mitigation as the consequences, in order to have a minimum impact for forest destruction and the habitats. Generally the cost for environmental mitigation is not anticipated in common cost estimation process and put this cost as risk reserve. Therefore, it is very difficult to find environment cost record whereas cost for road directly connected with the environment. For Indonesia as the third rank of tropical forest in the World, mining activities either regulated or not regulated is one of operation industries that contribute to the forest destruction and required immediate action to prevent it from getting worst. One of significant action identified for prevention, is regulating mining activities by rules as mandatory condition, either by government (in this case the Indonesian Government) or by financial institution such as the World Bank. The term from the Indonesian Government will give any mining companies permit for land access and operation, while the World Bank through their International Finance Corporation (IFC) standard requirements for the access to investment capital. By using both strategies will encourage any mining companies apply environmental standards in their project investment process.

In this paper, the Author main target is giving brief description of IFC application in project cost limited for mining road during construction stage, as small contribution to all effort for problem solutions concerning mining and environmental problems. With project case study, the Author will provide answers for two specific research questions as follows:

  • What are the IFC standard compliances for mining road construction project?
  • How to calculate the cost of environmental mitigation for mining road construction project following IFC standard compliances.

IFC Standard Compliances for Mining Road Project

Brief Description of IFC Standard Compliances

IFC is a member organization of the World Bank members that focuses on the private sector for developing countries. IFC was founded in 1956 and currently has 184 member states including Indonesia with one main vision to ensure environmental sustainability.

IFC provides Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) guidelines that can be easily accessed on their website. There are general and specific EHS guidelines for several industries including mining which contains EHS elements with performance indicators and monitoring actions. Depending on the project conditions, local standards sometimes also used as reference for consideration because generally IFC requirements are always higher than these standards, which will affect the project cost (in this case standards published by the Ministry of Environment Indonesia).  

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author 


Arif Permana

Indonesia




Arif Permana
, CCP is a professional civil and cost engineer with extensive 20 years project experiences for infrastructures, telecommunication facilities, mining sectors and recently assigned to the design and construction of geotechnical investigation survey vessel. His interest is extended to environmental cost and engineering following the previous project with IFC environmental requirement from the World Bank, in addition to project management, project control, planning and scheduling, estimating, contract management civil engineering, marine engineering, and geotechnical investigation.

Arif can be contacted at ariffile@yahoo.com

 

 

Risk Management Strategy in Projects Inspired by the Systems Engineering Model

FEATURED PAPER

By Wantuir Felippe da Silva Junior

Brazil

 


ABSTRACT

This paper aims to demonstrate the use and benefits of a holistic, systemic and consistent risk management model starting from the deployment of the highest level uncertainties which surround a project, subordinating such uncertainties to a hierarchy by impact on the business, integrated solutions and operational actions of the project (in that order).

INTRODUCTION

It is recurring the great number of pseudo-risks identified and analyzed on several projects. The inadequate selection of risks hampers the capture of “authentic risks” which can effectively cause considerable impact on the goals of a given project. A significant factor that contributes negatively in this direction is the use of risk management as “crutch” for an inefficient project management. The lack of knowledge of basic concepts and foundations regarding “preventive intelligence” begins at the very top of organizations. This gap is not limited to the subject “risk”, being also connected to a established “communication model”, which often disregard apparently obvious small details which, in practice, are not as obvious as they appear to be.

The strategic business decisions, their deployment and communication, have a very high importance, long before a project is set up. The greater the distance between the strategic business decisions and the project, the higher will be the probability of emerging fragmented and isolated information created empirically by managers and project teams. This stems from the need of assuming or defining guiding information (when they do not exist) to build a minimal necessary boundary condition framework for the decision making throughout the project.

Business vision, value proposition, assumptions and constraints not properly communicated create interference and distortions within the communication and information exchange throughout the project’s organizational structure. Many project managers believe that some business decisions are project risks, starting thus a failed identification of “pseudo-risks” for the project. Failed because it is no longer possible to change a strategic decision already made.

The risk is in the uncertainty and the uncertainty is in the future. Therefore true risks are related to imagined or estimated events within circumstances and conditions outlined, which can encompass a trend of potential impact to the project. Thus from this train of thought we can say that business risks already analyzed, with a decision made, including definitions and actions agreed towards the project are actually “facts”, and no longer uncertainties in the future. It is appropriate to say that such a decision can jeopardize a project goal. It should be emphasized that the definition of “risk” is something quite different from the definition of facts which jeopardize the project. Of course, strategic decision-making happen (or should happen) before the validation of pacts and work agreements on a project. It should be noticed that before a decision is made it is possible to mentally build a scenario where a potential uncertain future event, after being judged and analyzed, generates a referential informational base that serves as foundation for future (post-decision) definitions, schedules and actions. Therefore, a decision at the strategic level, for example, unfolds as a constraint for the tactical or operational level (figure 1).

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


Wantuir Felippe da Silva, Jr.

Brazil

 


Wantuir Felippe da Silva Junior
has 27 years of experience in the aeronautics industry, with 17 years in project management activities. He has knowledge and practical experience adhering to the concepts and fundamentals of PRINCE2, PMI, IPMA, Agile Methods and Deming Cycle. Mr. da Silva is currently a consultant, mentor, instructor and head of PMO in Integrated Product Development at Embraer (DIP). He is also founder of GPSimples (http://www.gpsimples.com/), an entity whose focus is the qualification of people to the project environment.

Wantuir is creator of the methods:

  • Risk Strainer (a framework that facilitates segregation between risks and issues).
  • Lean Scope Overview (understanding, deploying and managing project scope),
  • Lean Risk Overview Matrix (project risk identification and management),
  • Lean Project Direction – LPD (Progress Management and Project Decisions),
  • E2I2 – Extreme Experience In Innovation (development of creative engineering solutions in product and service design),
  • Wandala (management of interests and deployment of project requirements),
  • Blended 7S Model       & TOC (strategic deployment for projects),
  • Spock Analysis (judgment and decisions associated with deviations in projects)

 

 

Changing the Code of Agile Promotion

FEATURED PAPER

How promotion of an ‘agile’ product redefines the meaning of project management planning

By Muhamed Abdomerovic, D. Eng., Civil

Kentucky, USA

 


Abstract

For a long time now, the understandings of project management planning concept has been enthusiastically embraced in big engineering and construction companies. However, the concept has been criticized by many in information technology and other new fast growing industries. While it is true that the concept has not been always properly presented and applied, the derivatives of the concept cannot be used for effective development and implementation of project management plan. Well, the confusion and polarized standings are significant; the successful applications of current project management planning, including applications in information technology, as well as the calls for ‘paradigm shift’ and replacement of the concept still exist.

But problem is that the promotion of a planning concept routinely contrasts the current project management planning by changing the meaning of its components.

Introduction

A short, but serious disagreement in the development and implementation of project management plan comes after steady requests for something ‘simple’ and ‘flexible’ to cope with ‘uncertainty’ in project management planning. It was a promise delivered by the ‘Critical Chain’, the book that divided the project management community and dominated project management scene for two or three years. But promise failed and the state of confusion has been replaced by current development and professionalization of project management planning and resistance to planning incompetence.

Narrative alternatives to interpretation of current project management planning will most likely stay for a while. Today’s promoters of ‘agile’ approach that redefines the meaning of basic components of current project management planning are the most recent example.

Let’s start with the introduction of ‘agile’ movement, by considering some thoughts from its ‘manifesto’, which summarizes the main attributes of ‘agile’ approach, (http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html, Retrieved 6/30/2013).

The manifest emphasis the ‘early and continuous delivery’ of software solution to customer; ‘frequently’, within ‘a couple of weeks to a couple of months’, where delivered software represents in the same time ‘the primary measure of progress’. However, if agile does not look far enough in advance then measure of progress is relative; actually it relates to increments of a solution that may be soon changed, or abolished. During its course of action the approach ‘welcomes changing requirements’, which may be the price for lack of visions or project planning as a whole. The manifest also highlights importance of continuous involvement of customer in incremental development of software, where ‘business people and developers must work together daily through the project’, in open-ended sessions. Such an approach shifts most of responsibility for a solution to customer, who must think what he/she really wants and whether she/he is he willing to trade continuous involvement for incremental and uncertain results. Probably the following statement of the manifest best summarizes its open-ended approach: ‘Simplicity – the art of maximizing the amount of work not done – is essential’.

Nicholson describes software development methodologies that ‘have been traced back to 1957 at IBM’s Service Bureau Corporation’. But after decades of application, the traditional project management planning is tagged today as ‘Waterfall’ or ‘predictive’ method and declared by some as inadequate for management of software development. As key reason for inadequacy, a ‘strict, rigid stepping from one stage to another in the process’ of software development is cited. Although the correctness of this view has never been proven, it resonated within the software development community and new concept with high-grade terms such as ‘Agile’ or ‘adaptive’ became popular.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author


Muhamed Abdomerovic

Kentucky, USA

 


Muhamed Abdomerovic
, D.Eng., Civil, specializing in project management. He has more than forty years of experience in the application of scientific principles to project management planning. He mastered project management through many capital projects with a total budget of 12.5 billion. In working on variety of projects in the information technology, construction, the process industry and the energy sectors, he has gained broad insight into the project management theory and practice.

Mr. Abdomerovic is currently an independent consultant. He was previously project planner with Vanderlande Industries, master scheduler with FKI Logistex’s and program manager with Luckett & Farley. Prior to these positions he worked with Energoinvest and was responsible for the design and implementation of systems for management of large-scale development projects. He began his project management career in Vranica as a construction manager.

Mr. Abdomerovic has been an active participant in the development of the project management profession and has published many professional journal articles on project scope, time, cost and information management. He has also published articles in six proceedings of Project Management World Congresses and has published four books. His current research activities cover several aspects of project management including process relationships, project management system logic and system approach to project management planning.

Mr. Abdomerovic joined The International Project Management Association in 1972. He graduated from the University of Sarajevo with the Diploma of Civil Engineer. He was consecutively recertified as a PMI Project Management Professional (PMP) from 1998 to 2010.

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/muhamed-abdomerovic/

 

 

Interview with Simon Buehring

 

FEATURED INTERVIEW

Interview with Simon Buehring

Managing Director
Knowledge Train

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewed by İpek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

 

Simon Buehring is the founder and Managing Director of Knowledge Train, an accredited PRINCE2 training provider based in the UK. Simon regularly offers training courses and PRINCE2 project management in the UK and abroad and writes a blog on these topics. For over 28 years, Simon has worked on projects and has managed projects for a wide range of organizations, both in the UK and internationally, including the BBC, HSBC and IBM.

 


 Ipek Sahra Özgüler (Özgüler):   Hi Simon. Welcome to PMWJ. Please tell us about your recent project ‘The challenges with agile’, published by Knowledge Train in March 2017.

Simon Buehring (Buehring):      The challenges with agile is a new ebook I developed to assist teams who are getting to grips with agile. It contains insights from 6 industry experts who share their most common agile challenges and suggestions on how to overcome them.

Özgüler:       What is the main objective of conducting this project?

Buehring:     As the Managing Director of Knowledge Train, an AgilePM training provider, I have noticed in recent years an increasing interest in learning how to manage agile projects. Agile is becoming more popular because organizations need to adapt to a fast-changing digital world.  Implementing agile methods inevitably comes with challenges, so many organizations are reluctant to embrace such a transition.

Novices can gain a better understanding of agile methods by hearing different perspectives from experienced agile practitioner. Every agile practitioner has an experience or a lesson to share. I wanted to gather a collection of these stories from experienced practitioners to develop this ebook.

Özgüler:       Who made contributions to this project?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 


 

About the Interviewer


İpek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

 


İpek Sahra Özgüler
graduated from the Istanbul University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. As a project manager, she has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014.

She has managed a variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), insurance (Euler Hermes), audit (Deloitte), telecommunication, ICT and aviation sectors and gained broader insights. In addition, she has worked as international correspondent for the PM World Journal since 2014.

İpek is based in Isanbul and can be contacted at ipeksahra@gmail.com. Her portfolio is published at the http://ipeksahra.strikingly.com/.

To view other works by Ms. Özgüler, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

 

Interview with Nedret Orbay

FEATURED INTERVIEW

Interview with Nedret Orbay

Co-Chair of TPYME
Turkish Professional Project Manager’s Institute

 












Interviewed by
İpek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

 


Ipek Sahra Özgüler (Özgüler): Dear Nedret, please tell us about yourself a little bit so PMWorld Journal readers get to know you?

Nedret Orbay (Orbay): I graduated from Hacettepe University as one of the very first computer Engineers in Turkey. After that, I have worked as system engineer, project manager, technical manager, regional manager, consultant either in public and private sector since graduation and took part in several national, international EU and World Bank projects successfully.

I am acting as consultant and managing partner in Alfa Bilgi Teknolojileri Yönetim Danışmanlık. I am also Vice President of NORM Eğitim Danışmanlık Derneği and Co-Chair of TPYME – Turkish Professional Project Manager’s Institute.

Özgüler When was TPYME (Turkish Professional Project Managers’ Institute) established? What is its vision and mission of this institute?

Orbay:         TPYME (TPPMI) was established unanimously during the convention of the National Project Management Professionals Conference (UPMK) (http://www.upmk.org/), first held on May 2010. TPPMI (http://www.tpyme.org/), is a Social Media and Solidarity Platform. It is also a program running under NORM, Association for Training and Consultancy (http://www.norm.org.tr/).

The institute is composed of professionals and peers, building recognition and reputation, collaborating, researching and creating awareness/standards and training, all based on qualification and volunteering.

The institute aims to: determine project management techniques and approaches suitable to the Turkish culture and traditions, validate and determine the reliability of global applications, support, defend and network for the establishement of legal frameworks for project management applications, support the development of project team members and companies in terms of project knowledge areas, determine professional principles and standards, and prepare, monitor and update certificates of recognition and reputation.

Özgüler:       What is your role at the TPPMI? What are the current activities of the institute?

Orbay:         I am the Co-Chair of the institute.

The institute organizes monthly coffee meetings for members, during which a key note speaker delivers a brief presentation followed by discussions. The main activity of the institute is to organize a yearly conference to promote sharing new applied ideas in the Turkish community and networking for all members of projects and teams. The institute also maintains a website.

Continue to work on the national standards with NORM, organising seminars and meetings about presenting and recognition of the National Project Manager Certificate both in public and private sectors. The National Project Manager Profession has been approved and published as a national standard in Official Gazette on 2013. The qualification framework of the standard also completed and approved on 2016. The certification process is planning to be started in 4th quarter 2017.

Organising trainings based on National Project Manager Standard and Qualifications.

More…

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About the Interviewer


İpek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

 


İpek Sahra Özgüler
graduated from the Istanbul University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. As a project manager, she has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014.

She has managed a variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), insurance (Euler Hermes), audit (Deloitte), telecommunication, ICT and aviation sectors and gained broader insights. In addition, she has worked as international correspondent for the PM World Journal since 2014.

İpek is based in Isanbul and can be contacted at ipeksahra@gmail.com. Her portfolio is published at the http://ipeksahra.strikingly.com/.

To view other works by Ms. Özgüler, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

 

Project Performance Review

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   Project Performance Review: Capturing the Value of Audit, Oversight, and Compliance for Project Success
Authors:        Alexia Nalewaik & Anthony Mills
Publisher:    Routledge / Taylor and Francis Group
List Price:     $90.00
Format: Hard cover, 90 pages
Publication Date:   2016    
ISBN: 978-1-4724-6140-7
Reviewer:     Diana Romagnoli, PMP
Review Date: 02/2017

 


Introduction

This is a small, short in duration hardback book but the content is powerful. The subject of project performance of audit, oversight and compliance is covered extremely well in my opinion. They have pulled back the layers of project performance review excellently.

Though this is a short book it is not a quick read. It is written to cover the subject without a lot of fluff! I would say it has an academic approach. They want you to really understand what this subject is all about and to go about it with the significance it deserves.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The structure for this book is excellent. The subject of each chapter allows the reader to know exactly the coverage of the topic. They spend over half the book presenting the workings of the review process. I really appreciated how they presented it by not overwhelming but stimulating you to think of the application on the types of projects the reader may be working.

Additionally the second half of the book, the Overview chapter, is touchpoint for PMs to get the authors view of the project management performance review process in a visual with section annotations. It is thoroughly covered and presented from their PM experience discussed previously.

Highlights

They know their subject. They use tested examples of situations that will certainly present themselves during these review efforts. They realistically prepare the PMs that will tackle these evaluations. They present their project review process with all the importance that it deserves: as a learning effort, for suggestions for process improvement, and for team improvement. They show you where in a review process issues worthy of audit may present themselves. They are thorough without boring the reader or giving them too much information. They assume the reader is intelligent and therefore it is a pleasure to read.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Diana Romagnol

Texas, USA

 




Diana Romagnoli
, MBA, PMP has 30 years’ experience in the health care industry. Diana lives in Texas and works nationwide for a large enterprise health system based in Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

 


Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

Ethics and Governance in Project Management

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Ethics and Governance in Project Management: Small Sins Allowed and the Line of Impunity
Author: Eduardo Victor Lopez/Alicia Medina
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price: $58.32
Format: Hard Cover 157 Pages
Publication Date: 2016     
ISBN: 13: 978-1-4987-4383-9
Reviewer: Lloyd Pollock, PMP
Review Date: April 2017

 


Introduction

Ethics and Governance in Project Management is about how bad ethical behavior by a Project Manager can impact project success. The author talks about, for example, how small sins that are allowed such as arriving to work 30 minutes late daily by the project manager will have an impact on the project team and eventually the project itself.

Then they go on to discuss Line of Impunity which will help managers to identify ethical fault lines when an employee(s), manager(s), department(s) are in violation of ethical standards. These ethical fault lines will be able to assist managers in finding the source of the unethical behavior and gaining control and guiding employees back under control of corporate ethical standards that are expected.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book has eight chapters. Chapter 1: Antecedents, this chapter introduces the many different sources of ethics and how we are influenced to either do what is right or wrong.

Chapter 2: Ethics, Chapter 3: Context, Chapter 4 Governance, these three chapters explain how our ethical beliefs in doing good or slightly bad are being influenced by various sources like social media or corporate culture. With chapter 4 Governance why ethical standards and principles are created to keep unethical behavior in check and the benefits.

Chapter 5 Small Sins Allowed and the Line of Impunity, Chapter 6 Ethical Issues and Ethical Dilemmas, Chapter 7: The Ethics Code. These three chapters provide definitions with examples of unethical behavior that some individuals may consider allowable in their corporate culture. Chapter 6, I found this would be an interesting subject as case studies were provided with questions by project team members.

Chapter 8: Final Words, provides a review of the book and how it is important in identifying and managing unethical behavior.

Highlights

Over all the book provides how a person’s ethics are influenced by their environment, such as influences from parents, friends, social media and culture. Why it is important for corporate Ethics policies to be developed and enforced by project managers. Along with case studies with follow up questions to assist with discussions on what is right or wrong with project team members.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Lloyd Pollock, PMP

Texas, USA

 


Lloyd Pollock
has extensive experience in the telecom industry working as a Network Design and Systems Engineer for the build out of the Sprint PCS Network to managing U.S. Department of State projects in Afghanistan, Iraq and Liberia. He has two Master’s degrees in Telecommunications Management and Computer/Information Systems Management from Webster University. He has over 20 years of experience covering all areas of a project from project team member to managing projects in hostile work environments.

Lloyd has extensive experience managing many domestic and global telecommunication systems deployments, IT and Land/Mobile Radio department management and Logistics. He has the project management experience to effectively manage highly complex technical projects any place in the world.

Lloyd can be contacted at lloydpollock1@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net

 

 

Leading in Uncertain and Complex Projects

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:   Leading in Uncertain and Complex Projects: Supporting Structures for Self Management
Author: Lars Marmgren & Mats Ragnarsson
Publisher: Studentlitteratur AB, Lund (Sweden)
List Price:   265 kr
Format: paperback, 168 pages
Publication Date:   April 2016      
ISBN: 978-91-44-11034-9
Reviewer:     Charlie Green, PMP
Review Date: April 2017

 


Introduction

This book “Leading in Uncertain and Complex Projects” looks at the problem of how companies often lead large and complex projects and their need for increased efficiency and control in the management of those projects, And the problems it raises where their methods and tactics often result in less control and efficiency.

The authors then present a different way of leading and managing projects. This new strategy is to allow projects to self-organize using a strategy called “game plan” that emphasizes cooperation and overlapping responsibilities for the work required to complete the project through a common dialog and common understanding of the project and its needs to create a common ground for the project.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into 9 chapters. The book starts out with an overview of the problem with traditional project management and the ways projects are managed by many organizations and the problem where managing around risks and minimizing their uncertainty will result in a successful project. Where actually the end result creates an organization that is dehumanizing and destroys the sense of belonging and that profit is its only objective.

The book then in subsequent chapters goes into looking at a different concepts of organizing and leading projects in different ways that will help project managers to lead their teams in self-organizing and allow their team members to take part in creating the goals and objectives and the course of action for organizing their own work while working with others to achieve the desired end results of the project.

Highlights

The game plan strategy presented in the book is not just theory, but the authors look at two major projects that used the strategy in accomplishing the successful results of those projects. One of the projects was a large construction project, and the other was for the development and testing of a pharmaceutical drug. The two project managers for those projects throughout the book provide examples of how they used the different strategies in their projects and their thoughts of those strategies.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer


Charlie Green, PMP

North Texas, USA

 

 

Charlie Green, PMP has worked as a project manager since 1985. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Texas at Dallas. He holds a Project Management Professional certification. And he currently manages software implementation projects in the Financial Services industry. Previously he has managed new product, business process improvement, business intelligence and system development projects in the financial, telecommunications, information technology industries and military. Charlie is retired from the U.S. Air Force Reserve following a 26 year Air Force career. Charlie is a member of the Dallas, Texas, USA PMI Chapter.

Charlie can be contacted at charlie.green01@gmail.com


Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the
PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact editor@pmworldjournal.net.