SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Welcome to the August PMWJ

Welcome to the August 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

and

The Resurgence of Experience & Wisdom

David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the August 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 49th edition continues to reflect our efforts to attract more authors and readers internationally; it contains 31 original articles, papers and other works by 42 different authors in 17 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

Last month I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should be formatted differently, should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents. Alan Stretton in Australia responded (see his letter to the editor this month) that I might better use the opportunity to mention any new trends or important issues that I’ve seen recently as journal editor. So this month I take a shot at that, taking my liberty to very briefly discuss a topic that is meaningful to me and, I think, important to the project management profession.

The Resurgence of Project Management Experience and Wisdom

I agree that innovation and the energy of young and new ideas, technologies, people and organizations are important, for positive change, growth and transformation. I agree that education, training, certifications and qualifications are also important for the project management profession, and especially for young and those new to the PM field. However, none of those things are so interesting to me without context and perspective. I learn from younger leaders and professionals, but nowhere near as much as I learn from older, more experienced and wiser experts. And recently, that knowledge is reflected in articles published in this journal.

Perhaps it is because I am older now myself, but when I attend PMI meetings or project management conferences, visit project management blogs and websites, or read many articles and papers, I learn too little. When I read an article, paper or book by Alan Stretton, Russ Archibald, Peter Morris, Hiroshi Tanaka, Rolf Lundin and other older project management experts and former leaders (many of whom are in their 80s or 90s), I learn something in every paragraph, often in every sentence. For example, read Alan’s series article this month (and every month over the last few years, for that matter) and the second edition paper by Russ Archibald and Steen Lichtenberg.

Over the last ten years, I’ve had opportunities on some high-level program management consulting assignments to work with Wayne Abba, Miles Shepherd and Russ Archibald. Wayne and Miles are in their early 70s; Russ is 94. All three have decades of program and project management experience and I learn something new and valuable every time we are together. They and other older experienced professionals understand important news, developments or changes when they see them, and what is less important. They understand the context and potential impact of change (or potential change) – on both organizations and the PM profession. Russ has 60+ years of experience and is still researching new topics and writing papers and books. He’s inspirational, but also producing some really good stuff!

I appreciate the growing recognition that “competence” is important, and should be part of the qualification process for project managers. But I also think that there is a growing recognition that true competence can only be proven with experience, and that experience is really valuable. In many industries, project managers are the most experienced leaders in an organization – for example, in engineering, construction, petrochemicals, automotive, aerospace, mining, energy and many others, even many involving advanced technologies. The same is true of the project management profession. Former PM leaders are still experts. Like retired generals, older and retired project managers and PM experts are a wealth of knowledge. We need more of them to share their experience, knowledge and wisdom with the rest of us.

I don’t mean to disparage or discount the value of younger project managers, researchers or leaders, but for me, I’m just saying…

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal, which again contains some interesting and outstanding works…

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj35-Jun2015-Pells-PHOTO
David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL
Texas, USA

flag-usa




David L. Pells
is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association. Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government. David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA. He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

Enterprise-Wide PBM Methodologies

SERIES ARTICLE

Enterprise-Wide Project Business Management Methodologies and the PMO

Series on Project Business Management and the PMO

By Darrel G. Hubbard, PE
President, D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC
California, USA

and

Dennis L. Bolles, PMP
President, DLB Associates, LLC
Michigan, USA


A situation frustrating and plaguing executive management within many enterprises is their inability to adequately control resources, materiel, and facilities when managing a range of projects. This commonly results from the enterprise lacking a system of documented, formal, simple, and properly integrated project-portfolio/project-program/project policies, standards, methodologies, processes, procedures, and practices, which support the safe, prudent, strategically-focused, and cost-effective business management of the enterprise’s projects.

Most enterprises recognize the management value and usefulness of the Project Management Institute’s (PMIâ) and other international project management organizations’ standards and guides in addressing this issue. However, executives at all levels still struggle with how to implement those professional standards and guides within their own enterprises. Many executives view the PMI and other international standards as methodologies; this is not the case. Those standards are only intended to serve as the basis for developing an enterprise’s own portfolio/program/project policies, standards, and methodologies.

Understanding Project Business Management Methodology Development

This article discusses at a summary level how an Enterprise-level Project Business Management Organization can support the enterprise in developing an overall project management system of six major components. As practitioners and PMO managers, we need to understand the meaning of those component terms, within the context of the project management discipline, to more effectively employ them and to communicate to executive management their particular meaning and their functioning when managing projects in a business environment.

A System, in the project business management setting, can be seen as an integrated structured set of interconnected, interacting, interdependent, and interrelated components forming an intricate whole, which has inputs, outputs, and feedback mechanisms and is created to accomplish defined objectives or results in the enterprise’s management of its projects. Each project management system has defined and maintainable relationships among its major components of policies, standards, methodologies, processes, procedures, and practices, and, therefore, the whole operates better than the basic sum of its components.

Project business management Policies are the foundation of any system for project management and are the formally prepared, and management issued, statements concerning the enterprise’s governing or guiding principles, which are stated courses of action to be taken by the enterprise. Established policies are considered expedient, prudent, and advantageous by an enterprise’s executives and are intended by them to influence and determine future decisions and actions in the management of the enterprise’s portfolios, programs, and projects.

The enterprise’s Policies are commonly addressed by developing supporting Standards. A Standard, within the discipline of project management, establishes a model that provides for the common and repeated use of rules, guidelines, or operational characteristics when performing activities or obtaining results in managing portfolios/programs/projects. It is developed through consensus and promulgated by a recognized authority such as PMI, or a corporate executive, and is aimed at the achievement of an optimum degree of performance and outcomes in a project business management context. A third party professional standard can either be adopted as is by an enterprise, or it can be converted into an enterprise specific standard. In either case, those standards need to be operationally translated into a set of enterprise specific Methodologies for use by the enterprise in managing its portfolios/programs/projects.

A Methodology is an organized body of intra-related business management methods to be employed and followed in the project business management of the enterprise’s portfolios/programs/projects. Here a Method is a specific group of processes, procedures, and/or practices for attaining particular outcomes or objectives in the management of a portfolio/program/project. A Process within any particular project business management Method is a higher-level series or set of interrelated actions, activities, and rules performed to achieve a pre-specified set of outcomes, results, or services, when managing a portfolio/program/project. Each process is normally implemented by developing and issuing one or more implementing Procedures and Practices.

A project business management Procedure is a systematic presentation of instructional material that gives a series of steps to be followed in a definitive and prescribed order to accomplish a specific task, or set of tasks within a Process, during the enterprise’s management of a portfolio/program/project. A specific implementing Practice within the project business management discipline is an established way of doing things developed through, and documented based upon, experience and knowledge. It is a specific set of project business management actions that contributes to the execution of a project business management process or procedure and it may employ one or more techniques, tools, and/or templates.

For most enterprises, translating the PMI’s A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, The Program Management Standard, The Portfolio Management Standard, and Implementing Organizational Project Management: A Practice Guide, and other non-United States standards and guides into enterprise specific Standards and methodologies is a daunting task. Our research shows this task is most effectively performed by a Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) positioned at the executive-level of the enterprise. A properly chartered and established PBMO has the required capabilities to translate the concepts and processes within those standards and guides and to integrate them with the enterprise’s operations, business development, and services methods and processes.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: Bolles and Hubbard are the authors of The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management (PBMconcepts, 2014); A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts (PBMconcepts, 2012); and A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts (PBMconcepts, 2016). This series of articles is based on their books, research, courses and executive consulting experience.


 

About the Authors

pmwj42-Jan2016-Bolles-BOLLES
Dennis
L. Bolles, PMP

Michigan, USA

flag-usa

 


Dennis Bolles
, PMP, President – DLB Associates, LLC, has over forty-five years of experience in multiple industries providing business and project management professional services. He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their business strategic objectives with the analysis of their business process improvement needs and development of business and project management capabilities.

He has been a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI) since 1985, received his PMP® certification in 1986 (#81), and is a founding member of the PMI Western Michigan Chapter, serving on its Board of Directors and in several positions since its 1993 inception.

Bolles performs speaking engagements and assists Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) start-up teams begin the planning and implementation processes; conducts on-site organizational project management capability assessments; provides virtual and periodic on-site support for development of business and project management methodologies, policies, procedures, processes. systems, tools, and templates for organizational governance and corporate strategy; assists in the implementation of a project business management methodology that integrates strategic planning, business objective development, portfolio management, program management, and project management processes to achieve strategic objectives and maximize operational efficiency enterprise-wide through the development and management of Project Management Organizations.

Bolles served as the PMI Standards Project Manager who led the project core team to a successful completion and on-time delivery of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition in 2004. He has served on and has contributed to multiple PMI Standards bodies over the past 20 years.

He is a published author of many project management articles, is a PMI Congress/ Symposium/Chapter speaker, and author of Building Project Management Centers of Excellence, AMACOM, NY, 2002. He is the co-editor of The PMOSIG Program Management Office Handbook, JRoss, 2010. He is the co-author with Darrel G. Hubbard of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2012 and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2015. He can be contacted at [email protected] and at LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/dlballc01. Visit the http://www.pbmconcepts.com/ for information about current and future book projects.

To view other works by Dennis Bolles, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darrel-g-hubbard/

 

pmwj42-Jan2016-Bolles-HUBBARD
Darrel G. Hubbard, P.E.

California, USA

flag-usa

 


Darrel G. Hubbard
is President of D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC providing executive consulting and assessment services. He has over 50 years of experience in consulting, line management, and technical positions. He has served as a corporate executive officer; managed the due diligence processes for numerous mergers and acquisitions; managed information technology, proposal, accounting, and project control organizations; was a program manager on engineering projects; was a project manager on commercial projects; and a designated “key person” under government contracts. He has also held executive positions in, and was professionally licensed in, the securities and insurance industries.

He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their enterprise’s strategic business and tactical objectives. He provides analysis of their management structures, business processes, general business operations, and project management capabilities, while supplying specific recommendations on business, methodology, and process improvements. Mr. Hubbard also assists companies, as an out-side third party, with the intricacies of the due diligence process in their merger and acquisition activities. He also supports companies in the managerial development and establishment of their Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) and provides work­shops and seminars focusing on the business management aspects of project management.

Mr. Hubbard holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics with a minor in chemistry from Minnesota State University at Moorhead. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Control Systems in California. Mr. Hubbard joined the Project Management Institute (PMI) in 1978 (#3662), is a charter member of the PMI San Diego Chapter, and was deputy project manager for the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition ANSI Standard by PMI. He was the Exhibitor Chairperson for the 1993 PMI North American Congress/Seminar/Symposium, is a published author of many articles, a presenter at several PMI Congresses and other Project Management Symposiums, and a guest speaker at PMI and IIBA Chapter meetings. Darrel is also a Life-Member of the International Society of Automation (ISA).

He is a contributing author to The AMA Handbook of Project Management, AMACOM, 1993 and The ABCs of DPC: A Primer on Design-Procurement-Construction for the Project Manager, PMI, 1997. He is the co-author with Dennis L. Bolles of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of Enterprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – PBMconcepts, MI, 2012 and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2016. He can be contacted at [email protected] and LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/DarrelGHubbard Visit www.PBMconcepts.com for information about current and future book projects.

To view other works by Darrel Hubbard, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darrel-g-hubbard/

 

Defining and Using Risk Appetite

SERIES ARTICLE

Risk Doctor Briefing

Dr. Ruth Murray-Webster

United Kingdom


There is a growing recognition that a proper understanding of risk appetite is a vital influence on organisational performance. This is supported by regulators who expect boards to understand and express their risk appetite, and some senior executives in a range of public and private sector organisations are already taking a lead in this area.

This is a good start, but there is still confusion about how to define risk appetite and then use it to ensure that the organisation doesn’t take on too much risk (or too little).

Our book “A Short Guide to Risk Appetite” * (Hillson & Murray-Webster, 2012) attempts to dispel that confusion and provide clear advice on the topic.

There are four important factors to consider when defining risk appetite:

1  Conversation. This must be two-way, listening as well as talking, building respect for alternative perspectives. Different views on risk appetite are inevitable, driven by people’s inherent propensities for taking risk, and by their previous experiences of risk-taking that influence their perceptions of risk. This diversity is valuable, and open and honest conversation will enable differing perspectives to be aired and discussed.

2  Challenge. Diversity of views on risk appetite is normal, unless group dynamics such as groupthink are affecting the way people perceive risk, or if the group has worked together for so long that they have unconsciously adopted a cohesive approach. Challenge from a neutral facilitator will help decision-makers to consider alternative scenarios, and support open discussion of how much risk would be too much in the situation.

3  Cascade. Once senior decision-makers have a shared understanding of risk appetite for the whole organisation, this can be translated into measurable risk thresholds at the level of strategic objectives, as well as for operations, programmes and projects. Some advisors think that risk thresholds at lower levels in an organisation can be derived automatically using a formula, but this is rarely the right approach. Open conversation and neutral challenge will still be needed during the cascade process.

4  Controls. Finally, leading indicators are needed, not just lagging ones, to enable managers to know when current levels of risk exposure might breach risk thresholds. This might occur if risk exposure reaches a level where the outcome could not be tolerated, or risk exposure might get to a point where investing additional resources is no longer warranted. Where upper or lower risk thresholds are in danger of being breached, senior decision-makers will need to adopt a different risk attitude to ensure that risk exposure remains within acceptable limits. This will require the same level of conversation, challenge and cascade as the initial definition of risk appetite.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author


pmwj49-Aug2016-Murray-Webster-PHOTO2

Dr. Ruth Murray-Webster

United Kingdom

 

 UK small flag 2


Dr Ruth Murray-Webster
is Director of the Change Portfolio for Associated British Ports Ltd. Prior to taking up this role in 2015, Ruth has 30 years of experience in a series of roles to enable organisations in most sectors to deliver change objectives including as Director of the Risk in the Boardroom practice for KPMG LLP in the UK and 10 years as a Director of Lucidus Consulting Ltd.

Along this journey, Ruth researched organisational change from the perspective of the recipients of change for an Executive Doctorate at Cranfield School of Management. She has also taken a keen interest in risk management along the way, co-authoring four books on the people aspects of risk management with David Hillson (Understanding and Managing Risk Attitude, 2007; Managing Group Risk Attitude, 2008; A Short Guide to Risk Appetite, 2012), and with Penny Pullan (A Short Guide to Facilitating Risk Management, 2011).

Ruth was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Association for Project Management in 2013 for her services to risk and change.

Dr Ruth Murray-Webster can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Experiences Using Next Generation Management Practices

SECOND EDITION

The Future Has Already Begun!

Keynote paper presented at the 9th World Congress of the International Project Management Association, Florence, Italy, June 1992

By Russell D. Archibald
Archibald Associates
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

and

Dr. Steen Lichtenberg
Lichtenberg and Partners
Denmark


ABSTRACT

The world today requires from managers a holistic, broader view, and requires using management concepts and practices that are more realistic, provide faster responses to changes and uncertainties, and that can handle turbulence and fuzziness. These practices must reach across artificial boundaries, including political, technological, functional, economic, bureaucratic, cultural, and mental-such as the boundary between logic and intuition (right and left brain). Some of the likely future management principles that have been predicted and described in past years are already in practical use by many senior managers in various countries.

This paper presents personal views and experiences as seen from Northern Europe and the United States. Some important trends toward tomorrow’s management practices are highlighted and illustrated through case examples involving managers who have already applied such new and unconventional principles with success.

UNCERTAINTY AND CHANGE REQUIRE A NEW MANAGEMENT MODEL

The accelerating rate of change in all aspects of this world is commonly recognized, and needs no extensive discussion here. Yet our approach to planning and controlling complex projects has traditionally been to eliminate uncertainty and change from our projects, or at least treat them as if changes will not occur. Witness the overwhelming dependence on project planning, scheduling, monitoring and control tools that require single, fixed time and cost estimates “deterministic” methods, in the words of the mathematicians. As stated in a recent book, “We often prefer to do it definite although definitely wrong rather than to do it approximately right.”i

Probabilistic approaches, and the use of “fuzzy logic”, are now beginning to make significant inroads in project management practices around the world, as indicated by the announcement by several project management software vendors of personal computer packages that enable evaluation of PERT/CPM/PDM networks and schedules on a probabilistic basis.ii After the first experiences with the initial PERT approach to probabilities, which were not widely accepted, one of the first really useful packages was PGLTIMING, available since 1979 from Denmark. It calculates and ranks activities and factors of uncertainty according to their relative influence on the overall project uncertainty. A more recent example, named PLANii, identifies the “high risk path” in addition to the traditional “critical path”. Cost engineers are beginning to use range estimatingiv to measure cost uncertainty and risk.

Fuzzy logic has been used to control cement plant operations in Denmark, to decide when to replace cutting tools in French industry, to make regional planning decisions regarding facilities in Poland, and it is reported to be an infatuation in product design in Japan: “Digital computers operate in a precise world: Everything is on or off, yes or no, black or white. But fuzzy logic can accommodate a more complex reality. It lets computers deal with shades of gray concepts such as about, few, many, and almost. Paradoxically, this makes fuzzy logic faster at precise tasks such as focusing cameras. In short, it is Japan’s next weapon in both high and low tech industries. And it works with less software.”v Equivalent benefits have been obtained in Europe by using intelligent approximations in project planning.

To highlight only a few aspects of traditional project management methods that justify our claim that a new model is required, based on a new logic, consider these points vi

• Monolithic Versus Selective Detail: Traditionally, large amounts of detail developed monolithically for all aspects of a project are viewed as highly desirable, yet typically the areas of greatest uncertainty may not be treated at all because they are of a subjective nature. The new logic focuses primarily on the uncertainties and requires detailing them. The approach described later produces more realistic estimates based on 100 critical items and factors than conventional estimates based on 1,000 items in a project.

• Priority To Easy Items Versus the Important Ones: While all agree that priority should be given to the most important items, in traditional project planning and estimating the reverse is usually true. The important subjective factors are often those with the greatest uncertainty, and the new logic requires giving them priority over the easy, material, more certain ones.

• Interrelated Areas Are Treated Separately: Time, cost, resources, and technical performance are closely interrelated at the task, subproject and project levels. Yet traditionally, plans and schedules are prepared (often by scheduling specialists) separately from cost estimates (often prepared by specialized, even certified, cost engineers). Both of these areas are traditionally widely separated from the technology or product of the project, and they in turn are far from the sales and marketing people. The new logic is to keep interrelated areas interrelated, and avoid disturbing the whole, using the systems approach. Figure 1 summarizes some of the key factors involved in the old and the new logic.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th World Congress of the International Project Management Association held in Florence, Italy in June 1992. It is republished here with the authors’ permission.


 

About the Authors

pmwj49-Aug2016-Archibald-PHOTO1 RUSS
Russell D. Archibald

Archibald Associates
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

flag-usa

Mexico - small




Now 92, with careers spanning more than 70 years, Russ Archibald has had broad international experiences in piloting and designing aircraft and corporate engineering, operations, program and project management. His three project management related careers have been Military/Aerospace (19 years), Corporate Engineer & Executive (17 years), and Management Consultant (33 years to date). Russ has consulted to a wide variety of large and small organizations in 16 countries and he has resided in the USA, France, Mexico, Venezuela, Panama Canal Zone, and Peru with Marion, his wife of 70 years. For the past 23 years they have resided in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico.

Russ is founding member number 6 of the Project Management Institute/PMI, which today has 470,000 members in 205 countries and territories. He presented the first paper, Planning, Scheduling and Controlling the Efforts of Knowledge Workers, at the formation meeting of PMI in 1969, and was President of the PMI Southern California Chapter in 1991-2, founding member of the PMI Mexico City Chapter in 1996, and in 2006 was awarded the PMI Jim O’Brien Lifetime Achievement Award. A PMI Fellow and Certified Project Management Professional, he co-authored with Prof. Dr. Jean-Pierre Debourse the 2011 PMI research report Project Managers as Senior Executives. He was also a founding member in 1970 and is an Honorary Fellow of the Association of Project Management (APM/IPMA-UK).

Russ is co-author with his grandson Shane Archibald of Leading and Managing Innovation-What Every Executive Team Must Know about Project, Program & Portfolio Management (2nd edition CRC Press 2015, 1st edition 2013 also published in Italian, Portuguese and Spanish); author of Managing High Technology Programs and Projects (3rd edition Wiley 2003, also published in Italian, Russian, and Chinese), and co-author of Network Based Management Information Systems (PERT/CPM) (Wiley 1967). He has contributed chapters to 15 books edited by others, and presented 88 papers at many PMI, IPMA and other conferences in many countries. He holds BS (U. of Missouri 1948) and MS (U. of Texas 1956) degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Russ was awarded an honorary Ph.D. in Strategy, Program, and Project Management from the Ecole Superieure de Commerce de Lille in Lille, France in 2005. See russarchibald.com. Russ can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj49-Aug2016-Archibald-PHOTO2 STEEN
Dr. Steen Lichtenberg

Denmark

 

flag-denmark




Dr. Steen Lichtenberg
, PMI mb. no. 661, hon mb. & former president of IPMA. As an international management and risk management consultant, Steen is recognized as a leading researcher and expert practitioner in risk management. He consults, writes and speaks widely on the topic and has made an innovative contribution to the field, the Successive Principle, today internationally widespread.

Steen Lichtenberg has 40 years’ experience in research and risk management consulting providing support to public and private clients in many major industry sectors, including construction, telecommunications, transport, energy, IT, defense and government. Steen´s input includes in depth project analyses including accurate statistical prognoses of the end results as well as further possibilities of optimization and provisions against risks. He works both on ad hoc tasks or on implementation.

Steen’s contributions to the management discipline over many years have been recognized by a National Gold medal, and honorary membership of IPMA. His work has led to establishment of a governmental sponsored research program, Concept, in Norway which since 2002 aims to follow and further improve the basis for large public decisions.

Dr. Lichtenberg can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Achieve CAPM Exam Success

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj49-Aug2016-Arroyo-BOOKBook Title: Achieve CAPM Exam Success, Second Edition: A Concise Study Guide and Desk Reference       
Authors: Diane Altwies, PMP, Janice Preston, PMP, and Frank Reynolds, CAPM
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing, Inc
List Price:   $69.95 USA
Format: Soft Cover
Publication Date: Jan. 2014
ISBN: 978-1-60427-087-7
Reviewer: Jennifer Arroyo, PMP
Review Date: Aug 2016


Introduction

Companies in the 21st century face tremendous challenges in innovation and the changing nature of daily business operations. Need for project management has grown exponentially in every industry. By becoming certified in project management, a young business professional can show commitment to the project management profession.

The entry-level CAPM® certification presents a fundamental understanding of the knowledge, terminology, and processes of successful project management. As PMI suggests on its website, “Regardless of your career stage, the Certified Associate in Project Management CAPM® is an asset that will distinguish you in the job market and enhance your credibility and effectiveness working on — or with — project teams….. CAPM® recognizes your knowledge of the profession’s preeminent global standard so that you’ll stand out to employers and be poised to move ahead.”

The certification exam has 150 multiple choice questions, and examinees have three hours to complete it. The purpose of this book is to, “provide the reader with a consolidated source of material closely related to the PMBOK® Guide – Fifth Edition (2013).” As recommended by the authors it should be used in conjunction with PMI PMBOK® Guide to comprehend the massive amount of knowledge effectively.

Overview of book’s structure

This book is well organized and has a conversational approach to the fundamental knowledge and concepts of PMI’s PMBOK® Guide – Fifth Edition (2013).  It progressively breaks down the content into three parts: Study Tips & key Math Formulas, PMBOK® Guide Process Group & Knowledge Areas Overview, and contains practice questions for exam preparation.

The detailed key features delivered by this book include:

  • Reader gets free online access to over 1000 questions enabling the reader to perform practice tests by each of the 10 knowledge areas and/or simulate actual 150 question exam, with incorrect answer feedback.
  • It contains a pre-assessment test to help the reader develop a focused study plan and manage study time effectively and a post-assessment test to evaluate reader’s readiness for the actual exam.
  • It uses a sample project case study throughout the book to demonstrate how to apply tools and techniques covered in the PMBOK® Guide and exercises to further develop reader’s knowledge and competency.
  • It presents key definitions and tips to improve reader’s understanding, and sample end-of-chapter CAPM® exam questions and answers.
  • PMBOK® Guide Process Group & Knowledge Areas Overview include the following:

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj49-Aug2016-Arroyo-PHOTO
Jennifer Arroyo

Texas, USA

 

flag-usa


Jennifer Arroyo 
received her M.B.A. degree in Marketing from State University of New York at Albany.  Jennifer joined PMI’s Dallas Chapter in 2015.  She volunteered and served as supporting Book Review Coordinator as part of the professional development and social media marketing initiative.

Ms. Arroyo has more than 8 years of project management experience in the Global Business Marketing, Talent Development, and Financial Services industries. With her diverse global and regional PM leadership experiences, Ms. Arroyo is passionate about helping clients and businesses to achieve branding and PM success by effective social media project management.

Contact Jennifer Arroyo via [email protected]

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

PMP Exam Review Guide

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj49-Aug2016-Said-BOOKBook Title: Project Management Professional Exam. Review Guide. Third Edition
Author: Kim Heldman, PMP®; Vanina Mangano, PMP®; and Bett Fedderesen, PMP®.
Publisher: SYBEX – Wiley
List Price:   $30.00
Format: Soft cover
Publication Date: April 2016
ISBN: 978-1-119-17972-6
Reviewer: Masood Said
Review Date: July 2016

 


Introduction

This book is about the PMP® certification exam. It has been written for those who would be interested in appearing for the PMP® certification exam. It follows the same path as the PMBOK Guide 5th Edition ® which is a PMI publication and is considered a textbook for the exam.

However there is a difference. PMBOK® reading is based on chapters as laid out in the book, which are: First 3 chapters are about concepts related to project management, and from chapter 4 to 13 are related to the 10 knowledge areas (Integration, Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, HR, Communication, Risk, Procurement and Stakeholders). This book follows a different pattern. It follows the five process groups: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling and Closing. This means that it follows the processes as one would follow while doing an actual project. Interesting indeed!

The book is well written, easy to understand and can be very useful in preparing for the PMP certification exam. It also has 230 review questions with answers and explanations.

Overview of Book’s Structure

One interesting fact about the book is that it does not follow the same pattern as the PMBOK®. It is structured on the 5 process groups. I.e. Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. The book has been divided into 6 chapters and an appendix at the end.

These Chapters are:

Chapter 1 – Project Foundation

Chapter 2 – Initiating the Project

Chapter 3 – Planning the Project

Chapter 4 – Executing the Project

Chapter 5 – Monitoring and Controlling the Project

Chapter 6 – Closing the Project

Appendix – Answers to review questions

Brief contents of the Chapters are given below:

Chapter 1: Project Foundation

The authors describe the essentials of Managing Projects. Topics include Defining a Project, Defining Project Management, Identifying Project Management Skills, Understanding Project Environment, Understanding Project Life Cycle and Project Management Processes, Recognizing Professional and Social Responsibility. This Chapter has 15 Review Questions.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj49-Aug2016-Said-PHOTO
Masood Said, PMP

Lahore, Pakistan

flag-pakistan

 


Engr. Masood Said
, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, BS.C (Mech. Engr.; MS-IT; EMBA-HR Mngt.) is a Mechanical Engineer with over 35 years of Project Management Experience. He has worked in Pakistan and the Middle East on various Oil and Gas projects. He has been a member of PMI since 2002. Presently he is a trainer for PMP®; PMI-RMP®; PMI-ACP® certification courses. He also advises companies on optimization and improvement in processes. Based in Lahore, Pakistan, he also travels to Dallas, Texas on a frequent basis.

Email address: [email protected]

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Achieve Business Analysis Certification: A Concise Guide

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj49-Aug2016-Holderman-BOOKBook Title:   Achieve Business Analysis Certification: A Concise Guide to PMI-PBA®, CBAP®, and CPRE Exam Success
Author: Klaus Nielsen, PMP, PMI-PBA, PMI-ACP, CPRE-FL
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $69.95
Format: Softcover
Publication Date:   2016    
ISBN: 978-1-60427-111-9
Reviewer: Sandy Schmidt, PMP
Review Date: July 2016

 


Introduction

In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on business analysis certification. The three major business analysis certification exams are:

  • PMI-PBA® , offered by the Project Management Institute
  • CBAP®, offered by the International Institute of Business Analysis
  • CPRE, offered by the International Requirements Engineering Board

More and more organizations are seeing advantages to have certified business analysts, and more and more individuals are seeking out these certifications.Preparatory classes and “boot camps” can be expensive, so many individuals prefer to prepare for these exams on their own. Also, by self-studying, they can work at their own pace and according to their own schedule. This book can certainly help in that effort!

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is broken down into six parts.

Part 1 consists of an overview of the business analysis certifications, some study tips and how to pass the PMI-PBA® exam (much of which also applies to the CBAP® and CPRE exams), an explanation of the organizational need for business analysts, and pre-test knowledge assessments for the PMI-PBA®, CBAP®, and CPRE certifications.

Part 2 contains chapters covering the following domains: Needs Assessment Domain, Planning Domain, Analysis Domain, Traceability and Monitoring Domain, and Evaluation Domain. For each domain, there is a list of terms to know, an introduction to the domain, an explanation of each area within the domain, a chapter summary, and five test questions and answers relating to the domain.

Part 3 contains the PMI-PBA® knowledge skills, tools, and techniques; professional ethics and conduct standards; the relationship between the PMI-PBA® and PMBOK® Guide; Agile methodologies and the Agile Manifesto, and CBAP® and CPRE knowledge areas and alignment.

Part 4 contains an overview of the CBAP® exam and the BABOK® Guide, and how they align with the PMI-PBA®. Again, for those studying for the CBAP®, I highly recommend obtaining a copy of the BABOK® prior to studying for that exam, as well as some supplementary study material specific to the CBAP®. Also contained in Part 4 is an introduction to the CPRE, as well as a table of how the areas of the CPRE align with the PMI-PBA®.

Part 5 is a sample PMI-PBA® practice exam.

Part 6 contains glossary and acronyms, as well as a bibliography.

Highlights

There was more extensive treatment of material needed to pass the PMI-PBA® exam than the CBAP® and CPRE exams. As someone who has obtained the CBAP® certification, I would recommend that in addition to IIBA’s BABOK® (Business Analysis Body of Knowledge), an individual also study some CBAP® specific material as well as this guide.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj49-Aug2016-Schmidt-PHOTO
Sandy Schmidt, PMP

Texas, USA

flag-usa


Sandy Schmidt
is a member of the PMI Dallas, PMI Fort Worth, and IIBA Fort Worth Chapters. She has served as Secretary and Vice President of Education on the IIBA Fort Worth Board of Directors. She is currently a Principal Systems Analyst at Sirius XM Connected Vehicle Services in Irving, TX, where she has worked since 2012. She has over 20 years of Information Technology experience in Business Analyst, Systems Analyst, Project Manager, and Consultant roles. Her experience spans the property and casualty insurance, transportation, taxation, financial services, and vehicle telematics industries. She always enjoys new opportunities, people, and challenges.

She is originally from Detroit, Michigan, but moved to Southern California as a teenager and graduated from high school there. She earned her BS in Management from Pepperdine University and an MBA in Information Systems from California State University at Los Angeles. She relocated to Dallas/Fort Worth with a former employer. She has been a PMP since 2002, a CBAP since 2011, a CSM since 2012, a PMI-PBA since 2015, and obtained her CSPO certification earlier this year. She is also a SAFe Agilist and a CPCU (Certified Property and Casualty Underwriter). When not learning new things herself, she enjoys coaching, teaching, and mentoring others.

Sandy can be contacted at [email protected] Editor’s note:

This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]

 

 

Achieve Business Analysis Certification

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj49-Aug2016-Holderman-BOOKBook Title: Achieve Business Analysis Certification
Author: Klaus Nielsen, PMP, PMI-PBA, PMI-ACP, CPRE-FL
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   US $69.95
Format: Softcover
Publication Date:   2016    
ISBN: 13: 978-1-60427-111-9
Reviewer: John Holderman
Review Date: July 1016

 


Introduction

This book provides in great detail; strategies, techniques and tools for requirements management. It links the various areas to the PMBOK so project managers without strong requirements gathering skills can increase their understanding and apply these new skills to achieve greater success.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book is broken down into 6 parts. Part 1 is a general overview, study tips and pretests. Part 2 breaks down the Domains; Needs Assessment, Planning, Analysis, Traceability and Monitoring and Evaluation. Part 3 applies to the Knowledge, Skills, Methodologies and Standards. Part 4 shows how this book aligns with the IIBA CBAP and the IREB CPRE knowledge areas. Part 5 is a practice exam and Part 6 is the Appendices.

Throughout the book Klaus provides diagrams, tables of information and drawings to help the reader connect all the dots. Many of these additions explain relationships between the various types of project methodologies. Many of these are examples of tools and others give insight to cultural dynamics.

Highlights

In Part I, there are three pretests that give you a great perspective of where you stand, knowledge wise, before you get in to the book. The book then takes you through a great learning process where each chapter builds upon the last.

In Part II, the author breaks down each of the five domains with an introduction, a business or value connection, an action and a validation phase. He relates the PMI-PBA practices directly to the PMBOK and Agile practices. Each chapter has a posttest with an answer key for you to assess what you’ve learned. Part III provides insight to the application of the knowledge learned in Part II and adds to it.

Part III also provides a great section on Ethics and Standards of Conduct. Part IV discusses the BA from the IIBA and IREB perspectives and how they align to the material learned in the previous chapters.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj49-Aug2016-Holderman-PHOTO
John Holderman

Texas, USA

flag-usa

 


John Holderman
has worked in project management since 1997 with his most recent work in program management controls and reporting. John has managed the global implementation of UNIX server farms used in telecommunications and large, complex telephone switching systems. As a member of a new product introduction team he guided deployment team readiness and worked closely with engineering teams to ensure the product and customers were ready.

John has supported many global communications system deployments, has been an integral part of two electro-mechanical to digital telephone system conversions, authored policy documents, installation and commisioning manuals and has created many of his own tools used to manage projects. John’s technical background, along with his international project management experience, gives him a unique ability to very effectively manage highly complex technical projects.

John can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Systems Engineering Management

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj49-Aug2016-Odetola-BOOKBook Title: Systems Engineering Management, Fifth Edition
Authors: Benjamin S. Blanchard, John E. Blyler
Publisher: Wiley
List Price:   $155.00
Format: Hard cover, 576 pages
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978-1-119-04782-7
Reviewer: Oluwasegun Odetola
Review Date: July 2016

 


Introduction

I chose the fifth edition of Systems Engineering Management by Benjamin S. Blanchard and John E. Blyler for this book review as I am interested in systems engineering and I must state that this is one of the most engaging technical books I have read in a long time. It is very well written and can be easily understood by professionals as well as college students. It reflects the expertise and experience of the authors in real world and academic applications of systems engineering. This is a book that should be in the library of every systems engineering department and project management professional who desire to know how systems operate and how to handle the ever-increasing complexities of new systems. The reader is guided from the definition of systems engineering to system engineering requirements and the design process through program planning to system engineering program evaluation.

Overview of Book Structure

The book is broken into eight chapters which take readers through the entire system engineering process

1  Introduction to Systems Engineering: The first chapter lays the groundwork for the book by defining what a system is, identifying challenges in current systems’ environments and outlining the need for system engineering and this chapter achieves the aim of equipping the reader with a thorough understanding of what system engineering means.

2  The System Engineering Process: The second chapter explains the problem identification process and how to gather deficiencies together to form the basis for needs analysis by asking a set of simple questions such as, “what is required of the system, stated in functional terms?” and “what specific functions must the system accomplish?”. The authors also delve into system feasibility analysis, system operational requirements, the logistics and maintenance support concept, identification and prioritization of technical performance measures, the design integration process, system test and evaluation, production and retirement in this chapter and inasmuch as this chapter does not pick a particular discipline for exhaustive examination it explains how any engineering discipline can integrate different disciplines required for integration in a system .

3  System Design Requirements: Chapter 3 takes the reader through development of systems requirements and specifications for various disciplines such as software engineering, manufacturing and production engineering and the integration and interoperability of systems interfaces and it achieves its aim of giving the reader a clear understanding of system design requirements.

4  Engineering Design Methods and Tools: The fourth chapter reviews current and conventional design practices and computer aided design, manufacturing and support and how system engineering objectives can be met.

5  Design Review and Evaluation: In chapter five the authors describe the design review and evaluation process describing how systems engineering requirements are established in order to validate systems design, what constitutes formal design review, the design change and system modification process as well as supplier review and evaluation and explain the need for proper monitoring and control of systems throughout the system engineering process. The emphasis on proper system monitoring and control throughout the system engineering process is valid and as noted failing to properly monitor a system could be costly.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj49-Aug2016-Odetola-PHOTO
Oluwasegun Odetola

North Texas, USA

 

flag-usa




Oluwasegun Odetola
is a project management professional with experience managing projects to achieve higher than expected goals. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and a master’s degree in Project Management and became a certified Project Management Professional in 2012. He has over 14 years of experience in roles in Project Management, Information Technology, Engineering and Manufacturing. Oluwasegun is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas chapter. He can be reached at [email protected].

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Project Management Report from Spain

REPORT

PMI Madrid Chapter never stops; Summer slowdown of business activities in Spain

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain


pmwj49-Aug2016-Bucero-MAP








PMI Madrid Chapter never stops

I’m very proud to see how PMI Madrid Chapter is still growing (1717 members) not only about membership but in the amount of activities they do. Among those Chapter activities we can mention:

  • Webinar on June 9th. “Life cycle and processes groups” delivered by José Ochoa.
  • Webinar on June 23rd. “How to sell risk Management inside organizations” delivered by Isaac Olalla.
  • A Project Management Encounter was celebrated dealing with Interim Management from different perspectives. The attendees could know in detail what is Interim Management and its trends either in Spain and the rest of Europe. The PMI Madrid Chapter thanks to the Interim Management Spanish Association (AIME) their Support making happen that event; getting more than 300 attendees, sponsors and volunteers efforts made the event possible.

The “PMI CyL Branch” has had a very intensive activity organizing the workshop “Put your innovation’s attitude on shape” driven by Carmen Alonso Ramos (@carmengal) and Maravillas Carazo San José  (@maracarazo).

In terms of outreach, the Chapter closed an agreement with the PMI Rome Italy Chapter to announce their 20th anniversary as a Chapter and the events that they will promote base on that:

  • Webinar on July 22nd. “The importance of Performance Evaluation: A project Management perspective” delivered by Carlos González Jardón.  A Spanish Chapter collaboration’s initiative.
  •  The Chapter monthly meeting.

Please move forward!

TODAY IS A GOOD DAY! to work on the benefit of our profession.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj42-Jan2016-Bucero-Photo
Alfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 flag-spain

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup

REPORT

Two Big Nuclear Power Projects; Two Big Public Transportation Projects

By Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland


INTRODUCTION

This roundup introduces four large projects currently going on in Finland: Two in the nuclear power business area, and two in the public transportation business area.

OLKILUOTO 3

The Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, a 1 600 MW unit, contracted to be built by Areva for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto at the west cost of Finland, remains in its final stage of construction. The contract for building the power plant was signed in 2003 for 3 000 M€, and construction began in 2005, targeting completion in June 2009. Due to numerous challenges during the planning and construction phases, the target date has been pushed forward several times, first to 2015, and now to 2018 – nine years in total. According to Areva, the delays have pushed the total cost up to 8 500 M€.

Areva and TVO have conducted negotiations regarding the delay and related penalties, with TVO demanding 2 300 M€ from Areva, and Areva 3 500 M€ from TVO: Areva claims TVO has not carried out its contractual duties, and is therefore accountable for the costs of the string of delays. TVO claims Areva has failed to construct the power plant according to the contractual schedule, and is therefore accountable for the cost increase and for the loss of profit from selling electrical power to private and public customers. Unable to reach an acceptable solution, TVO and Areva have suspended negotiations, and escalated the dispute to international arbitration.

The matter is made more challenging by the French government plan to sell its share – majority – of Areva stock to Électricité de France (EDF) S.A. – the French electric utility company, largely owned by the French state, headquartered in Paris, France, with 65 200 M€ in revenues in 2010. EDF operates a diverse portfolio of over 120 GW of electrical power generation capacity in Europe, South America, North America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The French government would like to merge the loss-making Areva with EDF, however, EDF is unwilling to proceed with the proposed arrangement understanding the international arbitration may agree with TVO’s claims.

pmwj49-Aug2016-Vaskimo-IMAGE1

In the photograph: Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant is nearing completion despite the delay penalty dispute between Areva and TVO (photo courtesy www.stuk.fi)

HANHIKIVI 1

The Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant, a 1 200 MW unit, contracted to be built by Rosatom for Fennovoima at Pyhäjoki at the west coast of Finland, is proceeding full speed with the preliminary ground works. A preliminary approval to construct the plant was granted by the Finnish Government in April 2010, and by the Finnish Parliament in July 2010. The decision to invest in the power plant was made by Voimayhtiö SF, the largest owner of Fennovoima, in February 2014. The preliminary ground works for the plant are already under way, however, the final permit to construct the plant – applied for by Fennovoima in June 2015 – is expected to be granted by the Finnish Government no earlier than 2018. The plant is expected to go on line in 2024.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Vaskimo-PHOTO
Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

flag-finland


Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist. Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258. Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected] . For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51 .

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

On the Subject of the Editor’s monthly Welcome articles

8 July 2016

 

Dear David

You asked for thoughts about the nature of your editor’s welcome. My thinking is broadly as follows.

You are in a unique and rather privileged position. You receive stuff from all over the world, and materials which cover huge areas of the project management avocation. There can’t be any doubt that, from time to time, you see things emerging which no-one else is in a position to see – or certainly not from your perspective. I think many, if not most, readers would welcome your comments when such things do emerge. They could take any form, and may not happen every month. So I don’t see a standardized approach to such comments as being appropriate. Indeed, it would be a bit of a bonus if readers approached your editor’s welcome to each edition thinking, “I wonder what has caught David’s attention this month”.

I am inclined to think that, if you started doing this, it could well lead you towards modifying other aspects of your editor’s welcome. Indeed, a somewhat different approach towards introducing each edition could make it more interesting (whilst still enabling you to acknowledge new or important contributions/contributors). I also think that you do not need to mention all contributions in your editor’s welcome, as you already have an excellent Table of Contents which does that for you.

So these are some preliminary thoughts, for what they are worth. I would be more than happy to have a discourse with you if you think this would help.

Anyhow, keep up the good work!

All the best

Alan Stretton
Sydney, Australia

 

 

 

Benefits of Agile Project Management

SECOND EDITION

Benefits of agile project management in a non-software development context – a literature review

By Tomas Gustavsson

Karlstad University

Sweden


Abstract

In the last fifteen years we have witnessed a vast spread of new methods for managing projects within software development. In 2001, the Agile Manifesto stated the common values and principles of these methods, all aimed at producing better software. Several of these values and principals are specifically expressed for designing and programming software products. Since then, the benefits of these methods have led to a widespread use of agile project management even in non-software development contexts. But, how does these values and principals affect projects in non-software areas since some values and principals are not applicable? Do they perceive the same benefits? This paper presents a systematic literature review aimed at identifying benefits in projects adopting agile methods in non-software development contexts. Out of the 21 case studies analysed, most reported projects were from manufacturing companies but even from areas such as library management and strategy management. The most frequently reported benefits were related to team work, customer interaction, productivity and flexibility. The main parts of the benefits were corresponding to the first value in the Agile Manifesto: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools.

Key words: Agile project management, Scrum.

JEL code: M10 – Business Administration: General

Introduction

The methods originating in the nineties such as Scrum (Schwaber & Beedle, 2001; Schwaber, 2004) or eXtreme programming, XP, (Beck 1999) has now become famous under the term “agile project management” or “agile methods”. Today, most of the agile methods have been used in the IT industry for projects within software development (Mafakheri et al. 2008; Sheffield & Lemétayer, 2013). But although originating in the IT industry, agile project management is now moving into other businesses. Methods spreading from one context to another are nothing new. For example, Toyota Production System (TPS), originally used for car manufacturing, later became famous under the name Lean and has now moved into all kinds of industries such as healthcare (Kim et al. 2006).

Although there is extensive evidence of agile project management used in software development, there is a lack of empirical studies in other types of industries and projects. In an article by Pope-Ruark (2015, page 116) she states that “agile is not only popular in software development; a quick Google search reveals its reach in design, marketing, publishing, energy management, financial services, and civil and mechanical engineering, to name a few.” That can be found by executing a Google search, but what about published articles describing actual case studies of organizations that are not within software development? This literature review is an attempt to map articles showing case studies of agile project management used in other contexts than software development.

The main research question (MRQ) for the systematic literature review is: What are the experiences from using agile project management in a non-software development context? In order to answer the MRQ and evaluate the results, the question has been divided into the following two specific research questions (SRQ):

SRQ1: What benefits are experienced from using agile project management in non-software development contexts?

SRQ2: What challenges are experienced from using agile project management in non-software development contexts?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Gustavsson-PHOTO
Tomas Gustavsson

Karlstad, Sweden

flag-sweden

 


Tomas Gustavsson
is a university lecturer at Karlstad University and a consultant within project management, IT and leadership issues. Starting out as a software programmer in 1996, he was offered a job as an IT project manager after only one year in the industry. Since then, project management has always been in focus in Tomas’ career. In 2002, he heard of something called “agile ways of working” which contained smart tools and efficient methods that he whole-heartedly embraced.

Tomas has written several books in Swedish such as the book “Agile – konsten att slutföra projekt” (Agile – the art of completing projects) which in 2008 won the Project management book of the year award awarded by the Swedish IPMA-branch.

Tomas has published articles describing the use of agile methods in other contexts than IT, such as event projects and hardware product development. He can be contacted at   [email protected]

Books

  • Agil projektledning Övningsbok (2014), published by Bonnier Utbildning/Sanoma Utbildning
  • Agil projektledning (2011), published by Bonnier Utbildning/Sanoma Utbildning
  • Agile – konsten att slutföra projekt (2007-06-30), published by TUK Förlag
  • Ledarskapsdagbok – boken för din utveckling (2006), published by TUK Förlag

Articles and papers

Gustavsson, T. (2016). Benefits of Agile Project Management in a Non-Software Development Context – a literature review. Presented at the 5th International Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic Countries in Riga.

Gustavsson, T. & Rönnlund, P. (2013). Agile adoption at Ericsson Hardware Product Development. Presented at the NFF Conference 2013 in Reykjavik, Iceland.

Gustavsson, T., Rönnlund, P. (2010). Agile project management in public events. Presented at the IPMA2010 World Congress in Istanbul.

 

 

Critical Success Factors for the Construction Industry

SECOND EDITION

by Zakari Tsiga, Michael Emes and Alan Smith

University College London
Mullard Space Science Laboratory

United Kingdom


Abstract

This study aims to identify the critical success factors for projects in the construction industry. A list of factors were identified from the existing literature and grouped into categories. The authors added project risk management and requirements management to the list of categories to test the hypothesis that these should also be considered as critical success factors in the construction industry. The study identified 58 success factors classified into 11 groups, which were tested using an elicitation technique. Forty-nine responses were collected from project managers, who had an average or 15 years of project management experience and had participated in more than 15 projects. Once the data was collected, the authors adopted the use of the relative importance index to rank the categories. From the results, the top five most important are (1) Project Organization, (2) Project Manager Competence, (3) Project Risk Management, (4) Project Team Competence and (5) Requirements Management. This lead to the conclusion that both project risk management and requirements management should be considered as critical success factors. Further analysis of the data highlights the importance of scope management and soft skills in Requirements Management and Project Risk Management respectively.

Keywords: Construction Projects; Critical Success Factors; Project Risk Management; Project Success; Requirements Management.

JEL codes: D20, L10, M19

Introduction

The Construction industry is one of the main sectors of the economy; it consists of the entire process from project visualization to demolition of buildings and infrastructure. As a service industry it is interlinked with various industries. The importance of the construction industry can be seen throughout history and in the development of economies. According to the World Market Intelligence (2010) the construction industry employs more people than any other single industry in the world. The report by Global Construction Perspectives and Oxford Economics (2013) suggest that the sector is globally expected to rise by $6.3 trillion or over 70 % to $15 trillion by 2025 compared to $8.7 trillion in 2012. 
The construction industry incorporates all civil engineering projects such as building projects as well as the maintenance and repair of existing constructed projects.

As the industry is constantly growing, newer and bigger projects are always undertaken (Chan & Chan, 2004). These new undertakings generally come with more complexities as boundaries are being pushed. An example of such large project currently being undertaking is the Saadiyat Island project in Abu Dhabi, UAE with an estimated budget cost of $26 billion (Ponzini, 2011).

Project success is the end deliverable of every undertaken project. Project success has been a subject of debate (Alexandrova & Ivanova, 2012). In the construction sector various efforts have been taken in other to determine these project success criteria because different stakeholders have different views and perception of a project this in itself can lead to various views on project success.

  1. Background

1.1 Project Success

In the past, research on project success focused on the achievement of the iron triangle objectives (time, cost and quality) until recently researchers have identified the need to widen the criteria for measuring project success (Atkinson, 1999; Wateridge, 1998). Researchers such as de Wit (1988) emphasize that a project is considered successful if its stakeholders are generally successful and the projects technical performance specification has been achieved. Muller (2007) states that projects differ in a variety of ways such as size, uniqueness and complexity this has lead researchers such as Westerveld (2003) to state that the criteria for measuring project success should vary from project to project and hence it would be difficult to have a unique set of criteria for all projects in all industries.

1.2 Critical Success Factors

The identification and careful consideration of critical success factors can have a positive outcome on a project. New participants in the construction industry and also established companies can use these factors to easily help themselves in better project delivery for future projects (Bullen & Rockart, 1981).

More…

To read entire paper, click here

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Tsiga-PHOTO1 TSIGA
Zakari Danlami Tsiga

London, UK

UK small flag 2

 


Zakari Danlami Tsiga
, MSc is a PhD student working at the University College London (UCL). Prior to beginning the PhD program, Zakari undertook a masters’ program at the same university, this gave him the opportunity to work on the delivery of various projects for different clients such as Microsoft and the London Clearing House. From his work he developed an interest in Technology management and the importance of successful project delivery.  Zakari Tsiga can be contacted at [email protected].

 

pmwj49-Aug2016-Tsiga-PHOTO2 EMES
Michael Emes, MEng, PhD, MIET, MAPM, MINCOSE

London, UK

 UK small flag 2

 

Michael Emes is Deputy Director of UCL Centre for Systems Engineering and Head of the Technology Management Group at UCL’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL). He completed his first degree in Engineering, Economics and Management at St John’s College, Oxford, and a PhD at MSSL in developing cooling technologies for spacecraft. He worked as a strategy consultant for Mercer Management Consulting (now Oliver Wyman) on projects in retail, energy and transport, including a project advising the Department for Transport on how to address the problems of the rail sector in the last days of Railtrack plc. Michael now conducts teaching and research at UCL in the areas of systems engineering and technology management in domains including transport, health, defence and aerospace. He is a member of APM, INCOSE and the IET. He is Programme Manager and a lead trainer for the European Space Agency’s Project Manager Training Course and is Programme Director for UCL’s MSc in the Management of Complex Projects.

 

pmwj49-Aug2016-Tsiga-PHOTO3 SMITH
Prof. Alan Smith, PhD

London, United Kingdom

 

 UK small flag 2


Alan Smith
was awarded a PhD at Leicester University in 1978 based on his X-ray study of supernova remnants. His work involved the payload development and flight of a Skylark sounding rocket from Woomera, South Australia. Between 1984 and 1990 he worked for the European Space Agency at its technology centre in the Netherlands as both an astrophysicist and as an instrument developer. His early career involved a combination of technology development (space flight hardware on European, and Russian satellites), project management and astrophysics. In 1990 he joined University College London’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory, initially as Head of Detector Physics eventually becoming Director and Head of Department (2005). In 1998 he was made a Professor of Detector Physics. While at UCL he has been Director of UCL’s Centre for Advanced Instrumentation Systems (1995-2005), a Co-Director of the Smart Optics Faraday Partnership (2002-2005) and is presently founding Director of the Centre for Systems Engineering (1998-present). Alan was appointed Vice-Dean for Enterprise for the faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences in 2007, helped set up UCL’s Centre for Space Medicine in 2011 and is a member of UCL’s Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction board. He is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and of the Association of Project Management.

 

 

Micro IT Projects Success Criteria

SECOND EDITION

A Small Scale Scientific Research

Valentina Ivanova, PhD, PMP

New Bulgarian University

Sofia, Bulgaria


 Abstract

A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique product, service or result (PMBOK, 2013). The unique nature of projects and the fact that they are usually undertaken in a business environment makes the scientific approach to studying project success factors almost impossible.

In this paper a small scale scientific research on micro IT projects success factors is presented. Six teams of students who specialize in Game Development in B.Sc. “Information Technologies” programme, led by six students from M.Sc. “Information Technologies Project Management” programme at New Bulgarian University are assigned to work on comparable project in terms of both: organizational environment, stakeholders expectations, available information and existing communicational channels, and also in terms of project parameters as project scope, time and resources. The paper presents the research set-up and the monitoring processes. The projects’ plans, progress, recovery activities, milestones and final outcomes are described in details. The project management challenges, risks and issues, the decision making process, and the success rate in decision implementation are analysed. Key factors for project success are identified.

The proposed method for scientific research of project success factors is critically examined and compared to alternative approaches. Scaling up of the research is discussed.

Key words: project management, education in IT PM, project success factors.

JEL code: M15, I21, I23

Introduction

Teamwork is an essential requirement to complement theoretical knowledge and practical engineering skills in computer science and informatics. In their article about teaching teamwork to software engineers, presented to IEEE’s Frontiers in Education Conference – 2011, Lingard and Barkitaki quote Ben Amaba (Worldwide Executive of IBM since 2005): “Software engineers need good communication skills, both spoken and written. They need an analytical capability, and they need to be able to manage a project from end to end while working well with their colleagues.” (Lingard and Barkataki, 2011).

Informatics department at New Bulgarian University undertook a large-scale research project “Preparation of IT specialists for the Knowledge Economy” (scheme: BG051PO001-3.1.07, contract: BG051PO001-3.1.07-0072) on the most recent world-class practices on ensuring synergy of academic knowledge and yet building professional skills demanded by the IT industry in a higher educational setting. As a result of the project, the individual assignments in the third year of the undergraduate programmes were redesigned into larger scale multidisciplinary students’ group projects (micro IT projects). Using group projects as pedagogical tools raises some concerns, mainly based on scarcity of scientific evidence for or against the effectiveness of the method (Ashraf, 2004). Nevertheless, group projects are becoming an essential part of software engineering curricula (Mead, 2009, Sancho-Thomas et al., 2009, and van Vliet, 2006).

Recently the Bulgarian Industrial Association – Union of the Bulgarian Business (BIA) introduced a sector oriented competence framework. Each competence description includes both sector specific requirements and behavioural indicators. All competences in the ICT sector require strong teamwork skills (Competence Assessment Information System, 2015). Based on these structured industry requirements, on the recent good practices in software engineering curricula development (Mead, 2009), and considering the known drawbacks (Ashraf, 2004), Informatics department had selected micro IT group projects as the pedagogical tool for teaching teamwork in their academic setting.

Micro IT projects are considered an educational innovation in the context of undergraduate education at Informatics department. This paper presents a small scale research on the success factors of the micro IT projects implemented at Informatics department at NBU.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.


 

About the author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Ivanova-PHOTO
Valentina Ivanova, PhD, PMP 

New Bulgarian University
Sofia, Bulgaria

flag-bulgaria




Dipl. Eng. Valentina Ivanova
is assistant professor at Informatics Department at NBU, the largest private university in Bulgaria. Her main courses include programming languages, software engineering and IT project management at Bachelor and Master Degree Levels. She holds a PhD in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence), a PMP certificate, and since 2012 is a SEI Certified PSP Instructor.

Valentina Ivanova is in charge of the M.Sc. degree programmes at Informatics Department at NBU. Her main focus is the process of continuous improvement of the educational offer of the department at Master degree level, in order to meet the challenges of the dynamic technological and economical development in the globalized world. Her recent work is in the area of e-Leadership and e-Leadership curricula development.

Valentina Ivanova believes that agility in higher educational institutions’ programmes empowers students and businesses to pursue maximum business value as owners of their educational needs and goals.

Prof Ivanova can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Critical Factors for Project Team Collaboration

SECOND EDITION

Critical Factors for Project Team Collaboration in Developing New Products: Qualitative Perspective

Ruta Ciutiene,
Kaunas University of Technology

Vitalija Venckuviene
Kaunas University of Technology

Giedre Dadurkiene
JSC “Volfas Engelman”

Kaunas, Lithuania


Abstract

Human factors are the biggest challenge to project success and results. New product development (hereinafter NPD) projects require not only different competencies from different fields, but collaborative approach as well. Collaboration in project management is considered as one of the most important factors allowing reaching project’s success (Hansen M.T. et al., 2006). The paper deals with the factors determining an efficient collaboration of teams developing new products. The analysis of the scientific literature reveals three levels of critical factors of collaboration: organizational, team and individual. However, this paper is focused on theoretical and empirical analysis of organizational and team level factors of collaboration by employing qualitative research approach (focus group, and content analysis). A list of critical factors for project team collaboration in developing new products has been developed on the basis of team performance success theoretical findings. As a result of the content analysis, categories and sub – categories of collaboration factors have been revealed.

Key words: collaboration, new product development projects, team, factors.

JEL code: O15, M12

Introduction

Dynamically and rapidly changing environment, perfection of technologies, development of innovations, and, herewith, changing needs of clients raise new challenges to business. These reasons are conditioning organizations’ need to improve products’ quality, to tackle related problems more efficiently and to improve activity results (Edmondson E.C. et al., 2009). Successfully developed new products become one of the most important factors that create business competitiveness, and the human factor is a presumption for development of successful new products. In development of new products there are often used methodologies and tools of project management (Rolstadås A. et al., 2014). It is noticed in scientific literature that properly formed and managed team of new product development allows to reach better results and more successful products (Hirunyawipada T. et al., 2010Hirunyawipada T. et al., 2015). A topic of new products development is analysed in scientific literature widely enough: Bstieler L. et al. (2003) analysed an effect of environmental uncertainty on process activities, project team characteristics, and new product success; Dayan M. et al. (2009) analysed antecedents and consequences of team reflexivity in new product development projects; Islam et al., (2009) analysed the relationship between team learning and top management support; Holtzman Y. et al. (2011) analysed a role of diversified teams in development of new products, Martinuso M. et al. (2013) analysed the organizational impact of product development projects; Parkinson C. (2006), Son J.W. et al. (2011) analysed teams’ collaboration as organization’s strategical necessity.

Abundance of scientific studies that analyse factors of new product development success indicates the interest of academic society and importance of the problem, however role and factors of team collaboration in new product development still remains researched poorly enough. In scientific literature, a topic of collaboration in projects is analysed by distinguishing levels of both organization, and team and individual. In other words, we can distinguish three categories of factors positively or negatively affecting teams’ collaboration. Hence, we distinguish the factors of organization, team and individual levels. Further in this article we will analyse the factors of project teams’ collaboration at organization and team levels only.

The goal of the article is to examine the factors determining an efficient collaboration of teams developing new products.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 5th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2016. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.


 

About the Authors

pmwj49-Aug2016-Ciutiene-PHOTO1 RUTA
Prof Ruta Ciutiene, PhD

Kaunas University of Technology
Lithuania

Lithuania - small flag

 


Ruta Ciutiene
 holds a PhD in Management and Administration. Since 2001 she has been working in various positions at Kaunas University of Technology, where from 2012 she is a professor at Department of Management and Manager of the Project Management Master Degree study program. From 2014 she also is a Product Development Director in the Executive School of Economics and Business School. She teaches several courses in project management not only for economics and business, but for engineering students also.

Human resources management in projects and engineering projects issues are her main scientific fields of interest. She has practical experience in working with business and public sector development projects. She also trains and consults businesses and the public sector in project management processes. At the same time she coordinates, manages and participates in local and international studies and business development projects as well as scientific. Further, she works as an external evaluator on international projects.

Ruta Ciutiene can be contacted at [email protected].

 

pmwj49-Aug2016-Ciutiene-PHOTO2 VITALIJA
Vitalija Venckuviene, PhD

Kaunas University of Technology
Lithuania

Lithuania - small flag

 


Dr. Vitalija Venckuviene holds a PhD in Economics. Since 2013 she has been working as a lecturer at Kaunas University of Technology. She also is a shareholder in a family business. Business development, startups, also project management and in particular project evaluation techniques are her main fields of interest. Vitalija has experience in working with business and public sector, mainly consulting services. At the same time she applies, coordinates, manages and participates in local and international scientific and business development projects.

Vitalija Venckuviene can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj49-Aug2016-Ciutiene-PHOTO3 GIEDRE
Giedrė Dadurkienė

Kaunas, Lithuania

Lithuania - small flag


Giedrė Dadurkienė
works as a Brand manager at JSC “Volfas Engelman”, a food and beverage company based in Kaunas, Lithuania. Giedrė has a Master of Science degree in “Project Management”.

 

 

Putting theory to practice?

SECOND EDITION

Moving towards more engaged forms of practical scholarship in the management of projects

By Paul W Chan

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering,
The University of Manchester,

Manchester, UK


ABSTRACT

In this paper, I question the knowledge-practice divide by drawing inspiration from contemporary interest in practice-based theories. I focus on recent renewed interest in the Aristotelian notion of phroenesis (or, to put simply, the doing of practical wisdom). Rather than to turn knowledge into practice I argue that knowledge is practice. I stress that practical knowledge is not just what practitioners do; practical knowledge calls for deeper, more engaged forms of practical scholarship. Such scholarship demands a move away from ‘grab-and-go’ methods of knowledge creation depicted by earlier scholarship that provided prescriptive guidelines and toolkits, to consider the power of engaged scholarship (e.g. action research, ethnography) in co-creating practical wisdom in project management. I offer the newly-launched Professional PhD Programme in Project Management at The University of Manchester as a possible way of inviting practitioners to become co-researchers in putting practical wisdom to work.

Keywords: phronesis, practice-relevant scholarship, professional doctorate

INTRODUCTION

Project management has matured as a field from being “almost theory-free” (Morris, 2013b: 67) and “extraordinarily [silent] on the theoretical” (Koskela and Howell, 2002: 293), to current recognition that project management knowledge is pluralistic, drawing on a diverse range of theories (see Söderlund, 2011, and; Morris, 2013a). In part, this growing acknowledgement of the role of theory is due to the belief that “a theory of projects is beneficial to the development and acceptance of the field for a general audience” (Hällgren, 2012: 805). As Hällgren (2012: ibid.) noted, the more established top-tier academic journals tend to make higher “demands for theoretical contributions and scientific rigor […] than in journals in less established areas as project management”.

The pursuit of theoretical rigour is nevertheless not without criticism. Morris (2013b), for instance, while acknowledging the need to embrace theoretical pluralism, also warned against the development of theory for theory’s sake. He stressed that “[t]he problems we face in the world of projects, and the ways to address them, are often intensely practical. […] Yet, academics too rarely experience the reality of really managing projects” (Morris, 2013b: 69).

In this paper, I critically consider this bifurcation between theory and practice, along with the debate on the role of theory in project management. In so doing, the purpose is to question the rhetoric of turning knowledge into practice. Such a turn of phrase implies the separation between theory and practice, an assumption that knowledge is an entity that comes before its application in practice. In this paper, it is argued that such a linear view of knowledge production that emphasises the dichotomous distinction between theory and practice is outmoded. By drawing on current interest in and scholarship on practice-based theories (see e.g. de Certeau, 1984, and; Nicolini, 2012), it is argued that the problem lies not in turning knowledge into practice, but to situate knowledge production and reproduction in practice. Thus, theory is not some isolated entity that precedes and juxtaposes against practice (theory vs. practice); rather, practice and theory are both sides of the same coin, recursively intertwined and mutually constitutive of one another.

The paper is structured as follows. The next section will trace the debate on project management theory. This brief overview will outline the ongoing debate on the role of theory in project management, between those who favour a normative view of finding better or ‘best’ practice (e.g. Morris, 2013a; 2013b), and those who reject such normative accounts and prefer to study the multiple ways in which practices actually happen (e.g. Cicmil et al., 2006). Although the debate on theoretical unification/pluralism has made much progress on bringing theory to the fore, the review highlights the need to break away from the theory-practice divide. A salient review of practice-based approach to understanding project management and what project managers do is then outlined, with a view to reconnect theory and practice in project management. The paper closes with an illustration of how this can be achieved through the Manchester Professional Doctorate Programme.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 3rd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in May 2016. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Chan-PHOTO
Dr. Paul W. Chan

Manchester, United Kingdom

 

UK small flag 2




Paul Chan
is a Senior Lecturer in the Management of Projects in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering at The University of Manchester in Manchester, United Kingdom. www.mace.manchester.ac.uk/people/staff/profile/?ea=Paul.Chan.

Paul joined The University of Manchester, one of the founding institutions into the academic study of projects, in 2009. He is the Academic Director of the Professional Doctorate in Project Management Programme in Manchester. He specialises in the study of human relations, focussing particularly on how people respond to social, organisational and technological change. He has a track record of collaborating with industrial partners in the construction, manufacturing and transportation sectors on publicly-funded research projects to examine change management in practice. He is especially keen to uncover how innovative practices can often be found in mundane, everyday routines in organisations. Paul’s work has a strong social dimension. He is currently working with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the UK to develop better insights into communicating societal value of nuclear decommissioning. Paul is taking over as Chair of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM) in September 2016. He is also Editor of Construction Management and Economics, a leading peer-reviewed journal on construction and the built environment. Paul has authored over 70 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers.

Paul holds an undergraduate degree in Construction Management and a PhD from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland. He can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

The Brexit Project

COMMENTARY ARTICLE

The Need for a Project-Based Approach

Martin Hopkinson

United Kingdom


(15th July 2016)

The result of the British European Union (EU) referendum in June 2016 launched the largest UK project that we may see in our lifetimes. The electorate has set the government the objective of leaving the EU. Project completion is likely to be two years after the UK declares intention to leave under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. This article uses Association for Project Management (APM) and UK government guidance in order to identify issues with its governance and management that should be considered moving forwards.

Project Objectives

Although leaving the EU is an unambiguous high level project objective, much has yet to be decided about the level of detail below this. For example, it is uncertain as to whether the UK should remain in the European single market. Similarly, there is much debate as to the nature of future immigration controls and the consequences that these might have for UK citizens living in other EU countries. Moreover, since the EU is likely to continue to require membership of the single market to be conditional on the free movement of people, trade-offs will be required when setting objectives at a more detailed level.

A key issue with the UK’s post referendum position is that a decision has been taken to implement the Brexit project before the project has itself been adequately defined. The conventional project approach to avoiding this mistake is to use a project lifecycle model with planned phases and gate review decisions to govern the iterative development of project objectives and manage the associated risk and trade-offs. The Association for Project Management (APM) lifecycle provides an example of this principle by identifying the need for concept and definition phases prior to project implementation 1. Full commitment to a project would not normally be given until these initial two phases had been completed successfully.

In the current circumstances, I would argue that David Cameron was right to delay the Article 50 declaration. At the time of writing, Theresa May has just replaced him as Prime Minister (PM). The early indications are that she will not make the Article 50 declaration until the government is better prepared. This would give the government vital time to define and plan to achieve the Brexit project’s objectives at the appropriate level of detail before its implementation phase.

Points to consider before the UK declares intention to leave the EU under Article 50

Declaring intention to leave under Article 50 exposes the relevant nation to the risk that the EU can deem it to have left two years later regardless of subsequent events. Since there might be no turning back from this decision, it should be regarded as being the point at which the government has committed the country to the Brexit project implementation phase.   The UK government should thus be assured that the project plan is robust and that its risk implications are acceptable to the country before making the declaration.

Risks that are dependent upon the Brexit solution and its implementation could include:

  • the need for and outcome of a second Scottish independence referendum,
  • the effect on the Northern Ireland peace process of any new controls over the freedom of movement of people and goods across the Irish border,
  • the effect on national security arrangements, and
  • failure to achieve pre-existing government objectives promised to the electorate in the Conservative party manifesto during the 2015 general election.

To disregard such risks would be to treat leaving the EU as being of supreme importance, in effect trumping all other issues within the government’s portfolio of responsibilities. Although the constitutional implications of the referendum result are uncertain, it would seem unlikely that this would be an acceptable approach.

Although the new PM could make UK’s Article 50 the declaration immediately, a sound project governance process should require the executive to have reviewed a well-defined solution and risk-robust business case at the main project approval point. Given that so little progress has been made to date, the Article 50 declaration will need to be delayed if significant Brexit-related risks are to be managed effectively. This approach would be consistent with the UK Treasury’s Green Book 2, which opens with the statement that “All new policies, programmes and projects, whether revenue, capital or regulatory, should be subject to comprehensive but proportionate assessment, wherever it is practicable, so as best to promote the public interest”.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Hopkinson-AUTHOR
Martin Hopkinson

United Kingdom

UK small flag 2




Martin Hopkinson
is the Director of Risk Management Capability Limited and has 30 years’ experience as a project manager, project risk management specialist and consultant. His experience has been gained across a wide variety of industries and engineering disciplines and includes multi-billion pound projects and programmes.

Martin’s first book, The Project Risk Maturity Model, concerns the risk management process. His contributions to Association for Project Management (APM) guides such as Directing Change and Sponsoring Change reflect his belief in the importance of project governance and business case development.

In his new book Net Present Value and Risk Modelling for Projects he brings these subjects together by showing how NPV and risk modelling techniques can be used to optimise projects and support project approval decisions. (To learn more about the book, click here.)

 

 

Toni Ruttimann, Bridge Builder for the World

COMMENTARY ARTICLE

An Update

By Roberto Mori

Milan, Italy


There were a few moments of unnatural silence before the almost 1,000 Delegates granted the Speaker with an endless standing ovation (more than 5 minutes!).

Those who had the privilege of being there, vividly remember the key-note presentation by Toni Ruttimann, the Swiss bridge builder, at the opening ceremony of the 22nd IPMA World Congress in Roma (November 9th, 2008). Indeed Toni had delivered a touching and impressive example of the unbelievable achievements that determination, creativity, initiative along with deeply rooted human values could lead to.

In the long time elapsed since, Toni has continued helping people in South America and South-East Asia to build bridges that significantly improve the quality and safety of their lives. His record to date includes 730 bridges serving 2 Million persons, which have been built together with the interested populations in Ecuador, Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Costa Rica, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, Indonesia.

pmwj49-Aug2016-Mori-BRIDGE

One of Toni’s bridges in Nam Tee, Kachin State, Myanmar

The Times of London has defined him as one of the world’s more elusive heroes.

On the occasion of Toni’s recent visit to Italy, both an association for active citizenship of Arese – a center of 25,000 inhabitants very close to Milano, famous for its Alfa Romeo Museum and former Alfa Romeo premises – and a local newspaper organized two presentations of his that registered an overall audience of 1,300.

Toni’s activity has been introduced by the newspaper Director as a dedication to a unique mission. Indeed his dedication and motivation are as astonishing as the related achievements. Stand up and let’s build it together: this way Toni has motivated and led peasants, women, kids until their own bridges have been completely built.

More…

To read entire article, with some great photos, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Mori-AUTHOR
Roberto Mori

Milan, Italy

flag-italy




Roberto Mori
has an extensive background in Project Management of international turn-key projects of industrial plants, oil & gas and iron & steel sectors. He has covered several functions in project teams, up to the roles of Senior Project Manager, Projects Director and Portfolio Manager. His background includes also experience as Procurement Director and Operations Manager for the same type of projects portfolio. Today he is Director Special Projects in Tenova, one of the world’s leaders for iron, steel, mining and material handling technologies. (http://www.tenovagroup.com/)

Roberto Mori has been member of the Italian National Association of Plant Engineering (ANIMP) since the early 90’s, taking major part in the activities performed by its Project Management Section, IPMA Italy, of which he was President until February 2015. Information about ANIMP can be found at www.animp.it/IPMA

He was Chairman of International Project Management Association (IPMA) 2013- 2014, after having served as Vice President and President for four years. He has been Prize Winner of the IPMA Project Excellence Award 2006 and obtained the IPMA Otto Zieglmeier’s Award for Excellent Project Management Performance in 2008. Today he is member of the Jury for IPMA Project Excellence Awards. More about IPMA at http://www.ipma.ch/

Member of Scientific Committees for international conferences, author of published papers on project management topics, speaker at national and international congresses; he is also teacher for courses on project, risk and contract management.

Roberto Mori can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

Introducing Agile In Non-Agile Environments

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Ralph Moore, PMP, PMI-ACP

Wyoming, USA


So you want to be Agile? Well, read on then……

Introducing Agile to your organization sounds great in the boardroom, but once out in the trenches of your office it may not seem the way it was discussed in the boardroom. I will share my insights and try to help you avoid some of the common pitfalls that I have seen during my journey in the Agile world. In my experience there can be a huge difference in the way Agile functions in different size organizations and especially virtual work. I will focus on small organizations that are under a thousand employees total with the development team co-located on site with common sense as my guiding force. In my experience, some of the more important items to get ironed out quickly will be addressed:

  • Organizational Functions
    • Operations
    • Maintenance
    • Emergencies
  • Organizational Culture
    • Organizational commitment
    • Change and Stakeholder mind set change
    • Siloes
  • The Project Team
    • Role changes
    • Agile adds overhead
    • Time-boxes

Hey everyone, we are going Agile but what about running the business? Yes, your developers more than likely handle a wide variety of issues on a daily basis; let’s take a look inside of the daily grind:

Operations are the key to producing your product, providing your service or just plain old operating your business for success. So how do you stop your developers from this key business function so they can be Agile? Good question. Well each organization will handle this differently. The best scenario is for the developers to work on their projects and release reliable software on schedule and within budget. Is this always possible? Maybe not. So now what? So, how did I handle this situation? Well, what worked best in my experience is that we assigned a day to each developer where they would do operations related tasks. This time would be calculated into the project that was being worked on so we still could provide a realistic view of the work to be completed in the sprint. Maybe not the best option, but one that worked for me in the past.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj49-Aug2016-Moore-PHOTO
Ralph Moore

Wyoming, USA

 

flag-usa


Ralph Moore
is an experienced professional with more than 20 years in agile and traditional project management as well as roles in IT, Engineering, Telecommunications, Military, Public Safety and Education. Ralph is currently employed by a Wireless Telecommunications Company as the IT Project Manager in the Rocky Mountain region.

Ralph has earned a Master of Information Systems Management (MISM) degree with a Concentration in Information Systems Tools, a Bachelor of Science Technical Management and an Associate of Science Electronic and Computer Technology.

Ralph has earned several industry certifications to include: PMI-Certified Project Management Professional (PMP), PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP), CompTIA Certified Security+, CompTIA Certified Network+, Electronics Technician Association Certified Network Systems Technician (CNST), Federal Communications Commission (FCC), General Radio Telephone License (GROL).

Ralph is a veteran of the US Navy and served three tours in the Persian Gulf. He maintained a TOP-SECRET clearance while in the US Navy. Ralph resides in Fort Bridger, Wyoming, USA with his wife Tracy and their two dogs. To contact – [email protected]