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Welcome to the October 2016 PMWJ

AI, Thinking Machines and Project Management, and Welcome to the August 2016 Edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the October 2016 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 51st edition again reflects the international nature of this publication; 26 original articles, papers and other works by 31 different authors in 13 different countries are included this month.  News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of this journal is to support the global sharing of knowledge, please share this month’s edition with others in your network, wherever in the world they may be.

In July I wondered in this space whether my welcome article should contain more than simply a description of the current month’s contents.  Several readers then suggested that I use this opportunity to mention new trends or important issues that I see as journal editor.  This month I discuss an issue that I think really is new for those in our field to consider, the impact of artificial intelligence and thinking machines on program/project management.

AI, Thinking Machines and Project Management

In August at the 10th UT Dallas Project Management Symposium, I attended a very interesting paper presentation by Schenita Floyd of the University of North Texas titled “Do Machines Hold a Key to Business Success?” (Her paper is republished in the PMWJ this month; don’t miss it.)  In her presentation (and paper), Ms. Floyd described some history and recent developments in artificial intelligence (AI) and the rapid rise of robots and “thinking machines” in various industries.  While her discussion was somewhat general, a light bulb came on for me with regards to the potential impact of this whole topic on the project management field (which I immediately shared with PMI founder Jim Snyder, who was sitting next to me.)

We have all recently seen numerous media stories, and technical and scientific reports, about new developments in AI, including the national commitment and investments occurring in the field of robotics (especially in Japan). This was highlighted during the closing ceremonies of the recently completed Rio Olympic Games during which the 2020 Tokyo Olympics were promoted along with the role that robotics and technology are expected to play there.

But as Ms. Floyd points out, there are many applications of AI already in use in such industries as automotive, defense, manufacturing, health and medical treatment, meteorology, mining, online services, personal services, security and other fields.

With regards to “thinking machines”, computer chips and “smart” applications are embedded in many new consumer and industrial products today, nearly all appliances, much equipment, most machinery, and many new materials used in construction and manufacturing.  The “internet of things” is widely understood and discussed; it is already here and expanding rapidly.  And just this week, the nobel prize in chemistry was awarded to “Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Scottish-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard “Ben” Feringa for making devices (machines) the size of molecules, so tiny that a lineup of 1,000 would stretch about the width of a human hair.” The miniaturization of technology has accelerated these developments.

As I sat listening to Ms. Floyd in August, I thought, “Wow, this is important!  It could change the entire resource planning equation for many programs and projects around the world.  And I have seen nothing in the project management profession or literature about this.”

In addition to the resource planning implications, as Ms. Floyd discusses in her paper, how do we deal with such topics as work planning, communications, leadership, team building and teamwork when teams consist of both humans and machines? How will teams of humans and machines avoid conflicts, maximize productivity, minimize risks (and costs), meet deadlines and accomplish complex tasks together?  Maybe it’s not so complicated today but what about in 5,10 or 20 years?  And if you look at programs and projects in locations that are dangerous or inhospitable to humans (radioactive conditions, natural disasters, under water, deep underground, in outer space, etc.), a majority of team members in the future will probably be robots or thinking machines.

New developments in micro-computing, smart materials and communications technologies are leading to some spectacular opportunities for smart buildings, smart roads, smarter systems and smarter solutions, especially related to energy efficiencies.  I think it’s exciting.

These developments will have a dramatic impact on the world of projects and project management – in all industries where technology, equipment, machinery and materials are used.  Project executives, managers and professionals will need to consider thinking machines as resources for performing things that machines are good at – physical labor requiring certain capabilities, remembering details, processing data, analyzing scenarios, and much more.  They will need to consider AI, thinking machines, miniaturization and smart materials for both creating new products and for how those products will live, act and perform over their life cycles.

I am not offering any great solutions here, just raising these topics as something that the PM profession now needs to consider.  How will project planning, and resource planning in particular, be affected?  What about supply chains and procurement processes?  What is the impact on project teams? These are challenging and exciting Questions!  They are also already here.  Read Ms. Floyd’s paper in the journal this month; then let us both know what you think about this topic.

This month in the Journal

Now for this month’s journal which again contains some interesting and outstanding works.  Eight featured papers are included this month, on some very important topics. The research papers from academic leaders in Nigeria this month are outstanding, related to PPP projects in developing countries, corruption in the construction industry and the use of BIM for engineering and design.  The papers from Kenya and Zimbabwe discuss the application of PM in important social contexts, orphanages and general social work.  Emils Pulmanis’ paper discusses problems with the national eHealth rollout in Latvia. Joseph and Mario Kossman review game technology applications for validating the design of a healthcare project in Cameroon.  And Alan Stretton offers some perspective on just how useful or useless much current research published by project management academic journals seems to be.  These are the kinds of papers that we are looking for, those that share ideas, experience and knowledge that can help make the world a better place. Please check out these good papers this month.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

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David L. Pells

Managing Editor, PMWJ
Managing Director, PMWL

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David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, energy, defense, transit, technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to billions of dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world.

David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  Since 2010 he is an honorary member of the Project Management Association of Nepal.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of PM World Today.  He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs, global organizations and the U.S. federal government.  David has a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master’s degree in business from Idaho State University in the USA.  He has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

 

 

 

4th IPMA Research Conference in Reykjavik, Iceland

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland


Professor Dr Helgi Thor Ingason and Assistant Professor Dr Haukur Ingi Jonasson of the Financial Engineering and Engineering Management Department of Reykjavik University opened the 4th IPMA Research Conference at Reykjavik, Iceland, on 15th September 2016. The theme of the conference was Sustainability in Project Management. Mr Tom Taylor, Vice-President of Association for Project Management (APM), joint founder of Buro Four, principal at dashdot, and Visiting Professor at Salford University, performed the duties of Master of Ceremonies.

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Participants of the 4th IPMA Research Conference (photos courtesy Jouko Vaskimo)

The conference comprised a system of plenary sessions with keynote presentations by renowned experts in project management sustainability, workshops and world café sessions, and a generous offering of social events surrounding the official conference program. The conference, hosted by Reykjavik University, took place at the Nautholl Café next to the Reykjavik University main building on 15th … 16th September 2016, with over 50 participants from over 15 different countries.

The first IPMA Research Conference with the theme Theory meets practice in projects was organized by German Project Management Association (GPM) in November 2013 in Berlin, Germany. The second IPMA Research Conference with the theme How to make the research meet the need of practice in PM was organized by Business School of Nankai University in December 2014 in Tianjing, China. The third IPMA Research Conference with the theme Project management in emerging economies – practice meets research was co-organized by the University of Johannesburg, the Graduate School of Technology Management of University of Pretoria, and the University of Stellenbosch Business School in November 2015 in Cape Town, South Africa. For further information on the IPMA Research Conferences, please navigate to www.ipma.world/research/ipma-research-conferences/ .

A conference dinner was organized on 14th September – before the official program started – in the Nautholl Café. A group of Icelandic project management practitioners pursuing their Master of Project Management degrees at the Reykjavik University delivered a keynote presentation Sustainable development and the message from Paris, providing a general introduction of the term sustainability, to start off the dinner.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

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Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

4th IPMA Research Conference in Reykjavik, Iceland

REPORT

By Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland


Professor Dr Helgi Thor Ingason and Assistant Professor Dr Haukur Ingi Jonasson of the Financial Engineering and Engineering Management Department of Reykjavik University opened the 4th IPMA Research Conference at Reykjavik, Iceland, on 15th September 2016. The theme of the conference was Sustainability in Project Management. Mr Tom Taylor, Vice-President of Association for Project Management (APM), joint founder of Buro Four, principal at dashdot, and Visiting Professor at Salford University, performed the duties of Master of Ceremonies.

 

Participants of the 4th IPMA Research Conference (photos courtesy Jouko Vaskimo)

The conference comprised a system of plenary sessions with keynote presentations by renowned experts in project management sustainability, workshops and world café sessions, and a generous offering of social events surrounding the official conference program. The conference, hosted by Reykjavik University, took place at the Nautholl Café next to the Reykjavik University main building on 15th … 16th September 2016, with over 50 participants from over 15 different countries.

The first IPMA Research Conference with the theme Theory meets practice in projects was organized by German Project Management Association (GPM) in November 2013 in Berlin, Germany. The second IPMA Research Conference with the theme How to make the research meet the need of practice in PM was organized by Business School of Nankai University in December 2014 in Tianjing, China. The third IPMA Research Conference with the theme Project management in emerging economies – practice meets research was co-organized by the University of Johannesburg, the Graduate School of Technology Management of University of Pretoria, and the University of Stellenbosch Business School in November 2015 in Cape Town, South Africa. For further information on the IPMA Research Conferences, please navigate to www.ipma.world/research/ipma-research-conferences/ .

A conference dinner was organized on 14th September – before the official program started – in the Nautholl Café. A group of Icelandic project management practitioners pursuing their Master of Project Management degrees at the Reykjavik University delivered a keynote presentation Sustainable development and the message from Paris, providing a general introduction of the term sustainability, to start off the dinner.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

Finland Project Management Round Up

REPORT

Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter, Olkiluoto 3 and Hanhikivi 1 Nuclear Power Plant Projects, Länsimetro and Raide-Jokeri Transit Projects

By Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Helsinki, Finland


 INTRODUCTION

This roundup introduces Project Management Association Finland and PMI Finland Chapter, and continues the coverage of key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. PMAF was founded in 1978 to promote the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among professionals in all fields of project management. Almost forty years old, PMAF is an active and versatile participant in the global project management community.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF also works as a promoter and an intermediary of good project practices and experiences. PMAF members receive the biannual Projektitoiminta magazine, electronic newsletters, and web services. As of 2015, PMAF has over 4000 individual members.

Mrs. Taina Rämö-Korpinen is the presiding chairman of PMAF, and Mr. Timo Saros the General Manager.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

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Jouko Vaskimo
is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist.

Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258.

Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at [email protected]. For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51.

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

Project Management Update from Buenos Aires

REPORT

New Leadership Community of Interest at PMI Buenos Aires Chapter, PMI in Patagonia, PMI Events in Argentina, PMI Tour Cono Sur 2016 events across South America

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina


Last month we talked about PMI Buenos Aires Chapter Communities of Interest, created in order to analyze and research issues related to project management, share ideas, methodologies and experiences, and above all, enable participants to develop professionally.

Now the news is that the Chapter has a new community of interest called “Leadership”, led by Engineer Adriana Cibelli, volunteer of the chapter, with great professional experience and specialized in leadership and conflict resolution.

The aim of this community is to provide a context for creating and maintaining links between professionals to share experiences and generate specific knowledge and provide an area where it can be found related to the problem of innovative leadership in the local environment solutions. The Community aims to support continuous improvement in project leadership practices as a contribution to the profession. As the rest of the Chapter communities, the Leadership Community of Interest meets monthly with the participation of members of the chapter and those interested in the profession, having conducted a first meeting on September 19 at 6:30 PM.

Other activities developed by the PMI Chapter Buenos Aires we can highlight is the spreading of the profession in a new region of Argentina with the goal of bringing good practices throughout this vast country. In this case, this is the Patagonian Region, the southernmost area of the Americas.

On the context of a Project Management course at the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Comahuein the city of Neuquen, PMI Buenos Aires Chapter volunteers made a presentation to communicate to the audience what is PMI, its objectives and activities, what PMI Chapters are in Argentina as well as Regional Communities.

The event, in which the lectures were by Mario Soruli, Industrial Engineer, and Daniel Clerici, Industrial Engineer, had an audience of over 120 people, including people from industry, teachers and advanced students of Engineering.

More…

To read entire report click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

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CECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent
Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

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 Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector. Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012.  Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016.  Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia.

She can be contacted at [email protected] and www.activepmo.com

To view other works by Cecilia Boggi, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/cecilia-boggi/.

Implementation of the eHealth Project in Latvia

FEATURED PAPER

Project audit perspective

By Emīls Pūlmanis

State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia

Riga, Latvia


Abstract

In order to improve effectiveness of provision of healthcare service, the project implemented by the Ministry of Health- ”E-health in Latvia” is a step towards the right direction. It will provide the possibility for patients to ensure a greater control over their health issues, by maintaining healthy habits, lifestyle, increase substantiation of adoption of decisions and speed of service in the healthcare industry, ensuring quality and accessible information; patients will receive more quality services and in a shorter period of time for issuance of prescription drugs.

Nevertheless, the policy prepared by the Ministry of Health in the area of e-Health will not be implemented in the planned scope and the planned term; therefore the target-to improve the effectiveness of the provision of healthcare services will only be partially achieved.

The project „e-Health in Latvia” is necessary and important for the society, but already from the very beginning there have been substantial deficiencies (errors) – the professionals of industry are not involved in the project, multiple changes of institutions implementing the project, ineffective project management and finally, there has not been sufficient supervision of the project.

This Paper analyzes the implementation of the e-Health Project in Latvia from the audit perspective, showing results from the performance-compliance audit carried out by the supreme audit institution – State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia.

Introduction

Consider as an example a country where the Information and communication technology (ICT) environment and enabling environment for eHealth are both in their early stages. Within this national context, eHealth is project-based, featuring a few small initiatives that are seldom connected to each other. Projects tend to be time-limited, proof-of-concept pilots, where ICT is introduced (or imported) to demonstrate a technology in a limited context. The ICT applications used may themselves be innovative, but the projects are rarely sustainable. They fail because of a lack of infrastructure and skills, a narrow focus on one particular aspect of eHealth that disregards other concerns and impacts, and a lack of ownership by the health entities involved. The use of ICT in the general population in this country is limited to not much more than mobile phones. The commercial ICT market is fragmented, with little local expertise available. The government has no role in funding and technical support for eHealth. This comes instead from aid agencies, donors, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and consultants. In this constrained environment, the country cannot consistently meet its international obligations for public health reporting.

Countries can focus on a range of structured activities that lead to the progressive development of a national eHealth strategy. These include:

  • involving the key health and non-health stakeholders in creating a national eHealth vision and plan and its subsequent implementation.
  • establishing governance mechanisms to provide improved visibility, coordination and control of eHealth activities that occur across the country’s health sector.
  • establishing the strategic context for eHealth to provide the foundation for the eHealth vision and plan, and to enable the government to make informed decisions on whether to pursue opportunities that present themselves from the ICT industry and other stakeholders.
  • forming an understanding of the current eHealth environment in terms of the programmes, projects and eHealth components that already exist.

e-Health policy and project background

The Ministry of Health prepared the planning documents for the development of the e-health on a timely basis, as the use of information and communication technologies rapidly penetrated the health care industry. However, healthcare industry professionals were not involved in the development of planning documents, no feasibility studies, research and analysis of the health care were performed.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Emīls Pūlmanis

Riga, Latvia

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Emīls Pūlmanis
is a member of the board of the Professional Association of Project Managers in Latvia and development project manager at State Audit Office of the Republic of Latvia. He has gained a BSc. in engineer economics, a professional master’s degree in project management (MSc.proj.mgmt) and currently is a PhD candidate with a specialization in project management. He has elaborated and directed a number of domestic and foreign financial instruments co-financed projects. He was a National coordinator for a European Commission-funded program – the European Union’s financial instruments PHARE program in Latvia. Over the past seven years he has worked in the public administration project control and monitoring field. He was a financial instrument expert for the Ministry of Welfare and the European Economic Area and Norwegian Financial Mechanism implementation authority as well as an expert for the Swiss – Latvian cooperation program as a NGO grant scheme project evaluation expert. He has gained international and professional project management experience in Germany, the United States and Taiwan. In addition to his professional work, he is also a lecturer at the University of Latvia for the professional master study program in Project management. He has authored more than 35 scientific publications and is actively involved in social activities as a member of various NGO’s.

Emils can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Emils Pulmanis, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/emils-pulmanis/

 

 

The 10 Laws of Trust

BOOK REVIEW

laws-of-trustBook Title:    The 10 Laws of Trust: Building the bonds that make a business grow
Author:  Joel Peterson with David Kaplan
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   US$15.95         Format:  Hardcover, 128 pages
Publication Date:   2016     ISBN: 9780814437452
Reviewer:     Rodger L. Martin
Review Date:   September 2016

 


Introduction

From the forward-“The 10 Laws of Trust offers specific trust-building ideas and examples of how integrity, respect, humility, vision and more have helped elevate nimble startups, storied corporations and even sinking giants grasping for a lifeline.”

From my observation – The book does offer dialogue around each of the “10 Laws of
Trust.”  However, I don’t agree that these are “Laws.”  They are all important and relevant concepts for a great work environment.  However, they are not laws in the scientific sense, nor the legal sense.  Although still important and desirable for a healthy workplace, they are more guidelines, objectives, or goals.  But that doesn’t make for a catchy title.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The structure starts with a general overview of Trust, followed by a chapter devoted to each “Law:”

  • Start with Personal Integrity
  • Invest in Respect
  • Empower Others
  • Measure What You Want to Achieve
  • Create a Common Dream
  • Keep all Informed
  • Embrace Respectful Conflict
  • Show Humility
  • Strive for Win-Win Negotiations
  • Proceed with Care

It concludes with a chapter on Restoring Trust.

Highlights

It’s an easy read of soft skills.  It does contain several references to companies and individuals who either are trustworthy or prominently demonstrated untrustworthiness.  Each “Law” does have several sub-topics that expand on the meaning of that chapter.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

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Rodger L. Martin, JD, MBA, BSEE, PMP, PMP-ACP

Texas, USA

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Rodger L. Martin
has a broad background in business, law, engineering and Project Management, both plan driven and Agile.  He is a retired US Air Force officer with expertise in rockets and National Ranges.  His work experiences include government, military, public corporations, small business consulting and high-tech non-profit organizations.  For the last 15 years, he has worked on Document Management, Knowledge Management and Process Management/Modeling projects for commercial companies.  He acquired his PMP certification in 2007 and his PMP-ACP in 2015.  He is also a certified Mediator.

Email address: [email protected]

To view other works by Rodger Martin, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/rodger-martin/

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

The Healthy Workplace

BOOK REVIEW

healthy-workplaceBook Title:    The Healthy Workplace: How to Improve the Well-Being of Your Employees – and Boost Your Company’s Bottom Line
Author:  Leigh Stringer, LEED AP
Publisher:  AMACOM
List Price:   US$27.95        Format:  Hardback, 256 pages
Publication Date:   July 2016        ISBN: 978-0814437438
Reviewer:     Larry Barnett, PMP
Review Date:   September 2016

 


Introduction

Leigh Stringer, LEED AP, introduces The Healthy Workplace with a bit of personal humor to describe how the typical workplace of the 21st century may not contribute to the overall health of its workers.

The alarming increase in the cost of care, however, is not humorous.  In fact, a major portion of the cost of health care services goes to treat non-communicable, chronic illness.  Employers are paying a large part of that cost, and are seeing an increasing correlation between employee health and their bottom line.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The first few chapters of The Healthy Workplace discuss the historical development of humans, of industry, and the evolution of work and the human workplace.  They also raise concern about current and recent conditions in the workplace.  The modern workplace, in general, has been slow to respond to any such alarms.  However, some leading companies have been purposefully investing in the overall health of their employees, and are seeing real and lasting benefits.  Stringer discusses how flow, group flow, creativity, and a certain degree of control all work together to reduce stress and increase performance.

The next chapters consider the human physiology and how best to fine-tune it for maximum efficiency and effectiveness.  The author describes how physical movement can counteract the effects of sedentary behavior.  Moreover, she shows how movement can both expend and create energy, while motivating people toward better performance.  An entire chapter is devoted to practical ways of reducing stress and increasing focus.  Another chapter even targets ways to improve sleep habits.

The last two chapters describe how some well-known companies have successfully implemented strategies laid out in The Healthy Workplace.  Examples show how company culture can substantiate a health culture and positively affect the bottom line.  Finally, Ms. Stringer lays out strategies for building a business case for expanding or implementing a Health Initiative.

Highlights

The author closes with a year 2025 projection.  It is a hypothetical tale of two paths — business-as-usual or the evolved workplaceBusiness-as-usual requires little initiative; it leads to a bleak, unhealthy outcome. The path of the evolved workplace leads to healthy people, healthy companies, and healthy economies.  It is the result of a continuing and deliberate mindset shift to The Healthy Workplace.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

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Larry Barnett

Texas, USA

 

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Larry Barnett has broad experience in information technology, IT Project Management, Business Analysis, and Solution Development and Delivery.  His work experience covers a variety of industries, most recently the Energy industry, and previously, Paper & Forest Products.  He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration, Accounting, from Texas Tech University.  Larry is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter, having acquired PMP certification in 2015.  He serves as sergeant-at-arms for Dallas PMI Toastmasters.

Larry can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Secrets to Mastering the WBS

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj51-oct2016-van-nostrand-bookBook Title:    Secrets to Mastering the WBS in Real World Projects, second edition
Author:  Liliana Buchtik, PMP, PMI-RMP
Publisher:  Project Management Institute
List Price: US$ 39.95    Format:  soft cover, 207 pages
Publication Date:   2013     ISBN: 978-1-62825-033–6
Reviewer:     S. Lance Van Nostrand
Review Date:   September 2016

 


Introduction

I read this book as part of my rapid preparation for running a complex deadline driven program to deploy the systems and produce VR content for the Rio 2016 games. With a geographically diverse workforce and many projects to complete I felt the need to subjugate the schedule and task details from the deliverables.  Having all my teams focused on the deliverables made it easier for PMs to make team specific plans, schedules and detailed requirements to align to the overall schedule.  Where alignment was difficult, focus groups would resolve issues without disturbing other teams.

A stated goal of the author, Liliana Buchtik, is to “keep it simple”, provide how-to examples, show alignment with the PMBOK, and clarify how creation of a WBS helps address the project management problem of scope management.  I found this an excellent launch point for me as it provided a quick and practical guide to brush up on the theory since the needs of my practice did not allow for a deep theoretical study.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Twelve chapters for a book of 200 (approx.) pages kept each major topic a bite sized piece that could be consumed quickly during breaks in my day.  Diagrams and bulleted lists helped convey ideas efficiently and propels the reader through the material. Half the book defines the WBS and its practical advantages in scope definition, the second half discusses application of the technique within the larger project phases of inception, execution/QA, monitor and control, delivery.  Chapters 9 and 10 specifically discusses how a WBS is leveraged in the production of other artifacts you might find in a PMO repository (like the plans for risk management, HR, communications, schedule and costs)

Chapter 11 covers ways to use the WBS to help manage multicultural and virtual projects.  This was my situation and helped convince me that my plan to use the WBS as a key program management tool would be successful

Highlights

The “Top 20 Benefits of using the WBS” really helps cement how the WBS fits into an overall management scheme.  Most are good benefits but some seem in contradiction with each other.  Using a WBS to avoid uncontrolled changes (point 2) is great if the requirements of work items are known a-prioi but has little leverage if some work items are unable to be adequately defined up front and their later definition results in requirements that have significant schedule impact. However, the ability to “box in” and constrain the unknowns via the WBS helps to define this risk.

In projects where budgets are required (in my case as part of the sales pitch to win a contract) but before adequate investment in analysis of R&D efforts has been done there will be project work where the best the WBS can do is highlight deliverables that are risky.  I tried to breakdown these areas with more detail early so the risks could be contained but the WBS does not address schedule so time and costs are not helped by the WBS (as might be implied by point 9 where its stated that WBS can make it easier to “identify the budget” and “estimate the duration of each component”, which seems in slight contradiction to the chapter 1 definition of WBS as a scope definition not task or activity list).  However, overall I found most of the listed benefits to be accurate and helpful.

This presentation is the first I’ve seen that formalizes WBS components into Discrete and “Level of Effort” and this treatment makes a huge difference by adding to the WBS relevance as a tool (Chapter 5).  Level of Effort activities (mostly project management activities being treated in the WBS like deliverables) are not readily measured end results but are ongoing activities that must exist and are key to managing a project (schedule management, HR management, stakeholder management, etc).  Too often, time spent in these management activities is hard to account for in project cost accounting but by clearly showing these efforts alongside deliverables (based on the WBS) then everyone on the project including the PMs have a logical WBS item to charge their time against.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

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Lance Van Nostrand

Texas, USA

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Lance Van Nostrand
is the CTO of Immersive Media Company and leads projects, research and operations in a high tech environment of a small company.  Prior work includes system engineering work across multiple facilities for Carestream Health and also the Kodak Research labs.  He has experienced project and portfolio management activities in both small and large companies and understands the striking differences  in the challenges that must be overcome to be successful.

Lance can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Your Project Management Coach

BOOK REVIEW

9781118144244 cover.inddBook Title:    Your Project Management Coach: Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World
Author:  Bonnie Biafore and Teresa Stover
Publisher:  John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
List Price:   $44.99 USA     Format:  Soft Cover, 504 pages
Publication Date:   2012     ISBN: 978-1-118-14424-4
Reviewer:     Charlie Green, PMP
Review Date:   August 2016

 


Introduction

Recently, when I was looking for my next book to read, I happened to see one whose title with the word “coach” in it caught my attention.  I picked up the book and quickly scanned through the pages and I liked what I saw.  It appeared to go deeper and provide some actual suggestions or coaching on the different project management topics. I found that the authors went deeper that just providing the concepts, but also provided some real examples and pitfalls to watch out for.

If a book doesn’t grab my attention, I lose interest quickly and won’t finish reading it or recommend it.  This one did grab my attention and I read it from cover to cover.   I do recommend Your Project Management Coach: Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is broken into six parts with each part having multiple chapters.  Part I, Understanding Projects and Project Management, goes into defining what a project is, the components of a project and some characteristics of a project manager.

Part II, Planning a Project, goes into detail explaining project planning and all of the components that can go into a project plan. As a bonus, the authors have created project forms and artifacts that they explain and use as examples throughout the book and provide a link that a reader can download to modify and use on their own projects.

Part III, goes into details of executing a project.  They give information and suggestions on obtaining project resources, kicking off the project, team building, managing resources and how to have successful project meetings.  Part IV, is on Monitoring and Controlling the project.  Here they explain the importance of gathering project data and keeping an eye on it and how to make corrections as needed.

The Part V, Closing the Project, discusses wrapping up and closing a project, obtaining customer acceptance, and making sure everything is closed out and archived for future reference.  They also share reasons why it is important to capture lessons learned all the way through the project instead of waiting until the end of the project.  Part VI, Taking the Next Steps, discusses Project Management Offices, Project Portfolios and how to select the right projects.

Highlights

At the end of each chapter the authors ask some questions to get the reader to think about what they have read and to make sure the reader comprehended the material just shared.  These are not multiple choice questions, but the reader really needs to think and make sure they understood.  At the back of the book is a section that provides answers to each question throughout the book.

More…

To read entire Book Review, click here

 


 

About the Reviewer

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Charlie Green, PMP

Dallas, TX, USA

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Charlie Green has worked as a project manager since 1985.  He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Texas at Dallas.  He also holds a Project Management Professional certification.  He currently manages software implementation projects in the financial services industry.  Previously he has managed new product, business process improvement, business intelligence and system development projects in the financial, telecommunications, information technology industries and military.  Charlie is retired from the U.S. Air Force Reserve following a 26 year Air Force career.  Charlie is a member of the Dallas, Texas PMI Chapter.

Charlie can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published.  Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. 

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Going Agile with SAP

SECOND EDITION

By Suzanne Mallette

IT Portfolio Manager
Commercial Metals Co.

Irving, Texas, USA


CMC Background

Founded in 1915, Commercial Metals Company and its subsidiaries recycle, manufacture, and market steel and metal products and related materials through a network of locations around the world. CMC is an efficient, high-quality, low-cost producer. With a high degree of vertical integration and is organized into five business segments across two geographic divisions:

CMC Americas:  Americas Recycling, Americas Mills, Americas Fabrication

CMC International:  International Mill, International Marketing & Distribution

Complexity of the Business and Business Drivers for Change

CMC has been on SAP since 2008 with approximately 5000 users. We are a full SAP shop and have implemented a wide range of SAP products. The division that undertook the SAP implementation using Agile is unique because it is unlike other areas of the company since profits are made on both the purchase from the vendor and the sale of scrap material to the end user.

Through contract negotiations on the buy and sell side, unique pricing models exist depending on the vendor/buyer relationship which can include the type of scrap material being purchased and sold. The legacy system the division was previously on was not sufficient for these intricate pricing transactions and left the division managing these contracts manually, through spreadsheets, and required triplicate entries into the legacy system, once for the purchase and another for the sale, then manual reconciliation of the transaction(s) were sent to the vendor or buyer of the scrap materials.

The business driver for change was to streamline their business processes and reduce the effort of data intake and entry processes. Additionally, the division wanted a system that provided a solution for intake that allowed minimal redundancy, eliminated the need for spreadsheets to manage data entry and pricing, and to move off of their legacy system and onto SAP.  The benefits of moving to a new system outweighed remaining in the legacy system and included full automation of their pricing models; reduce risk of errors with manual processes and re-alignment of resources to a more sales focused role.  The ability to drive automation with an end to end solution in place would also allow better reporting capabilities to support better business decisions.  There is a history of unsuccessful attempts at moving this division within CMC from their legacy system to SAP because of their complex business model. The business was apprehensive on giving more time but they come to a point where an increase in overhead with more staff would be required if new business was taken on.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 10th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in August 2016.  It is republished here with permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Suzanne Mallette

Commercial Metals Co.
Irving, TX, USA

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Suzanne Mallette
, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMI-PMP, CSM, is IT Project Portfolio Manager with Commercial Metals Company in Irving, Texas, USA. Background includes a combined 16 years’ experience implementing ERP systems and managing projects. Suzanne has an MBA from the University of Texas at Arlington and a BA in Management Information Systems from Texas Wesleyan University and holds certifications as a Certified Scrum Master, PMIACP and PMP.  She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Do Machines Hold a Key to Business Success?

SECOND EDITION

By Schenita Floyd

Dallas, Texas, USA


Abstract                                                                                    

Artificial intelligence (AI) is here, but can we use it to improve project performance to meet deadlines and stay within budget?  Every project manager knows the project team is the most valuable resource, but with technological advances the new project team may include an artificial intelligence resource such as R2-D2.   Can we as humans work comfortably with Siri, Alexa, R2-D2, and Watson without feeling intimidated or threatened?  Will you listen to your teammate, Deep Blue, or ignore his warnings as rubbish and trust yourself on your next approach?  Project teams are currently working together internationally touching a variety of time zones and cultural differences.  Imagine leading a project team with humans and artificial intelligence machines.  Introducing the new human resource challenge, Man vs Machine!

It may seem intimidating or scary, although there are already many industries using artificial intelligence such as automotive, entertainment, manufacturing, and healthcare.  We can learn from these industries, researchers, sci-fi movies and books.  One known solution discussed in academia is having humans and AIs split tasks based on their individual strengths.  Do not forget about the pitfalls of projects and upper management influences!  Project managers must prepare to deal with bottlenecks from AIs and humans.  Executives will lean more towards using artificial intelligence as a resource because of manageability and cost savings, but project managers must incorporate human guidance, creativity, intuition, judgement, and nuisance.

This paper seeks to explore human insecurities with machines, introduce our future co-workers, and identify ways the new team will work together to benefit the business.

Keywords:  artificial intelligence, project management, robots, human resource, machines

Do Machines Hold a Key to Business Success?

Technology is moving at a rapid speed and more and more businesses are embracing artificial intelligence with billions in investments. According to the Economist magazine (2016), “technology giants are speeding to increase their AI activities and spent $8.5 billion dollars on research, deals, and jobs”.  Businesses are working closely with artificial intelligence researchers to develop and build innovative smart machines of the future.  Siri and Alexa are no longer foolish assistants running a few preprogrammed tasks.  Now, you can have full conversations with Siri as if she is human.  Even Microsoft announced their new product, Conversations as a platform, a host of bots for applications like Skype.  Do machines hold a key to business success?  If you consider recent business investments, then the answer is yes.

What is Artificial Intelligence?

Wikipedia (2016) defines artificial intelligence as “the intelligence exhibited by machines or software or the study and design of intelligent agents, in which an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes action that maximizes its chance of success.”  Ray Kurzweil (2000) in his book the Age of Spiritual Machines defines AI as “the field of research that attempts to emulate human intelligence in a machine. Fields within Artificial Intelligence include knowledge-based systems, expert systems, pattern recognition, automatic learning, natural language understanding, robotics and others.”

The field of AI was founded at a conference on the campus of Dartmouth College in the summer of 1956.  Attendees were John McCarthy, Marvin Minsky, Allen Newell, Arthur Samuel, and Herbert Simon. Artificial Intelligence actually dates back to many early philosophers and to what most people call the father of Artificial Intelligence, an English mathematician named Alan Turning. Alan Turing wrote several papers and the most noteworthy papers were Intelligent Machinery and Computing Machinery and Intelligence where he describe his test to see if a machine had human capabilities, also known as the Turning Test (Wikipedia, 2016).  Kurzweil explains in How to Create a Mind, “if passed a machine has the level of intelligence as a human” (Kurzweil, 2012).

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 10th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in August 2016.  It is republished here with permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

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Schenita A. Floyd

Dallas, Texas, USA

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Schenita Floyd
is a Project Manager with 20 years of experience in managing engineering, marketing, and IT related projects.   She is currently a Project Manager at the University of North Texas in Denton where she is pursuing her PhD in Applied Technology and Performance Improvement.

Schenita graduated with a BS degree in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas and has an MBA in Finance from Southeastern University.  She has a Master’s certificate in Project Management from George Washington University and has held her PMP certification since 2001.

Schenita can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

Applying Lean Methods in Real World Projects

SECOND EDITION

By Wayne Bullard, PMP, LSC

Texas, USA


ABSTRACT

Different companies may see projects differently.  In working for non-PMO firms who are looking to keep costs down while providing optimal project support, Lean has become a successful tool in the arsenal of achievement. Lean allows for stabilizing, standardizing, and simplifying procedures and processes that eliminate wasted time, resources, and costs.  Lean has also served to build understandable models to communicate how the procedure or process relates to the products and/or services provided to customers.

The three case studies cover different real world projects from start to finish merging lean ideas into each because of a corporate culture more inclined toward Six Sigma, Lean, or other methodologies. Instead of digging PMP trenches to battle for the best method, being adaptable opened communication within teams, opportunities to update, and paths to successful completion.

These diverse case studies cover technology for a wireless services optimization project, procurement for a capital approval procedure, and business operations for a real estate selection workflow and tracker.  The paper will illustrate by being flexible to take ownership of a project, the teams met the corporate vision and advanced their project management capabilities.

LEAN BACKGROUND

Lean approaches problems like a scientist seeking knowledge through research. Merriam-Webster defines the Scientific Method as “principles and procedures for the systematic pursuit of knowledge involving the recognition and formulation of a problem, the collection of data through observation and experiment, and the formulation and testing of hypotheses.”

In a similar manner with Lean, the knowledge of the problem has been recognizing “Muda”, or waste, in production. Taiichi Ohno pursuit of eliminating waste starts with asking why five times to uncover the root of the problem for to formulate, test and observe solutions, or “how” to be more productive.  He defines this with the simple equation of

Present capacity = work + waste

The Toyota Production System he developed sought to identify and eliminate waste completely when discovered.  The areas of wastes are:

  • Overproduction
  • Waiting
  • Transportation
  • Processing
  • Inventory
  • Movement
  • Defects

Taiichi Ohno summarizes it simply in an interview. “All we are doing is looking at the time line from the moment the customer gives us an order to the point when we collect the cash.  And we are reducing that time line by removing the non-value-added wastes.”

The start was slow as Mr. Ohno’s implementation was contained in the production line within his responsibility at Toyota.  Management and workers outside of his line were skeptical but one key element allowed him to move forward, leadership acceptance to allow him to make improvements.  It was not until his promotion to a general manager role did it begin to expand into other production lines due to leadership recognizing his achievements and assigned more responsibilities.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally presented at the 10th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in August 2016.  It is republished here with permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


About the Author

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Wayne Bullard, PMP

Texas, USA

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Wayne Bullard
, PMP, LGC has been a practicing project professional since 1996, earning Project Management Professional certification through PMI in 2005, and earning Lean Bronze Certified in 2013 and Lean Silver in 2016.  Wayne has served nonprofits and industries in finance, construction, wireless and telecommunications, community associations, event planning, and manufacturing.  Wayne brings about positive changes for designing and streamlining policies and procedures, reducing waste and expenses, creating technology lifecycle trackers, leading facility and safety best practices in the workplace, managing vendor relationships, contract negotiations, and asset tracking to minimize losses.  He has served roles as IT technology specialist and management, real estate specialist and project manager, facility manager, and Vice President IT Networks. Wayne currently works with corporate real estate, nonprofits, offers mentoring, and is actively planning for his Lean Gold certification.

Wayne can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Experts needed for US TAG for ISO TC 258

COMMENTARY

Experts Are Needed for US Technical Advisory Group to Technical Committee 258 Project, Programme, and Portfolio Management: So Why Should You Participate?

By Rebecca Winston, JD, PMI Fellow

Idaho, USA


Upfront it should be noted that in other participating and observing countries the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is referred to as the Mirror Committee.  If you are reading this article as someone domiciled in one of those countries and after reading this article would like to participate in Technical Committee 258 (TC 258), you should contact the Standards Organization in your country of domicile or the Mirror Committee contact or the Secretariat of TC 258, Karl Best, at [email protected].

So what is the US TAG responsible for within the umbrella of ISO and in particular TC 258:  Project, Programme, and Portfolio Management?  The US TAG is the body under the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that is responsible for the following items:

  • determining the U.S. positions on various draft standards, draft documents, agenda items and ballots;
  • submitting U.S. proposals for New Work Items and where applicable working drafts;
  • providing adequate U.S. representation to ISO TC 258 meetings by designating the US head of delegation and members of delegations; and,
  • nominating U.S. technical experts, known as Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) and representatives to serve on ISO working groups, study groups, and other ad hoc groups as approved by the TC or appointed by the TC Chair.

Membership to the US TAG is based on experience in the Project Management field and current US TAG interest category balance per the Operating Procedures of the US TAG.  To be considered for membership, one should send an email to Lorna Scheel, administrator of the US at [email protected].  She will contact the interested party and set up a conference call to discuss the US TAG and what the two categories of being a member means:  participating and observing.  If the party is interested in being a member in either of those two categories of membership, Ms. Scheel will send an application to be completed by the requesting party.  Once the application is completed, the application should be sent to Ms. Scheel and she will forward the application to the US TAG for consideration and input.

If the majority of the US TAG members vote to accept the requesting party as a new member, fees will be processed according to membership type selected.  Ms. Scheel will explain the membership fees.  Fees are used to support her position and travel as the Administrator.  Note, the fees do not completely cover her support, but do defray those costs.

So why should any SME want to participate?

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author

rebecca-winston
Rebecca Winston, JD

Former Vice-Chair, Chair, Fellow – PMI®
Idaho, USA

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Rebecca (Becky) Winston
, Esq., JD, PMI Fellow, is a former Chair of the board of the Project Management Institute (PMI®). An experienced expert on the subject of project management (PM) in the fields of research & development (R&D), energy, environmental restoration and national security, she is well known throughout the United States and globally as a leader in the PM professional world.  Becky has over 30 years of experience in program and project management, primarily on programs funded by the US government.  She is a graduate of the University of Nebraska’s College of Law, Juris Doctorate (1980), in Lincoln, Nebraska and has a Bachelor’s of Science (BS) degree in Education from Nebraska Wesleyan University She is a licensed attorney in the states of Iowa and Nebraska, USA.

Active in PMI since 1993, Rebecca Winston helped pioneer PMI’s Specific Interest Groups (SIGs) in the nineties, including the Project Earth and Government SIGs, and was a founder and first co-chair of the Women in Project Management SIG. She served two terms on the PMI board of directors as director at large, Secretary Treasurer, Vice Chair (for two years), and Chair (2002). She was elected a PMI Fellow in 2005.  She has served as a reviewer of the Barrie Student paper for the PMI Educational Foundation for several years.  She is also a member of the American Bar Association and the Association of Female Executives in the United States.

Ms. Winston periodically serves as an advisor to organizations such as the National Nuclear Security Administration (USA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on topics ranging from Program and Project Management to project reviews, risk management and vulnerability assessments. She has also been serving on the Air Force Studies Board for five years for the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

Since 2008 she has also served in the capacity of Chair of the US Technical Advisory Group and Head of Delegation for Technical Committee 258:  Project, Programme, and Portfolio Management, as well as serving on the various Working and Study Groups drafting guidance standards. She has extensive recent PM experience in the areas of alternative energy, national defense and security, and has worked closely with local, regional and national officials, including Congress and the Pentagon.  She is also a global advisor to the PM World Journal and Library.

Becky can be contacted at [email protected].

 

 

From Re-Covering to Recovering Projects that Went Bad

ADVISORY

Projects do not fail. People fail them.

By Charles Villanyi Bokor

The CERP Group

Ottawa, CANADA


Aim of the Study: To advance the knowledge, interest and methodology that corporations and Recovery Project Leaders (RPL) need to undertake a project that was made to perform significantly below expected and/or vital results and is about to fail. To explore the fundamental elements of a methodology for recovering failing projects, as well as the implications of a recovery and by extension inspire future reflections to pro-actively prevent certain failures.

Implications of the Findings

  1. Every 2nd project does not have to be in trouble and if it was managed to the brink of failing, it does not have to fail.
  2. In order to recover a project that was made to fail, executives must first explicitly acknowledge that it is failing and resolve to recover it.
  3. In order to achieve significantly better results (produce project outputs) than what was achieved, project development will have to be approached and governed significantly differently.
  1. Leading a Recovery Project is much more about establishing relationships, than following processes.

Abstract

No matter who is counting, too many projects are made to fail. According to most estimates, one out of two projects is made to track behind the original schedule, cost more than the original budget and deliver less functionality than defined or more than needed. While the foregoing is significant, what is more significant is that such projects will also produce less value to the organization than what was estimated in the Business Case. Without making significant changes to the way failing projects are developed and governed, they can only be expected to go from bad to worst.

When the problem(s) with a failing project is(are) reluctantly examined, the ensuing reaction is predominantly to accentuate the close tracking, finger pointing and the command and control procedures that may in fact have produced the problem. Maintaining the same mindset, methodology and project governance prolongs the destructive cycle. This research paper is a summary of the 0+2 Steps Project Recovery© methodology (a body of practices, processes, and rules) that proved effective when used to get a bad or failing project back on track. This innovative project development methodology is not instead of but in addition to and totally compatible with other project management best practices. It is a guide for the experienced Recovery Project Leader and project stakeholders involved with implementing and deploying a large project in a difficult organizational environment or with significant constraints. It reviews a handful of sine qua non requirements and the imperative to have the organization’s resolve.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Charles Bokor

Ottawa, Canada

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Charles Villanyi Bokor
is a Strategic Management Consultant focused on Leading to Better Decisions. Principal activities include Business Transformation, Problem Project Recovery & Leadership, Strategic Planning. Charles works mostly in Ottawa but has successfully completed assignments in Florida, Wales, Malaysia, Sweden and Australia, and was key-note speaker in Johannesburg South Africa and Victoria BC. Formal education includes an Executive Development and Diploma in Management (McGill University), M.Sc. Mathematics (Université de Grenoble, and U. de Montréal) and B. Sc. Mathematics (Concordia University). He was: Program Director of the Corporate Performance Management Program, Sprott, Carleton; Director of IS/IM at Royal Trust; and at Northern Telecom; CMC; CMC Board Member; PMI-OVOC Board Member; Governor of ICCC; is ITIL Certified and a TBS Independent Project Reviewer.

Charles can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Risk: the role for communication

SERIES ARTICLE

Communicating Projects – The Series

By Ann Pilkington

The PR Academy

United Kingdom


PR and communication practitioners can derive huge benefits from adopting the principles of project management. One example of this is the area of risk.  Projects also benefit greatly from involving communication colleagues in the risk identification process.

From a project manager’s perspective, risk is often thought about in terms of risk to the project being able to deliver.  This means that reputational risks to the wider organisation can sometimes be missed.  This is where the PR/communication input is valuable.  PR as defined by the UK Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) is all to do with reputation:

Public Relations is about reputation – the result of what you do, what you say and what others say about you.  Public Relations is the discipline which looks after reputation, with the aim of earning understanding and support and influencing opinion and behaviour. It is the planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain goodwill and mutual understanding between an organisation and its publics.

Damage to the wider organisation’s reputation can impact on project deliverables – suddenly there can be angry stakeholders to deal with and the project’s objectives can be questioned. Clearly these wider risks may not all sit on a project risk register and will need to be escalated, but flagging them up means that there should be no surprises for the wider organisation. It also helps the internal reputation of the project to be seen to be thinking at an organisational level.

Wider reputational risk can be spotted during a thorough PEST analysis and a good communication lead will want to start there, but it can be important to look more widely as a PEST may have been done very much with the impact on the project in mind – not the wider organisation.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project communications is by Ann Pilkington, founding director of the PR Academy (UK) and author of the book Communicating Projects published by Gower in 2013.  Ann is one of the UK’s leading experts on communications; she shares her knowledge with project managers and teams around the world in this series in the PM World Journal.

 


 

About the Author

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Ann Pilkington

United Kingdom

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Ann Pilkington
is the author of Communicating Projects published by Gower in 2013.  She is a founding director of the PR Academy which provides qualifications, training and consultancy in all aspects of communication including change project communication and project management.

Information about Ann’s book, Communicating Projects, An End-to-End Guide to Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Effective Communication, can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/isbn/9781409453192.

Ann can be contacted at [email protected]

To see previous articles by Ann Pilkington, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ann-pilkington/

 

Vision, Mission and Policies for OPBM and PBMO

SERIES ARTICLE

Establishing Vision, Mission and Policies for Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) and the Enterprise-Level Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) – Executive Overview

Series on Project Business Management and the PMO

By Darrel G. Hubbard, PE 
President, D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC
California, USA

and

Dennis L. Bolles, PMP
President, DLB Associates, LLC
Michigan, USA


Introduction

Executives should view organizational project management as a specific business management con­struct or concept just like Financial Management, Accounting Management, Information Technology Man­agement, Production Management, Engineering Management, or Operations Management—each of which report to the enterprise’s executive level and provide specific business or technical services and support, on an enterprise-wide basis. That is why we use our term of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) to emphasize the business aspects represented by the concept of organizational project manage­ment. Organizational Project Business Management, as with Accounting Management, requires a func­tional organization to provide, implement, and maintain the necessary and associated infrastructure within the enterprise. For OPBM, that functional organization is the Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) operating at the senior executive-level. A chief project officer, who reports directly to the chief executive officer, leads the PBMO and is responsible for implementing and managing Project Business Management on an enterprise-wide basis.

For OPBM to be inculcated across the enterprise, the enterprise’s long-term business vision and mission for Organizational Project Business Management must be explicitly defined, cover the implementation and use of the Project Business Management Organization, and be formally issued and mandated by executive management.

Need for Visions, Missions, and Policies

Executives and senior managers need to care about establishing formal institutionalized vision, mission, and policy statements for all of the enterprise’s operational business management functional organizations, that are required to implement and manage those business management functions enterprise-wide, including Organizational Project Business Management, and its Project Business Management Organization.

Why? Because, a properly integrated set of vision, mission, and policy statements accommodates the numerous business and management factors driving the enterprise’s project-portfolios, project-programs, and projects, improves organizational communication, reduces procedural deficiencies, minimizes lost time, and optimizes resource distribution and application. Formally stated visions, missions, and policies enhance the psychological and occupational work environment and improve the physical business environment in which we all live and work. In today’s competitive, litigious, and project environments, a structured, communicated, and concise set of current visions, missions, policies, and the supporting system of methodologies, processes, procedures, and practices is a simple and effective means of establishing and maintaining prudent project/program/portfolio business management. It is a proven means of helping sustain profitability and delivering value and benefits. It is also the first and best defense against un-welcomed litigation.

Formalized visions, missions, and policies must exist to support the enterprise’s development of the methodologies and processes and are required to generate the formal implementing procedures and prac­tices. These documents support the enterprise’s staff so they can repeatedly make the same types of prudent business decisions while routinely and successfully performing the same kinds of tasks. Visons, missions, policies, and procedures establish a large portion of the business environment in which operational and project/program/portfolio personnel work, and they are an important determinant role in instituting organ­izational effectiveness. They direct or influence how personnel resources perform work and how other types of resources are used effectively and efficiently. From a human and organizational effectiveness standpoint, those policies and procedures also determine how personnel reach decisions; how personnel perform when doing their work; and how the enterprise reacts to the performance of portfolio, program, and project per­sonnel.

An enterprise’s set of vison, mission, and policy statements are also indicative of an enterprise’s value system—its beliefs about employee behavior, its concepts of community, and its professional responsibil­ity. What an enterprise espouses will establish how the enterprise is perceived by its employees, customers, suppliers, regulators, shareholders, stakeholders, and community.

Therefore, enterprises must ensure their OPBM and PBMO vision, mission, and policy statements are consistent with the enterprise’s overall vision, mission, values, culture, beliefs, and long-term business strategies and business objectives.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: Bolles and Hubbard are the authors of The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management (PBMconcepts, 2014); A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts (PBMconcepts, 2012); and A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts (PBMconcepts, 2016).  This series of articles is based on their books, research, courses and executive consulting experience.

 


 

About the Author

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Dennis
L. Bolles, PMP

Michigan, USA

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Dennis Bolles
, PMP, President – DLB Associates, LLC, has over forty-five years of experience in multiple industries providing business and project management professional services. He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their business strategic objectives with the analysis of their business process improvement needs and development of business and project management capabilities.

He has been a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI) since 1985, received his PMP® certification in 1986 (#81), and is a founding member of the PMI Western Michigan Chapter, serving on its Board of Directors and in several positions since its 1993 inception.

Bolles performs speaking engagements and assists Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) start-up teams begin the planning and implementation processes; conducts on-site organizational project management capability assessments; provides virtual and periodic on-site support for development of business and project management methodologies, policies, procedures, processes. systems, tools, and templates for organizational governance and corporate strategy; assists in the implementation of a project business management methodology that integrates strategic planning, business objective development, portfolio management, program management, and project management processes to achieve strategic objectives and maximize operational efficiency enterprise-wide through the development and management of Project Management Organizations.

Bolles served as the PMI Standards Project Manager who led the project core team to a successful completion and on-time delivery of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition in 2004. He has served on and has contributed to multiple PMI Standards bodies over the past 20 years.

He is a published author of many project management articles, is a PMI Congress/ Symposium/Chapter speaker, and author of Building Project Management Centers of Excellence, AMACOM, NY, 2002. He is the co-editor of The PMOSIG Program Management Office Handbook, JRoss, 2010. He is the co-author with Darrel G. Hubbard of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2012 and  of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2015. He can be contacted at [email protected] and at LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/dlballc01. Visit the www.PBMconcepts.com for information about current and future book projects.

To view other works by Dennis Bolles, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dennis-bolles/

 

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Darrel G. Hubbard, P.E.

California, USA

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Darrel G. Hubbard
is President of D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC providing executive consulting and assessment services. He has over 50 years of experience in consulting, line management, and technical positions. He has served as a corporate executive officer; managed the due diligence processes for numerous mergers and acquisitions; managed information technology, proposal, accounting, and project control organizations; was a program manager on engineering projects; was a project manager on commercial projects; and a designated “key person” under government contracts. He has also held executive positions in, and was professionally licensed in, the securities and insurance industries.

He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their en-terprise’s strategic business and tactical objectives. He provides analysis of their man-agement structures, business processes, general business operations, and project man-agement capabilities, while supplying specific recommendations on business, methodology, and process improvements. Mr. Hubbard also assists companies, as an out-side third party, with the intricacies of the due diligence process in their merger and acquisition activities. He also supports companies in the managerial development and establishment of their Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) and provides work­shops and seminars focusing on the business management aspects of project management.

Mr. Hubbard holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics with a minor in chemistry from Minnesota State University at Moorhead. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Control Systems in California. Mr. Hubbard joined the Project Management Institute (PMI) in 1978 (#3662), is a charter member of the PMI San Diego Chapter, and was deputy project manager for the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition ANSI Standard by PMI. He was the Exhibitor Chairperson for the 1993 PMI North American Congress/Seminar/Symposium, is a published author of many articles, a presenter at several PMI Congresses and other Project Management Symposiums, and a guest speaker at PMI and IIBA Chapter meetings. Darrel is also a Life-Member of the International Society of Automation (ISA).

He is a contributing author to The AMA Handbook of Project Management, AMACOM, 1993 and The ABCs of DPC: A Primer on Design-Procurement-Construction for the Project Manager, PMI, 1997. He is the co-author with Dennis L. Bolles of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of Enterprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume I: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – PBMconcepts, MI, 2012 and  of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2016. He can be contacted at [email protected] and LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/DarrelGHubbard Visit www.PBMconcepts.com for information about current and future book projects.

To view other works by Darrel Hubbard, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darrel-g-hubbard/

 

Risk Communication Through Storytelling

SERIES ARTICLE

Risk Doctor Briefing

By Joachim Adebayo Adenusi, CFIRM

The Risk Doctor Partnership

UK and Nigeria


Albert Einstein is reported as saying “Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” A lot of our risk communication is very logical but not very imaginative. Experience shows that people listen better if the message is presented attractively, and storytelling is one powerful way to achieve that goal. An expressively-told story grabs the attention of the listener and creates vivid images in their minds which aid understanding and retention of the underlying message, especially when we’re dealing with concepts of uncertainty and risk.

What makes storytelling unique as a communication method?

  • Stories translate difficult concepts into a concrete form that can be handed down verbally or in written form, helping to shape and preserve culture.
  • Storytelling is interactive and flexible, causing the listeners to engage with the story and the storyteller.
  • A strong connection is formed between the storyteller and the listener, allowing the message to penetrate to the listener’s subconscious mind.
  • Stories engage reluctant or unbelieving listeners who would not listen to the same message if it was communicated in a more traditional form.
  • A well-told story stimulates creative thinking, and allows listeners to use their own imagination to put themselves in the story.
  • Hearing a story together creates a positive group identity.

The use of stories to communicate key messages has been part of the African heritage for many years. In pre-colonial times, many villages faced huge challenges that could only be overcome by careful planning and strong leadership. For example, when facing enemy invasion, the community leader would develop a detailed plan to defend the village and defeat the invaders. But then he had to encourage and motivate the community to implement the plan.

More…

To read entire article, click here

 


 

About the Author

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Joachim Adenusi, CFIRM, ACII, MSc

Nigeria & UK

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Joachim Adebayo Adenusi
is an expert risk management consultant and an Associate with The Risk Doctor Partnership (www.risk-doctor.com), offering specialist risk management consultancy and training. He is Director of Inspirational Risk Management Services Limited, a risk management business based in the UK, providing a wide range of risk consultancy, training and audit services. He is also Director of Conrad Clark, a risk consultancy with businesses in both the UK and Nigeria.

Joachim is a passionate and inspirational risk professional with over 22 years’ work experience across different sectors. He is a keen promoter of performance-based Enterprise Risk Management, and he has developed a unique approach to ERM based on these principles.

Joachim currently advises major UK financial services and underwriters on implementing and embedding Basel ll and Solvency II requirements. His main focus is on adding value to organisations and demonstrating efficiency, savings, performance improvement, profitability and waste reduction through effective management of risk.

Joachim won the UK Public Sector Risk Manager of the Year award in 2009-10, and was highly commended in the European Strategic Management Awards in 2007 and 2008. He is a risk certified trainer and a chartered insurer (ACII), and a Chartered Fellow (CFIRM) and former Director of the UK Institute of Risk Management (IRM).

He is also the founder and chairman of the Nigerian Risk Awards, which exists to promote and recognise excellence in risk management in Nigeria. The awards have been running successfully since 2013, with categories across all major sectors, and they have gained a reputation as a highlight of the risk calendar in the country.

Email: [email protected]

 

Leading Extreme Projects: Strategy, Risk and Resilience in Practice

SERIES ARTICLE

Advances in Project Management Series

Dr. Alejandro Arroyo and Dr. Thomas Grisham

Argentina, Australia, Canada, Switzerland, USA

and around the world


Imagine a Project Manager leading a Consortium for an integrated gas field program in the Peruvian Rain Forest — program that includes construction of an energy site in the Americas that involves Peruvians, Argentines, Swedes, and Americans.  It is a huge program in the Peruvian rainforest requiring a complex logistic operation carried out by three different consortia on a tight schedule, and in demanding topography. It includes new infrastructure, ocean shipping, port operations, ground transportation, aerial operations, and river barging.  It also includes indigenous communities, politics, drug trafficking exposure, and “shining path” events (Shining Path is a brutal Maoist political group in Peru).

All of these elements are components of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), and they play an important role in all projects, especially global ones.  People have discussed and debated ethics for thousands of years, and the relationship between capitalism and socialism.  Needless to say, the debate continues and there are as many visions of CSR as there are people.  For example, the USA passed the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which forbids bribing a foreign official.  If an organization is found guilty, the CEO goes to jail, in theory.  But, a criminal offense in the USA is an accounting issue in Germany where bribes were, at one time, a tax deduction.  Thus the rules and the application of the rules vary widely, and the rules in the Peruvian rain forest are far more flexible than in the Western world.  Can you imagine leading such an endeavor?

In a new work, the authors use Case Studies to demonstrate what was actually done on a number of extreme projects such as the one described above, to illustrate the challenges, and to recommend steps that can be taken to help diminish the impact upon future projects. We have explained and developed the structure of each Case Study in detail but the names of the actual participants have been changed.  By extreme projects we mean those conducted in demanding physical, political, multi-cultural, multi-country, multi-organizational global environments, and were often the operational windows turn out to be as tight as they are unpredictable.  Or as Cockburn and Smith write in a recent article in this column, VUCA projects that are volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous!  The Case Studies encompass the Americas, Africa, and Asia, and cover the extractive industries portion of the author’s experience as well as transportation infrastructure-related projects.

Examples of issues which the authors have encountered often, in all sectors of our global economy include:

  • JV or alliance partners with different goals and objectives
  • Suppliers and vendors with questionable ethics and hidden agendas
  • The importance of effective logistics
  • The need for political fluency and competence
  • The need for cultural fluency and competence
  • The need for strong leadership
  • The need for multidisciplinary teams, and interdisciplinary leadership
  • The importance of principled leadership
  • A strong understanding of local communities and societies
  • A lack of infrastructure
  • A lack of operational monitoring and financial control
  • Poor communications
  • A lack of concern for the environment

We consider it critically important to lead projects from conceptualization, through design and construction, and into operations, utilizing what we call Collaborative Project Enterprises (CPE’s).   A CPE is naturally constructed of diverse interdisciplinary teams with a variety of organizational goals…

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

Editor’s note: The Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books previously published by Gower in UK and now by Routledge. Information about the series can be found at https://www.routledge.com/Advances-in-Project-Management/book-series/APM

 


 

About the Authors

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Dr Alejandro Arroyo

Argentina, Australia, Canada, Sweden
Many other countries

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Alejandro Arroyo
has more than 30 years’ experience as operator and consultant in global project logistics, stakeholder management, environmental management, operations optimization, and strategic contextual assessment with respect to mining, oil and gas, hydropower, infrastructure, nuclear power and alternative energy projects. Alejandro has worked for and cooperated with a long list of well-known companies both in the natural resources and global transportation industry such as Pan American Silver, Silver Standard, Aura Minerals. Talisman Energy, Talon Metals, AECL-CANDU, Areva, ABB, Alstom, Galaxy Resources, FMC Lithium, Hunt Oil, ZIM Israel Navigation,  and many others.  He is at present lecturing on global operations, international business, and project-related topics at various universities in Latin America and Canada further to running his own company SOUTHMARK LOGISTICS with branches across South America and worldwide operations. His credentials include a Bachelor’s degree in Maritime Business (UMM, Buenos Aires, Argentina), Master’s degree in Marine Economics and Operations (WMU, Malmo, Sweden), MBA in Marine Resource Management (AMC, Launceston, Australia), and Doctor of Project Management (REMIT University, Melbourne, Australia).

 

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Dr Thomas Grisham

Switzerland, UK, USA
Many other countries

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Dr Thomas Grisham
has over 45 years of experience on domestic and international business and programs up to US$3 billion in the power, infrastructure, transportation, education, commercial, communications, manufacturing, business development, and dispute resolution sectors. This experience has been gained in 73 countries across a variety of business models, with expat assignments in Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and part-time in India, Spain, and the UK. He has over 16 years of research and teaching experience at all levels in numerous universities, in a variety of countries, currently in Switzerland. He provides executive education in numerous countries, with over 400 companies, from Alcatel-Lucent to ZTE. His has written two books, portions of two others, and is an arbitrator for AAA and ICDR, and is a member of the Economist Magazine panel for the good judgment project. Dr Grisham can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

 

The essence of collaboration: Extending our reach and potential

SERIES ARTICLE

Advances in Project Management

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management
University of Hertfordshire

United Kingdom


It is sometimes said that competition makes us faster, but collaboration makes us better.

The Oxford Dictionary defines collaboration as “the action of working with someone to produce something”.

While collaboration enables two or more parties to work together on a shared purpose in order to attain a particular benefit, implying a good fit with project practice, the various project management bodies of knowledge and IPMA’s newly released Individual Competence Baseline say little about what it is and how it may apply to projects.

Major initiatives and projects often require collaboration across a team, or between different teams and organisations, in order to enhance competitiveness or performance. Collaborating teams are often large, virtual, diverse, specialised and distributed. Collaboration can therefore take place in one of two forms:

  • Synchronous, where the team interacts in real time (often as a co-located team housed to facilitate physical collaborative and joint working in close proximity, or electronically, via online meetings, instant messaging, Skype or other joint working platform)
  • Asynchronous, where interactions are time-shifted, geographically dispersed, or are simply designed to allow a group to collaborate at times that suit individual participants. Shared documents, workspaces and Wiki pages allow such teams to work together. More recent examples include crowdsourcing efforts, combining the best of crowd participation and outsourcing to tackle complex, detailed and demanding assignments by groups of interested participants who are able to divide the work and focus on achieving the wider purpose through this division of labour and expertise

Standardising collaboration

The British Standards Institute has an established standard on Collaborative Business Relationships. BS 11000, which forms the basis of the forthcoming international ISO 11000 standard, notes that in business, as in other walks of life, teamwork can pay real dividends and companies that work together can often achieve much more than they can achieve alone.

The standard advises that collaborative business relationships can take many forms, including: (private or public) strategic business partnerships, supplier relationships, consortia and alliance partnering, shared services, collaborative procurement, divisional relationships and client or customer relationships. In short, many of the arrangement utilised in complex or large projects would qualify as collaboration initiatives.

BS 11000 provides the strategic framework required to establish a successful collaboration and enables organisations to focus their effort through an eight-stage approach covering the following steps:

More…

To read entire article, click here


Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books previously published by Gower in the UK and now by Routledge.  Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower/Routledge Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  To learn more about the book series, go to https://www.routledge.com/Advances-in-Project-Management/book-series/APM. Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ. 

 


 

About the Author

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Darren Dalcher, PhD

Series Editor
Director, National Centre for Project Management
University of Hertfordshire, UK

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Darren Dalcher
, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI, SFHEA is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK.  He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London.  Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management.  Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond.  He is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board.  Prof Dalcher is an academic editorial advisor for the PM World Journal.  He can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Prof Darren Dalcher, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darren-dalcher/.