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The Project Manager’s Guide to Mastering Agile

Book Review

pmwj38-Sep2015-Mehrooz-BOOKBook Title: The Project Manager’s Guide to Mastering Agile: Principles and Practices for an Adaptive Approach
Author: Charles G. Cobb
Publisher: Wiley
Format: Soft cover; 403 pages   
List Price: $65.00
Publication Date:  January 2015           
ISBN: 978-1-118-99104-6
Reviewer: Nazanin Mehrooz, PMP, CSM, SA
Review Date:    August 2015


Introduction to the Book

Many industries and organizations are moving away from use of waterfall methodology and adapting agile. Some project managers find themselves more comfortable with using the waterfall approach to manage their project and find it challenging to adapt to this new approach. This book is intended to help them understand agile principles and find ways to transition to the new approach more smoothly. The book also raises visibility into areas where a blend of both approaches may be beneficial to organizations based on the type of work that needs to be managed. Understanding the limitations and benefits of each approach will help project managers address this need better.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is broken down into the following parts:

  1. Fundamentals of Agile
  2. Agile Project Management
  3. Making Agile Work for a Business
  4. Enterprise-Level Agile
  5. Case Studies
  6. Appendices

There are a total of 22 chapters and 4 appendices. The book serves well as a textbook course with summaries of key points and questions which will deepen the understanding and foster additional discussions at the end of each chapter. These would be ideal topics to start additional discussions in related forums or mentoring sessions.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

Often when you read books about agile, I discover page after page about all the negative aspects of utilizing waterfall methodology. What I liked about this book is that it raised awareness that some parts of a project may be better managed in a waterfall process based on the type of work and external dependencies. It also helped to understand the limits of each approach rather than thinking there is a magic bullet which covers everything. The focus should be a more balanced integration of both rather than a competitive approach of picking the best methods. Many organizations are utilizing a hybrid approach between the two and discovering it serves them well.

Highlights: What I liked!

I really liked the way this book was laid out. It has a great deal to offer for everyone. It provides a good starting point of understanding why agile has become more popular and the benefits it offers. It clearly describes the different roles, principles and values in simple language and offers sufficient details around each to reinforce the concepts nicely.

Additionally, it provided best practices around backlog grooming, pattern-based development approaches and automation testing. For those who have already had exposure to the agile principles and benefits, the author provided other valuable insights in this book by sharing how to utilize various tools to enhance communication capabilities for both co-located and distributed teams.

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About the Reviewer

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Mehrooz-PHOTONazanin Mehrooz, PMP, CSM, SA

North Texas, USA

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Nazanin Mehrooz is a certified project manager, scrum master and SAFe Agilist. Nazanin started her career as a software developer and transitioned to leading mid-size teams as a functional manager and (most currently) a senior project manager and Release Train Engineer in Technology Services at BNSF. Her background includes managing a portfolio of 30+ projects with budgets exceeding 15 Million USD. Nazanin is an active volunteer for the PMI Dallas and Fort Worth Chapters. Email: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management for Supplier Organizations

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj38-Sep2015-GallardoEstrella-BOOKBook Title:   Project Management for Supplier Organizations
Author: Adrian Taggart
Publisher: Gower Publishing Limited
List Price:   $119.95         
Format: Hardcover
Publication Date:   March 2015   
ISBN: 978 1 4724 1109 9
Reviewer:     Luis Gallardo Estrella
Review Date: August 2015


Introduction

I have been working in project management for more than 5 years. All my experience has been as a contractor for a major client needing help with project management. Even though I have an idea of the interaction between a client and supplier, I never fully understood the relation in so many aspects until I read Project Management for Supplier Organizations.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is 270 pages long divided into 4 parts with 18 chapters.

Part 1 – The Challenge of Projects

Part 2 – The Perspective of the Supplier Organization upon Projects

Part 3 – Aligning the Interests of Owner and Supplier Organizations

Part 4 – Selected Project Management Techniques for Supplier Organizations

Highlights

Part 1 of the book defines a project, the different organization structures, how people respond to different matrix organizations, and project lifecycle. The author gives yet another example of a unique project versus a routine operation. He also describes the different types of matrix organizations and the interaction with people.

Part 2 discusses the perspectives between an owner and supplier organization within a project. It compares and contrasts lifecycle models, opportunities and risks, and classifications of the supplier organization within the owner organization based on their project management role.

Part 3 relates the interests of supplier and owner organizations. It states how the project lifecycles are connected, the design of the procurement chain, the different types of payment and contract models, and change management.

Part 4 takes us back more into what we have seen in project management. It describes who to do marketing in a project environment, how to sell, talks about estimating techniques, and project management.

Highlights: What I liked!

From part 1 of the book, the thing I liked the most is how the author illustrates the difference between routine operations and unique projects in a chart. This figure gives you a vivid idea about the differences. The author also has a chart in which he describes the contrast between task-oriented and function-oriented organizations.

Part 3 of this book was very good. He describes different types of owner and supplier organizations He shows us their different project lifecycles and the relationship between them. What I liked the most is how the author describes the connection between the supplier and owner organizations. He also comments of the different types of contracts within this relationship and provides tips as to which type of contract and payment form is better depending on the project.

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About the Reviewer

 
pmwj38-Sep2015-GallardoEstrella-PHOTOLuis Gallardo Estrella, PMP®, CSM®

Texas and Mexico

Mexico - small

 

 

Luis Gallardo Estrella has 13 years of experience in IT including the last 7 years as a project manager in the banking and retail industries. His current experience is as a technical project manager for Bank of America under the Global Wealth and Investment Management (GWIM) Line of Business (LOB). Luis considers himself to be an effective leader who is very goal-oriented, a planning specialist, comfortable leading with all levels of technical resources and always trying to innovate business processes, having a proven success record in delivering IT projects. He has also helped his current team with process improvements to focus on project delivery that include improving forms to streamline work and helping build and manage the team’s SharePoint site.

He recently obtained his PMP® and ScrumMaster® (CSM) from Scrum Alliance.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Portfolio Management: A Strategic Approach

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj38-Sep2015-Awolesi-BOOKBook Title: Portfolio Management: A Strategic Approach
Author: Ginger Levin and John Wyzalek
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   $69.95
Format: Print/eBook
Publication Date:   20140829      
ISBN: 13-978-1-4822-5104
Reviewer:     Chinwe Fran Awolesi
Review Date: July 2015

 


Introduction

Portfolio Management: A strategic Approach provides a practical and comprehensive compilation of the expertise of Portfolio Management for Project, Program, Portfolio and Operation managers and executives of organizations of any size. It documents standards promoted by professional bodies (PMI, MoP) and accredited individuals as well as tested strategies that has evolved from the growth and use of Portfolio Management by highly experienced professionals from around the world – Americas, Europe, Middle East, Africa and Australia.

It is a reference manual for Portfolio, Program and Project Management professionals, as well as team members wanting to understand why and how governance decisions are made in prioritizing and selecting work that provides the best justification for the use of organizations scarce resources for sustainable benefits. It provides guidelines, examples and techniques in an easy to read, understand and implement manner that is applicable to every day need of managing a Portfolio of projects.

It covers the 5 domains of Project Portfolio Management (PPM) in its entirety.

Overview of Book’s Structure

After the engaging preface, the book introduces the editors, followed by the contributors, providing detailed bios with their work experience, education and profession in PPM.

Each of the 18 chapters of the book covers independent subjects that can be studied and referenced on its own. The chapters end with a concise summary of the concept and additional references where applicable.

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About the Reviewer

 
pmwj38-Sep2015-Awolesi-PHOTOChinwe Fran Awolesi

Canada

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Chinwe Awolesi
is a value driven Projects/Program/Portfolio management professional with 20+ years of IT software development and implementation experience in Financial Services and IT Software development organizations. She is focused on building and nurturing business relationships that foster organizational growth and sustainability by ensuring that stakeholders’ requirements are managed and delivered to achieve strategic objectives.

Chinwe Fran Awolesi holds an MBA degree and Post Graduate certificate in Project Management from the University of Texas at Dallas, a bachelor’s of science degree in computer science. She is a Certified PMP and ITIL Expert.

Her scope of Project Management delivery covers new technologies development, IT operations support, banking and channels applications implementation and continuous process improvements.

Chinwe can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management Case Studies and Lessons Learned: Stakeholder, Scope, Knowledge, Schedule, Resources and Team Management

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj38-Sep2015-Stillinger-BOOKBook Title:   Project Management Case Studies and Lessons Learned: Stakeholder, Scope, Knowledge, Schedule, Resources and Team Management
Author: M. Kemal Atesmen
Publisher: CRC Press
Format: PDF eBook
List Price: $47.96 (Paperback), $41.97 (eBook)
Publication Date:   September 2014
ISBN: 978-1-4987-0040-5
Reviewer:     Ralph Stillinger, PMP
Review Date:  August 2015


Introduction

The author Mr. Kemal Atesmen through his 35 years of experience depicts 82 project snippets in just under 200 pages along with a few short bullets on the lessons learned for each respective project.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The lessons learned are divided into stakeholder, scope, knowledge base, schedule, resource & budget and project team. Mr. Atesmen took Project Management to include closure seriously and documented his results well.

Reading the book is like reading a recipe, this organized project overview followed by lessons learned for each overview is easy to follow. The reader must get beyond the repetitiveness of each chapter knowing there are no surprises in format other than the varied lessons learned while reading this book.

Highlights

The most important takeaways from the book are not surprisingly “The Lessons Learned”. Each project does have, as expected different problems, challenges of which you can glean from the author’s experience. I know that in every one of my projects there are always challenges and different lessons learned. Applying these lessons is what makes project managers better the second, third and finally in the authors case the 82nd time around.

Highlights: What I liked!

As I read this book my takeaway was not to repeat the pitfalls and problems that Mr. Atesmen has already experienced. In many instances while wearing my project manager hat I can sympathize with his issues.

Another takeaway was obvious that successful Project Managers do not have easy going personalities; they are strict regarding change and working with external influences on the project team. This lesson resonated with me personally so I appreciated the reminder regarding change. Working with authoritarian micro-managers as we have all experienced must be raised to the upper level management and human-resources staff with documented incidents.

More…

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About the Reviewer
pmwj38-Sep2015-Stillinger-PHOTORalph M. Stillinger, PMP

Texas, USA

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Ralph M. Stillinger
, PMP, is an analytical and detail-oriented IT professional project manager with 20 years of experience in architecture, design and development of large scale, high-volume transactional-based applications complemented by product design and development with extensive client-facing roles.

Producing Innovative Solutions to complex business processes for large corporations such as Philips, American Airlines, London Underground, Lockheed, General Dynamics, Taiwan Rapid Transit Corporation, Government Agencies to include Central Appraisal Districts (property tax folks).

Specialties: Optimist / Motivator: Enjoy spreading my “can do attitude” to the team. Patent holder, Inventor and Entrepreneur, I enjoy product design and creation.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Creative, Efficient, and Effective Project Management

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj38-Sep2015-Padlan-BOOKBook Title: Creative, Efficient, and Effective Project Management
Author: Ralph L. Kliem, PMP
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   $69.95
Format: eBook, 289 pages
Publication Date: October 2013  
ISBN: 978-1-4665-7692-6
Reviewer: Marinella Padlan, PMP, CSM
Review Date: July 2015


Introduction

This is a well thought out and comprehensive book on creativity and how it relates to project management.  The author states, “The main premise of the book is that everyone has the ability to be creative.”  The book contains ideas, tools, and techniques to aid project managers in bringing out the creative side of project teams, and create and encourage an environment that fosters creativity within the project management framework.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book consists of 14 chapters. The first 6 chapters focus on defining creativity, the challenges and benefits of creativity, and how the creative life cycle fits into the product and project life cycles. It addresses misperceptions about creativity, describes characteristics of creative individuals and groups, explains challenges and constraints that inhibit and promote creativity.

The 7th chapter describes the creativity life cycle models that fit in well with the project life cycle. Chapters 8 through 13 follow the same format for the 6 project processes: describing the benefits, consequences of not performing the process, deliverables, challenges and constraints, creative abilities required for each process, actions project managers can take with individuals and teams when setting the environment for creativity, tools and techniques, how the creativity life cycle can be applied, a conclusion, and a “Getting Started Checklist”.

The last chapter has a “baker’s dozen” of takeaways that describe key points that the creative process requires in order to be a success, as well as actions and ideas to be incorporated into projects. Figures depicting life cycles, processes and deliverables, and tables with examples support the concepts.

Highlights

True to the book’s title, “Creative, Efficient, and Effective Project Management “, the deliverables, tools, techniques, and checklists detailed in the Defining, Organizing, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing processes will guide project managers in managing their projects efficiently and effectively. The author supports the premise of the book by explaining that creativity is an iterative process. Failures should be seen as a “return on experience rather than return on investment” and “as a springboard for eventual success”. Creativity can lead to innovation when discipline, effort, willingness, and perseverance are applied.

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About the Reviewer

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Padlan-PHOTOMarinella Padlan

North Texas, USA

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Marinella Padlan
is a certified project manager and scrum master. Marinella started her career as a software developer and progressed to leading application development teams for 3 Fortune 500 companies. She is currently an IT Applications Manager at Torchmark Corporation. She has been a certified project manager since 2009 and is a member of the PMI Dallas chapter. She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

From Projects to Programs: A Project Manager’s Journey

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj38-Sep2015-Wright-BOOKBook Title:   From Projects to Programs: A Project Manager’s Journey
Author: Samir Penkar, PMP
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   $34.97
Format: e-book
Publication Date:   09/2013         
ISBN: 9781466591813
Reviewer:     Chris Wright
Review Date: June 2015


Introduction

Life is full of journeys, some planned and some unexpected. With luck, one can find the marks of a previous traveler, and learn from their experience. Knowing which dangers to avoid, which places are a must-see, and where the best dining is can make all the difference between a pleasant vacation, and a disastrous trip.
In this book, Penkar lays out a fine example of how to undertake the career move from managing projects to managing programs.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The overall concept of the book is to tell the story of a young project manager who has been placed into the position of program manager. She has to grow into the role, dealing with new expectations and gain an understanding of what it means to be a program manager.

The idea serves as a platform for basic terms to be explained, ideas to be explored, and as she travels down this path, the reader is engagingly educated as well.
A real treasure awaits at the end, as when the story is done the appendices hold interviews with project managers, a primer for Agile development, and further details of program management.

Highlights

As a new program manager struggling with the differences between her previous experience as a project manager, the protagonist zeroes in on three main domains: governance and oversight, benefits focused, and integration management. As she struggles to learn how to manage each of these at a higher level, the reader gains the benefits of her experience.

As an example, she shares an exasperation with “bloated governance bodies with a czar-like demand for unnecessary documentation and not enough accountability or transparency” which many managers have encountered, and learns to bring to bear an appropriate level of governance.

She also struggles with understanding how to focus on benefits, a concern that’s not usually part of project management. As a project manager, the shareholders are responsible for the benefits of the project, and the manager just brings it in on time, under budget, with a appropriate quality. As a program manager, it’s important to focus on what benefits are to be gained, and how to objectively measure those benefits. This is an entirely new level of management to most project managers.

Another example of focus is the importance of the timeline, “An integral element of a roadmap is some sense of a timeline, and, in order to get to a timeline, we need to understand project schedules for the various program components. … Getting to a timeline prematurely can lead to a host of new challenges. Yet, at times, it is by far the most influential component that can propel people into action.” Excellent advice for any manager who’s encountering people reluctant to begin!

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About the Reviewer


pmwj38-Sep2015-Wright-PHOTOChris Wright

Texas, USA

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During his time at Brainspace, a pioneer in machine learning technology that extracts meaning from unstructured text, Chris Wright has worn many hats – project manager, QA, documentation and lead customer support. He also teaches communication, leadership and personal development to grade school and high school children on Saturdays with thinkandspeakup.com. Email: [email protected]

 

Using Risk Assessment Codes to Rank Order Facility Projects

SECOND EDITION

Fred Fanning, CFM, PMP, LEED Green Associat

Virginia, USA


ABSTRACT

It is the author’s experience that facility professionals do not get all the resources they need to perform preventive maintenance, as well as facility improvement projects. This often results in a backlog of work. There is a way that facility professionals can rank order facility improvement projects so that the most important ones are presented to management with a better chance of approval. This is done by identifying the risks associated with each project and recommended those with the highest risk. After high-risk projects effort can be placed on medium risk and then low risk. Usually resources run out before all medium risks are done, but using this method will ensure high-risk projects are done. In this paper, the author explains a process he has used for over twenty years with very good success that can be easily explained to budget staff and senior leaders.

INTRODUCTION

“Facility professionals typically are responsible for the oversight, operation, and maintenance of the buildings and grounds, as well as service contracts” (Finance, 2013). Facility maintenance consists of preventive maintenance, planned and unplanned replacement maintenance, planned minor works, breakdown maintenance, and unplanned property services. The author will refer to all the maintenance except preventive maintenance as facility improvement projects. Facilities maintenance normally requires a 2-4 percent of the building replacement cost be reinvested each year in maintenance to keep the facility fully operational. Unfortunately, most facilities reinvest less than 2 percent of the building replacement cost, which creates a backlog of maintenance that grows each year (Predicting, 2012). Preventive maintenance costs run the same each year with an increase for inflation; however, many of the facility improvement projects have a high one-time cost and are known as capital projects (Operations, 2013). These capital projects are required to compete with other projects outside of facilities but within the organization. It is essential that all projects are competitive. Facility professional often think some funded projects do not seem as important as facility projects that were not funded.

Capital projects compete against each other and those that make the best case are funded. To get their projects funded facility professionals must submit the best project packages they can. These packages must provide a clear description of the project, its cost in current and future dollars, and justification for funding. Putting the best packages forward gives the facility projects a better chance of being funded. Unfortunately, the reality is that many facility professionals are never taught how to prepare project packages and that results in facility packages not getting funded.

The author is a trained and certified facility professional. Over the years, he has developed a process that leads to effective project packages that get funded. One of the essential elements of any project package is a clear description of any safety risks posed by the work of the project. Projects with a safety risk should be funded before projects that don’t have any risk to them. Facility professionals must be able to identify projects that have a safety risk and rank order them so that the most dangerous projects are funded first. It is essential for a facility professional to have a complete list of all capital work that needs to be done. From this list, each project must be analyzed to determine the hazard of injury, illnesses, or environmental damage. The results of this analysis will be provided on the list of facility projects.

More…

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


About the Author

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Fanning-PHOTOFred E. Fanning

Fredericksburg, Virginia, USA

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Fred E. Fanning
, CFM, PMP, LEED-Green Associate, is retired from the US Government where he served as a program and project manager. He is also an independent author. Fred is the author of Basic Safety Administration-A Handbook for the New Safety Specialist. He authored the chapter Safety Training and Documentation Principles that was published in the best-selling Safety Professional Handbook and in Hazard Prevention through Effective Safety and Health Training. He also authored the chapter Safety Training that was published in the best-selling Construction Safety Management and Engineering. Fred’s book and all three chapters were peer reviewed and published by the American Society of Safety Engineers. Fred has authored several other books and over 40 technical articles. Fred has presented several papers before national audiences. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Excelsior College and master’s degrees from National-Louis University and Webster University. Fred can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Today’s Most-Competitive PM Teams: Shining a Light on Next-Gen PM Practices

SECOND EDITION

By Stacy Goff

ProjectExperts

Colorado, USA


Abstract

In every generational change, the seeds of success are sown by the pioneers in prior generations. For example, many foundations of the last fifteen year’s popular project management topics, including agile pm, business analysis, strategic alignment, and applied leadership and interpersonal skills in projects, were the competitive advantages of leading companies and agencies of 1985-2000. Further, the recent interest in “PM 2.0” merely showcases the frequent practices of PM innovators of the last 30 years.

The practice of professional project management has now seen four 15-year generations, with different areas of emphasis in each new generation. Given this history, this session provides a series of vignettes that shine the light on past and current-generation elite and competitive practices that are now mainstreaming to form the Next-Gen commonly-accepted practices in project and program management.

Shining a Light: 7 Sample Vignettespmwj38-Sep2015-Goff-IMAGE

A. The Myth of PM Best Practices

B. Reassert Practice Importance

C. Adapt Methods to Project Size

D. PM Role Excellence and Key Processes

E. Overcome Management Complexity

F. The Role of Leadership and Soft Skills

G. Align Projects and Business Strategy

Who is integrating smart and innovative PM practices today? What are the challenges they face in implementing them? What pm performance advantages are they gaining? And, what are professional associations, trainers and consultants doing to help practitioners reap the benefits?

A. The Myth of PM Best Practices

What are the Best Practices in the world of project and program management (PPM)? Are there a few immutable truths that are transferable across nations, organizations, industries, cultures, and project teams? I often see assertions promoting PM Best Practices—despite my belief that the phrase is an oxymoron—that our discipline is not yet mature enough to have universal best practices. This section is a recap of many discussions on best practices over my years as a PM practitioner, and as a consultant.

My opinions about PM Best Practices go back to the early 1980s, when, as a PPM consultant, I frequently encountered executives, line managers, project managers, and other consultants, who expected to hear my handful of easy-to-implement “PM Best Practices.” In that era, I often made recommendations for improved effectiveness and performance, but I called them “Competitive Practices.”

And, I usually sought, uncovered, and identified these practices from within their own organizations. It was clear years ago that one organization’s best practices could be a scourge for others.

Here’s why…

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


About the Author

 

pmwj23-jun2014-Goff-IMAGEStacy Goff

ProjectExperts

Colorado, USA

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Stacy Goff, the PM Per4mance Coach, is President of ProjectExperts®, a Program and Project Management consulting, tools and training company. A Project Management practitioner since 1970 and consultant since 1982, he helps improve Enterprise, Department or Project Team PM Competence, effectiveness and Performance.

In addition to years of service to PMI®, he is also co-founder and 2009-2015 President of asapm®, the American Society for the Advancement of Project Management, and was Vice President of Marketing & Events for IPMA®, the International Project Management Association, 2011-2014.

An insightful consultant and dynamic speaker, Mr. Goff provides program and project consulting, training and coaching services. He presents at major industry conferences, and offers workshops of interest to Executives, Managers, Program and Project Managers and leaders, technical staff, and individual contributors. By 2000, he had exposed over 45,000 people to Project Management. Today, his tools and methods are used by government agencies, Enterprises, consultancies and individuals on six continents. Email: [email protected]

Note: PM Per4mance: A trademark of Goff Associates, Inc., the ProjectExperts. The 4 in Per4mance reflects Personal, Project, Program and Portfolio Management Performance.

Multiple website links are instream in this paper.

All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 

Bridging the Gap: Traditional to Agile Project Management

SECOND EDITION

By Susan Parente, PM

Connecticut, USA


ABSTRACT

In today’s world of fast-paced technology and continually changing requirements and project scope, the need for Agile Project Management has greatly increased. Responding to this demand, the PMI® (Project Management Institute) launched a new certification, the PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)SM. The result of this fast growing certification is the creation of a new space where Project Management and Agile Practices for Software Development meet. This calls us to ask how do we transition from traditional project management to agile project management? This paper translates traditional project management and its processes, as detailed in the PMBOK Guide, to agile practices. It discusses methodologies which can be used to assist in bridging the gap between traditional project management and agile project management.

What is Agile Project Management and when does it make sense to use agile practices? How do the PMBOK Guide knowledge areas we are familiar with relate to agile project management and how are they incorporated into agile practices will be evaluated. Recommendations for implementing agile practices will be provided.

When requirements and environmental conditions are in flux, our ability to respond to changing needs is critical to managing projects with agility. When should you implement agile practices and how do you implement agile project management in a traditional project management environment? This paper will respond to these questions based on research in this field.

OVERVIEW

The objectives of this paper on Bridging the Gap: Traditional to Agile Project Management are to assist traditional project managers with understanding what Agile project management is and what Agile practices are. Traditional project management will be compared to Agile project management. This paper will engage in the topic of when Agile practices are valuable to use and why they should be used. Finally, a number of agile methodologies will be reviewed and advantages and disadvantages of each will be detailed.

The goal of this paper is to provide readers with a path from tradition to Agile project management, along with a reason to choose that path.

PURPOSE

What is Agile? Agile is not software or a software package. It is a set of principles that guide teams and that guide product development. Adoption of Agile necessitates a culture shift for organizations, since in many ways it is contrary to traditional organization and managerial structure and how traditional project management works. Agile requires open communication between teams, stakeholders and customers. This open communication can see to be a beneficial attribute, and it is; however it also comes with increase client engagement which might not work well in all project environments.

To begin this discussion of Agile project management, let’s first define what Agile is and is not.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Parente-PHOTOSusan Parente

Connecticut, USA

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Susan Parente, PMP, PMI-ACP, CISSP, PMI-RMP, ITIL, MSEM is a project engineer, consultant, speaker, author, and mentor who leads large complex IT software implementation projects, and the establishment of Enterprise PMOs. Ms. Parente’s focuses on risk management and Agile project management. She has 16+ years’ experience leading software and business development projects in the private and public sectors, including a decade of experience implementing IT projects for the DoD. Ms. Parente is also an Associate Professor at Post University in Connecticut. She has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Rochester in NY and has a MS in Engineering Management from George Washington University in DC. She is also PMP, CISSP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP and ITIL certified, and is a CMMI and ISO 9001 Practitioner.

Ms. Parente is a Principal Consultant at S3 Technologies, LLC. Her company’s focuses on revitalizing projects through the use of risk management. S3 Technologies does this by teaming with clients, stakeholders and vendors and using risk management to deliver project successes. Ms. Parente trains and mentors project managers in the area of project and risk management. She is also an Agile project management generalist. Ms. Parente has developed a methodology which she uses to implement risk management programs for both small and large clients and is currently completing her manuscript for a book on implementing risk management.

Susan can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Maturity Growing: Brazil Central Bank Case

SECOND EDITION

By Bruno Peres Aguiar, Darci Prado and Manuel Carvalho Da Silva Neto

With the collaboration of
Marcelo Cota, Sérgio Caracas and Russell Archibald

Brazil


Abstract

The objective of this paper is to present how the Banco Central do Brasil (BCB), the Brazilian Central Bank, reached a PM maturity level of 4.2 in 2014, according to the PRADO-PM Maturity Model, starting in 2007 from a maturity of 2.1. So BCB doubled its maturity in seven years and reached a level of excellence. This paper presents the general PM situation within BCB at the time of the first measurement, describes the improvement projects that were conducted for the advancement of the Bank’s PM maturity, and summarizes the achievements and benefits that were derived from the current PM maturity.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

The BCB is a federal agency whose mission is “to ensure the stability of the purchasing power of the Brazilian currency and a sound and efficient financial system within the nation of Brazil.” This mission is accomplished through the actions of its 4,000 employees, distributed in more than 40 organizational units. Its operation spans nationwide, with offices in nine state capitals and headquarters in Brasilia, the nation’s capital city. To frame this mission within its global context we note that Brasil ranks number 7 in the world in the value of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP), as shown in Figure 1, just after the United Kingdom and ahead of Russia and Italy.

Rank Country/Region GDP (Millions of US$)
 World 74,699,258
 European Union 17,512,109
1  United States 16,768,050
2  China 9,469,124
3  Japan 4,898,530
4  Germany 3,635,959
5  France 2,807,306
6  United Kingdom 2,523,216
7  Brazil 2,246,037
8  Russia 2,096,774
9  Italy 2,071,955

Figure 1. First 9 Countries Ranked by GDP
Source: International Monetary Fund, 2013.

Since the BCB is an institution whose actions reverberate in both national and international financial markets, its work processes are well defined, and supported by stable and lawful standards. All projects that introduce change within the national financial system are obviously extremely important to a nation’s economy and political stability.

BCB realized in 1998, due to a crisis in the Brazilian banking system, how projects were important to position the organization to face the challenges of the market. During that year, with supporting resources from the World Bank, projects were implemented with the objective to modernize some of its working processes. The first core of project management comes from this moment.

Today, the organization has four project offices (three departmental and one corporate). Departmental offices are located in departments that plan and conduct their work in a projectized manner. These are the:

  • Department of Planning, Budget and Management (Corporate PMO-Espro),
  • Integration and Surveillance Support for the Supervision Area (Degef),
  • The Corporate University of BCB (Unibacen), and the
  • Department of Information Technology (Deinf).

2.0  CURRENT SITUATION – CORPORATE PROJECTS (2015)

The Corporate Project Office (Espro) is a division of the Department of Planning, Budget and Management (Depog), under the jurisdiction of the BCB Deputy Governor for Administration.

The annual portfolio of corporate projects has around 80 projects in 2014, distributed in the various stages of their life cycles – initiation, execution and controlling, and closing. It’s a portfolio that has resources of R$ 115 M (approximately USD 40M) per year, as well as sufficient human resources for its execution.

These projects are conducted through established practices and project methodology which is in its 4rd edition (MGPro 4.0). There are several levels of authority and several committees that enable governance and management of the project management model, and a team that is well prepared with the theme

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Aguiar-PHOTO1Bruno Peres de Aguiar

Central Bank of Brazil
Brasilia, Brazil

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Bruno Peres de Aguiar
is the Head of the Corporate PMO at Central Bank of Brazil. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Business, MBA in Finance, PMP and MSP Practitioner. Working with projects, programs and portfolio at Central Bank since 1998, focused on new methodologies, PM training, PM process and relationship with stakeholders at the top management level.

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Aguiar-PHOTO2 PRADODarci Prado, PhD

Belo Horizonte, Brazil

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Darci Prado,
PhD, is a Partner-Consultant at FALCONI Consultores de Resultado. Darci holds a bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering from UFMG, postgraduate degree in Economic Engineering from FDC and PhD from UNICAMP. He participated in the establishment of the PMI chapter in Minas Gerais and Paraná, and was a Board member of PMI-MG between 1998-2002. He was the president of IPMA-BH Club between 2006 and 2008. He has the IPMA-Level B certificate and is author of 10 project management books. Darci can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj33-Apr2015-Neto-PHOTOManuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto
is a Guest Professor at Fundação Dom Cabral and consultant in the areas of Project Management, Process Management and Strategy Deployment. MSc in Management at CEPEAD-UFMG, and he also has PMP Certification. He has the titles of specialist in Economics Engineering (INEA / EEUFMG) and Financial Management (FJP) and holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering from UFMG. Manuel has 45 years’ experience in the market, of which 39 are in Projects. Participated or directed over 300 projects in medium and large private or state companies and public organizations. He was Undersecretary of Planning and Budget of the State of Minas Gerais from 2007 to 2008. Manuel can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Key drivers of discrepancies between initial and final costs of construction projects in New Zealand

SECOND EDITION

By Dr. Jasper I. Mbachu and Cresilda Cross

School of Engineering and Advanced Technology,
College of Sciences, Massey University,

Auckland, New Zealand


ABSTRACT

Construction projects and the environment within which they are implemented are complex, dynamic and over-regulated. As a result significant discrepancies are introduced between initial contract prices and final accounts for most projects. These discrepancies introduce enormous risks and uncertainties with consequences such as disputes, high cost of project finance and low profit margins. Previous studies have looked at the myriads of discrepant factors, but little attempt has been made to quantify and segregate them along lines of responsibilities and accountability in the building development process. This research aimed to fill this knowledge gap by examining the nature and contributions of the key cost escalators from the actions/ inactions of the key stakeholders as well as wider factors. Feedback from a two-stage survey of consultants and contractors in the New Zealand construction industry was analysed using content analysis and multi-attribute methods. Results revealed 6 sources of discrepant factors. These comprised issues related to the owner or owner’s principal agent, designers, contractors and subcontractors, project & environment, quantity surveyors/ estimators, and external parties such as local councils and utility companies. Change orders and quality of design information were perceived as the most significant sources of cost escalations which were attributed to the owner and designers, respectively. The report presents the priority factors under each broad category. It is recommended that project teams should proactively address the priority factors identified in the study with a view to effectively mitigating project cost overruns and ensuring more reliable outcomes in the project delivery process.

Keywords: Construction project, cost overrun, final costs, initial costs, variations

INTRODUCTION

Construction projects and the environment within which they are implemented are complex (Kartam and Kartam, 2001), dynamic (Mohammed et al., 2010) and over-regulated (Mbachu, 2012). As a result significant discrepancies are introduced between initial contract prices agreed at the onset and the adjusted final accounts for most projects (Olatunji, 2008; Ko, 2009). These discrepancies introduce enormous risks and uncertainties with serious consequences such as disputes, high cost of project finance and low profit margins (Zakaria et al., 2013). Mbachu (2012) argued that, as an obligation of duty of care and the basis for rewards, clients, financiers and other stakeholders expect consultants and contractors to careful consider risks that may affect outcomes in their operations and provide informed advice that the interested parties can rely on to make decisions such as commissioning projects or lending project finance. When proper risk analysis is not done and outcomes deviate from initial expectations, the reputation of the construction professionals suffers great damage.

This is more so that, on account of attribution theory, clients will always put all the blame on the service providers, notwithstanding that they contribute to the risks; the justification being that service providers are paid for shouldering the risks inherent in their services. It is therefore critically important that risk factors, especially in relation to cost advice, are investigated so that appropriate risk response measures are put in place at the onset.

Research objectives

The specific objectives of the study were as follows:

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Mbachu-PHOTODr. Jasper Mbachu

Massey University
Auckland, New Zealand

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Dr. Jasper Mbachu
is a senior lecturer and coordinator of construction programmes in the School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, Massey University. For the past 20 years, Dr. Jasper has taught in universities in Nigeria, South Africa and New Zealand. He has over 14 years of construction work experience as a quantity surveyor, contracts manager, construction manager and a planner for the development of a range of building and civil engineering projects. He is the Secretary and Treasurer of the Auckland Branch of the New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NZIQS). An RICS Chartered Surveyor, Dr. Mbachu is also a professional member of the NZIOB, PMI and the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA). He convenes the annual series of the New Zealand Built Environment Research Symposium (NZBERS) (construction.massey.ac.nz/nzbers.htm). Dr. Mbachu can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Mbachu-PHOTO2 CROSSCresilda Cross

Fletcher Construction
Auckland, New Zealand

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Miss Cresilda Cross
is a quantity surveyor cadet at Fletcher Construction, Auckland, New Zealand. Before joining Fletcher Construction, she completed a Bachelor of Construction (Quantity Surveying) degree at Massey University in 2013. Working under the supervision of Dr Jasper Mbachu, Cresilda’s research interests are in the fields of contract administration and financial management of construction. She can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Risk Perception Management Plan: A Theoretical Overview

SECOND EDITION

By M. Dianne Leveridge, PhD and Gregory B. Baecher, PhD

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Maryland

College Park, Maryland, USA


ABSTRACT

Risk engineers conduct comprehensive risk assessments for many types of large projects, often singularly focused on the technical assessment.  Overlooking comprehensive community stakeholders in the assessment process increases stakeholder skepticism, apprehension, and mistrust regarding safety, health and welfare of nearby stakeholders, for complex projects.  Social experts repeatedly document connections between problem framing, communication processes, and risks.  This paper considers formalizing connections between the risk register to stakeholder perceptions and communication plans. A theoretical Risk Perception Management (RPM) plan connects risks into communication plans based upon including social expert suggestions for four large projects:  two bio-safety-level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories and two levee system assessment projects.  The concept of a Risk Perception Management (RPM) Plan integrated with the risk register is presented.  The paper shows how the RPM concept iteratively captures stakeholder perceptions to build associated communication plans, thus potentially increasing risk assessment value for stakeholders and decision-makers.

Background & Motivation

The variety of risk assessment processes of high-impact, low frequency hazards frequently contributes to project schedule delays. Experts suggest improvements to federal agencies regarding risk assessment methodology, processes, communication, and characterization, including specifically articulating subjective elements associated with uncertainty (Presidential/Congressional Commission on Risk Assessment & Risk Management, 1997; NRC, 1983; EPA, 2000; EPA, 2003; NRC, 1994; NRC, 2008). Unfortunately, adoption of these suggestions remains inconsistent and incomplete (North, 2003; Mirer, 2003; NRC, 2008b; GAO, 2006; NRC, 2010c).

Planning risk assessment activities connected to the decision at hand has been repeatedly recommended since the Red Book (EPA, 2000; Hoch, Kunreuther, & Gunther, 2001; NRC, 1996; NRC, 2008; Presidential/Congressional Commission on Risk Assessment & Risk Management, 1997). Risk Assessment practice which delivers a report failing to meet the needs of the problem at hand remains a pervasive issue (Charnley, 2003; Anderson, 2003).   In addition to problem statement disconnects, the 1983 Red Book recognized potential conflicts of interest when risk analysts deliver assessments and also make risk management decisions. To avoid this conflict, the Red Book suggested separating analysts and managers (NRC, 1983). Risk assessment practice within federal agencies resulted in multiple interpretations regarding the conceptual separation between analysts and managers. The Risk Perception Management (RPM) plan concept suggests collaborating with social experts toward closing the separation while simultaneously avoiding conflicts of interest.

Conceptually, the RPM plan captures stakeholder perceptions through iterative collaboration between risk engineers and social science experts; subsequently enabling management decisions through appropriate stakeholder communication. Further research includes using the RPM to verify increased value-add of the assessment process. Capturing stakeholder perceptions throughout the risk analysis process, coupled with collaborative communication, facilitates potentially improving risk analysis value.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Leveridge-Baecher-PHOTO1Dr. M. Dianne Leveridge

Maryland & Kentucky, USA

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Dr. M. Dianne Leveridge
earned her PhD in Civil Engineering Project Management at the University of Maryland Clark School in 2014; holds a Master’s Degree in Engineering Project Management from the University of Maryland-College Park, a Master’s Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) from the Project Management Institute. She holds an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the University of Kentucky.

A retired manufacturing engineer, she has 20 years’ experience managing global projects and people, meeting deliverables and expectations in a manufacturing environment on several continents. During her career, she has developed and delivered projects ranging from $50 thousand dollars to $20 million dollars. In Fall 2014 she began serving as the Director of Technical Programs for the Kentucky Community & Technical College System, a system of 16 community colleges across Kentucky. Dr. Leveridge can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Leveridge-Baecher-PHOTO2Dr. Gregory B. Baecher

University of Maryland
College Park, MD, USA

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Professor Gregory Baecher
received his bachelor of science in civil engineering in 1968 from the University of California, Berkeley, and his PhD in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972.   Since 1995, he has been the Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering at the University of Maryland, also serving as Chair of the Department of CEE until 2003. He principally works on risk and reliability methods for civil infrastructure affected by natural hazards, with a focus on geotechnical and water resources engineering. Dr. Baecher can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Towards an Understanding of Work Motivation in Temporary Organizations

SECOND EDITION

By Dr. Ravikiran Dwivedula
American College of Dubai, UAE

Prof Christophe Bredillet
Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada 

Prof Ralf Müller
Dept. of Leadership & Organizational Behaviour, BI Norwegian Business School


ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to propose an operational definition of work motivation in temporary organizations. We use job design perspective of work motivation as a theoretical lens. We present an extensive review of job design theories from I/O psychology and present the work motivation literature from temporary organizations along these theories. We then identify items for the work motivation construct based on this literature review. We empirically test the reliability and validity of these items using a survey with a sample of 199 project workers. The findings confirm the previously established construct of work motivation. Academic and managerial implications of these findings are discussed.

Key Words: Work Motivation, Project Management, Temporary Organizations

INTRODUCTION

Work motivation is a driver to organization’s performance. Work motivation as a topic draws interest both from practitioners, and academic. It has been shown to lead to attitudinal, behaviour (Pierce, Gardner, Dunham, & Cummings, 1993) and performance outcomes (Moorehead& Griffin, 1998). Hence, it has important implications for managing the workforce. From an academic perspective, work motivation is a key construct in organizational research, where much research has been dedicated to an understanding of its antecedents and outcomes (Moorehead, & Griffin, 1998). While it has been extensively studied in Industrial/ Organizational (I/O) psychology literature, research from project management discipline on this topic has been modest and sporadic. In the current paper, we address this research gap. The present study contributes to the extant literature by suggesting an operational framework of work motivation for temporary organizations. To do this, we set the following objectives for this study:

  1. To consolidate the literature review on work motivation in temporary organizations by establishing a theory base
  2. To propose a possible operational definition of work motivation in temporary organizations.

Organization of the paper. We have organized this paper as follows. First, we will review the major theories of work motivation from the Industrial/ Organizational (I/O) psychology literature. We will refer to the context or the job design perspective of work motivation. Second, we will review literature on work motivation in temporary organizations along the major theories of work motivation identified from the I/O psychology literature. Third, we will present the research design where we empirically test the proposed construct of work motivation. Fourth, we will present the findings. Fifth, we will discuss the findings in detail, followed by the concluding remarks.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


About the Authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Dwivedula-PHOTO1Dr. Ravikiran Dwivedua

Dubai, UAE

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Dr. Ravikiran Dwivedula
(Ravi) is an Associate Professor of Management, and MBA Program Director with American College of Dubai, UAE. His research interests are broadly in the area of Work Motivation, and Employee Commitment in Temporary Organizations. His teaches Human Resource Management, Organization Behavior, and Project Management. He has been a contributor and reviewer for major project management journals such as Project Management Journal, and International Journal of Project Management. He has also presented and reviewed papers for major research conferences including PMI Research Conferences, EURAM, and IRNOP. He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Ppmwj38-Sep2015-Dwivedula-PHOTO2 BREDILLETrof Christophe Bredillet

Canada/France

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Professor Christophe N. Bredillet
, PhD, D.Sc., IPMA Level A, FAPM is professor of project management at Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR). He is the Scientific Director, Société française pour l¹avancement du Management de Projet (SMaP) and adjunct Professor at Queensland University of Technology’ (QUT) Project Management Academy. He specializes in the fields of Portfolio, Program & Project Management (P3M). From 2012 to 2015, he was the Director of the QUT Project Management Academy. Before joining QUT, he was Senior Consultant World Bank and, from 1992 to 2010, he was the Dean of Postgraduate Programs and Professor of Strategic Management and P3M at ESC Lille. His main interests and research activities are in the field of Philosophy of Science and Practice in P3M, including dynamic of evolution of the field, bodies of knowledge, standards, and their link with capability development, capacity building, governance and performance. He was Executive Editor of Project Management Journal® between 2004 and 2012. In 2012, he received the prestigious Manfred Saynish Foundation for Project Management (MSPM) – Project Management Innovation Award for his contribution to a philosophy of science with respect to complex project management.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Dwivedula-PHOTO3 MULLERDr Ralf Müller

Norway

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Dr Ralf Müller
is Professor of Project Management and former Associate Dean at BI Norwegian Business School, as well as adjunct and visiting professor at many institutions worldwide. He lectures and researches in leadership, governance of projects, organizational project management, and research methods. He is the (co-)author of more than 160 academic publications. Among the many awards he received is the 2015 PMI Research Achievement Award (a life-time achievement award), and the 2012 IPMA Research Award, which he received together with Monique Aubry and Brian Hobbs. Before joining academia, he spent 30 years in the industry consulting with large enterprises and governments in more than 50 different countries for their project management and governance. He also held related line management positions, such as the Worldwide Director of Project Management at NCR Corporation. Professor Müller can be contacted at [email protected]

 

An Investigation into Challenges facing Distributed Teams: Case of South Australian Construction Projects

SECOND EDITION

Dr. Morteza Shokri-Ghasabeh
SA Health, Adelaide, South Australia

Reza Hosseini
Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria

Dr. Nicholas Chileshe
University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia

Dr. Bo Xia
Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland

Australia


Abstract

There is increasing momentum within the construction industry to deploy distributed teams on projects, yet the major challenges that companies face for managing teams in distributed arrangements has yet to be explored in the construction context. Driven by such need, this study is intended to present an account of the major challenges encountered throughout the life cycle of offshore outsourcing arrangements within the South Australian construction industry. To this end, the study describes the observations made within the natural contexts of one construction project in terms of the challenges to the success of deploying distributed teams for outsourcing of works. Discussions remain in dialogue with relevant theories and the pertinent literature to explain the interpretations and lessons learned and to underpin the conclusions made. It is contended that this study contributes to the field by providing an illuminating insight into potential challenges facing distributed teams being implemented in outsourcing tasks in construction projects. Discussions also offer practical guidelines for construction project managers and assist them in dealing with potential challenges of offshore outsourcing through the lenses of distributed team working principles.

Key words: Challenges, Distributed teams, Virtual teams, Construction industry, Project management

JEL code: O33

Introduction

Construction project teams are increasingly utilising distributed teams for delivering projects (Henderson, 2008; Ramalingam et al., 2014) inasmuch as the construction industry is not a local industry anymore due to the pressure from globalisation. As such, a large number of construction firms specifically in developed countries are moving towards higher levels of internationalisation in order to benefit from the global opportunities. Consequently, construction companies in developed economies (e.g. Australia) are transferring their operations to the developing countries, with lower running costs and much more opportunities in terms of skills and talents (Horta et al., 2013). In essence, it is becoming imperative for construction organisations to adopt distributed teams in order to deal with the challenges of the contemporary business environment (Chen and Messner, 2010)

Given such growing prominence of distributed teams in construction projects, possessing the scientific know-how pertinent to implementation of distributed teams becomes very relevant as urged by Vorakulpipat et al. (2010). That is, for achieving the desirable outcomes out of deploying distributed teams organisations have to predict and overcome the challenges through implementing effective managerial strategies (Yen et al., 2002). On the other hand, implementing distributed teams successfully within the construction context requires an in-depth understanding of the unique challenges that are not necessarily akin to the challenges encountered in face-to-face teams (Hosseini and Chileshe, 2013).

Against this backdrop, construction litearture has been criticized for the scarcity of studies conducted about distributed teams (Chinowsky and Rojas, 2003; Hosseini and Chileshe, 2013). Moreover, practitioners cannot rely on the results of the studies from other sectors of the industry due to the obvious specific approach of the construction industry towards innovative methods (Love et al., 2001) such as distributed team working. This implies that knowledge on distributed teams should be created within the natural context of the construction industry. As a result, the constrcution industry has remained in need of creating knowledge to supply the industry with essential information of the challenges faced in deploying distributed teams on construction projects (Hosseini and Chileshe, 2013). This has been the driving force behind conducting this study as described next.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghasabeh-AUTHOR1Dr. Morteza Shokri-Ghasabeh

SA Health, Adelaide, South Australia
University of South Australia
Federation University Australia

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Dr. Morteza Shokri-Ghasabeh
is a Project Consultant to a variety of industrial projects in Construction, Infrastructure, Mining, Oil&Gas, IT and Health. He is also a casual lecturer and a student supervisor in Construction Management and Project Management at the University of South Australia (UniSA) and Federation University Australia. Morteza holds a PhD degree in Building from UniSA. He has also received a BSc in Civil Engineering and an MSc in Construction Management. Dr. Shokri-Ghasabeh is a member of PMI (MPMI) and a former Board Member of PMI South Australia. Morteza is also a Member of the Australian Institute of Project Management (MAIPM), a Member of the Australian Institute of Building (MAIB), a member of American Association of Cost Engineering International (MAACEI). His major research interests include Knowledge Management, Project Success, Project Selection, Project Controls, and Project Management. Morteza is keen to provide support to both academia and industry for future cooperation.

Dr. Morteza can be contacted via either [email protected] or [email protected].

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghasabeh-AUTHOR2 HOSSEINIReza Hosseini

Deakin University, Australia

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R
eza Hosseini is currently a lecturer in Construction Management at Deakin University. He is a Civil Engineer and has been active as the C.E.O of a construction company with practical experience of the construction industry for more than eleven years in the Middle East. In addition, he has been conducting many research projects for the Building Code Office of Iranian Ministry of Housing for five years, and has been the co-author of many published works including books, academic journals and conference papers. M. Reza has an MSc in Construction Management, and his main research fields are virtual design and construction, virtual team working, productivity and reverse logistics within the construction context. He has been a member of board of directors for Project Management Institute (PMI) Adelaide chapter and a member of Australian Institute of Building (AIB), Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM) and building SMART Australia.

Reza can be contacted at [email protected], for information about M. Reza Hosseini, visit http://www.deakin.edu.au/profiles/reza-hosseini

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghasabeh-AUTHOR3 CHILESHEDr. Nicholas Chileshe

University of South Australia

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Nicholas Chileshe is a Senior Lecturer in construction and project management at School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia. His current research interests include total quality management, supply chain management, reverse logistics, sustainability, construction management, risk and value management, project management and project success. His research findings have been published in internationally-recognized journals and presented at important conferences, and received a number of awards such as the winner of outstanding reviewer award at the Literati Networks for Excellence (2008, 2010) for the Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, highly commended award paper at the Literati Networks for Excellence 2008 for the Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, and Outstanding Paper Award Winner (Jointly awarded with Dr Morteza Shorki-Ghasabeh) at the Literati Networks Awards for Excellence 2015 for Construction Innovation.

Currently, Dr Chileshe acts as the member of Editorial Boards for the Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, International Journal of Construction Supply Chain Management, Journal of Quantity Surveying and Construction Business, and member of Editorial Review Board for the International Journal of Construction and Project. He is also member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Engineering Project, Production Management (EPPM), the International Advisory Board member for the Lean Construction Unit at the Central University of Technology, South Africa, currently the Chair of Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) Australasian Education Panel. He also regularly reviews proposal for the National Research Foundation (NRF), South Africa, and the Higher Education Academy (United Kingdom [UK]).

Nicholas can be contacted at [email protected], for information about Dr Nicholas Chileshe, visit http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/staff/homepage.asp?name=nicholas.chileshe https://staff.qut.edu.au/staff/xiap/

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghasabeh-AUTHOR4 XIADr. Bo Xia

Queensland University of Technology
Australia

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Bo Xia is a Senior Lecturer in construction and project management at School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology. His research interests are in design-build, project delivery systems, construction management, and sustainable buildings (especially on sustainable housing for older people). His research findings have been published in internationally-recognized journals and presented at important conferences, and received a number of awards such as the winner of outstanding paper for 2011 in the Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction and the winner of the Best Themed Paper Award, 37th Australasian Universities Building Educators Association (AUBEA), 4-6th July 2012, Sydney.

Currently, Dr Xia acts as the member of Editorial Boards for the Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research (JBCPR), and member of Editorial Review Board for the Built Environment Project and Asset Management. He is also member of International Council for Building Research Studies and Documentation (CIB), Chinese Research Institute of Construction Management (CRIOCM), and the international research member of the Research Centre of Sustainable Built Environment in Chongqing University, China.

Paul can be contacted at [email protected]. For information about Dr Bo Xia, visit https://staff.qut.edu.au/staff/xiap/

 

Current Status and Future Potential of the Research on Critical Chain Project Management

SECOND EDITION

Mahdi Ghaffari and Dr. Margaret W. Emsley

University of Mancheste

Manchester, UK


Abstract

 Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) is a relatively new method which introduces a new mechanism for managing uncertainties in projects. A high number of studies on CCPM have been published and it seems it is now time for an extensive review. This study consults the CCPM literature in an inductive manner in order to answer the following questions: Is ongoing research being conducted on CCPM or has it lost its popularity among researchers? What have been the different approaches towards CCPM in the literature and what has each of them contributed to the knowledge area? What improvements have been made to the method since its introduction in 1997 and have these answered the critiques of the method? In what direction should future research be directed and what are the potential areas of CCPM for further development? The main aim is to describe the current status of research on CCPM and explore CCPM aspects that require more research. This study covers 140 journal and conference papers written on CCPM through an “exhaustive with selective citation” approach identified through online and reference searching. Those papers are categorised into six groups of introductory, critical, improving, empirical, case-reporting and exploiting papers, using the “hierarchical coding” method. As the result of this, the current status of research on CCPM is critically reviewed, themes are identified and 21 areas for future investigations are recommended that mostly need operational research analyses.

Keywords: Critical chain, Project scheduling, Literature review, project management.
JEL: O21, O22

Introduction

Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) was first introduced by Eliyahu Goldratt as a new method of managing projects at the International Jonah Conference in 1990 (Bevilacqua et al., 2009). It remained unexplored until he decided to repeat his success in writing “The Goal” business novel in 1984, this time with “Critical Chain” in 1997. In his book, Goldratt extended the principles of the Theory of Constraints (TOC) to project management. TOC was based on the principle that every system has a constraint that prevents it from reaching higher levels of performance and the only approach to improve the system performance is to enhance the capacity of that constraint. With regard to CCPM, this unique constraint in single project environments is the longest chain of activities in the project network, taking into account both activity precedence and resource dependencies (critical chain) and in multi-project environments is the resource impeding projects’ earlier completion. Goldratt (1984, 1997) provides a 5-step procedure for the process of ongoing improvement (identify the constraint, exploit the constraint, subordinate other non-constrained entities to the constraint, elevate the constraint, return to step one if the constraint is changed). CCPM also suggests estimating activity durations to their 50% probability of being completed on time and consider a buffer (project and feeding buffers) at the end of each chain of activities to allow for uncertainties. There are also some other buffers, namely resource buffer, drum buffer, capacity buffer and cost buffer. Some other characteristics are that it is completely against multitasking, does not consider activity due dates and schedules non-constraint activities to their latest start.

CCPM is not a holistic approach towards managing projects and is more a scheduling method addressing schedule-related aspects of projects. It only includes human aspects in terms of scheduling activities and not related to leadership, project governance and communication. These aspects should be addressed through TOC philosophy or Lean principles, as explained in the TOC Handbook (Cox and Schleier, 2010). As it is outside the scope of this study to explain in more detail the principles of CCPM, readers are encouraged to read the CCPM classic book by Leach (2014) for a comprehensive explanation.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 4th Scientific Conference on Project Management in the Baltic States, University of Latvia, April 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghaffari-AUTHOR1Mahdi Ghaffari

The University of Manchester

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Mahdi Ghaffari
is a PhD candidate at The University of Manchester undertaking his research on resource availability issues in Critical Chain Multi-Project Management environments and their effects on sizes of buffers in such environments. He has achieved a Bachelor’s degree (BSc) in Industrial Engineering and Master of Science in Management of Projects. His experience includes working as a project manager of maintenance projects for about three years. He is also certified as PRINCE2 Practitioner by OGC based in the UK and PMP by PMI based in the USA.  Mahdi can be contacted at [email protected].

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghaffari-AUTHOR2 EMSLEYDr. Margaret Emsley

The University of Manchester

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Dr. Margaret Emsley is a civil and structural engineer who joined what was then UMIST in 1986. Previously she had carried out research at Loughborough University and worked as an engineer for Tarmac Construction. She was involved in setting up the MSc in Construction Project Management in 1987 and has contributed to the teaching of many courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. She has supervised 5 PhD students and over 150 MSc students and has 7 current PhD students. She is currently Chair of the School Board and Programme Director of the MSc Management of Projects (including the four routeways: Commercial Project Management, Construction Project Management, Engineering Project Management and IT Project Management).  Prof Emsley can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Symptoms of Recovery in Real-State Projects in Spain and PMI Madrid Chapter Monthly meetings in September 2015 (Project Management Update from Madrid)

REPORT

Project Management in Spain – Monthly Report

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain


Symptoms of Recovery in Real-State Projects in Spain

Real-State and Construction market is starting to improve showing some recovery symptoms. Investments, mainly from foreign capital but also local, has placed Spain in his watching point and we have seen, during last year, how some important operations regarding assets acquisition are happening, basically on the offices and hotel market in Madrid and Barcelona.

Those operations are generating at the same time a good recovery in the “Project Management” business, both at the “Due Diligence” technical phase, and the management of refurbishing projects. In order to give an idea about this market, and the operations volume closed recently, only during the last twelve months since June 2014, at firms like Bovis have developed reports about “Technical and environmental Due Diligence” for more than fifty buildings, either the buyer side and the seller one.

That situation has produced a substantial increase of refurbishing projects of existing buildings that has contributed to an activity increase of constructions at the building market last year, first time from the beginning of the financial crisis. But we cannot say that the real estate market is completely recovered until seeing that new investments for new buildings have started, as a result of the demand increase and the property funding. And fortunately, we are starting to see clear recovery symptoms in that area too.

The real estate companies that have supported the financial crisis better because of having healthier balance sheets are giving the first steps to recover the property activity. This is still a very incipient activity, but it is a hopeful symptom to foresee that recovery can be consolidated during the next years.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

 

A_BUCERO_2014_mayAlfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

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Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

Yes, there is a project! (Project Management Update from Belo Horizonte)

REPORT

Project Management Report from Minas Gerais

By Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

International Correspondent

Minas Gerais, Brazil


 

YES, THERE IS A PROJECT

Yes, I admit. My last reports are so pessimistic. Things, actually, are getting worse in Minas Gerais and Brazil.

But there is an important and major project that is underway in Minas Gerais.

The Confins International Airport (see photo) was object of concession to state owned Infraero and a joint venture formed by two private companies (a Brazilian and a Swiss).

In the concession agreement there is an obligation to invest to implement a new terminal, with 17 boarding bridges and expand yards and runways, all this until April 2016.

The budget for this is R$700 million, something like US$200 million (because the recent real devaluation).

Unfortunately there will be delays because the required environmental permits have not been issued due to a long strike by agency officials responsible and the traditional slowness of the authorities in these matters.

It is curious to note that in a country which technically is in recession, having had its third consecutive quarter with negative growth, Brazilian airlines transported never so many people as in the first half of 2015. So, airports are having a huge demand also.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj33-Apr2015-Neto-PHOTOManuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto, MSc, Mech. Engineer and PMP is Fundação Dom Cabral Invited Professor and also Consultant. He is a seasoned professional with over 40 years of experience in Project Management, Process Management and Strategy. Manuel has managed or participated in more than three hundred huge projects across different fields including Steel, Mining, IT, Telecom, Food Processing, Government and Construction, to mention a few. He worked also in projects to implement PMO (Project Management Office) and Project Management Methodology. He has also strong skills in Leading People and Finance. He served as Minas Gerais State Undersecretary for Planning and Budget, from 2007 to 2008. Manuel is a part-time international correspondent for PM World Journal in Brazil.

Manuel can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/manuel-carvalho-da-silva-neto/

 

Queensland AIPM Chapter Forum and Awards Night (Project Management Update from Brisbane)

REPORT

Project Management Report from Queensland

By Mary Martin

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia


 

Queensland Forum and Awards Night

Queensland AIPM Chapter recognizes regional Australian Institute of Project Management award winners

In the run up to the October National AIPM Conference, to be held in Tasmania, Australia’s most southern state capital, each Australian state runs an educational Forum and subsequent Awards night for their individual and corporate members.

Queensland’s event was held on August 20th. In addition to a generous number of industry sponsors, the day included the launch of a mentoring program as well as a Job & Pathways Fare to assist with employment opportunities for members transitioning out of downsizing industries, including mining.

With speaker presentations covering Queensland Reconstruction projects, after our recent years of devastating cyclone destruction; discussions on Building Capability within a major infrastructure organisation and the magnitude of engineering a framework to manage the recent G20 event held in Brisbane, there was plenty of daytime topic variety to interest the forum attendees.

The evening Awards event was a great success with a sell-out cocktail party at City Hall, with Award nominees clearly highlighting Queensland’s expertise in project management as well as confirming our talent for enjoying a great night out.

At state level, Awards were contested in categories including Construction/Engineering, Defence/Aerospace, ICT Telecommunications, Organisation/Change Management to name a few, culminating in the premier awards of Project & Program Manager of the Year. These worthy award winners will now compete with the other 7 states and territories for national recognition and ultimately a chance to be celebrated internationally through a number of auspices including the International Project Management Association.

We now eagerly anticipate the National Conference in Hobart where Queensland expects to hold up its reputation for batting above their weight in regard to our national Award haul.

See below for regional award winners (based on AIPM QLD press release ).

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Martin-PHOTOMary Martin

Primal Solutions
Brisbane, QLD, Australia

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Mary Martin is Business Manager/Facilitator, project management consultant, and business advisor at Primal Solutions in Brisbane, Australia. She also serves as an international correspondent for the PM World Journal in Australia

Born and educated in Sydney, Australia, Mary came to project management by the accidental route.   After a corporate life in Finance and Executive General Management, Mary developed an enviable reputation in business consulting, assisting clients with issues ranging from Business to Boardroom communications, to substantial HR transformation and commercial bid management.

Whilst undertaking a long term consulting role she was obliged to take on responsibility for the project management of local and international projects developing an abiding interest in project and program management improvement, which now sees her exclusively advising in this challenging environment.

Mary is actively involved with the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), currently as a Councillor for their Queensland Chapter. Mary is also an inaugural member of AIPM’s special interest group Women in Project Management, which seeks to support and educate women who are growing a career in this always exciting discipline. Mary’s tertiary qualifications include Bachelor’s degree, Commerce in Accounting and Bachelor’s degree, Business in HR & Marketing.

Primal Solutions provides project management training solutions, maturity benchmarks, methodology consulting, AIPM certification, PMO Gateway reviews, project HR strategy assessments and recruitment services, corporate skills audits and other services for Australian and organizations in the Asia Pacific region. For information about Primal Solutions, visit http://www.primalsolutions.com.au/

Mary Martin can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Enhance PMBOK® by Comparing it with P2M, ICB, PRINCE2, APM and Scrum Project Management Standards

STUDENT PAPER

By Sam Ghosh, Danny Forrest, Thomas DiNetta, Brian Wolfe & Danielle C. Lambert

Masters in Project Management Degree Program
James A. Clarke School of Engineering
University of Maryland

College Park, Maryland, USA


1.0  Abstract

The objective of this project is to enhance and enrich “A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge” (PMBOK®), 4th edition of Project Management Institute (PMI) by comparing and contrasting it with the following standards:

  1. International Project Management Association (IPMA) International Competence Baseline (ICB) version 3.0 and related articles
  2. Association for Project Management (APM) Body of Knowledge (BOK), 5th edition, UK Professional Body for Project Professionals and related articles
  3. Project Planning and Project Management (P2M), volume I, II, Booklet, 2003, Association of Japan (PMAJ) and related article
  4. PRojects IN Controlled Environments (PRINCE2®), Office of Government Commerce (OGC) and related articles
  5. Scrum Agile Standard.

Structure of Project Report: For each standard, the driving forces for its adoption, its content, synergies and differences with PMBOK® are noted at a high level. New competencies and keywords from each standard are identified that are not covered, or adequately illustrated in PMBOK®. These new competencies are used to enhance (1) a particular section of Body of Knowledge (BOK) of PMBOK® and/or (2) the Input, Tools and Technique, Output (I/TT/O) of one or more of the 42 processes of PMBOK®.

Appendix: Includes a brief comparison between PMBOK® and other global standards, mapping of each standard with the Knowledge Areas (KAs) and Process Groups (PGs) of PMBOK®, enhancement to PMBOK® in a table, the Project Plan, lessons learned, list of abbreviations, and a glossary.

2.0. Introduction

 2.1. Project Management History, Adoption and Influence

A project is a unique endeavor with a start and end date that delivers a specific result or service. Although a project is temporary, the results of a project can be long-lasting. Project Management is a discipline in itself. It helps meet project requirements by applying knowledge, skills, tools, techniques (pg. 6, PMBOK®) and human interactions. It also ensures that the project aligns with corporate strategy and objectives. Project Management started in the 1960s with engineering projects. Today, Project Management is a recognized discipline that is used in a variety of business domains for projects of all sizes. Many global standards on Project Management are now available along with certifications, education and training.

2.2. PMBOK® History and Adoption

PMI is a non-profit organization that was founded in 1969 by a group of 5 people in Atlanta. PMBOK® was first published by PMI as a white paper in 1987. The fourth and latest edition was released in 2008. Although PMBOK® is an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard, it was contributed to by members across the world. Over 2.8 million copies are in circulation and available in 10 languages. It is the most widely accepted guideline on Project Management. PMI has over 307,000 members in 180 countries with 10-20% annual growth. (Cable, 2011)

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: This paper was prepared for course ENCE662 Introduction to Project Management, a core course for the Master of Engineering in Project Management degree in the James A. Clarke School of Engineering, University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, Maryland, USA. Course instructor was Mr. John Cable, Director of the Project Management Center of Excellence at UMD. This paper was originally published in the January 2012 edition of the PM World Today. It is republished here with permission, and at the request, of the authors.

 


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghosh+-PHOTOSam Ghosh

Maryland, USA

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Soumajit (Sam) Ghosh
has over twenty years of experience in industry, and academia in Information Technology, and Project Management. He has worked as Project Manager, and Enterprise Architect for start-up ventures, government agencies and Fortune 500 companies in mission critical projects. He is certified Project Management Professional (PMP), PMI, Sun Certified Enterprise Java Architect, Sun Certified Web Component Developer, Sun Certified Java Programmer and Competent Toastmaster, Toastmasters International. He holds MS in Computer Science, and MS in Industrial Engineering from Texas Tech University. He is a PhD Candidate at A. James Clark School of Engineering, The University of Maryland, College Park, specializing in Project Management. He can be reached at: [email protected].

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghosh+-PHOTO2 FORRESTDanny Forrest

Co-Author

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Danny Forrest
has 11 years of professional experience in the Biotechnology industry.  He has helped manage multiple projects ranging from a bio-fuels start-up venture to the manufacture of new Tuberculosis vaccines.  He is currently managing a series of plant improvement projects at Maryland biotech mainstay GlaxoSmithKline as an Automation Engineer. He holds a B.S. in Bioengineering and a Masters of Engineering in Project Management, both at the University of Maryland, College Park.  He can be reached at [email protected].

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghosh+-PHOTO3 DINETTAThomas DiNetta

Co-Author

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Thomas DiNetta
is a professional engineer with nine years of experience in three different fields of engineering. He has helped develop radar, sonar, command and weapon systems for the U.S. Navy and its allies around the world.  He is currently employed by Lockheed Martin in their Engineering Leadership Development and Program and is working on the SPY Radar.  Thomas has a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Villanova University and a Masters of Engineering in Project Management in The University of Maryland, College Park.  He can be reached at [email protected].

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghosh+-PHOTO4 WOLFEBryan Wolfe 

Co-Author

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Bryan Wolfe has a Masters of Engineering degree with a concentration in Project Management in The University of Maryland, College Park. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Industrial Mathematics from Shepherd University in May of 2011. He is currently working as an Assistant Project Manager for an electrical contracting company. He can be reached at [email protected]

 

pmwj38-Sep2015-Ghosh+-PHOTO5 LAMBERTDanielle C. Lambert

Co-Author

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Danielle C. Lambert
has her Masters of Engineering in Civil and Environmental Engineering with a concentration in Structural Engineer from the University of Maryland, College Park. She also holds her Bachelors of Science degree in Applied Mathematics from Towson University.  She is currently a Structural Engineer for Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson, Inc. and is a member of ASCE and ICRI.  She can be reached by email at [email protected]

 

Five Current Trends in Project Management

COMMENTARY

By Luca Cavone

Milan, Italy


Summary

The change, the evolution are at the core of the world we live in, the environment and of human being. In 1859 Charles Darwin has theorized as these dynamics happen in response to the need for adaptation, respect to the context that surrounds us.

In the past, it was observed as these aspects are not applicable only to the nature, but the same principles are found in other fields, including business. Whether you talk about market trends, competitors, business models or technologies, companies are subject to continuous change in order to survive and thrive.

In addition to these external factors, other internal dimensions are subject to the same principles: processes, organization and resources change and evolve according to different needs.

For project driven organizations, where the core of the business are projects, also processes and project management methodologies undergo changes over time.

In this paper, I have collected a series of reflections about the recent evolution of project management, based on my experience together with further insights exchanged with colleagues and other professionals: five main trends are introduced as outcomes.

Introduction

In a daily work as consultants, we have the opportunity to observe the evolution of companies over time. This path can be more or less visible depending on what is affected in the change process. There can be different dimensions involved, for example: strategy, organization, processes, tools, methodologies; usually it is difficult that only one of these dimensions is involved separately, rather more than one is subject to change, because of the mutual influence.

The companies where the core of the business is driven by projects, of course do not escape this kind of considerations. By focusing on their distinctive element, project management, it is interesting to remark that their approach to the methodology and best practices change and evolve over time.

Starting from this point, I had the chance to reflect several times on how the approach and the application of project management has changed within companies.

Some of the changes have been underway for some years, so in the eyes of industry experts will be certainly not new; others are emerging recently and will be fundamental for the future of the project management in the coming years.

I summarized the following five main trends:

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About the Author                                                          

 

pmwj35-Jun2015-Cavone-PHOTOLuca Cavone

Milan, Italy

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Luca Cavone is a Consultant at JMAC Europe, the Consulting firm of the Japan Management Association. He is mainly focused to support companies in the governance of innovation projects and product development. He has a strong background and expertise in project management methodologies and business practices. Before joining JMAC he had several years of experience in international projects within the aerospace industry. Together with the consulting activities he’s involved as a lecturer for masters and university courses on project management and innovation management. Since 2014 he’s Adjunct Professor in “Language and Communication Skills for Project Management “ at Master in International Business & Economics, University of Pavia.

Since 2009 he has been member of the IPMA (International Project Management Association), for which he has held board positions both a national and international level. He’s regularly invited at international conferences to deliver speeches and workshops

Luca joined the PMWJ in 2013 as an international correspondent in Italy; he can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Luca Cavone, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/luca-cavone/