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Project Management of Hotel Opening Processes

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj33-Apr2015-Campbell-BOOKBook Title: Project Management of Hotel Opening Processes
Author: Gert Noordzij
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing
List Price:   $40.00
Format: Soft Cover
Publication Date:   2014
ISBN: 978-1495459375
Reviewer:     John Campbell
Review Date: February/March 2015

 

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Introduction

The initial reaction I had was one of glee as this book’s cover indicates that it deals with “Project Management of Hotel Opening Processes”. I have spent the last fifteen (15) + years in the management of Hospitality Projects for Hotel Owners of facilities rated 4+ stars. Once I opened the book however I discovered the contents of the book, all data gathered and statistics deal with the opening of hotels in Greater China. This should have been pointed out on the cover in my opinion.

The good news is that while the data in the Appendixes has been gathered from research on eight hundred and twenty five (825) individual projects located in Greater China and Asia, it is my opinion that the statistics relate, in similar strength, to the numerous projects that I have completed in the United States including Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Jamaica.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into three (3) sections;

  1. The introduction, Root Cause of Problems and Application of the PMBOK©
  2. The Feasibility of a HOW-TO-MANUAL and
  3. Appendixes of Root Causes and the Introduction of a Proposed Extension to the PMBOK® for Hotel Opening Process, formatted to the PMBOK© Knowledge Areas.

Highlights: What I liked!

Chapter 6 contained Appendixes.

The appendixes contained interesting information regarding hotel openings, while they were for specific projects in greater China and Asia, in my opinion the data could apply across the board to hotel projects anywhere in the world.

Who might benefit from the Book?

The concept of following the layout of the PMBOK® Guide is beneficial to all projects, and certainly to Hotel Ownership and Management firms. The book offers an extension to the PMBOK® Guide that lays out suggested elements for the opening of Hotels however; in my opinion the opening of any commercial construction project could benefit from the suggested Knowledge Area extensions.

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About the Reviewer

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John Boyd Campbell

Texas, USA

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John Campbell
is a professional with 30+ years of progressive experience and proven leadership in professional ground-up and renovation construction project management of hospitality and healthcare facilities. Consistently exceeds goals for cost reductions, and schedule completions. Hands on management experience in seismic safety and hurricane regulated facilities. Lean implementation project management. Active in new product evaluations, business integration as a result of acquisition, outsourcing, and energizing highly motivated teams.

Specialties include Project Management; Project Leadership / Personnel Development; Personal and Professional Development; Communication & Reporting; Scope, Schedule and Budget; Results Driven, Goal Oriented, Self-starter; Quality Control; Lean Means & Methods; Risk Assessment and Management

John currently teaches Risk Management to Project Management Professionals (PMP’s) for Personal Development Units (PDU’s) as required to maintain their Certification. John can be contacted at [email protected] or on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/jbcjr1pmp/

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

The Basics of Project Evaluation and Lessons Learned

 

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj33-Apr2015-Coelln-BOOKBook Title: The Basics of Project Evaluation and Lessons Learned
Author: Willis H. Thomas
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   US$24.99
Format: soft cover, 214 pages
Publication Date:   August 2014
ISBN: 978-1-4822-0453-7
Reviewer:     Maryanne Coelln, PMP
Review Date: February 2015

 


 

Introduction to the Book

This is the second edition of an original work created for a doctoral dissertation supported by renowned experts in the field of evaluation.

Looking for an easy to read tutorial on what is, and how to conduct, lessons learned on a project? Mr. Thomas has the ticket for you.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book starts by orienting the reader with a few informational chapters on project management. They’re easy to skip if you are a seasoned project manager, and helpful to read if you are new to the discipline.

Chapter headings lead the reader to areas of their interest. Help on agile projects? Want to get examples of what questions to ask? Is there a company out there similar to mine that I could learn from in a case study? How can I benchmark my improvements? Mr. Thomas has nicely organized the material to help find an area that applies to what is being searched.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

Mr. Thomas added three new chapters from his first revision. The new chapters cover Agile Retrospectives, Knowledge Transfer and PRINCE2 (a methodology more common in Europe; a de facto process-based method for effective project management).

Highlights: What I liked!

What I liked most was that the book is written in a very conversational tone. The chapters are easily identifiable as to content, and topics of greater interest can be found quickly. The breadth of project management functional areas to review for improvement and the follow up approaches using various methodologies are very good.

I had an online version for my review, but the hard copy version includes a CD of a Project Evaluation Resource Kit (PERK) that could help the reader. It’s a fully functional MS Access Lessons Learned Database if you’d like something set up for you to help store and search for captured lessons learned.

More…

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About the Reviewer

 pmwj33-Apr2015-Coelln-PHOTO

Maryanne Coelln

Texas, USA

 

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Maryanne Coelln
, PMP, is Director of Project Delivery for the American Airlines Federal Credit Union.  Maryanne has a B.S.C. degree in Marketing from Santa Clara University, California and earned her PMP in 2003. She has over 15 years of experience in leading technical project teams and is focused on developing practical methodologies. She has been an active member in the PMI Dallas Chapter for many years.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]al.net.

 

Communication for Continuous Improvement Projects

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj33-Apr2015-James-BOOKBook Title:   Communication for Continuous Improvement Projects
Author: Tina Kanti Agustiady
Publisher: CRC Press – Taylor & Francis Group
List Price:  $94.95
Format: Hardcover, 320 pages
Publication Date:   October 2013           
ISBN: 9781466577756
Reviewer: Patrick James
Review Date: March 2015

 


 

Introduction

We all know the importance of communication and specially communication in managing project. Communication plays a very important key role in the success of any project. Significant numbers of projects have failed because of poor communication. Not only that but effective and attentive listening is equally important.

This book emphasize on effective communication which is important for the success of any project. You may have the best tools and experienced project lead but without proper and effective communication, there is always a high risk of project failure.

Tina Agustiady, an expert in lean six sigma and continuous process improvement guru, has summarized this book in such a way that it is very easy to follow and understand the concepts. Even though most of the examples and references are from the manufacturing industry, still same continuous improvement methodologies and concepts can be easily adopted by any organization across the board.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book consists of 12 chapters with real time and easy to understand business examples, with charts, graphs and tables. Author has summarized the major concepts from effective communication to emphasis on best-in-class practices, maintaining sustainability, empowering employees. Tina has highlighted the importance of managing project teams and project sponsors in the similar way you would manage a project itself, by effective communication, how to build trust in your team, how to change status quo, how to empower decision making. Tina has also shared her experience and knowledge about visual communication as well as lean six sigma and TPM (Total Production Maintenance).

More…

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About the Reviewer

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Patrick James

Texas, USA

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Patrick James MBA, PMP, graduated from Punjab University in Lahore, Pakistan, with a major in Mathematics & Statistics; he has an MBA in Marketing from Preston University. He earned his PMP Certification in 2014. 8 years ago while working as an analyst he slowly started advancing his true passion to work as a project manager and to manage complex and challenging projects. Over the last 5 years he has successfully managed several Business Process Improvement and re-engineering projects. He likes working with cross functional teams in a collaborative environment. Patrick is an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) and the PMI Dallas Chapter. He likes to read articles & books on Project Management, IT and Business Optimization. Patrick can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Great Lessons in Project Management

Book Review

pmwj33-Apr2015-Strecker-BOOKBook Title: Great Lessons in Project Management
Author: David Pratt
Publisher: Management Concepts Press
List Price:   US$29.00
Format: soft cover; 143 pages
Publication Date:   2015
ISBN: 978-1-56726-472-2
Reviewer:     Stephen Strecker
Review Date: March 2015

 


 

Introduction to the Book

This book is a fast paced collection of 19 fascinating lessons learned short stories that drive home key principles for success in project management, with a general emphasis on rescuing troubled projects. The book presents a relatively concise yet lively business background scenario for a wide range of challenged (primarily government organization) IT projects that are resuscitated by the author (or one of three of his peers), with effective solution techniques.

The author seeks to teach useful, widely applicable project management lessons learned solutions in short, easily digested chapters, where each one focuses on a single principle. It is a solid contribution to the field, with material that is easily approachable, a quick read and applicable to most types of IT projects. Overall, it provides an insightful consultant perspective, where the author’s extensive experience clearly shines through.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is organized into 19 short chapters that guide the reader through 19 interesting case studies. Each one presents a problem scenario, along with the solution and a clearly labeled lessons learned summary section. The topics include scope management, management and control, project team management, stakeholder management, project initiation, communications management, quality management, time management, HR management, cost management, project governance, procurement management, project planning, risk management, project execution and project management integration.

The first eighteen chapters can safely be read in any order but the reader should probably save the final (integration) chapter for last.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

Personal narrative stores are an excellent teaching tool for sharing practical experience, in a way that draws in the reader. The author is very good at using that approach to compiling a page-turner collection of useful advice that clearly focuses on the PMBOK process groups and knowledge areas. Credible troubled project scenarios set the user up for appropriate project manager empowered solutions, which are then clearly summarized as broadly applicable lessons learned. Each of those lessons learned is descriptive yet concise and directed to either the project manager or the project sponsor (or both).

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About the Reviewer

pmwj33-Apr2015-Strecker-PHOTO

Stephen Strecker

Texas, USA

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Stephen Strecker
, MBA, PMP, ITIL is a Senior Consultant with Healthcare Provider Solutions, a Xerox consulting company, in north Texas, USA. He has over 25 years of experience in the IT and management industry, demonstrating comprehensive expertise with end-to-end PMO, program and project leadership in healthcare infrastructure and application development for major hospital organizations.

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

The Scorecard Solution: Measure What Matters and Drive Sustainable Growth

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj33-Apr2015-Tripathi-BOOKBook Title: The Scorecard Solution: Measure What Matters and Drive Sustainable Growth
Author: Dan E. King        
Publisher: AMACOM, American Management Association
List Price:   US$ 29.95; $18.47 in Kindle edition
Format: Hard cover; 277 pages
Publication Date:   2015
ISBN: 978-0-8144-3492-5
Reviewer:     Arvind Tripathi, PMP, MBB
Review Date: March 2015

 


 

Introduction

According to the author, senior leaders mostly receive sanitized information due to the messenger’s fear of getting shot for bringing the bad news. This is a dangerous scenario for a decision maker.

This book tries to address this problem by giving a practical tool for maintaining a clear and constant view of the business to enable better decision making. This tool is called “Organizational Prowess” or O.P. and is built on a scale from 10 to 100 that reflects four level of organizational maturity or competence. From best to worst they are:

  • Agile: 80-100 points; Organization has enviable speed to market, a culture of innovation and exceeds financial targets.
  • Resilient: 60-79 points; Company is able to achieve its financial targets but stretch goals are nearly impossible.
  • Vulnerable: 30-59 points; Organization regularly misses financial targets, suffers talent erosion and has minimal innovation.
  • Lagging: 10-29 points; Company has a passionless culture and does not innovate. Without changes, its survival is in doubt.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book’s approach has three major components in coming up with the scoring criteria:

  1. Strategic Planning (Chapters 1-4, 9, & 10)
  2. Execution Framework (Chapters 5, 7 thru 11)
  3. Talent (Chapters 6, 8 & 9)

Introduction and Chapter 1 talk to the overall approach and define important terms followed by Chapter 2 that talks to the timing or applicability of the approach. It also introduces a hypothetical company to the discussion and due to this case study, it all sounds very practical and doable.

Chapter 3 lays out the above three components for the primary categories. These components are specific, measurable, and given a numerical rating. This approach avoids personal opinions and vague claims of being better than average. Chapter 4 continues the strategic planning discussion and why it is so important to get this right.

More…

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About the Reviewer

pmwj33-Apr2015-Tripathi-PHOTO



Arvind Tripathi, PMP

Texas, USA

 

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Arvind Tripathi is a Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Continuous Improvement Coach at Flowserve in Dallas, Texas. He is a Project Management Professional (PMP), Lean & Six Sigma Master Black Belt (MBB), and a Certified Manager for Quality & Organizational Excellence (CMQ/OE) from American Society for Quality (ASQ) with 20+ years of professional experience in project and program management.

Arvind has delivered impressive business results in Aerospace, Automotive, Chemicals, Management consulting, Oil & Gas, Technology and Service industries. He has an MBA in Finance from Wichita State University, MS in Engineering Management from the University of Oklahoma and BS in Mechanical Engineering from India. He has been active in PMI, IIE, ASQ and is a past National Baldrige Examiner.

Email: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

 

Breakthrough Business Analysis: Implementing and Sustaining a Value-Based Practice

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj33-Apr2015-Zatar-BOOKBook Title: Breakthrough Business Analysis: Implementing and Sustaining a Value-Based Practice      
Author: Kathleen B. Hass
Publisher: Management Concepts Press
List Price: $ 45.00
Format: Soft cover – 283 pages
Publication Date: December 2014
ISBN: 978-1-56726-464-7
Reviewer: Serin Zatar
Review Date: 03/2015

 


 

Introduction

The author, Hass, introduces the role of BA as typical business analysis activities defining and managing requirements. Then briefly discussed the struggle of BA practitioners to form BA communities, share knowledge/best practices, and improve outcomes of their efforts. She addressed the current challenges businesses face due to global integrated 21st century economy that has affected IT application, business strategy, and project management. The BA role, in return, changed from a business partner fulfilling an organization’s need into a data driven, holistic thinker, innovator, strategists, and transformational leader.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Hass introduces and presents the framework for implementing and sustaining a value-based BA practice that involves three phases:

  • Part 1(Chapter 1-2) Readiness: “Is our organization ready?” First, examine the organization’s culture. Second, build a business case. Then, a BA lead describes the value and cost of implementing a mature BA Practice. To add value, a BA lead is advised to enlist an executive sponsor, who in return, gives the case accountability. To guide the evolution of a BA practice, a steering committee is formed to provide support.

  • Part 2(Chapter 3-5) Implementation: “How do we build the BA practice?”  A BA practice needs a department, known as BA Center of Excellence (BACOE), which is accountable for standards, tools, and responsible for building and sustaining effective BA practices. It assesses both the team and organization’s maturity and capability; which results in building a capable BA team.

  • Part 3(Chapter 6-11) Sustainability: “How do we institutionalize and continue to improve BA practices?”  Key to success is to run the BA practice like a business. Focusing on effective practices and input that have measurable results. Innovative practices gives value and proves worthiness of the investment. Reach and maintain efficiency in communication and management to prove success of practices. As a result, a BA team will grow from good to great.

Highlights

The author presents this new framework to suite various organizations depending on their maturity matrix and their desired future growth span. The tools explained in the book offers a stage-by-stage approach to ensure that the BA practice is customized to the organization by embedding the BA practice discipline into its structure, adding value to the customers, and wealth to the bottom line.

The book encourages, locks and loads the BA professional to take the lead and become the organization’s champion of a value-based BA practice and lead the business into the 21st century economy.

Hass, ends the book with an outline of the framework that is based on real life success stories and case studies to ensure the BA practice/BA specialist is the right fit based on the organization’s culture and political situation.

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About the Reviewer

 pmwj33-Apr2015-Zatar-PHOTO

Serin Zatar

Texas, USA

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Serin Zatar currently works in the USA and holds the position of Project Manager-Corporate Real Estate for Caliber Home Loans Inc. She is Business Administration graduate from the American University of Beirut (AUB) and a Certified Project Manager (PMP). She has 13 years in real estate development and 9 years in Project Management, with focus on international clients in the field of construction, real estate management and business strategy.

www.linkedin.com/in/serinzatar

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books. If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management Report from Milan

 

REPORT

By Luca Cavone

International Correspondent

Milan, Italy

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INTRODUCTION

The official opening of Expo 2015 is almost upon us, less than a month and starting from May 1st Milan will become the world’s reference point for the main global event of 2015.

In this issue I have decided to devote a special edition to the event, taking a different perspective with respect to what normally the mass media described to us.

In recent months we received a lot of information about the exhibition areas and what we can see in the pavilions of each country. On the opposite, we know very few about all the projects that have been launched in parallel and that will be the legacy for the future.

In the next few pages I will introduce some of the major projects, sharing some highlights from each.

I wish you good reading and I invite you in the next six months to come to Italy and visit Expo in Milan!!!

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About the Author

 pmwj33-Apr2015-Cavone-PHOTO

Luca Cavone

Milan, Italy

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Luca Cavone is a Consultant at JMAC Europe, the Consulting firm of the Japan Management Association. He is mainly focused to support companies in Innovation Management and Product Development Projects typical of R&D and Marketing areas, with an interdisciplinary background of the business processes. In JMAC Luca follows also the study and development of project management methodologies based on the application of Lean Thinking approach. Before joining JMAC he worked several years in the Aerospace industry.   Since 2009 Luca has been actively involved with the International Project Management Association (IPMA); at that time he was between the founders of the Young Crew Italy and was appointed as first chairman. In 2011 he left the position to join the Young Crew Management Board, where he’s currently Head of Membership and Responsible for the Young Project Manager of the Year award. Since 2010 Luca is also a member of the Executive Board of IPMA Italy.

Luca is an international correspondent for PM World in Italy; he can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Luca Cavone, visit the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/luca-cavone/

 

Project Management Update from Cairo

 

REPORT

By Almahdy Eltonsy

International Correspondent

Cairo, Egypt

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Project financial control with uncertain conditions

Interview with Miriam Amin,

Financial Controller and Consultant

Interviewer: Almahdy Eltonsy, IPMA – B

 

First I would like to introduce you, could you tell us about yourself?

My name is Mariam. I worked as a Senior Financial controller in Siemens Egypt.

During my career journey, which for the last 15 years is with Siemens, I have touched the Healthcare industry and Energy Transmission sector.

Now I am a consultant financial controller and trainer.

 

Healthcare and energy transmission!!! , it looks as a big gap isn’t it?

Financial control remains the same; sure projects are different but the financial controlling and project controlling remains the same.

When we deal with projects controlling we put in place tools that we use to “See” – “Measure” – “ Compare / benchmark “ – “ Raise Flag”.

As I told you the concepts are the same but as you notice they are not typically the same.

Even within the same industry, each project has its own “DNA” and its own “Genetics”, parents are the same but children are different.

 

What do you mean by projects “DNA” and “Genetics”?

Oh I mean by that when the project is born or even if the project is in the formulation phase, a lot of circumstances and effects influence how the project will look like.

Based on that, we put the controls in place; each project has its own criteria and own challenge, as I told you typically like your children.

 

How do the children look now, I mean projects?

Well thanks for this question. As you can see now the whole world is under a huge un-certainty, the most stable places became un-stable and you may notice fluid situations in many places that we considered as solid earlier.

The Middle East, Africa and Latin America, considered as the most growing countries and with high growth rates, in the same time the situations there are not stable and mature, and guess what that makes the business more challenging and more attractive.

You could see a lot of opportunities but with high risks, which means higher mitigation plans to hedge each risk. And that will lead to a much higher base cost. Not just that, but there is no confirmation that you put the right mitigation plan in place!

More…

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About the Author

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Almahdy Eltonsy

Cairo, Egypt

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Almahdy Eltonsy
, IPMA – B is a Senior Project Manager in the HealthCare industry, and the first healthcare PM granted the IPMA-B certification in Egypt. Starting with Siemens in 1993, Almahdy has extensive technical and managerial experiences, gaining the ability to work cross-functionally in a time-intensive environment. One of the most important milestones in Almahdy’s project management career is Children’s Cancer Hospital in Egypt (57357) ( http://www.57357.com/ ), a 30 Million Euro Project. As a GPM for this strategic pivotal project, the scope was not only project management but also the service management, in addition to work with accreditation bodies.

In 2012 Almahdy moved to GE HealthCare to work as a product service manager for Surgery – X-Ray – Intervention – Ultrasound – Life Care solutions, using his experience in leading the service team with project management methodology. Almahdy’s motive to change is to take a new challenge and exposure to new cultures and discipline, taking advantage of his technical and managerial skills and using the project management tool box in general management aspects.

In addition to his work in healthcare, Almahdy worked as an IT project developer with one of the largest media and advertising groups in Egypt. Almahdy was able to realize a new methodology and software for Media planning and advertising campaign planning. Almahdy holds a B.Sc. in Systems and Biomedical Engineering from Cairo University – Faculty of Engineering, and passed many specialized courses in Siemens, GE and Microsoft. Linkedin: Almahdy Eltonsy. Email: [email protected]

To view other works by Almahdy Eltonsy, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/almahdy-eltonsy/.

 

Project Management Report from Belo Horizonte

 

REPORT

By Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

International Correspondent

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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The Dark Side of the Economy or One Difficult Year for PM

The 2014 Brazilian economy official results were revealed a few days ago. GDP grew a “spectacular” 0.1%. Industry and Investments (this down 4.4% compared to 2013) are the accounts that impacted more that awful result.

Such numbers would have been even worse if the GDP calculation methodology had not been changed, for among other things, to include the costs of IT, innovation and R & D investment (amazing, but until then they were expenditures). In the case of Project Management, falling investment means fewer projects, fewer jobs and less interest in the subject.

The 2014 results reflect only a huge lack of market confidence in the Brazilian economy. After years encouraging consumption and expanding the supply of credit, fiscal unorthodox maneuvers, betting on companies that do not correspond and insisting on a certain isolation, rather than take advantage of the increasingly global world and markets, the government saw these efforts prove harmless. There were no structural changes or transforming investments in infrastructure, nor discussed and encouraged the knowledge and good education to become national priorities.

One day the bill arrives. Then it arrived.

If the year 2014 was bad, 2015 could be worse. Market analysts and economists predict a fall in GDP and an even greater fall in investments.

Major drivers of investment in Brazil in recent years were the mining company VALE, oil company PETROBRAS and construction areas, this last as a result of a kind of real estate “bubble”.

More…

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About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Neto-PHOTO

Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto, MSc, Mech. Engineer and PMP
is Fundação Dom Cabral Invited Professor and also Consultant. He is a seasoned professional with over 40 years of experience in Project Management, Process Management and Strategy. Manuel has managed or participated in more than three hundred huge projects across different fields including Steel, Mining, IT, Telecom, Food Processing, Government and Construction, to mention a few. He worked also in projects to implement PMO (Project Management Office) and Project Management Methodology. He has also strong skills in Leading People and Finance. He served as Minas Gerais State Undersecretary for Planning and Budget, from 2007 to 2008. Manuel can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by this author, visit the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/manuel-carvalho-da-silva-neto/

 

UK Project Management Round Up

 

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

________________________________________________________________________

 

INTRODUCTION

The clocks have gone forward once again so I guess it must be Spring here in UK. Looking out of my window, it does not seem much like it but I know it is Springtime because there is a rash of project-related conferences and exhibitions. Hopefully we will see some green shoots in the Project World. We are also in the throes of a general election campaign and many see this as a project. We also look at some developments at Sellafield and a project to design a shadowless skyscraper as well as some other interesting ideas for projects. This is also the season for the professional societies to move ahead with their programs.

NUCLEAR DEVELOPMENTS

As it is the end of the Parliamentary session and the end of this Parliament, there are lots of reports from various worthy Parliamentary Committees. One that caught my eye is from the National Audit Office (NAO) which looked at waste management at Sellafield. More precisely, the report noted that the Nuclear Decommissioning Agency (NDA), the people charged with looking after the clean-up of the UK’s legacy nuclear plants, including Sellafield. The NDA re-estimated the lifetime cost of cleaning up Sellafield at £53 billion. What was surprising about this is that a year ago, the estimate stood at £48 billion. So the life time costs have more than doubled since the 2010 estimate of £25 billion, as NDA have understood the nature of their projects, the risks involved and the nature of their sites.

All has not been sweetness and light at Sellafield as the contract of Nuclear £430 K, a cost described by Margaret Hodge, Chair of the Public Accounts Committee (PAC), as ‘galling’ as it would have to be added to the tab picked up by the UK taxpayer. The PAC has criticized the NDA management of the clean-up, pointing out that the PAC had concluded over a year ago that NDA had not ‘demonstrated why NMP ownership of Sellafield provides good value for money’. PAC noted sourly that the NDA had only taken the decision to terminate the contract in January 2015.

Projects at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) have also been in the headlines this month as the Government considers whether to terminate the management contract of AWE Management, a consortium now made up of Serco who have many outsourcing problems in addition to this contract, Jacobs who bought BNFL’s share and Lockheed Martin. Who have interests in the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee in the USA. The management contract was awarded in 2000 and was due to run for 10 years at a cost of £2.2 billion. Contract duration was extended to 25 years. So far, it is estimated that some £9 billion has been spent at Aldermaston.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

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MILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

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Miles Shepherd
is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

Project Management Update from Santiago

 

REPORT

By Jaime Videla

International Correspondent

Santiago, Chile

________________________________________________________________________

 

Processes and Risks

In recent months we have seen our country hit by various disasters: the eruption of a volcano in the south, the forest fires in central and south, and a week ago a flood that devastated northern Chile generating an initial count of over 23 dead and 57 missing persons.

No government can anticipate the occurrence of such disasters. However, the authority is obliged to anticipate their occurrence and minimize their impacts, especially taking into consideration the geographical and geological characteristics of our land.

Project management teaches us that one of the main causes of project failure is lack of planning. What has been the risk response planning for such calamities? Who are the people responsible for monitoring the identified risks?

Another important cause is the lack of processes and procedures. Who evaluates the effectiveness of the risk management process? What preparation and instruction has been provided to inhabitants to address these scenarios?

Chile has a national emergency office, ONEMI, under the ministry of the interior, responsible for coordinating the National System of Civil Protection. Its mission is to plan, promote, coordinate and implement actions of prevention, response and rehabilitation in situations of collective risk, emergencies, disasters and catastrophes natural or caused by human action.

In light of recent events, it is urgent and necessary for ONEMI to review the planning, analysis and response to risks and processes, procedures and responsibilities for monitoring threats in order to reduce to a minimum loss of life human, animal and plant.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

 

About the Author

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JAIME VIDELA

Santiago, Chile

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Jaime Videla, PMP
, is the Managing Director for Videla Montero Consultores a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of AccuFast! Cubicaciones, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 20+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Germany.

Since 2006 Jaime has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects.

Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Mr. Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

 

Project Management Outsourcing

 

COMMENTARY

By Rüdiger Geist

Zurich, Switzerland

And

Prof Gerhard Ortner

Vienna, Austria

________________________________________________________________________

 

Starting somewhere in the 1980’s Outsourcing became a trend in many industries of the western economies. Companies think about how to improve their efficiency, effectiveness and – of course – their profits. So more and more functions like accounting or IT-services became a commodity and whole markets for outsourcing services developed. This trend did not even stop at companies’ core business processes. Nowadays business process outsourcing seems to develop as an acknowledged management discipline.

Practice shows us that project management will not be an exception. More and more businesses use third party services to scale down in-house project management pools, improve PM maturity by widen project management services (e.g. PMO), add additional peak resources, etc.

In our book published in Germany by Springer-Gabler we look closer at the modern project management processes and their eligibilities to be outsourced. First the entire cloud of different outsourcing terms is to be cleared a little bid. Then the most popular PM process models (PMI, IPMA and ISO 21500) are pooled to form seven main PM process groups. The main part of the book deal with the analysis of each PM process of these groups. Thereby eight criteria are applied to check if a process is appropriate to be outsourced. The criteria where based on an empirical study conducted in Austria, Germany and Switzerland where PM professionals give their inputs to questions about PM outsourcing.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Authors

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Rüdiger Geist

Zurich, Switzerland

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Rüdiger Geist
, PfMP, PMP, IPMA Level B is the Managing Director of [email protected] GmbH, a Swiss-based consultancy specializing in coaching, consulting, outsourcing and training in the areas of Project, Programme and Project Portfolio Management. He actually is also Associate Professor of Project Management at Kalaidos Fachhochschule (Zurich). In the past he also lectured for the International Institute of Management (Fribourg) and IFA AG (Zurich). He was Managing Director for Agora Associates GmbH during 2007-2008, where he was engaged in consulting, coaching and training in project, program and portfolio management. He was previously lead PM coach, project manager and project portfolio manager for Credit Suisse; senior project manager, coach and portfolio manager for SPOL AG; assistant CFO, contract manager, project manager, and coach for CSC Switzerland; project designer, manager and coach for CSC PLOENZKE AG in Wiesbaden, Germany; and information systems developer for BVV Versicherungsverein des Bankgewerbes AG, Freie University and others in Berlin.

Rüdiger has a Diploma in Political Science from Freie University Berlin (1988) and in Informationsorganisator from Siemens/Nixdorf, Berlin. He is also a CMMI and SPICE certified assessor. Rüdiger holds an IPMA Level B project management certification and the Project Management Professional (PMP®) certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®), as well as the PMOS (CSC) and a Masters Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University (GWU) in the USA. Rüdiger has authored papers and presentations at IPMA and PMI conferences and sat on the board of the PMI Switzerland Chapter as Vice President Education & Certification.

Fluent in English and German, Rüdiger is based in Zurich and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

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Gerhard Ortner

University of Applied Science bfi
Vienna, Austria

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Dr. Gerhard Ortner
, IPMA Level C, is professor at the University of Applied Sciences bfi Vienna, Austria (bachelor program “Project Management and Information Technology” and the master program “Project Management and Organization”). He holds a PhD degree from the University of Technology Vienna, where he worked for more than 10 years in the department of industrial organization and has several years of experience in project management with specific regard to organizational and technological topics. Recently he published the 2nd edition his book on Project Management Offices (ISBN: 978-3-662-45276-9) and the very first book on Project Management Outsourcing (ISBN: 978-3662450086), both in German language.

Prof Ortner can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Stakeholders and Risk

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia

________________________________________________________________________

 

Managing risks is important because it focuses attention on the uncertainties that matter. The international risk standard ISO31000:2009 Risk Management – Principles and Guidelines says risk is the ‘effect of uncertainty on objectives’, and the Project Management Institute Practice Standard for Project Risk Management defines risk as an ‘uncertain event or condition that, if it occurs, has a positive or negative effect on a project’s objectives.’ These definitions implicitly contain three elements:

  • An uncertain event or condition (situation) that may occur in the future;
  • The likelihood of occurrence of the situation; and
  • The effect (positive or negative) that the occurrence would have on one or more of the project’s (or program’s) objectives.

Consequently, for every project objective there will be various risks of different types that may affect it, all of which require managing.

Stakeholders interact with risk management in three distinct ways:

  1. A significant proportion of project (or program) risks are directly caused by the action or inaction of stakeholders, in some circumstances this may be in excess of 90% of the identified risks.
  2. The perception of what is an acceptable or unacceptable risk is intrinsic to individual stakeholders and their attitudes – some people seek and enjoy risks (eg, skydivers), others are risk averse.
  3. The identification, assessment and management of risk depends on the decisions and actions of stakeholders.

All of these factors affect the perception of project success and again these perceptions are formed and held by stakeholders based on their personal experiences of the project and its outcomes.

In short, successful risk management requires effective stakeholder management and the stakeholder’s perceptions of project success or failure is intrinsically linked to effective risk management.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Bourne-PHOTO

Dr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

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Dr. Lynda Bourne
is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

A new paradigm in E&T: Result oriented Learner-Centred E&T approaches using APHs

 

SERIES ARTICLE

IPMA Education and Training Series

By Chinwi Obari Mgbere

Asst. Professor, School of Engineering,
Nazarbayev University,

Astana, Kazakhstan ________________________________________________________________________

 

As part of implementing the IPMA 2020 strategy, the IPMA Education and Training Board has embarked on a remarkable innovation project. The development of Annotated Project Handbooks (APHs) that will bridge theoretical knowledge and practical experience as described by Pantouvakis (2015) may prove a useful tool. This project has a chance of succeeding if efforts are made at all levels, namely at the curriculum, educator (trainer) and learner (student, project manager), embedding hands-on project management experience in the training curriculum.

Most training programmes are rarely based on practical experience. Learners ask for practical cases to kick-start their project management experience.

This paper addresses Learner-Centred E&T approaches using APHs developed to support and increase visibility and impact of E&T within current IPMA Member Associations and facilitate the sustainable development of new Member Associations through delivery of value based Education & Training.

This paper comes from a practitioner perspective and looks at learner-centred approaches to education and training. For successful implementation of this approach, we highlight three areas of innovation in E&T.

  • Curriculum within the framework of an Annotated Project Handbook
  • Professionalism of educators
  • The Learner-centred learningCurriculum

It is argued, that the world of Education and Training must make a fundamental shift, from an institution centred model to a mobile, flexible, technologically solid and more learner-centred model.Higher education sector as a whole appears to be somewhat averse to innovation. There is no real evidence of reorientation in the sector. Education providers are poorly equipped to adapt to a rapidly changing world. Yet, with more and more private sector education providers entering the market, the need for innovation is increasing. It is with this context that the IPMA E&T’s vision is set out.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles is by members of the IPMA Education and Training (E&T) Board or other IPMA leaders on the subject of project management education, training, careers and related topics. More information about the IPMA E&T can be found at http://ipma.ch/education.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Mgbere-PHOTO

CHINWI OBARI MGBERE

Nazarbayev University,

Astana, Kazakshtan  

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Chinwi Obari Mgbere
, Industrial & Civil Eng., M.Sc., PhD, Project & Programme management, with 15 years’ experience in managing projects is charged with the implementation of the Nazarbayev University facility construction in Astana, Kazakhstan (7 project portfolios consisting of 27 projects, including MEGA projects). More than 10 years’ experience in professional project management, implementing projects in several countries from Ukraine, to Vietnam and now Kazakhstan. He is National First Assessor in Nigeria for the IPMA 4-Level Certification, Head of the PMDAN Education and Training Board and implementor of corporate Project, Program & Portfolio Management Control Systems. E-mail: [email protected]

 

The Application of Earned Value Management to Agile Development and The Application of Agile Development to Earned Value Management

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Earned Value and Agile

Introduction

By Ray Stratton

USA

________________________________________________________________________

Agile development approaches the task of developing software systems from a new angle. Rather than beginning with fixed requirements which remain the basis for final product delivery Agile begins with a feature list (stories) that may change over the duration of the project. The expectation is that the cost and schedule at final delivery is as planned and thus some of the final list of desired features may not be completed due to lack of time or budget.

Furthermore, as the project is underway the anticipated environment at the time of final delivery may change and thus the initial feature list might change during the project’s lifetime to help ensure a product of maximum value at the time of delivery.

Lastly, knowing it’s unlikely that all features will be implement means the priority of each is constantly being evaluated by the user/customer, thus changing plans for remaining work. Agile development continuously reviews both the scope and technical priorities to keep pace with the evolving environment while working within a defined budget and timeline. The goal is to get the most value for the funds spent and time used. Less important features might be left behind.

Earned Value Management (EVM) has traditionally been applied to waterfall type development with fixed scope and fixed technical requirements. EVM’s traditional strength has been in monitoring the cost and schedule performance and providing estimates at complete for the final cost and schedule when all the requirements are met. It has relied on the assumption that (1) the requirements are fixed (unless rebaselined) and (2) all requirements must be met in the final delivery.

How can EVM apply when “done” might mean less than “all”? What if the project goal is to get the most bang for buck, not spend whatever time and budget is needed to get it all? Given this scenario how can EVM apply to agile development? How can agile development embrace EVM? What is the best way for government programs to enable AGILE development while still obtaining useful EVM data?

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The College of Performance Management (CPM) published a Compendium of articles on Earned Value and Agile based program management in The Measureable News in late 2014. The articles are now being republished in the PM World Journal, as agreed with CPM and the authors. This introduction by Ray Stratton launches the series. For information about CPM, visit their website at https://www.mycpm.org/


 

About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Stratton-PHOTORay W. Stratton, EVP, PMP

Management Technologies

USA

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Ray Stratton
, PMP®, EVP®, is founder and president of Management Technologies, an earned value management training and consulting firm. He provides his clients EVM training, ANSI 748 process engineering, third party EVM assessments, and application of EVM to their projects and programs. He has taught earned value management to US and foreign governments, educational institutions, and commercial and defense companies. He is the author of The Earned Value Management Maturity Model®, published by Management Concepts, and Ray Stratton’s Earned Value Professional (EVP) Exam Study Guide. Mr. Stratton is also the editor of the monthly “The EVM Newsletter™”

Ray W. Stratton has over twenty five years’ experience as a software program manager with a major aerospace defense firm. While there he managed the development of radar, communication, and command and control systems. Mr. Stratton retired from the Naval Air Reserve at the rank of Captain. He last commanded an Engineering Unit that supported a variety of studies and projects on behalf of the Naval Air Systems Command, laboratories, and ranges.

 

 

Why an Agile Approach Needs to be Different

 

SERIES ARTICLE

Earned Value and Agile

By Luis C Contreras

AzTech International LLC (goAzTech.com)

USA

________________________________________________________________________

Quick Definitions

Firstly, let’s define Agile broadly and understand if it is, indeed, different from EVM based on high-level definitions or objectives. For the purposes of this paper, let’s assume that Agile is an umbrella term that includes Scrum, Extreme (XP) Programming, and other similar practices.

Agile

Agile project management might be called a “features-driven”, “values-driven”, and “time-driven” approach to managing software projects by cycling through rather short sprints or iterations of feature development to produce tangible value in multiple deliverables. Agile includes methods with terms that are unfamiliar to most EVM practitioners. These terms include scrums, scrum masters, XP programming, releases, stories (epics, themes, and just plain stories), story points, story owners, sprints, backlogs, burn-down charts, burn-up charts, velocity, standup meetings, and more. Agile can be used for small or large projects and even for projects less than one year long, though certainly for multi-year projects as well. Agile has proponents who promote a continuum of agile complexity that ranges from using “agile concepts” to adopting formal Agile such as SCRUM and certification for SCRUM Masters or practitioners.

Earned Value

Earned Value might be called a “plan-driven” or “baseline-driven” approach that emphasizes management by exception using variance thresholds to manage any kind of complex project, including software or hardware systems, construction, or other development and production efforts. EV uses terms known throughout the aerospace, defense, and other sectors with large, government-funded projects, usually exceeding $20M and typically longer than one year. EV has proponents who promote a continuum of EV complexity that ranges from using “EV concepts” to what some call “EV-Lite” and then to what is called “full-blown EVMS” requiring adherence to the ANSI-748’s 32 guidelines for implementing an EVMS. The US Government requires ANSI-748 compliance for government-funded projects over $20M and in some cases for smaller projects too. Other national governments also require or encourage using ANSI-748 or some variation for managing large and risky projects.

Disagreements

Some Agile proponents consider EV old-fashioned, perhaps even outdated, and not flexible enough to manage software projects. Some suggest that EV emphasizes “waterfall planning” where work is highly sequential:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The College of Performance Management (CPM) published a Compendium of articles on Earned Value and Agile based program management in The Measureable News in late 2014. The articles are now being republished in the PM World Journal, as agreed with CPM and the authors. An introduction by Ray Stratton launched the series in the April 2015 edition of the PMWJ. This is the first article in the series. For information about CPM, visit their website at https://www.mycpm.org/


 

About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Contreras-PHOTO

Luis C Contreras

AzTech International LLC (goAzTech.com)

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Mr. Luis Contreras
is President of AzTech International LLC and has over 20 years of experience implementing Earned Value Management Systems throughout the US, Canada, and Europe. He has worked with both government and industry on both sides of DCMA Compliance Reviews, and with contractors on numerous Integrated Baseline Reviews (IBRs). He helps organizations optimize all facets of EVMS–from the proposal stage to baseline development and execution. His breadth of expertise includes EVM, scheduling, ERP/MRP, and earned value in a manufacturing or production environment. Mr. Contreras has led AzTech’s design team in developing custom applications as well as commercial tools such as Run!23 and Run!AzTech for MS Project scheduling professionals, AutoVAR for advanced variance analysis, and AzTech Compliance Expert (ACE) for assessing EVMS compliance prior to Integrated Baseline Reviews (IBRs), Compliance Reviews, Reviews for Cause, and for independent assessments and self-assessments.

 

Life Cycle Success Factors that affect the Success of IT Projects and Programs

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Eddie R. Williams

USA

________________________________________________________________________

With over 25 years of managing and overseeing successful projects and programs spanning aerospace, DOD, commercial and government agencies before and within Portfolio, Program and Project Management Offices, I am indebted to my initial two mentors who early in my career emphasized keeping a focus on:

  • The Customer/Client (and User)
  • Business and System Requirements
  • The Triple Constraint and other areas
  • Success Factors

With that emphasis over the years I have had a focus on two areas:

1) While not limited to, addressing at least the following group of items including the Triple Constraint components:

a. Scope (project/requirements)

b. Time/Schedule

c. Approved Budget/Cost (approved changes going forward beyond the baseline)

d. Risk Management

e. Quality (approved and implemented requirements)

f. Customer/User Operational Satisfaction (product/system operating reliably in the operational environment)

As my success continued, I continued to be customer (and user) and requirements focused. I managed all my projects and programs with the above emphasis; a balancing act that was, and is, worth it.

Note: About a couple of decades ago it had been reported by Gartner and Standish that  60-80 % of IT projects and programs failed. By whatever criteria, I was extremely disappointed to hear/see that and made a personal commitment to assist in ways that would contribute to a change; increase the success rate. And on the other hand, I was EXTREMELY PLEASED THAT PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS THAT I AND MY TEAMS (because it is about teams) had managed were within the 20% successes.

2)  The other area was not only knowing and understanding the goals and objectives of the projects and programs but understanding and identifying Critical/Business Success Factors (C/BSFs). (The information can be used to create and develop a checklist to review and evaluate a project or program.)

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Williams-PHOTO

Eddie R. Williams

USA

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Eddie R. Williams, a senior business and technical program manager, has over 25 years of experience as a program and project manager for system/software engineering, business solutions, and Information Technology (IT) development and management in aerospace, DOD, and commercial IT industries. He has been a Project Manager, Sr. PM, Program Manager, and Sr. Program Manager. Mr. Williams has been a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) through the Project Management Institute since 1999. Before becoming a certified project and program manager, he held positions such as Systems and Procedures Analyst (programming and creating system/software specifications), Configuration Management Specialist and Manager, Software Product/Quality Assurance Engineer and Manager, Division Administrator/Manager (development methodologies, management and control).

He is also a coach/mentor and educator, has been a speaker at numerous conferences, and is the author of:  Software/Firmware Configuration Management (Within the System Development Process), Management Control and Quality. He also provided program management content that was published in Wiley publication, Program Management for Improved Business Results, Second Edition, 2014. Eddie can be contacted at http://www.itprofessionalfacilitator.com/.

Learn 10 Proven Strategies to Improve Your IT Project/Program Success! Visit: http://www.itprofessionalfacilitator.com/

To view other works by Eddie Williams, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/eddie-r-williams/

 

Reaching the Tough Crowd During Change

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By A. J. Holley

Director of Change Management and Learning
Changepoint

Kentucky, USA

________________________________________________________________________

The tough crowd—you know them. They’re almost everywhere we turn—at home, school, work, sporting events, or even volunteer groups. In change initiatives, it’s even tougher to influence these individuals to be part of a solution. We usually choose avoidance—declaring ‘That’s just Joe being Joe,’ allowing them to pitch tantrums or demonstrate passive aggressiveness, while bringing others down along the way.

If confronted, some in this camp feel they are falling on their swords of loyalty to the tried-and-true ways of the past, or that everyone else is drinking the corporate Kool-Aid. Have you ever stopped to think of the costs incurred when a major project is stalled due to behavior of internal critics, those feeling victimized by change, or others politically motivated to somehow sabotage progress?

While interpersonal communication is an age-old challenge, adequately planning how to communicate change is still underestimated as an effective tactic. Simple, persuasive messages can be delivered for a small investment, even without a well-staffed communications team. As a comparison, consider the costs of endless meetings debating on whether or not the project status is yellow or red. While this is going on, your tough crowd—and your entire audience—is creating their own truths which may manifest into impenetrable walls of defensiveness.

Consider two of the usual suspects and tactics to chip away at those walls.

  1. The Critic. Proceed with caution.

We may wonder how these folks got hired, but only the most scrutinizing of interviewers can reveal certain undesirable traits. Critics have a ‘no’ or ‘it won’t work’ for just about everything, but depending on their expertise and status, they can still be leveraged in a productive way. For example, let them lead a piece of the change that’s important to them. If this seems manipulative, it is. But when orchestrated the right way and for the right reasons, it can work wonders. When other team members see critics playing a role that supports change, it can gain hefty momentum in the new direction.

But, remember to exercise caution! The critic may sense this maneuver and become defensive. Be prepared to have a direct conversation stating their influence or negative effect on others, and that they are expected to behave in a way that supports the strategic decision, whether or not they accept a leading role. If they still push back, one of the most powerful lines delivered to an audience full of employed critics was “…You know what? We’re going to pay you to try.”

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


About the Author

pmwj33-Apr2015-Holley-PHOTOA. J. Holley

Director of Change Management and Learning
Changepoint

Kentucky, USA

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A. J. Holley
joined Changepoint to lead the development of a new Organizational Change Management solution to help customers manage the human element of change–a core challenge to any project or business transformation. Holley has over 15 years of experience leading organizational development and change management initiatives, and shares best practices and valuable strategies for project managers to apply to make communication a more calculated and strategic tool for project management success across a business.​

Visit Changepoint at http://www.changepoint.com/

 

Project Initiation Process – Part Three

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Dan Epstein

New York, USA

________________________________________________________________________

3.0 Document Requirements and Obtain Project Authorization

Note: This article is based on the book Project Workflow Management: A Business Process Approach by Dan Epstein and Rich Maltzman, published by J Ross Publishing in 2014. The book describes PM Workflow® framework, the step-by-step workflow guiding approach using project management methods, practical techniques, examples, tools, templates, checklists and tips, teaching readers the detailed and necessary knowledge required to manage project “hands-on” from scratch, instructing what to do, when to do and how to do it up to delivering the completed and tested product or service to your client. While PM Workflow® is the continuous multi-threaded process, where all PM processes are integrated together, this article will attempt to describe the initiation set of processes as a stand-alone group of processes that can be used independently outside of PM Workflow® framework. It will be difficult in this article to not venture into processes outside of project initiation, such as planning, quality, risk, communications and other project management processes, so they will be just mentioned. For more information, please visit www.pm-workflow.com.

For part 1 and part 2 of this article please visit:

Part 1: http://pmworldjournal.net/article/project-initiation-process/

Part 2: http://pmworldjournal.net/article/project-initiation-process-part-two/

In part 1 of the article we discussed the following:

  1. New project request and the benefit statement, which provide the delivery team with a general idea about the project and the expected benefits from the project.
  2. Calculation and the sample of the cost-benefit analysis to establish whether benefits from the project justify expenses.
  3. Project Control book, a tool for keeping all project documentation in one place.

The part 2 of the article advised on:

  1. Business Requirements Analysis —The article guides you to obtain detailed project requirements and to analyze them.
  2. Traceability Matrix —The requirements traceability matrix is a tool for documenting, updating and tracking all requirements and changes to the project scope throughout the life of the project. The template for the traceability matrix was provided.

The initiation process flow diagram was presented in the Part 2 of the article. Please refer to it in order to follow descriptions below.
Once the new Traceability Matrix, described in Part 2 of this article, created and all requirements documented, the Business Requirement Document (BRD) will be created.

3.1 Create Business Requirements Document (R6)

BRD is a document which, when signed off by the Requirements Manager, which is a role assigned by project manager, and clients’ management, represents a baseline for requirements. The project authorization is based on those requirements. The Business Requirements Document (BRD) never changes, because it is a baseline set of requirements, used to obtain client’s approval for the project and funding.

The traceability matrix is a dynamic document. It reflects the current status of requirements; therefore, it changes during the course of the project. It contains, along with the baseline requirements, the history of all changes to requirements during the project life cycle. Based on the contents of the Traceability Matrix, the first client deliverable document can be produced in the process Business Requirements Document (R6), which provides details of all business requirements.

More…

To read entire article (click here)


About the Author

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Dan Epstein
New York, USA

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Dan Epstein combines over 25 years of experience in the project management field and the best practices area, working for several major Canadian and U.S. corporations, as well as 4 years teaching university students project management and several software engineering subjects. He received a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the LITMO University in Leningrad (today St. Petersburg, Russia) in 1970, was certified as a Professional Engineer in 1983 by the Canadian Association of Professional Engineers – Ontario, and earned a master’s certificate in project management from George Washington University in 2000 and the Project Management Professional (PMP®) certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in 2001.

Throughout his career, Dan managed multiple complex interdependent projects and programs, traveling extensively worldwide. He possesses multi-industry business analysis, process reengineering, best practices, professional training development and technical background in a wide array of technologies. In 2004 Dan was a keynote speaker and educator at the PMI-sponsored International Project Management Symposium in Central Asia. He published several articles and gave published interviews on several occasions. In the summer of 2008 he published “Methodology for Project Managers Education” in a university journal. His book, Project Workflow Management – The Business Process Approach, written in cooperation with Rich Maltzman, was published in 2014 by J. Ross Publishing.

Dan first started development of the Project Management Workflow in 2003, and it was used in a project management training course. Later this early version of the methodology was used for teaching project management classes at universities in the 2003–2005 school years. Later on, working in the best practices area, the author entertained the idea of presenting project management as a single multithreaded business workflow. In 2007–2008 the idea was further refined when teaching the project management class at a university. In 2009–2011 Dan continued working full time in Project Management. Dan can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Project Scope Management in PMBOK made Easy

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Dr. T D Jainendrakumar

Madhyapradesh, India

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The main objective of any project is to fulfill the scope of the project on time and within the budget.

What is Project Scope?

Scope refers to all the work involved in creating the deliverables of the project and the processes used to create them. Project scope management includes the processes required to ensure that the project includes all the work required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully. Uncontrolled changes are often referred to as project scope creep; it is the duty of the project manager to see that the changes are managed without increasing cost and time.

There are two types of scope that are Product Scope and Project Scope

  • Product scope: The features & functions that characterize the product, service, or result documented usually by the Business Analyst in consultation with the stakeholders.
  • Project Scope: The work that needs to be accomplished to deliver a product, service, or result with the specified features and functions.

Project has to be completed by fulfilling the customer requirements related to product functionalities as well as the project expectation that is on time within budget. Generally the product scope will be managed and monitored by the line managers this is called engineering management, whereas project managers will be concentrated on project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, resource, communication, risk, procurement and stakeholder management. In some companies Project managers has to perform both, the problems faced in such type of situation is that the project manager may be more concentrating on his technical capabilities and mostly doing the line managers job that is engineering management and may be failed to perform project management ( this is called halo effect ).

Plan Scope Management

The first process in this knowledge area is to Plan Scope Management which is coming under planning process group. This is the process of creating a scope management plan that documents how the project scope will be defined, validated, and controlled. It provides guidance and directions on scope will be managed.

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About the Author

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Dr. T D Jainendrakumar

India

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Dr. T D Jainendrakumar, PhD, MCA, PMP is an international PMP trainer, EX-Scientist/Principal Scientist/Joint Director, N.I.C, Ministry of Information and Communication Technology, Government of India, Madhyapradesh. He has over 25 years’ of extensive experience in the areas of IT Project management in e-governance at Ernakulam District Collectorate, District Courts of Kerala, Central Administrative Tribunal Ernakulam, Rajeev Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (400 crore project), New Delhi and Principal Systems Analyst in National Informatics Centre, Madhya Pradesh State Centre especially in the following areas of specialization: IT practice management (Project Management Methodologies, Tools and techniques, Standards & Knowledge);IT Infrastructure Management (Project Governance, Assessment, Organisational Instructions & Facilities and Equipments); IT-Resource Integration Management (Resource Management, Training & Education, Career Development & Team Development);IT-Technical Support (Project Mentoring, Project Planning, Project Auditing and Project Recovery); and Business Alignment Management (Project Portfolio management, Customer Relationship Management, Vendor Management & Business performance management).

Teaching Project Management & ICT Subjects for professionals and post graduates. Master of Computer Applications (MCA), a 3 year post graduate course dealing with software Engineering and Project Management from a premier institute Anna University Campus. He is a PMP of PMI USA since 2008. Resource person of PMI, you can see his name in the PMBOK 4th edition and 5th edition published by PMI, USA under the list of contributors for project management. Scored 4.11 out of 5 in the project management (2005) examination conducted by brainbench.com, secured a Masters Certificate in Project Management, and is one among the top scorers (First in India and 3rd position in the world in the experienced category).

Published many international journal papers in PM World Today having cumulative index factors more than 2 in the areas of specialization of Project Management & Information Technology.

Holding a Hon’ Doctorate from Cosmopolitan University, USA in Project Management & Information Technology. Presently working as an independent project management consultant and an International Project management (PMP) trainer. Provided PMP training to the senior officials of big MNCs like M/S. Earnest & Young and He is a visiting professor and sharing his knowledge and experience and to handle classes in Management Information Systems, Quality Management, Project Management and Software Engineering to some of the big universities. He can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/t-d-jainendrakumar/