SPONSORS

SPONSORS

The Influential Project Manager – Winning Over Team Members and Stakeholders

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj40-Nov2015-Barnett-BOOKBook Title:   The Influential Project Manager – Winning Over Team Members and Stakeholders
Author: Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI Fellow
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   $49.95
Format: Paperback and eBook
Publication Date:   July 2014
ISBN: 13-978-1-4665-9633-7
Reviewer:     Larry Barnett, PMP
Review Date: October 2015


Introduction

Author and PMP, Alfonso Bucero shares key insights through a compelling story for Project Managers (PMs), from first-timers to seasoned professionals. Bucero uses situations many PMs are likely to encounter. Project teams on the edge, disconnected (or overzealous!) managers, undependable sponsors, and other, even hostile, environments.

The Influential Project Manager gets to the heart of the soft skills that seem critical for project management. The author shows why persuasion might not hold a candle to influence, though they seem synonymous. He details why certain soft “influencing” skills are important—and achievable—for a disciplined PM. This book gets practical, with step-by-step, “How-To” methods for developing these skills.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The Influential Project Manager is framed around the story of a horse and how that horse has value…but only with proper handling.

Part I: Training a Better Horse

The ten chapters in Part I cover the “nuts and bolts” of developing soft skills. These skills include active listening, developing trust and integrity, formulating strategies, showing generosity, understanding people, and more. The author ties them all together, skillfully and in the context of project management, under the umbrella of influence.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj40-Nov2015-Barnett-PHOTOLarry Barnett, PMP

North Texas, USA

flag-usa

 



Larry Barnett
has broad experience in information technology, IT Project Management, Business Analysis, and Solution Development and Delivery. His work experience covers a variety of industries, most recently, the Energy industry and Paper & Forest Products. He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration, Accounting, from Texas Tech University. Larry is a member of the Project Management Institute, Dallas Chapter, having acquired PMP certification in 2015.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management, Denial, and the Death Zone: Lessons from Everest and Antarctica

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj40-Nov2015-Watson-BOOKBook Title: Project Management, Denial, and the Death Zone: Lessons from Everest and Antarctica
Author: Grant Avery
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price:   $44.95
Format: Hardcover, 264 pages
Publication Date:   October 2015 
ISBN: 978-1-60427-119-5
Reviewer:     Jan Watson, MBA, PMP
Review Date: 10/2015


Introduction

Good planning, good experience, and good judgment are always valuable but they are critical if the project is extremely complex and hopelessly ambitious. The book looks at lessons learned from Everest and Antartica successes and struggles and applies the lessons to business today to improve project success rates.

Using the CORA triangle, the book looks at capabilities of delivering, outcomes maximizing, and managing risk appetite to help us deal with risks and improve results.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is composed of 13 Chapters and the 14th chapter is the Epilogue. Real life stories (from mountain climbers to organizational projects) are shared to make the lessons easier to understand, interesting, and memorable.

Read the Introduction to understand the background why the book was written and get a sense of what inspired the book. Experts contributed epigraphs in each of the chapters. Key literature references are added to learn more on key topics. WAV web added value is available for multi-factor tables to test for high risk propensity. Examples from Everest and Antartica to ICT-EB projects examine how risk appetite, leadership, and complexity impact success or failure.

Highlights

The book looks at risks and constancy of failure due to climbing higher not safer. Everest climbers’ failure and death remain constant even with better tools due to higher risk taking to maximizing outcomes at the cost of sacrificing personal comfort. Risk homeostasis occurs when we become comfortable to the amount of risk we are exposed to, then we increase actions that result in higher risks. Risk homeostasis also occurs when we become uncomfortable to the amount of risk we are exposed to so that we decrease actions that result in higher risks. Normal narcissism and Shadow of the Leader principles are drivers of risk appetite and affect decision making.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj40-Nov2015-Watson-PHOTOJan Watson, MBA, PMP

Texas, USA

flag-usa

 

 

Jan Watson is a strategically-minded difference maker who improves business results through people, technology, proven LEAN Six Sigma DMAIC process (Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and full project life cycle management utilizing Project Management Institute – PMBOK, Scrum, and Agile methods. She is a passionate senior project manager who blends solid planning, communication, leadership, and organization skills with proven consulting skills to achieve throughput objectives. Jan is a successful researcher and strategist focused on leveraging new processes and innovative thinking to champion oversight and monitoring of projects; leverage positive work relationships to foster high performing teams and unite senior management on objectives; and identify areas of opportunity and streamline processes to provide the highest level of service to customers at 100% client satisfaction. She is a strong Change Agent, using Kotter and other methods with adoption and realization.

Email: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, contact [email protected].

 

 

Business Driven PMO Success Stories: Across Industries and Around the World

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj40-Nov2015-Swan-BOOKBook Title: Business Driven PMO Success Stories: Across Industries and Around the World
Author: Mark Price Perry
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price: US $ 39.95
Format: Hard Cover, 368 pages
Publication Date: January 2013
ISBN: 978-1-60427-076-1
Reviewer: Rita Swan, PMP
Review Date: October/2015


 

Introduction

This is an excellent book that clearly depicts what it takes for a PMO to be successful. It includes many success stories and ample techniques to ensure that a PMO is driven by specific needs of the business.

In contrast, the author clearly articulates the shortcomings and mishaps that lead to a PMO failure. He provides case examples and surveys to support his arguments.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is organized in two parts:

Part 1: Business Driven PMO Insights and Techniques

Section 1 – PMO Mandate

Why PMOs Fail

PMO Survey Findings

Project Management Community Mind-set All Wrong

Case Study Examples of PMO Failure

Techniques for establishing a PMO Mandate

Section 2 – PMO Business Acumen

This section is devoted to reviewing the importance of project management practitioners’ exhibition of PMO business acumen. This includes business driven project acumen, portfolio acumen, dashboard acumen, methodology acumen and maturity acumen.

Section 3 – PMO Future

This last section contains perspectives regarding the future of the PMO domain considering numerous research and opinions of subject matter experts. A perspective that the PMO domain needs improvement within the formal project management and PMO community was sited. In addition, this section includes perspectives regarding PMO managers’ skill set which is thought to be broad enough for a wide range of application.

Part 2: Business Driven PMO Success Stories

The last part of this book contains a list of numerous business problems that were successfully addressed by the PMO in various companies.

Highlights

Attention is first given to research report statics that shows the following:

25% – PMOs fail within the 1st year

50% – PMOs fail by their 2nd year

75% – PMOs fail and are closed by their 4th year

Traditional inside-the-box thinking regarding PMOs causes them to fail. The Project Management community focus on people, process and tools and the typical roadmap for setting one up does not work. It is a means to the ends of the PMO versus a focus on the ends to be achieved by the PMO. Without knowing the business problem to be solved, a plausible solution can’t be found.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj40-Nov2015-Swan-PHOTORita Swan, PMP

Texas, USA

flag-usa

 


Rita Swan
, PMP Certified (September 2005) is an IT / SAP Project Manager with proven experience managing projects in numerous areas, including systems development, integration, business process reengineering, ERP implementations, creating ERP Centers of Excellence (COEs), data center consolidation and virtualization. She leverages a strong interpersonal skill set that encompasses solid relationship building and business management expertise across multiple industries and sectors.

Rita can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Management Science, Operations Research and Project Management

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj40-Nov2015-Gao-BOOKBook Title:   Management Science, Operations Research and Project Management: Modeling, Evaluation, Scheduling, Monitoring
Author: Jose Ramón San Cristóbal Mateo, PhD
Publisher: Gower Applied Business Research
List Price:   $124.95     Format: Hard Cover
Publication Date:   2015     ISBN: 978-1-4724-2643-7
Reviewer:     Jack Gao, PhD
Review Date: October 2015


Introduction

This book combines Management Science, Operations Research Discipline modelling, Evaluation, Scheduling and Monitoring techniques with project management theories and methodologies to lay down the foundation for further multi-disciplinary research and expand the Project Management Body of Knowledge.

It applies modern modelling techniques such as Network Models, Multi-Objective Decision-Making Models, Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Models, Forecasting Models, Simulation Models, Markov Models and Operations Research quantitative techniques such as Game Theory, Dynamic Programming, and Data Envelopment Analysis to Project Management Practices.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book organizes chapters by model types and quantitative techniques. Each chapter has summary, project management related process and activities flow chart, Mathematical Model and Formula, Data Tables, and applications of these models and quantitative techniques.

Most of chapters have real world data, chart, and example to demonstrate how to apply these models and quantitative techniques to project management concepts and practices.

Highlights

The book emphasizes quantitative approaches in project management practices through the development of models and algorithms. Especially, it applies these models and techniques to big size, long term projects which involve many variables and multiple phase decision making, and it helps project managers redesign their project and program processes and models.

Project managers need formal training in decision-making but sometimes, they do not have enough knowledge of Operations Research or lack a guide book for how to form a mathematical model for their project cost and operation models such as minimizing total project costs, meeting contracted project phase completion dates, and ensuring that activities achieve certain quality level. This book provides project managers with the tools and methods necessary to make sound decisions and manage projects successfully.

The author has added valuable insights to the body of knowledge dealing with the optimization of the project management.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

pmwj40-Nov2015-Gao-PHOTOJack Gao

Texas, USA

flag-usa

 

 

Jack Gao has a PhD in Operations Research and Management Sciences from the University of Iowa in the United States. He has had serveral publications in Management Science and Operation Research Conferences. He is an active PMI member and certified PMP project manager. Currently he is CEO of Netstar Systems LLP, an IT consulting firm.

Email address: [email protected]

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

PMI Santiago Chile Chapter Elections, PMI Tour Cono Sur events in Chile, Solar Power and Transmission Lines

REPORT

Project Management Update from Chile

By Jaime Videla

Santiago, Chile


 

PMI Santiago Chile Chapter

Call for nominations for new board

Last month a committee was stated with the mission to call directory elections for the next period 2015-2016. It is expected that after the second week of November they meet again, but this time to assess the applications.

In the coming days the period of applications will begin to integrate the directory and shape the list or lists of the election process participants.

pmwj40-Nov2015-Videla-IMAGE1

Once the vote is conducted, the committee will meet with the new directive, in order to start operational during the month of December of this year.

For more information, please visit http://www.pmi.cl/ ; contact by telephone at +56 2 2481 4060 or by email to [email protected].

More…

To read entire report, click here

To read entire report, click here

 


 

 About the Author

pmwj39-Oct2015-Videla-PHOTOJAIME VIDELA

Santiago, Chile

flag-chile

 

 

Jaime Videla, PMP, is the Managing Director for Videla Montero Consultores a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of Accufast, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 20+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Mexico and Perú. Since 2006 has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects. Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Jaime Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

Award Season, Rail Industry News, New Nuclear Programme and Short Reports

REPORT

UK Project Management Round Up

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK


 

This Month

This month comes news of project management awards, yet more about the rail industry in UK and even more about the power industry.

Award Season

Autumn seems to be the main time of the year for Awards, certainly in the PM world where the International Project Management Association (IPMA) have just handed out their Project Excellence Award at their World Congress in Panama. IPMA also recognized the contribution of APM President Tom Taylor which has included dynamic performances as Master of Ceremonies at many World Congresses as well as technical and organizational input to help IPMA to its current position in the world of PM.

pmwj40-Nov2015-Shepherd-IMAGE

Photo: Stacy Goff, Roberto Mori, Tom Taylor

Meanwhile, in the Southern Hemisphere, the Australian Institute of Project Management held their annual Achievement Awards last month and now, APM has celebrated their Awards night at the Hilton in London’s Park Lane. Full details of the spectacular night are available at https://www.apm.org.uk/Winners .

Also announced were five new Honorary Fellows, Mary McKinlay, lately APM Board Member and IPMA Vice President; Peter Horsted, head of controls at Royal Mail; Mark Thurston of CH2M; Air Vice Marshal Julian Young, Royal Air Force and head of the Ministry of Defence, Defence Equipment and Supply organisation; and Simon Henley, late Royal Navy and International Centre for Complex Project Management. All are outstanding ambassadors for project management and have made significant contributions to the profession. See https://www.apm.org.uk/ for full details of these inspiring new APM Fellows.

Visitors to Britain will know we have variable weather and that at this time of the year, Europe is often cut off and so it proved this week when IPMA President Reinhard Wagner was marooned in Germany when he should have been in London to collect the Sir Monty Finniston Award on behalf of IPMA. Mary McKinlay did the honours in his absence.

More…

To read entire report, click here

 


 

About the Author

pmwj36-Jul2015-Shepherd-PHOTOMILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

flag-uk

 

 
Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

PMI Tour Cono Sur Regional Congress in multiple cities – Cordoba and Buenos Aires

REPORT

Project Management Update from Buenos Aires

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina


 

It already started in Argentina the most important Congress about Project Management of the region, named PMI Tour Cono Sur 2015.

The PMI Tour Cono Sur is a Regional Congress that’s takes place in multiple cities during successive dates, helping the synergies between the different PMI chapters of the region, allowing both speakers and participants to attend several consecutive events.

The first edition of this Tour took place in 2005, involving PMI Chapters of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Santiago, Chile y Montevideo, Uruguay.

This is the first time in the history of this PMI Tour Cono Sur event that Cordoba city, Argentina is included in the schedule, having developed with success during October 29th. The congress had excellent speakers with a participation of more than 250 professionals and students, which expect to have a PMI Chapter in the city really soon.

Congress ended with the lecture given by former NBA basketball player Fabricio Oberto. This charismatic basketball player captivated the audience explaining his learning experience while included on a high performance team, the San Antonio Spurs coached by Gregg Popovich.

Thursday, November 5th, it took place the PMI Tour Cono Sur congress of Buenos Aires city in the neighborhood of Recoleta, with excellent lectures too. The keynote speaker was PMI Board of Directors Antonio Nieto Rodriguez who talked about “The Value of Project Management.

More…

To read entire report click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

CECILIA BOGGICECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina

 Argentina flag smallest

 

Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector. Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012. Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016. Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia.

She can be contacted at [email protected] and http://www.activepmo.com/

To view other works by Cecilia Boggi, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/cecilia-boggi/.

 

Spain represented at PMI Global Congress North America, PMI LIM Meeting in Madrid in November, PMI 2016 EMEA Congress in Barcelona

REPORT

Project Management in Spain – monthly report

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain


 

Spain is represented at the PMI NA Congress in Orlando (Florida)

One more year, Spain is represented at the PMI Global Congress in North America, this time celebrated in Orlando (Florida). The attendees could enjoy this year the Disney Magic Kingdom on top of sharing, learning and networking as usually happens at every PMI Global Congress. In the picture below you can see PMI Fellows Yanping Cheng, Davidson Frame and Alfonso Bucero, with Randall L. Englund (PM Executive Consultant, speaker and author) and their respective wives.

pmwj40-Nov2015-Bucero-PHOTO

Randall L. Englund and Alfonso Bucero presented their new book “Project Sponsorship” – Second edition – this time published by PMI (Project Management Institute) on September 19th. The “Project Sponsorship” subject is being a very demanded subject during this year by many organizations. The “project sponsorship” relevance has been reported by PMI in several publications during this year (one of them was: “The Pulse of the Profession”).

This year during the Award gala was served a very nice dinner to all the attendees.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

A_BUCERO_2014_mayAlfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

 flag-spain

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

When Millennials and Baby Boomers Collide

SECOND EDITION

By Amanda Arriaga and Jessica Iselt Ballew

Texas Department of Public Safety

Austin, Texas, USA


ABSTRACT

In 2012, the Texas Department of Public Safety (TXDPS) established an Enterprise Project Management Office (EPMO) to ensure that necessary resources were in place throughout the agency and that they were being applied to the actual priorities. The Executive Director asked one of his trusted advisors to help create and implement this office. Knowing the position would be fast-paced and challenging, the Director of the EPMO needed to staff the office with the resources that could get the job done.

The initial team ended up being comprised entirely of females. The team also mainly consisted of females in their thirties or younger. Despite what the typical assumption might be, this team worked very well together. The challenge came in having this team of millennials be the face and voice of change across an agency whose upper management team consisted predominately of male baby boomers and a large, diverse, and multi-generational workforce from various backgrounds. How did they work with them successfully in order to achieve the mission of the EPMO?

This paper will provide insight into the opportunities and pain points that were faced when creating the EPMO, the Enterprise Project Roadmap and revamping the agency’s Administration Division as a whole. The paper will focus on lessons learned along the way, providing the reader with tips and tools on how to effectively communicate with and lead diverse groups of people.

DEVELOPING THE TEAM

In 2011, the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Public Safety (the Department) identified the need to establish an Enterprise Project Management Office (EPMO) in order to improve results by increasing visibility and improving planning and alignment towards true priorities.

The Executive Director appointed one of his high performing and trusted advisors to establish and oversee this office. This advisor happened to be a millennial and a female. The newly appointed Director of the EPMO knew that she had to build a team that had both the technical and business knowledge to effectively establish and operate this new organization, so she began seeking out the best individuals to fit those needs. By happenstance, the initial team ended up being comprised entirely of females. These females ranged in age from approximately 25-55 but the majority of the staff were in their late twenties or early thirties.

Millennials are described by the Pew Research Center as “confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change”. They are also described as the “always connected” generation, being available by email, phone, text message or social media at all hours of the day and night. This type of energy made the EPMO active and interested in standing up this new program as soon as possible. The common characteristics, values, and viewpoints shared by the team members led to collaboration and understanding and enabled the team to work swiftly and efficiently to establish the standard operating policies and procedures for the EPMO.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

pmwj40-Nov2015-Arriaga-PHOTO ARRIAGAAmanda Arriaga

Austin, Texas, USA

flag-usa

 


Arriaga
is the Chief Administrative Officer at the Department of Public Safety, State of Texas, overseeing the functions of Human Resources, Facilities, Procurement & Contracts and Enterprise Projects.  She is also the co-chair of the Texas Association of State Systems for Computing and Communication (TASSCC) Special Interest Group in Project Management, and President of the Austin Young Lawyer’s Association.  Amanda earned her BBA in Management from Texas A&M University and a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.  She has served as Governor Rick Perry’s Special Assistant for Homeland Security and Border Affairs, and DPS Chief of Government and Media Relations.  Amanda can be contacted at [email protected].

 

pmwj40-Nov2015-Arriaga-PHOTO BALLEWJessica Iselt Ballew

Austin, Texas, USA

flag-usa

 


Jessica Iselt
Ballew is the Deputy Assistant Director for Policy and Planning at the Department of Public Safety, State of Texas, overseeing enterprise projects, procurements, and contracts.  She is co-chair of the Texas Association of State Systems for Computing and Communication (TASSCC) Special Interest Group in Project Management. Jessica has a B.S. in Communications through Arizona State University.  She has over 18 years of experience in the planning, development, and delivery of information technology solutions and conducting and driving business and process analysis and improvements. Jessica can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Security Essentials for Project Managers: Protecting Email and Mobile Devices

SECOND EDITION

By Neil Farquharson

Dallas, Texas, USA


Abstract

Cyber-crime and espionage attacks your employers’ or clients’ reputation, profitability and future. Still somewhat quaintly referred to as “hacking,” these threats are now foremost in corporate strategic thinking. With the security breaches at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Sony, Home Depot and many others, and the Edward Snowden revelations about message interception, senior executives are realizing that data security is no longer an issue to be decided solely by the IT department. It is a decision to be made and budgeted for in the boardroom. Project managers have unprecedented access to all levels of an organization including the C-Suite, and so not only have an influence over the design of business security processes, but also may be called upon at short notice to brief senior executives on data security issues, and even to make recommendations.

This paper seeks to identify vulnerabilities for corporate data loss and finds that data in transit across the public Internet and via mobile devices are the main mediums for data interceptions. It also highlights process weaknesses and human behaviors that expose these vulnerabilities.

Introduction

Executive boards across all industries continue to struggle to understand cybersecurity risks. According to a recent survey, just 11% of board members say they have a “high level” of knowledge about the topic.1 While an earlier study by the National Association of Corporate Directors yielded the results graphed in Figure A. These were the ratings board level directors gave themselves around the time that the Anthem and other high profile data breaches were elevating concern about cybersecurity risks firmly into the boardroom.

pmwj40-Nov2015-Farquharson-CHART

Source: National Association of Corporate Directors

Figure A. How directors across sectors rated their own knowledge of cybersecurity risks

No More Complacency

Until recently, senior executives and boards of directors have often been complacent about the risks posed by data breaches and cyberattacks. However, there is an obvious growing concern about the potential damage to brand reputation, class-action lawsuits and costly downtime that is motivating executives to pay greater attention to the security practices of their organizations. No longer can the C-Suite leave security issues up to the IT department. They are hiring CISOs (Chief Information Security Officers) as fast as they can find qualified candidates; and paying increased salaries to attract them. Often they seek informed opinion from any third-party professional contact with knowledge of security issues, and project managers can find themselves being asked to offer such opinion. Although there is a multitude of cybersecurity risks, project managers should make themselves aware of the three major agents that cause breaches, and the vulnerabilities that can be exploited, or innocently compromised.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Farquharson-PHOTONeil Farquharson, PMP

Technology Evangelist

Texas, USA

flag-usa

flag-uk




As Technology Evangelist for Zix, Neil Farquharson takes technical subjects and distills them down into easily understandable summarized forms. A former soldier, engineer and operations manager, he relocated from the U.K. to the U.S. in 2003. Since then, he has been a regular speaker at IT security and telecoms events.

Mr. Farquharson holds degrees from the University of Glasgow and the University of Texas at Dallas. He lives in Dallas with his wife and children.

Neil can be contacted at [email protected]

 

The Baseless Fear of Mentoring Millennials

SECOND EDITION

By Zelda Jones

North Texas, USA


Abstract

Baby Boomers are trickling into retirement while Millennials are surging into the work force. At the current pace it is almost certain the paths of these two disparate groups will cross in the work force. Boomers, including Project Managers, must now begin the task of passing down their vast knowledge and comprehension of their discipline to the upcoming generations.

This paper investigates the complex mentoring role the Baby Boomer Project Managers will assume when Millennials are assigned to their project. Proposed tactics for effective two way communication will be explored based on the extensive differences and surprising similarities between the Boomers and the Millennials.

Included in the paper are case studies of project management mentoring which illustrate both traditional and reverse mentoring. Some of the most productive and innovative Millennials are contrasted against Baby Boomers whose achievements set the stage for many advances being made today.

Keywords: Baby Boomer Project Manager, Baby Boomer mentor, reverse mentoring, generational communication gap, tech-savvy Millennial, Millennial-aged worker, no-collar worker, geek culture, geek culture professionalism, digital generation, digital dialect, Baby Boomer/Millennial communication, aging work force

The Fear of Mentoring

Newton’s law of motion (or inertia) states: An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. Surviving in today’s workforce is difficult enough, but add Newton’s unbalanced force – mentoring – to the equation, and the likelihood of volunteer participation in a mentoring program becomes slightly less than zero. Mentoring anyone, much less someone who is outside our comfort zones (age, gender, background, etc.) can strike fear into the hearts of even the most capable and willing people.

People are afraid of mentoring. These are actual quotes from people who were asked if they would mentor a new employee:

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Jones-PHOTOZelda Jones

Texas, USA

flag-usa

 

 

Zelda Jones wants to live in a world where every driver on the road is courteous, business meetings are mesmerizing, and Millennials are willing to communicate without a digital device.

As a Baby Boomer Project Manager Zelda has the pleasure of sharing many of her work days with Millennials. She concedes that the millennial experience can sometimes be, well… exasperating. The communication techniques she knew back in ‘the day’ no longer apply. And, to add insult to the ‘old school’ injury, expecting a Millennial to get information by reading a stack of documentation is a tragically misguided expectation. What’s a Boomer to do?

Zelda has over 20 years of project management experience and earned her PMP in 2006. She is a 9 time presenter at the UTD Project Management Symposium. She has authored/co-authored 17 publications including international works. In trying to keep up with current Millennial trends, she can be found on Instagram tagging items with a ‘Like’ or an occasional ‘AYKM’ and making other brief comments using her alter ego jones.zelda. Contact her by email at [email protected]

 

Vision to Value: Executing Initiatives Successfully

SECOND EDITION

By Todd C. Williams, PMP

Washington, USA


 

Abstract

Value: The lynch-pin of successful businesses. What drives business must drive our initiatives and projects. Although scope, schedule, and budget are key factors in project success, both initiatives and their constituent projects must deliver value. Meeting “the big three” is no guarantee of a positive outcome. Instead consistently track value and make adjustments to the triple constraints to attain sufficient value. Arguably value is the project manager’s most critical deliverable in the project. It requires significant insight into the business objectives, the project’s customer, and a thorough understanding of the needs over the wants. This is key to executing initiatives successfully. Project managers must lead (leading subordinates, leaders, and customers), assign priorities based on a global view, and know when to say no.

Vision to Value

Initiative success rates are dismally low. Failures in constituent projects, lack of adoption, trouble in change management name just a few of the reasons. Estimates for success rates range from only 25% to 40%i, ii, iii of all projects meet the end users expectations. To understand this problem one has to understand what makes an initiative successful. Experience indicates that most companies believe that it is completing its component projects within the scope, schedule, and budget defined at the onset of the project. I disagree. It requires planning, communication, adaptability, and change management.

A Tale of Failure

Let’s explore a project that most of us are aware of and see if this definition applies. The project is the deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope—the history being in the public domain. The concept of a space telescope was conceived in in 1923 by the scientist Hermann Oberth; however, it took until the 1970s for technology to catch up and allow it to be considered feasible. In 1977 the project was funded with $200,000,000 and a projected launch date in 1983. The spacecraft, however, did not enter final assembly until 1985. Launch finally occurred in 1990 with delays coming from scope changesiv and the Shuttle Challenger tragedy. Heralded as a huge achievement everyone waited for telescope stabilization and the transmission of first spectacular images. Unfortunately, the images were anything but spectacular. NASA was faced with an orbiting telescope originally priced at $400MM and had ballooned to $2.5 Billion, was seven years late, with a “spherical aberration” in a mal-manufactured mirror. In other words, the mirror was ground incorrectly and could not focus on distant images. To any astronomer a poorly manufactured mirror is the cardinal sin. NASA had missed the basics in Astronomy 101. The mirror is the primary component of any telescope and to have it built wrong was simply inconceivable.

Scientists eventually developed a solution and in 1993 a shuttle visit delivered and installed a high-tech set of contact lenses that allowed the Hubble Space Telescope to deliver the stunning images that most of us have become so familiar with.

But the story does not end there. In 2003, shuttle tragedy struck again and the loss of the Columbia forced NASA to restrict all flights to orbits that could take safe harbor in the International Space Station. The orbit of the Hubble, however, is not coincident with the space station and the final Hubble servicing mission was canceled. The reaction was immediate and resounding. Hundreds of millions of people complained forcing Congress and NASA to develop an alternate solution over deorbiting the telescope. In 2009, the final servicing mission was flown on Shuttle Atlantis, with the Shuttle Endeavor in full ready to be launched if troubles on Atlantis arosev.

The question to the readers who believe in the posited definition of success is, “How can a project that was over 6 times its original cost, was ten years late (doubling the timeline), and did not function as designed, get to be so successful as to merit the risk to human life to prolong the service of its product?”

It had missed the commonly used measures of success—scope, schedule, and budget—and was a successful for one reason only. To the millions of laypeople of the United States (who could lobby Congress) and hundreds of millions of laypeople around the world the Hubble Space Telescope had value—value that was measured in pictures and discoveries that fueled imagination, hope, and dreams. It is the intangible attribute of value that makes a project successful.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Williams-PHOTOC. Williams

Washington, USA

flag-usa

 

 

A strong comprehensive strategic foundation coupled with operational excellence allows companies to build the capabilities to thrive. This is Todd Williams’ approach to helping companies succeed. Utilizing over twenty-five years of experience he helps companies turn their vision into value by executing initiatives successfully.

Following his mantra, “Strategy, People, Process, and then Technology,” he specializes in rescuing projects and helping organizations build the infrastructure to prevent future failures.

His international experience, working with executives and multicultural teams has earned him a reputation as someone that can come into any situation and address issues. Captured in his book Rescue the Problem Project, he defines a project audit and recovery process for rescuing red projects that focuses on the role of people in projects, root cause correction, and failure prevention.

He also writes for The CEO Magazine, American Management Association Playbook blog, his own Back From Red blog, and numerous other outlets. Periodicals, including Fortune/CNN Money, CIO Update, ZDNet, Enterprising CIO, and IT Business Edge routinely, ask for his opinion on critical issues facing today’s business leaders.

He is also an internationally acclaimed speaker doing over 30 presentations and workshops a year throughout the United States, Canada, and European Union.

Todd can be contacted at [email protected]

 

The Ravenel Bridge Project: Delivering Ahead of Schedule and Under Budget

A Risk Management Case Study

By Susan Parente, PMP

Connecticut, USA


ABSTRACT

In the construction field, being on time, on budget and within scope can sometimes occur as utopian goals. However effective risk management not only supports meeting these objectives, but it may also assist in delivery of project results ahead of schedule and under budget!

The Ravenel Bridge was a design-build project completed in 2005. This bridge replaced the John P. Grace Memorial Bridge and the Silas N. Pearman Bridge, which were built in 1929 and 1966. This bridge was designed to withstand a number of potential hazards, including: earthquakes, hurricanes and ship collisions.

The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge (also known as the New Cooper River Bridge) Project is an excellent case study of how risk management supports achievement of meeting and exceeding project performance requirements. This bridge not only buoyed the transit connection of the Mount Pleasant and Charleston communities, it provided us with an excellent example of how risk management can make a profound difference in project performance and delivery of project objectives.

This paper reviews the practices used in the construction of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge, and how they relate to effective project risk management. It details how project risk management supported the completion of this large project under budget and ahead of schedule, while supporting environmentally friendly practices in construction.

We should not be under the impression that all projects are late and over budget. Instead let’s manage project uncertainty (risk) to deliver our projects ahead of schedule, and under budget, while meeting customer satisfaction requirements.

OVERVIEW

The objectives of this paper, Risk Management Case Study: Delivering Ahead of Schedule and Under Budget are to remind us of the feasibility of not only meeting project objectives of time, cost, and scope by delivering on scope, on time and within the project budget, but also the possibility of delivering project requirements ahead of schedule and under budget. This paper will engage in the topics of effective project planning and execution through the use of risk management. The goal of this paper is to provide readers with a sound example of the benefits of using project risk management for project planning and execution.

BACKGROUND

The Cooper River Bridge was a construction project of the SCDOT (South Carolina Department of Transportation). This was a bridge replacement project, in the Charleston, South Carolina area. The new bridge, the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge, replaced 2 bridges which were at their end of life: The Grace Memorial and Pearman Bridges, which were along US 17 over the Cooper River. These bridges connected the cities of Charleston and Mount Pleasant, as did the bridge replacement. (USDOT, FHA, n.d.)

The main contractor for this project was Palmetto Bridge Constructors (PBC), a joint venture of Flatiron’s Civil Division and Tidewater/SKANSKA. A joint venture of TY Lin International and HDR provided design review, engineering and inspection services for SCDOT. The bridge cost was approximately $675 million and was the largest contract in SCDOT’s history. The project cost was 2.5 times the department’s annual construction budget and used a Design-Built approach, which means development began before design was completed.

The project was initiated in July 2001, with a completion of July 2006. The project was planned for 5 years, but PBC planned to complete it in 4 years to decrease overhead costs. The project was broken down into 5 subprojects (or phases): 2 interchanges, 2 high-level approaches, and the main span. Each phase had it own budget, schedule, equipment, and management.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the author and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

pmwj24-jul2014-Parente-AUTHOR IMAGESusan Parente

Connecticut, USA

flag-usa

 


Susan Parente
, PMP, PMI-ACP, CISSP, PMI-RMP, ITIL, MSEM is a project engineer, consultant, speaker, author, and mentor who leads large complex IT software implementation projects, and the establishment of Enterprise PMOs. Ms. Parente’s focuses on risk management and Agile project management. She has 16+ years’ experience leading software and business development projects in the private and public sectors, including a decade of experience implementing IT projects for the DoD. Ms. Parente is also an Associate Professor at Post University in Connecticut. She has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Rochester in NY and has a MS in Engineering Management from George Washington University in DC. She is also PMP, CISSP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP and ITIL certified, and is a CMMI and ISO 9001 Practitioner.

Ms. Parente is a Principal Consultant at S3 Technologies, LLC. Her company’s focuses on revitalizing projects through the use of risk management. S3 Technologies does this by teaming with clients, stakeholders and vendors and using risk management to deliver project successes. Ms. Parente trains and mentors project managers in the area of project and risk management. She is also an Agile project management generalist. Ms. Parente has developed a methodology which she uses to implement risk management programs for both small and large clients and is currently completing her manuscript for a book on implementing risk management.

Susan can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Strategic Portfolio Management in the Irish Public Health Service

Clarity – Visibility – Control – Simplicity

CASE STUDY

By Seamus Woods

Head of Portfolio Management
Health Service Executive

Dublin, Ireland


 

The Health Service Executive (HSE) provides or funds all of Ireland’s public health service in hospitals and communities across the Republic of Ireland. It is a large organisation with over 100,000 employees and budget of €12,131m. Today the Health Service is made up of delivery system bodies and agencies each charged with the delivery of some aspects of health services. The development of the system has in many cases been based on the need to address specific health care problems at a particular point in time. Studies have shown that the system is highly fragmented with overlap and uncertainty in terms of who is responsible for services delivered.

It is widely accepted that changes were needed to achieve national health care goals efficiently, effectively and in an affordable manner. In that context the Government launched Future Health (Department of Health, 2012) that sets out a policy framework to radically reform Ireland’s health service and to ensure that the resources invested are used effectively to achieve good health outcomes. The HSE, to give effect to the ‘Future Health’ policy wanted to develop a Reform Portfolio around what it considers to be the major system priorities:

  • Reform of the acute hospital delivery system
  • Reform of the Community and Primary Care delivery system
  • Clinically-led, multi-disciplinary, cross-organisation, design authority for integrated models of care
  • Reform of ICT to strategic enabler of reform and operations
  • Reform of Finance Systems and Organisation
  • A new vision and strategy for Human Resources

To manage the Reform Portfolio the HSE set up a System Reform Group (SRG) to oversee the wide range of strategic reform programmes across the various care Divisions in the Health Services in which various methodologies, styles and approaches exists to both programme and project management. The SRG faced a number of critical challenges:

  • Achieving consistency in a decentralised organisation
  • Not ‘over egging’ the programme/project management methodologies
  • Getting sponsorship at the highest levels, nationally and locally
  • Getting the right engagement and culture change at all levels – clinical and non clinical
  • Managing the many ‘moving parts’

This paper describes the Portfolio approach to managing such a large Portfolio (42 programmes of work and over 500 projects).

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Woods-PHOTOSeamus Woods, IPMA – A, PMP

Health Service Executive
Institute of Project Management

Dublin, Ireland

flag-ireland

 

 

Seamus Woods is an Assistant National Director (Senior Portfolio Manager) in the Irish Health Service Executive and is also a faculty member of the Irish Institute of Project Management. He has over 29 years of experience at Senior Management level within the Health Services and more than 25 years’ experience of project management and change management as a practitioner, instructor and leader.

Working initially in the former Mid-Western Health Board he held senior roles at Board, Strategic and operational levels across a range of services. With the advent of the new health Service Executive in 2004 Seamus set up and led a national projects office for the community services sector .In 2010 he was seconded to Children services to programme manage the setting up of a new national Children’s Agency (TUSLA) and its associated Reform programme. He returned to the Health Service Executive in 2013 as Head of Portfolio Management for the Health Reform Programme.

Seamus can be contacted at [email protected]

 

PMs Are Having Fun In IT Offshoring Projects! Case Studies

COMMENTARY

By Adam Alami

Australia


Available literature suggests that there is a significant growth in the global IT Offshoring market. Ever since the internet has IT Outsourcing/Offshoring is becoming a recognizable IT procurement strategy. IT Project Offshoring execution process has received the least attention in the literature, academics and practitioners signalize that a better management of the relationship will lead to a successful IT Offshoring. However, there is very little empirical evidence underlining how cross-border projects are run. The challenges encountered in the execution process are numerous and not always generic.

The purpose of this qualitative study is to identify, understand and diagnose IT Offshoring project challenges, particularly in regard with Project Management.

The Scope of the Research

The aim of this research is to get an acute insight into challenged faced by IT Offshoring projects, through multiple case studies. For the information gathering, structured interviews from voluntary participants were used. At its core, this research is qualitative in nature, and not quantitative, in that the neither the data nor the findings can be subjected to rigorous statistical or numerical analyses.

The interviews conducted were semi-structures and thus collected data narrative in nature. This data was analyzed using ‘pattern matching’ techniques that suit very well for a quantitative research model.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Alami-PHOTOAdam Alami

Sydney, Australia

flag-australia

 



Adam Alami
is a seasoned IT consultant with over 18 years’ experience. Business Analysis and Project Management is his passion. His experience revolved around major business transformation projects. He is a versetail IT professional. He accumulated a wealth of cross industry experience with Tier 1 businesses in major projects in the areas of Enterprise Transformation, Integration, Migration, and Systems Modernization.

He has a track of academic achievements. He holds a Bachelor degree in Software Engineering from the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM) and a Master degree in Computing from the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS).

Adam has a passion for research. His research interests are IT Offshoring, Global Project Managements, Banking Technology, Business Analysis, Information Technology and Culture, Enterprise Innovation and Business Solutions.

Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.adamalami.com/

 

How Blogging Can Help You Land Your Dream Job in Project Management

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Jerry Ihejirika

Lagos, Nigeria


With the high rate of global unemployment, I wonder how many of our recent graduates in project management (PM) have landed their dream jobs. And as more and more PM graduates are being produced by our higher institutions, they would continue to join in this very long queue of job search, globally.

However, it is now common knowledge that the first thing recruiters and employers do is to search for you on social media. So the best place to position yourself first is on social media. But, with the numerous profiles of PM job seekers online, how do you actually stand out from the social media crowd? The answer is through BLOGGING.

Gone are those days when blogging was meant for the journalists, writers and gossip mongers. In today’s world, a good blog can land you your dream job in a company that values project management in or outside your country. How so? Let’s take a look.

My Story

I discovered the power of blogging in 2008 when I joined my first Internet Network Marketing Company. I set up my blog to promote the company’s travel products and services and also recruit members into the company’s Network Marketing system.

I’d expected to generate some local and international traffic by doing this, but I did not anticipate the overwhelming, positive response I got from my upline member who took the time to check out my blog. I also used the blog to a great success in building an international team.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Ihejirika-PHOTOJerry Ihejirika

Lagos, Nigeria

flag-nigeria

 

Jerry Ihejirika is a project management graduate (BTech) and blogger. He’s passionate about project management and blogging.

Jerry has published several insightful articles on project management, social media and career development. He’s also working towards establishing an Initiative (PM for Africa Initiative) that will help in creating more awareness, promoting and advancing the best practice of project management in Africa.

You can connect with Jerry Ihejirika through his blog at http://jerryihejirika.com/.

 

Project Procurement Management for Project Managers

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Dr. T D Jainendrakumar

Madhyapradesh, India


 

What is Procurement Management?

Procurement management includes the processes required to acquire goods or services from outside the project team. It includes Contract Management and Change Control Processes. And includes controlling contract issues by an outside organization

What is a CONTRACT?

A Contract is a legally binding detailed formal document that refers to an entire agreement between 2 or more parties. All terms & conditions of a Contract must be met by both the parties. Anything not mentioned in the Contract is not Legally Binding to anyone.

Types of Contracts

  1. Fixed Price (Lump Sum): If the scope is clear and well defined, we can sign a contract on a fixed total price and the risk is on the seller side as the buyer need not bother about any variations in the cost. There are 3 types of fixed price contract as shown below:

A. Firm Fixed Price (FFP). Seller has to fulfill the obligations with in a fixed price. The risk is on the seller side as any cost overrun will be borne by the seller.

B. Fixed Price Incentive Fees Contract (FPIF) (Based on the complexities or certain conditions apart from fixed price buyer will pay some incentive, if the seller is completing the project on time or meet certain performance conditions set by the buyer etc. If the cost reaches above a ceiling limit, the seller has to bear the excess cost.)

C. Fixed Price with Economic Price Adjustment Contracts (FP-EPA) (for a long duration project, to meet the escalation or price variations of some materials or labour charges, buyer has to pay a Fixed Price and cost of escalation within the duration of the project, it protects both the parties from price inflation.)

2. Cost Reimbursable Contract: In this type of contract scope is not exactly defined and not known to both the parties and the price is open based on the final incurred costs of the product. In this type of contract risk is on the buyer side as buyer has to pay for facing the uncertainties. There are 3 type of cost reimbursable contract as given below:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj30-Jan2015-Jainendrakumar-AUTHORDr. T D Jainendrakumar

India

 flag-india

 

Dr. T D Jainendrakumar, Hon’ PhD, MCA, PMP is an international PMP trainer, EX-Scientist/Principal Scientist/Joint Director, N.I.C, Ministry of Information and Communication Technology, Government of India. At present he is working as the head of the department, Department of Computer Science and Applications in the St. Joseph’s College of Engineering and Technology, Palai, Kerala, India.

He has over 25 years’ of extensive experience in the areas of IT Project management in e-governance at Ernakulam District Collectorate, District Courts of Kerala, Central Administrative Tribunal Ernakulam, Rajeev Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (400 crore project), New Delhi and Principal Systems Analyst in National Informatics Centre, Madhya Pradesh State Centre especially in the following areas of specialization: IT practice management (Project Management Methodologies, Tools and techniques, Standards & Knowledge);IT Infrastructure Management (Project Governance, Assessment, Organizational Instructions & Facilities and Equipment’s); IT-Resource Integration Management (Resource Management, Training & Education, Career Development & Team Development);IT-Technical Support (Project Mentoring, Project Planning, Project Auditing and Project Recovery); and Business Alignment Management (Project Portfolio management, Customer Relationship Management, Vendor Management & Business performance management).

Teaching Project Management & ICT Subjects for professionals and post graduates. Holding a degree in Master of Computer Applications (MCA), a three year post graduate course dealing with software Engineering and Project Management from a premier institute Anna University Campus, Chennai, India.

He is a PMP of PMI USA since 2008. Resource person of PMI, you can see his name in the PMBOK 4th edition and 5th edition published by PMI, USA under the list of contributors for project management. Scored 4.11 out of 5 in the project management (2005) examination conducted by brainbench.com, secured a Masters Certificate in Project Management, and is one among the top scorers (First in India and 3rd position in the world in the experienced category).

Published paper in UNICEF in 1995, and published many international journal papers in PM World Today since 2008 having cumulative index factors more than 2 in the areas of specialization of Project Management & Information Technology.

Holding a Hon’ Doctorate from Cosmopolitan University, USA in Project Management & Information Technology. Presently working as an independent project management consultant and an International Project management (PMP) trainer. Provided PMP training to the senior officials of big MNCs like M/S. Earnest & Young and He is a visiting professor and sharing his knowledge and experience and to handle classes in Management Information Systems, Quality Management, Project Management and Software Engineering to some of the big universities. He can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/t-d-jainendrakumar/

 

How to Tackle a Problem with Business Design Thinking

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Parker Lee

Oregon, USA


 

Every day, we all have challenges, opportunities and initiatives to tackle. I’ve found it best to approach and manage this work using several Business Design Thinking tools.

Before offering a few examples of these tools, let me explain what I mean by Business Design Thinking. Business Design Thinking is an alternative approach for how a business runs compared to a traditional top-down, silo-like organization that plans and operates with linear processes.

Setting context 

The first step to tackling a problem is setting context. Apply the proverbial, “Know Thyself” axiom before trying to solve your problem. By building a framework for your challenge, you will get yourself off to a good start. Clarity on the task to be done is important for excellence in execution, as well as in gaining alignment and participation in the design of your problem’s solution. Gather your associates and work through the important elements of the initiative.

Another great technique is developing a problem brief. This should be done with a group of all the affected stakeholders. Use a workshop session with your stakeholders to complete your brief. I suggest it is printed out as a large wall canvas, then have each participant put ideas on one sticky note and post it in each brief category. Perform an alignment activity to discuss and vote on the agreed upon response.

Key components of your brief should be:

  • Goal: Start with the end in mind and work backwards. What is your goal? On what issues is it determined? Write your goal as a question, i.e., “How might we double our customer base with a completely different service in three years?”
  • Why:       Why do you want or need to address this problem? What is the specific problem you are solving? What is your strategic intent?
  • Available Resources: Do you have a project budget? Assistance from Human Resources? Who is your team size? Do you have access to outside resources such as consultants, contractors or agencies? What technology is available?
  • Parameters & Timing: Are parameters already established? Are you required to stay within certain boundaries? What is your timing? Do you have to demonstrate a solution within one year? Three months? Five weeks?
  • Responsibilities: What is the decision process? Who is involved and what are their roles (e.g., input, recommend, fund, approve, influence, perform)
  • Sponsors:       Who are your formal and informal sponsors? The division head? Key leaders? The president of the company?
  • Measure:       How will you know you are succeeding? What are your measures, how are they taken and how often?

More…

To read entire article (click here)

 


 

About the Author

pmwj40-Nov2015-Lee-PHOTOParker Lee

Oregon, USA

flag-usa

 


Parker Lee
is president of Compass52 and has been actively designing organizations for better performance and empowering change since the 1970s. Previously, he was president and executive vice president of business development at XPLANE, which, under his leadership, enjoyed significant annual growth while delivering innovative design thinking engagements for clients globally. During the “dot com” era, Parker acted as vice president of business development for four pre-IPO technology companies. Parker also pioneered the use of social media for use in communications for the California State Democratic Party during the 2004 election. Lee is a graduate of UC Davis in Organizational Development.

Contact email: [email protected]

 

Communicating for Effect

SERIES ARTICLE

Series on Effective Stakeholder Engagement

By Lynda Bourne, PhD

Melbourne, Australia

 


 

There is no point in communicating with anyone if you do not want an effect; you are wasting their time and yours! Communication is the way we influence other people’s thoughts and actions, therefore every communication should be focused on achieving a desired effect on the person’s attitude or behaviour. The effect may be:

  • To prevent any deterioration in a currently satisfactory attitude;
  • To improve a currently unsatisfactory attitude;
  • To stop or reduce damaging or negative actions or behaviours;
  • To ensure or encourage supportive actions or behaviours.

The challenge is knowing which effect you need to create, and then based on the priority of the stakeholder and the importance of the change (from the perspective of both timing and significance) choosing the optimum communication approach.

In earlier articles I’ve discussed the relationship between stakeholder perceptions and project success and the three types of stakeholder communication. Project Relations (PR) and ‘reports’ cover off the needs of most of the stakeholders who are not critical at this time, with minimum effort. This article is focused on the ‘directed communication’ needed to change the attitude or behaviour of the small group of critical stakeholders who need to be doing something differently to support the successful delivery of your project.

Each directed communication is focused on one stakeholder to achieve a desired change in their attitude, behaviour, or both. Maybe a functional manager needs to stop obstructing your project and actively support the loan of some key resources for critical work, or the sponsor needs to approve some additional funding.

The first step in this process is defining precisely what you need from the stakeholder. You also need to prioritise these communications so you focus most of your effort on the most important changes you need at this time.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on effective project stakeholder engagement is by Lynda Bourne, PhD, Managing Director of Stakeholder Pty Ltd (Australia) and author of the books Stakeholder Relationship Management and Advising Upwards, both published by Gower (UK). Dr. Bourne is one of the world’s leading authorities on program/project stakeholder relations. See her author profile below.         

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj34-May2015-Bourne-PHOTODr. Lynda Bourne

Melbourne, Australia

flag-australia

 

 

Dr. Lynda Bourne is Managing Director of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd – an Australian based company with partners in South America and Europe. Through this global network she works with organisations to manage change through managing the relationships essential for successful delivery of organisational outcomes.   Lynda was the first graduate of the RMIT University, Doctor of Project Management course, where her research was focused on tools and techniques for more effective stakeholder engagement. She has been recognized in the field of project management through her work on development of project and program management standards. She was also included in PMI’s list of 50 most influential women in PM.

She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS). She is a recognized international speaker and seminar leader on the topic of stakeholder management, the Stakeholder Circle® visualization tool, and building credibility and reputation for more effective communication.   She has extensive experience as a Senior Project Manager and Project Director specializing in delivery of information technology and other business-related projects within the telecommunications sector, working as a Senior IT Project Management Consultant with various telecommunications companies in Australia and South East Asia (primarily in Malaysia) including senior roles with Optus and Telstra.

Dr Bourne’s publications include: Stakeholder Relationship Management, now in 2nd edition, published in 2009, Advising Upwards published in 2011, and Making Projects Work, published in 2015. She has also contributed to books on stakeholder engagement, and has published papers in many academic and professional journals and is blogger for PMI’s Voices on Project Management.

Dr. Bourne can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Lynda Bourne, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-lynda-bourne/

 

Resilience as Bouncing Forward: Developing the capability to cope when bouncing back is no longer sufficient

SERIES ARTICLE

Advances in Project Management

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management
University of Hertfordshire

UK

 


 

In recent years resilience appears to have proliferated the discourse in many domains and contexts to become the buzzword of choice. The term resilience is to be found in dialogue regarding policy, cities, security, development, energy, resources, food, health, politics, terrorism, natural disasters, climate change, enterprise risk, governance and organisational change. Yet, it appears to be described in different terms and understood in a myriad of ways. Nonetheless, the plurality of domains and conversations seem to regard the concept as a positive and much needed quality or capability.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines resilience as: The capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; or the ability [of a substance or object] to spring back into shape. The former invokes a certain quality, for example mental toughness; whilst the latter implies elasticity, illustrated by the ability of grass or trees to bend with the wind and ultimately return to their former shape or position.

At a fundamental level resilience refers to the ability of a system (or a person) to cope with change. In engineering, this will often refer to the ability of materials and structures to absorb and avoid damage. In psychology, it might refer to the ability of individuals to adapt to stress and adversity. In ecology, it acknowledges the potential responses to perturbations and disturbances. In urban development, cities, security contexts and enterprise planning, it might relate to the preparation for, response to, and recovery from threats and challenges.

Change is always a challenge

The growing interest in resilience corresponds to the increasing realisation that uncertainty and turbulence play an inevitable part in a world of relentless change, continuous innovation and fierce global competition. As traditional certainties and expectations are eroded and plans and assumptions become questionable, new uncertainties and ambiguities need to be addressed.

While the history of the human race appears to be continuously punctuated by change, the rate of change in recent times appears to have accelerated. Traditional measures of change such as the rate of adoption of technologies seem to indicate that new inventions and technologies are being adopted at an ever-increasing pace. Growing pressure to perform and deliver under turbulent conditions results in new and larger risks that must be borne by organisations. Uncertainties in traditional stock markets, global terrorism, unresolved political issues, catastrophic weather events, mass migration and a constant fight for resources further underpin a period of greater turbulence and uncertainty.

Resilience offers a promise to adjust to the inevitable shocks characterising an unpredictable world and survive, and even thrive, despite the disruption and upheaval of change. Ultimately, it implies a capability to bounce back and recover. However, in this new world, which changes faster than we are able to adjust, bouncing back offers modest advantages.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK. Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM. Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ. Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Dalcher-PHOTODarren Dalcher, PhD

Series Editor
Director, National Centre for Project Management
University of Hertfordshire, UK

UK small flag 2




Darren Dalcher
, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK. He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”.

Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London. Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement.

He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management. Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond.

He is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board.

Prof Dalcher is an academic editorial advisor for the PM World Journal. He can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Prof Darren Dalcher, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darren-dalcher/.