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Welcome to the October 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

By David Pells

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA


Welcome to the October 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 39th edition of the Journal contains 35 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 37 different authors in 16 different countries. News articles about projects and project management around the world are also included. Since the primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge related to program and project management (P/PM), please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of articles, papers, reports, book reviews and news stories are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for you and your organization; publish an article or paper in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers and review the Author Guidelines for the journal. Then just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month’s edition with a Featured Interview with Aldo Gebbia, President of IPMA Italy and a very experienced project executive. The interview was conducted by Luca Cavone, PM World’s correspondent in Milan, and is the first of several interviews planned by Luca. Don’t miss this first one.

3 Featured Papers are included this month, by authors in three different countries. Hery Mada Indra Paska in Indonesia is the author of a paper titled “A Case Study on the Implementation of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in the Canal Reconstruction along Crude Oil Pipeline in Indonesia.” This good paper was prepared as a result of a course delivered by Dr Paul Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha in Jakarta, Indonesia. The paper was submitted earlier this year to the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International (AACEi) in partial fulfillment of the Certified Cost Professional (CCP) requirements.

Chima Okereke, PhD, Nigerian engineer and project management leader currently residing in the UK, has authored another paper aimed at the leadership in Nigeria. “Dedicated and Competent Human Resources are essential for the Success of Project Nigeria” contains some important advice and references. If you are interested in how the project management profession can help during transitions to new governments or for unleashing real economic development, read Dr. Okereke’s recent works.

José Ramón San Cristóbal, head of the Project Management Research Group at the University of Cantabria in Spain, is the author of “Management Science methods and methodologies for Project Management: What they model, how they model and why they model.” Professor Cristóbal’s paper aims to assist project managers in understanding both the implicit and explicit assumptions underlying management methods and their principal aims and purposes. This is a very useful paper.

6 Series Articles are included this month by authors in Australia, South Africa, the UK and the USA. Alan Stretton, PhD (Hon) in Australia is back with the 4th article in his 7-part “Series on general management functions and activities, and their relevance to the management of projects.” His article this month is titled “Management leading function and activities.” Don’t miss this article and series by one of the world’s leading project management experts.

Dr. Lynda Bourne in Australia, principal of Stakeholder Management Pty Ltd and one of the world’s leading authorities on the subject of program/project stakeholder management, has provided another useful article in her series on “Effective Stakeholder Engagement”. This month’s article is titled “Communication Planning”. More practical advice from Dr. Bourne on a subject of critical importance on many projects!

Andrew McGregor in South Africa representing the Risk Doctor Partnership is the author of this month’s Risk Doctor Briefing titled “Modifying Risk Behaviour with Change Management.” This is a very useful article. Change management principles can be useful for implementing many different project management processes and improvements. Don’t miss this short but important article.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj35-Jun2015-Pells-PHOTODAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

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David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory support for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/.

For more, visit http://www.pmworldjournal.net/ and http://www.pmworldlibrary.net/.

 

Do or Die Project Management: Lessons Learned from a

SECOND EDITION

By Elizabeth A. Rodgers
Booz Allen Hamilton

Maryland, USA


ABSTRACT

Projects take on a number of shapes, forms and lives of their own. Some are more successful than others depending on outside factors. The “Do or Die Project Management: Lessons Learned from a Zero-Day Project” project gets that name from the main feature of the project: the no float execution time. Execution time affected all aspects of the project including planning, execution, cost, risk, communication and closeout. The lessons learned from this project point to key factors, such as risk and communications management, which allowed it to be successful and points to factors that could have been detrimental. By examining these lessons project managers will be able to apply key insights to future projects that have similarities to “Zero-Day.”

Introduction

The Zero Day project entailed planning an office move of all technical systems including desktop computers, telephones, peripheral equipment, televisions, network equipment, wires, cables, and servers and racks. The planning team was given nine months for planning the move. The goal was to move from Building A to Building B in three days.

This paper will review lessons learned about critical phases of the project, but will primarily focus on the execution phase and managing the communications of this phase. Questions we were required to answer included: What are the goals? What does it take to get there? What are the costs? Who will do the work? How will we know it was successful? What are the risks? What are the assumptions?

Planning

Planning is of utmost importance in any project. However, in the Zero Day project, because of the very limited execution time, the planning phase was imperative. Planning activities included: contractor meetings, moving companies, temporary help, facilities management for the current site, and facilities management for the new site. Our planning team was created immediately after the decision to move. With a limited organizational budget, our planning team consisted of support managers already in place, including the Office Manager, Facilities Manager, IT Manager, Library Manager and Security. The planning staff had to quickly become move experts and project management experts in addition to working our normal day jobs. The overall planning time was nine months, and included several additional vendors including professional office movers, ISPs, telecommunications experts, furniture vendors, and communications experts.

Communication

Communicate, communicate, communicate – with your stakeholders.

The critical planning requirements and tight, no float schedule required the project planning team to assemble an airtight communications plan for before, during execution and after the move. The IT Project Manager has authority over technology solutions, but little authority regarding users’ actions. This required the IT Project Manager to examine the most effective ways to communicate. The method of communication is just as important as the message. Understanding the culture of the audience and authoritative sources are critical. It is important to know the value of each stakeholder group, and your influences as a project manager at various stages of the project. Four general areas of authority that a project manager may or may not have include:

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Rodgers-PHOTOElizabeth Rodgers

Booz Allen Hamilton
Maryland, USA

 

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Elizabeth Rodgers is an experienced and certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and ITIL Foundations professional with more than 20 years of information technology experience. As a Lead Associate for Booz Allen Hamilton, Elizabeth uses best practices and industry standards to deliver several high-level projects to federal government clients in the cybersecurity and law enforcement industries. She has proven qualifications in project management, service management, knowledge management, technology operations and process improvement with the expertise to consistently exceed organizational goals. Elizabeth holds a Bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University, an M.S. in Cybersecurity Policy from the University of Maryland University College, and is a Deloitte Cybersecurity Scholarship Award Recipient. Elizabeth Rodgers can be contacted at [email protected].

 

Complexity Theory and Project Management

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj39-Oct2015-Berndt-BOOKBook Title: Complexity Theory and Project Management
Author:      L. Wanda Curlee and Robert Gordon
Publisher:   John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
List Price:   US$125.00 Format:
Hard Cover, 416 pages
Publication Date: 2011
ISBN:        978-0470545966
Reviewer:   Madison Berndt
Review Date:     October 2015

 


Introduction

This book approaches complexity within projects as an opportunity to embrace change in a way that is intended to strengthen organizational capabilities. The underlying assumption that Curlee & Gordon have is that organizations need to incorporate practices that inject complexity into projects as a managed process. Curlee & Gordon propose that this be done at the framework level within PMBOK, as well as at the organizational level through the inclusion of virtual teams on projects.

Curlee & Gordon take the position that PMBOK is a methodology that needs to be modified in order to account for complexity in the modern environment. The book discounts the counter position that PMBOK is a framework that leaves room for other practices and tools to be included. What I enjoyed about the book is that the logical argument for moving away from a linear approach provides a useful description of how complexity within projects needs to be identified and how it drives the need for deviations from certain practices. Because the book’s perspective on PMBOK is similar to the opinion many others have, it’s a great primer for the type of discussion an experienced project/program manager may need to have when coaching a new project manager engaged on a complex project.

Most of the book covers the management of virtual project teams. The impact of virtual teams is viewed through the prism of complexity theory, and in doing so we get to see how the use of virtual teams drives the creation of the core capabilities needed for dealing with emergent complexity. Curlee & Gordon illustrate how making the adjustments to accommodate effective use of virtual team members carries additional value for the organization by providing the opportunity for higher levels of engagement, job satisfaction, and project execution. Half of the book is focused on the application of complexity theory to project and organizational culture. By relating cultural changes for the organization to project level decisions, the book shows project managers how well managed projects can have a positive impact on team members and influence corporate culture.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The first 15% of “Complexity Theory and Project Management” is devoted to a general overview of complexity theory and how complexity theory is seemingly at odds with PMI’s PMBOK training. Having provided a general description of complexity and an argument for expanding the PMI PMBOK framework to include complexity, Curlee & Gordon focus on elements of complexity evidenced when using virtual project teams and shows the reader how to best use this to benefit the organization.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Berndt-PHOTOMadison Berndt

North Texas, USA

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Madison Berndt is a Senior Project Manager located in the Dallas, Texas area focused primarily on enterprise IT infrastructure deployments. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, having earned his Bachelor of Science in Economics in 1989 and Master of Business Administration in 2007. In 2010 he earned the PMP certification. Mr. Berndt can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

The Influential Project Manager – Winning Over Team Members and Stakeholders

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj39-Oct2015-Martin-BOOKBook Title:   The Influential Project Manager – Winning Over Team Members and Stakeholders
Author: Alfonso Bucero
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price:   $49.95
Format: Paperback and eBook
Pub Date:   July 2014
ISBN: 13-978-1-4665-9633-7 (Paperback), 978-1-4665-9633-7 (eBook)
Reviewer:     Rodger L. Martin, JD, MBA, BSEE, PMP
Review Date: Sep/2015

 


Introduction

The author, a PMI Fellow, presents his 30+ year journey into developing his soft skills as a successful project manager, especially becoming an influencer. Influence as a skill creates a long term benefit, whereas persuasion’s effect may only last for a short while. The book describes ten keys to influencing others to support both you and your ideas; outlines techniques for improving your listening skills, provides a trust assessment for determining your level of influencing (and if others perceive you as trustworthy), and demonstrates how to build a network of informal alliances to achieve success.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book mainly devotes a chapter to several soft skills needed for success:

  • Practicing Active Listening
  • Developing Trust
  • Practicing Integrity
  • Influencing to Win
  • Practicing Generosity
  • Understanding People
  • Developing Commitment
  • Cultivating Your Informal Power, and
  • Understanding How to Convert Project Vision into Reality

The final chapters discuss Techniques for Developing and Sustaining Your Influence, and the Myths/Mistakes of Influencing.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book?

The author asserts that soft skills, especially the ability to influence, will have the greatest impact on project success. Influence is not the same with all people. Influence may start with authority, but frequently the project manager does not have positional power over stakeholders. The project manager must influence them to gain cooperation. Influence also includes motivating and mentoring. Technical skills are important, but communicating and influencing others affect project success more than anything else.

Highlights: What I liked!

Each chapter contains assessment tools for the reader to measure their own level of various soft skills. Overall, easy and enjoyable reading! Success anecdotes are from his life experiences and demonstrate that influence is a journey

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

 

rodger-martinMartin, JD, MBA, BSEE, PMP, PMP-ACP

Texas, USA

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Rodger L. Martin has a broad background in business, law, engineering and Project Management, both plan driven and Agile. He is a retired US Air Force officer with expertise in rockets and National Ranges. His work experiences include government, military, public corporations, small business consulting and high-tech non-profit organizations. For the last 15 years, he has worked on Document Management, Knowledge Management and Process Management/Modeling projects for commercial companies. He acquired his PMP certification in 2007 and his PMP-ACP in 2015. He is also a certified Mediator.

Email address: [email protected]

To see other works by Rodger Martin, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/rodger-martin/

 

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management for Small Projects

BOOK REVIEW

pmwj39-Oct2015-Piracha-BOOKBook Title:   Project Management for Small Projects, 2nd Ed
Author: Sandra F. Rowe, PhD, PMP
Publisher: Management Concepts
List Price:   $32.00
Format: 219 pages, softcover
Publication Date:   2015    
ISBN: 978-1-56726-474-6
Reviewer:     Sara Piracha
Review Date: September 2015


Introduction

The second edition of Project Management for Small Projects contains a condensed version of PMBOK guidelines aimed at simplifying the project management process and making it more realistic and adaptable for smaller projects and assignments. In addition to the project management framework, this book also highlights the value of the discipline and is useful equally for junior project managers and anyone else who is designated to complete a task or assignment created to improve processes and operational efficiency.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is organized into 3 sections:

The first part is devoted towards making new project managers apprised of the various stages a project undergoes. It is structured to introduce concerns and other vital aspects to take into consideration prior to the initiation of a small project and then explain to a beginner the logical order of knowledge areas within project management. It creates a foundation and primes the user to understand topics covered in the rest of the book.

The second part of the book provides a comprehensive view of each knowledge area that can be adopted for small and simple projects. It explains how phases of executing, monitoring & control can be combined into one knowledge area when working on a small project.

The third section of the book focuses on management of multiple projects simultaneously. It dives into how various tools can be used efficiently on multiple projects to minimize cost and maximize utility of project management tools. It also succinctly discusses the “power of one” to highlight the fact that sometimes, project managers may be the only responsible party and there may not be a team to collaborate with. This is a truthful representation of scenarios in which the project manager is single-handedly responsible for completing the work and also leading and managing the project using his/her ingenuity.

Highlights: What I liked!

This book is a superior resource for not only project managers but also individuals who have had exposure to project management but never received formal training or education in this area. The information in this book is skillfully organized to provide valuable knowledge at a basic level.

More…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

 


 

About the Reviewer

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Piracha-PHOTOSara Piracha

Texas, USA

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Sara Piracha has worked as a project manager and senior analyst for several Fortune 500 companies. In her past roles, she has served in various industries including Aerospace and Transportation. She has an extensive background in finance and accounting. Her project management experience includes a variety of areas ranging from software implementation to auditing and compliance. She is a member of other professional organizations such as Project Management Institute and Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants. Sara can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note: This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. PMI Dallas Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, the audience for most project management books.

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

 

The Three “F”s to Instilling Success Habits within Agile Scrum Teams: Foundation, Familiarity and Fundamentals

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Brian Vanderjack

and

Mabel Menard

Illinois, USA


The test to tell if you have an issue with Agile Scrum Ceremonies (where Ceremonies are re-occurring Agile Scrum meetings) is people not showing up, showing up late or meetings that wonder off topic. If these behaviors are plaguing your Ceremonies the this article can help as it is intended to assist Agile Scrum-Scrum Masters at instilling in Team Members desired habits for Ceremonies and to maintain these desired behaviors. By using the three “F”s as a guide, Ceremonies are by far more likely to have team members show up, start on time, and stay on topic. These three F’s are Foundation, Familiarity and Fundamentals. We find that poor behaviors learned from other team efforts can mar non-Agile efforts and are ready to take control of team member’s minds. It is as if poor behaviors, like not being ready at meeting time or trying to derail a Ceremony, are lurking in the team member’s sub-conscious waiting to manifest themselves. If your Ceremonies are focused on the core reasons for holding the Ceremonies, as defined by Agile Scrum, you are more likely to avoid undesirable behaviors.

For instance, if you are holding a daily standup, adhere to the “Foundation” as indicated by Agile Scrum tenants. The best example is the Daily Standup agenda which is to quickly go to each team member and have them indicate: what did you do yesterday, what are you doing today, and what are your impediments to success, if any? The major issue with these Ceremonies, especially in the Daily Standup is digressing from the stated purpose.

Specifically, the development part of the team will often try to use the Daily Standup for problem solving. This is easily rectified by scheduling a 15 minute “Issues Ceremony” (intended to be a new additional Agile Ceremony) immediately following Daily Standups. The idea, as the name implies is to simply look at each active issue on an issues log and discuss each item quickly. If there is a need for more time to be invested into a topic than can be addressed at a 15 minute time-boxed Ceremony, a new meeting is to be scheduled to burrow into details. We have seen this idea of an issue-Ceremony being scheduled immediately after the Daily Standup work wonders. This is because all participants know that any issue they want to discuss will be given an opportunity for discussion.

More…

To read entire article (click here)


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Vanderjack-PHOTO1 BRIANBrian Vanderjack, PMP, MBA, CSM      

Illinois, USA

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Brian Vanderjack holds an MBA, granted with Distinction from DePaul University, a PMP, and a CSM certification. He is the Principal Trainer at PMHighway LLC and his new book “The Agile Edge: Managing Projects Effectively Using Agile Scrum” is available on AMAZON.COM (you can find the book at http://amzn.to/1KmR2XB). He has also published several articles on Agile and project management & team leadership that were international journals. In addition he is a/an:

  • Award winning full time ScrumMaster at one of the largest IT departments in the world.
  • Agile Trainer on many occasions at AT&T and at PMCentersUSA (PMCentersUSA is a former winner of vendor of the year from PMI).
  • Successful leader in advancing Agile Scrum having led an effort to create on-demand ScrumMaster Training. Over 1,000 people have taken this training to date.
  • Regular speaker at IBM, AT&T and PMI Chapters on Agile Scrum and Project Management topics, to audiences measured in the hundreds.
  • Seasoned public speaker having provided lively seminars at The Wisconsin Business Analysts Accociation(WIBADD), IEEE, AT&T, Abbott Labs, Northrup Grumman, University of Phoenix, University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Abbott labs etc.
  • Award winning instructor working as a faculty member for the University of Phoenix
  • Member of toastmasters, where he has held the position of “Area Governor” and winner of approximately 2 dozen awards for public speaking

Mr. Vanderjack lives Downers Grove, in a suburb of Chicago with his wife, two sons (when they are not in school or traveling somewhere) and a retired show dog/Wheaton Terrier, named Finley. Finley, sadly, was kicked out of the competition circuit early in his competition career due to goofing off too much; like the time he did a back flip during the final judging rounds. The breeder seemed quite happy to give him to us (smile).

Brian loves to meet new people by traveling to new locations to provide seminars and courses on Leadership, Agile Scrum, Project Management, Persuasion, Conflict, Risk, and Presentation Skills for the Professional Work Environment.   He has over 1,000 LinkedIn endorsements for leadership and similar, and can be reached at [email protected].

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Vanderjack-PHOTO2 MENARDMabel Menard

Illinois, USA

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Mabel Menard has been the Campus College Chair for the College of Social Sciences at the University of Phoenix in Chicago since October 2012, overseeing the Colleges of Humanities & Sciences, Heath Sciences Professions, and Security & Criminal Justice plus the Bachelor’s in Human Services, Criminal Justice Administration, and Health Administration programs. In addition, she acts as a special projects consultant for a social service agency and an HR consultant for a law firm on an as-needed basis. In her spare time, she mentors Asian-American professionals and international students. She is also a mentor and facilitator for the OCA Mentoring Asian-American Professionals program and a mentor and the Social Media Coordinator for the University of the People Mentorship Program.

Ms Menard received her Bachelor of Arts cum laude in Social Science and Master of Science in Clinical Psychology from Radford University, Radford, Virginia. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology from, and was a Psy.D. candidate (ABD) at, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, Illinois. She also received her MBA in Human Resources Management from the University of Phoenix and has been pursuing her Ph.D. in Organizational Leadership with a concentration in Health and Human Services.

Ms Menard’s management experience includes retail, acoustics engineering consulting firm, and psychiatric rehabilitation programs. She also has extensive research and quality assurance experience, having been involved in the design of and data collection for various research and quality assurance projects. Her HR experience includes writing, reviewing, and updating personnel and operational policies and advising affiliates on HR best practices.

Ms Menard’s clinical experience includes psychiatric rehabilitation services, student counseling, and court-ordered psychological evaluations and therapy. She also has extensive teaching experience both domestically and internationally. She became a faculty member of University of Phoenix, Chicago campus, in January 2009, teaching courses in Criminal Justice Research, Management, Business Research, Psychology, and Human Services.

 

Project Controls Personnel: Finding the “Right Stuff”

SERIES ARTICLE

Earned Value-based Project Management

By Lisa Wolf

Maryland, USA


Abstract

So you want (or need) to implement Earned Value Management (EVM) in your organization? In order to do so, you need to recruit and hire the right people with the right skill set. That skill set can be formulated and expressed in many different terms including (but not limited to) personality, technical knowledge, and analytical capabilities. You post the job, receive a ton of resumes, and then you realize that you are uncertain how to discern between those who claim they know what they’re doing and those who actually can do what you need them to do. How do you pick the right people with the right skill set? This paper discusses one person’s view of the various roles in the world of EVM and how to recruit and retain the right talent.

INTRODUCTION

What is “The Right Stuff?” First of all, it is a movie based on the story of the original “Mercury Seven” astronauts (Alan Shepard, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter, Wally Schirra, Gordon Cooper, Gus Grissom, and Deke Slater) and their macho, seat-of-the-pants approach to the space program. Originally a book by Tom Wolfe (no relation, unfortunately), it covers an exciting time in the United States space program from the breaking of the sound barrier by Chuck Yeager to the establishment of Project Mercury at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Most importantly to us, it showed that no one had a clue how to run a space program or how to select people to be in it (NASA was only six months old when the Project Mercury astronauts were chosen).

pmwj39-Oct2015-Wolf-IMAGE1

Often, particularly if new to the contracting world of development, modernization, upgrade or enhancement work valued at $20 million or more requiring Earned Value Management, we can find ourselves in exactly the same figurative boat. From a slow start with humiliating mistakes, Project Mercury eventually became popular worldwide and the six successful manned flights were followed by millions of people on radio and TV not only in the United States, but around the world. So, too, can be the experience of establishing your Earned Value Management System and attendant team… well, perhaps not as grand as being on radio or TV (unless you REALLY mess up – not the kind of attention you really want), but certainly success can be found and maintained by finding people with the “right stuff-.” – and you can expect to make mistakes along the way.

Alan Shepard: Sounds dangerous
Recruiter: It is! Extremely dangerous!
Alan Shepard: Count me in!

Initial Recruiting: What Job Title Is Really Needed?

What, exactly, is the difference between an EVM Analyst, a Planner/Scheduler, and a Project Controls Professional (not to be confused with a Project Controller (financial analyst) or a Project Controls Engineer (technical liaison))? It really depends upon your organization and its needs, as well as what definitions your organization has developed and what your system description states about roles and responsibilities. The following provides definitions of these roles based upon observations and discussions with people from various companies:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This article was contributed by the College of Performance Management (CPM), an international association for those engaged in earned value management, project cost and schedule control, program management and program/project performance management. For information about CPM, visit their website at https://www.mycpm.org/

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Wolf-PHOTOLisa Wolf

Maryland, USA

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Lisa Wolf is the Earned Value Management (EVM) and Procurement Systems Focal Point for Booz Allen Hamilton, your essential partner for predictive intelligence, emerging technology, and advanced engineering. In her role, Lisa is responsible for ensuring the proper assessment, compliance and training of the Earned Value Management and Procurement Business Systems through proposal support, Integrated Baseline Reviews (IBRs), Internal Surveillance Reviews (ISRs), Joint Surveillance Reviews (JSRs), Pre-Award reviews, Peer Reviews, and Subcontract Administrator process surveillance. Lisa’s wide range of diverse EVM experience as a practitioner has been in RDT&E, Production, Deployment, Software Development, and IT and support services projects of varying contract sizes and types with myriad clients.

Lisa presently also serves as Co-Dean for the College of Performance Management (CPM) 600-G (Government EVM) Education and Certification tracks and Deputy PM for CPMs Integrated Project Management certification program. She is also co-Lead of the National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Integrated Program Management Division (IPMD) Contracts working group, and the Vice President of Communication for the College of Performance Management (CPM). She is a frequent speaker and trainer of Earned Value and Project Management topics in the United States at EVM World, IPM conferences and other PMI events, as well as worldwide, including presentations and trainings in Alexandria, Egypt, Yokosuka, Japan, the Cayman Islands, and Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. She has served as a guest lecturer for graduate students at Bowie State University in Maryland, as well as a course developer and leader for the American Management Association.

Lisa earned her MBA from The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and has been certified by the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International (AACEI) as an Earned Value Professional (EVP) and by the PMI as a Project Management Professional (PMP).

Lisa D. Wolf, EVM and Procurement Systems Focal Point, Booz Allen Hamilton, 1 Preserve Pkwy, Rockville, MD 20852, 301.802.0627 / [email protected]

 

Social Infrastructure Development: The Case for Private Participation in Potable Water Supply in Colombia

SECOND EDITION

Prof Juan David González-Ruiz
Faculty of Business Studies and Marketing
University Institution Esumer
Medellin, Colombia

Carlos Alejandro Arboleda, PhD
Profit Investment Bank
Bogotá, Colombia

and

Prof Sergio Botero
Faculty of Mines, National University of Colombia
Medellin, Colombia


ABSTRACT

The growing need for promoting the development of social infrastructure in order to close the gap in potable water supply requires an active participation of the private sector. Indeed, public policies are required to detect the critical aspects and challenges toward a reliable water supply for larger populations. This paper emphasizes the analysis and assessment of the current conditions of potable water supply sector in Colombia. In this context, we do consider potable water supply as an important component of social infrastructure taking into account the existing regulations for utility companies in Colombia and the current legislation (Bill 1508/2012), which promotes private sector participation in developing infrastructure. As a result of this analysis, new policies could be implemented by local authorities to foster new private investments in social infrastructure projects. In addition, new funding mechanisms could be explored to diversify the supply of financial resources, including those from capital markets and multilateral agencies. It is expected that this paper will contribute to define policies and best practices to increase the participation of the private sector in potable water supply taking into account the legal and regulatory environment in Colombia, which it is very similar to other developing countries.

INTRODUCTION

During the last decades, the potable water supply sector in Colombia has experienced little changes related to the way it operates and how it involves the private sector in the provision of this essential service. As a result of this condition, the gap in potable water supply coverage has not had a meaningful increase over time. Consequently, this has caused many environmental, economic and public health effects. For example, in rural areas (inhabited by the poorest segments of the population) polluted water sources and distribution networks in poor conditions have produced various diseases gastrointestinal disorders, which is responsible for 7.3% of infant mortality (Mejia et al., 2012).

For this reason, the central government must create mechanisms that encourage the engagement of private investors in the different social infrastructure projects, particularly in the potable water supply sector in order to improve and expand coverage of the service, especially at the poorest areas. In order to encourage the participation of the private sector, the Colombian government enacted in 2012 the Bill 1508 on Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs), which aims to regulate and generate mechanisms of participation and involvement of the private sector to develop public infrastructure.

This legislation and its implementing regulations were developed with the aim of accelerating the development of infrastructure, particularly in roads and other user fee based systems. In 2014, ten projects were awarded with total investments above US$ 5 billion. These projects and their investments will start by the end of 2015 once the financial closing is achieved. For public services provision, the government issued in January 14, 2015, a decree named 063 to regulate the particularities in the implementation and commissioning of Potable Water and Basic Sanitation projects.

Similarly, this paper addresses the challenges associated with finding appropriate funding for social infrastructure, particularly for potable water. In this context, the observed need for increasing potable water supply coverage confirms the requirement to create mechanisms to involve the private sector to provide infrastructure services of potable water. Therefore, it is necessary to generate strategies aligned with public policies leading to identify key challenges and critical issues. Furthermore, PPPs could define how both parties, the private investor and the public sector, align their interests towards developing projects that consider factors such as sustainability, accessibility, and reliability on potable water supply. Therefore, involving the private sector to provide potable water supply through schemes associated with the development of projects through PPPs and project finance as a mechanism for structuring and financing of projects must be promoted.

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To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 2nd annual University of Maryland Project Management Symposium in College Park, Maryland, USA in June 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Authors

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Gonzalez-GONZALEZJuan David González-Ruiz

Medellin, Colombia

Colombia - small flag

 

 

Juan David González-Ruiz is an Associate Professor at the School of Management and Marketing, Institución Universitaria Esumer. He is Ph.D Candidate in the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, where he received his B.S. in Management Engineering as well. He holds a Master’s degree in Financial Management at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and a Specialization in Management and Prospective Strategy at the Universidad Potificia Bolivariana. When he was studying in Spain, he was a research assistant of VICO Project with Prof. José Marti Pellon. He worked in Constructora Conconcreto S.A., a major construction company in Colombia as a Business Strategy Analyst. His experience includes significant know-how in financial modeling, capital market, business strategy, project investment, and experience in the infrastructure sector. He is co-author of the book “Principles of Modeling Financial in Excel”, which was written with Prof. Santiago Medina Hurtado. He has been advisor for companies in valuation, mergers and acquisitions, business plans, and debt restructuring. In January 2012, he was awarded a research fellowship by Universidad Nacional de Colombia. In 2015, he was awarded as the best teacher at the Institución Universitaria Esumer in the Project Management Specialization Program. His research area is water supply infrastructure based on Project Finance and Public-Private Partnerships. Juan David is based in Medellín-Colombia and can be contacted at [email protected] or [email protected]

 

Cpmwj39-Oct2015-Gonzalez-ARBOLEDAarlos Alejandro Arboleda

Bogota, Colombia

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Carlos Alejandro Arboleda is Civil Engineer from the Facultad de Minas (Universidad National de Colombia – Medellín), with a Master’s Degree in Civil Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Colombia) and a Master of Science and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Purdue University (USA), with emphasis on infrastructure development and management and structuring of projects under Public Private Partnership. With over 20 years of experience in engineering projects, Alejandro has worked in Pedro Gomez y Cia as infrastructure and operations manager. He also worked for Constructora Conconcreto S.A. for over 10 years as project engineer and project manager for infrastructure projects. He is currently working as partner / director at Profit, an investment banking firm in Colombia with emphasis in the infrastructure sector. Alejandro has been a visiting professor at the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of Illinois – Urbana Champaign. Since 2010, he has been teaching a graduate course on Private Public Partnership at Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá where he is currently a visiting professor. Carlos Alejandro can be contacted at [email protected] or [email protected]

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Gonzalez-BOTEROSergio Botero

Medellin, Colombia

Colombia - small flag

 

 

Sergio Botero B. is an Associate Professor at the Organizations Engineering Department, Faculty of Mines, Universidad Nacional de Colombia at Medellin. He holds a Doctor of Science degree in Engineering Management  – (Major: Energy and Environmental Management)  at The George Washington University, Washington, DC.,  a Master´s degree in Engineering Management at Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. and a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Medellin, Colombia. His experience includes the following positions: Professor and Researcher in “Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana” (Medellín, Colombia), in the Energy and Thermodynamics Group, Focused in Energy Efficiency projects in Colombia. Consultant in the Inter-American Development Bank (Washington, D.C., U.S.A.), as a technical assistant of the “Sustainable Markets for Sustainable Energy” Program, which was focused in developing markets for energy efficiency and renewable energy in Latin American countries. Director of Turbogen department, “Motoplantas Bristol” (Medellín Colombia), marketing micro turbines in Colombia and power plants for rent. In his current position at Universidad Nacional he has worked in the following activities: Director, Organization Engineering Department. Director of the “Energy – Environment – Economy Modeling and Analysis” research group. In addition, he has been teacher in the following programs, Postgraduate: Doctorate in Engineering – Industry and Organizations. Master in Engineering Management, Specialization in Energy Markets, Specialization in Financial Engineering, Specialization in Management. Undergraduate: Engineering Management, and Industrial Engineering. Sergio is based in Medellín-Colombia, and can be contacted at: [email protected] 

 

29th IPMA World Congress in Panama City, Panama

REPORT

By Jouko Vaskimo

Editorial Advisor & International Correspondent

Panama City, Panama and Helsinki, Finland


Mr Reinhard Wagner, International Project Management Association (IPMA) President, and Mr José E. Reyes G., Asociatión Panameńa de Gestion de Proyectos (APGP) President, opened the 29th IPMA World Congress at Panama City, Panama, on 28th September 2015. The theme of the 29th IPMA World Congress, the first one to be organized in the Americas, was The way to project management in a multicultural context. Mr Tom Taylor, Association for Project Management (APM) President, performed the duties of Master of Ceremonies at the congress plenary sessions, including opening and closing ceremonies.

pmwj39-Oct2015-Vaskimo2-IPMA PHOTO

Mr Tom Taylor addressing the 29th IPMA World Congress opening ceremony audience (photos courtesy Jouko Vaskimo)

The congress comprised an extensive system of plenary sessions with keynote presentations by renowned experts in project management, parallel streams with practitioner and scientific foci, and a generous offering of social events surrounding the official congress program. The congress, organized by Asociatión Panameńa de Gestion de Proyectos, took place in the Hotel Westin Playa Bonita Business & Convention Center on 28th … 30th September 2015, attracting over 100 presenters and 500 participants from over 40 different countries. For more information on the 29th IPMA World Congress in Panama City, please navigate to http://www.ipmawc2015.com/ .

An IPMA Global Young Crew Workshop (GYCW) preceded the World Congress on 25th … 27th September, 2015. The Global Young Crew Workshop was organized as an opportunity for young project-oriented people around the world to get to know one another. The GYCW comprised interactive workshops, streams, and presentations from renowned keynote speakers. Participants had the opportunity to expand their horizons and bring new and creative views to the way they manage their projects. A special emphasis was on group discussions, interactive learning, networking and having fun. The GYCW can be considered the premium IPMA event for young project managers and people building a career in project management.

More…

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About the Author

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Vaskimo-PHOTOJouko Vaskimo

International Editorial Advisor

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Jouko Vaskimo works as Development Manager at Aalto PRO, the Professional Development unit of Aalto University in Espoo, Finland. He is also an International Correspondent and Editorial Advisor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992. Since then he has held project management related assignments with increasing levels for responsibility at Sinebrychoff Ltd, the oldest brewery in Scandinavia; Kemira Engineering Ltd, the leading chemicals manufacturer Finland; DNA Finland Ltd, a large Finnish mobile phone operator; Nokia Business Infrastructure; and Ixonos PLC, one of the leading Finnish ICT consultancies. Jouko holds the IPMA Level C (Project Manager) and Level B (Senior Project Manager) certificates. He is a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter. He received the PMP certificate in 2003. Since October 2007, Jouko has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258. Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at jouko.vaskimo“at”aalto.fi .

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

Infrastructure Projects, Transatlantic Sports, a Post Project Review, an International Scandal, Falling Beechnuts and the End of Summer in UK

REPORT

UK Project Management Round Up

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK


INTRODUCTION

Well, here we are at the end of the Summer but not quite in the Winter. Not only is the season changing but the Project World is also in a state of flux. This month we have news of UK infrastructure projects, sports projects that link across the Atlantic and a major scandal in Germany that affects project managers everywhere. There has also been a development in a major project involving multiple owners that completed several years ago.

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

Infrastructure projects always attract a lot of passion in our very crowded land so it comes as no surprise that the rumour that Britain is to sign a deal with China to build a prototype reactor in Essex stirred up comment. According to Press reports, the deal, which would see the first Chinese-designed and operated facility in the West, is part of the price for Chinese finance for two other reactors. This news comes just a week after the French operator EDF admitted that the new reactor at Hinkley Point, one of the two new reactors it is due to build, has been delayed until 2014. This is more than just a little contingency consuming delay as the reactor was originally due to be up and running by 2017. EDF blame the latest delays on financing uncertainties but there have been the EDF design problems, too, as faults have been found at Flamanville. “It is a serious fault, even a very serious fault, because it involves a crucial part of the nuclear reactor,” according to Pierre-Franck Chevet, head of France’s nuclear safety inspectorate.

A report in April in The Independent claimed that a second investigation had been ordered into the quality of the steel used to make the “pressure vessel”, which encloses the ground-breaking reactor near Cherbourg. If the steel proves to be defective, the completion of the prototype EPR plant could be delayed for several years. The concern is that the same manufacturing techniques had been used in the steel for the identical safety casings destined for Hinkley Point, which “have already been manufactured”

All this is bad news for the French nuclear industry which draws considerable support from the French Government. It seems the French overseas nuclear construction has had a bad time for the past few years. The Olkiluoto No 3 reactor, in Finland, has been plagued by controversy with main operators Areva shutting down construction after a dispute over compensations and unfinished automation planning. This shifted full operations back from 2016 to sometime in the period 2018–2020. Current cost estimates put the full cost of construction at about €8.5 billion, compared with the revised original estimated delivery price of €3 billion. This would mean that the Olkiluoto reactor would be the world’s fifth or sixth most expensive structure, exceeding even the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

EDF already have an unenviable record of project failure with their plant at Flamanville, France, running up an eye-watering trebling in cost and a six year schedule delay. The Hinkley Point reactor is twice the size of Flamanville. Does this mean we can expect a six-fold cost increase over original and a 12 year delay? Looks like EDF are already well into the delay and have upped the cost estimate several times already.

More…

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About the Author

 

pmwj36-Jul2015-Shepherd-PHOTOMILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

UK small flag 2

 

 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses. Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia. His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA). He is currently Director of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and the Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management. He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance. Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

News from the PMI Santiago Chapter, Power Generation and Mining Projects in Chile

REPORT

Project Management Update from Santiago

By Jaime Videla

Santiago, Chile


PMI Santiago Chile Chapter

Cono Sur Tour 2015 – Selected papers

After a successful reception process and thoroughly selection, the papers for the Cono Sur Tour 2015 have been selected. They will be key to the development of the Congress of Management and Administration Project this year.

The presentations should address the issue of Research and Innovation, from the perspective of project management.

The evaluation process took into account the correspondence to the theme of the Congress and the purpose clearly established. The relevance and possibility of practical use in the immediate. A topic of current interest to the profession of project management. Learning objectives clearly defined and aligned with the script of the presentation. Clear exposition of the subject; the experience in previous presentations to any chapter or previous Congresses PMI and the experience of the exhibitor.

Those selected are:

More…

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About the Author

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Videla-PHOTOJAIME VIDELA

Santiago, Chile

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Jaime Videla, PMP, is the Managing Director for Videla Montero Consultores a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of Accufast, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 20+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Mexico and Perú. Since 2006 has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity of the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects.

Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Jaime Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

 

Shades of Agile Gray

COMMENTARY

By Rodger martin

Texas, USA


We live in a digital world that prefers to think in black and white, On or Off, Agile or Plan-Driven. In reality there are more shades of gray. Although Agile is comprised of many more methodologies than just Scrum, most people around me tend to view Agile only in Scrum terms. The Agile artist needs to know when to apply Scrum, Kanban, Extreme Programming, Feature-Driven Development or Test Driven Development, to name just a few.

This article offers an approach when trying to fit the square peg in the round hole. For software development it has been a long hard road to get the culture change to fixed time blocked iterations. Challenges include:

  • Frequently there is preparatory work that needs to be done in an enterprise environment before the Agile development team tackles the story.
  • Integrated Agile requires the skills of the Business Analyst or the Design Architect to evaluate options before programming starts.
  • Sometimes, the time needed for the work effort is more than the length of the sprint and the story is already broken down as much as possible. Reporting a continuous working story does not show business value at the end of each sprint.
  • In a large organization, there can be dependencies/interactions with other groups that supersede the time blocked constraints.

The largest cultural issue that goes largely unaddressed in Agile literature is “How to Experiment?” For non-agilists, this is often viewed as “failure.” In reality it is what makes Agile work. For example, did Thomas Edison fail 6,000 times in finding the right material for a filament, or did he did experiment and eliminate 6,000 material candidates? Unfortunately, “Fail” is still a four letter word to most managers (especially those who control the funding sources).

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About the Author

 

rodger-martinMartin, JD, MBA, BSEE, PMP, PMP-ACP

Texas, USA

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Rodger L. Martin has a broad background in business, law, engineering and Project Management, both plan driven and Agile. He is a retired US Air Force officer with expertise in rockets and National Ranges. His work experiences include government, military, public corporations, small business consulting and high-tech non-profit organizations. For the last 15 years, he has worked on Document Management, Knowledge Management and Process Management/Modeling projects for commercial companies. He acquired his PMP certification in 2007 and his PMP-ACP in 2015. He is also a certified Mediator.

Email address: [email protected]

 

How Millennial Are You?

SECOND EDITION

By Susan Case

Texas, USA


Introduction

There is no denying it, they are coming. The number of Millennials is on the rise and they will soon be a large part of the workforce.   The Millennial generation is comprised of more than 75 million Americans born between 1981 and 2000.1 By 2020, people from this generation are expected to make up 46% of the workforce.2

Understanding the Millennial generation is critical to the success of any manager as the leaders of today have a responsibility to shape the leaders of tomorrow. Despite their claim of independence and self-sufficiency, Millennials can benefit from the guidance and experience of more “seasoned” workers.   But that knowledge transfer will only take place if today’s workers and leaders take the time to understand and build relationships with this young generation.

The ideas and comments shared in this paper stem from books and internet research on Millennials, as well as a Focus Group specifically designed to explore the work environments and preferences of Millennials.

Generational Differences

Every generation thinks they are special. Depending on each individual’s experience, people claim their generation had it better or worse than the current generation. The truth is that each generation is simply different – not better, not worse, just different. The key to being an effective manager or co-worker is understanding the roots of peoples’ perspectives and adjusting your style to theirs as appropriate.

The following table describes the last four generations of workers and their core beliefs. Keep in mind that some of the core foundations are generalizations based on years of research and behavioral studies and may not apply to everyone in that generation.

This Generation Born In Has These Characteristics
Traditionalists 1928 – 1945 ·   World War II generation

·   Go to work, earn a living, and don’t complain

·   Loyal to company, company loyal to them

Baby Boomers 1946 – 1964 ·   Currently leading – and retiring from – today’s organizations

·   Overflowing with experience and insight

·   Promotions earned based on hard work

Generation X 1965 – 1980 ·   Independent and pragmatic

·   Give them work and leave them alone to do it

·   Dislike being micro-managed

Millennials 1981 – 2000 ·   Received constant praise and reward from parents, teachers, coaches, mentors

·   Respect for authority must be earned

·   Highly collaborative, prefer to work in teams

* Some studies suggest different date ranges for the Generation X and Millennial groups, and identify the O Generation as those born between 1998 and 2015. However, most research uses the date ranges noted above.

Characteristics of Millennials

Research shows that Millennials have certain characteristics or traits. All of the following are generalizations and there are, of course, exceptions as everyone has different experiences. However, if a manager or colleague can understand what motives most Millennials or why they behave as they do, steps can be taken to bridge the gap between the generations.

  • Tech Savvy – Millennials have always lived in a world with computers and the internet. They used computers in school. They communicate through texts, posts, tweets, SnapChat, and FaceTime. They invent apps for SmartPhones. In the business world, they expect to use technology. It does not have to be cutting edge, but it should be current.

Quotable Quotes: A wellness program is underway at Company X where a Millennial Focus Group session was conducted. Employees are to track their daily exercise on a printed form. One of the Focus Group participants said, “You can tell this program is designed to get the old people to exercise more. You only have to exercise for 10 minutes at a time. Then you fill out a paper form and fax it to the health center.”3

  • Health Conscious – Many Millennials are health conscious.       They like to be active. They expect gym membership to be a company benefit, and preferably one that is paid for by the company. They expect the gym to be comparable to what they could get outside the company for a similar price.

Millennials prefer healthy lunch and vending machine options. If a cafeteria is available at work, they prefer that lunch be free or subsidized in some way. If they have to pay a high price for something that they could get cheaper outside of work, or if they feel the lunch options are not healthy, they will go off-site for lunch. For many companies, food service is subsidized and a certain amount of revenue is necessary to maintain the option for employees. By providing healthy, affordable breakfast and/or lunch options at work, employees and food service workers will benefit.

  • Educated – Today’s workforce is competitive and many companies require a college degree. Baby boomers could get into a company and move up based on hard work. Gen Ys might have a bachelor’s degree but could get a job without one. They were promoted by demonstrating their expertise or because of their ability to lead / manage others. Today’s Millennials are educated with at least a bachelor’s degree. Older Millennials may have stayed in school longer and completed an advanced degree when jobs were scarce during the economic recession. For others, the market they are entering is so competitive that an advanced degree is required to even be considered for an interview.
  • Achievers – Millennials have played on more sports teams, been involved in more activities, and worked on more school group projects than any other generation. They have taken on leadership roles, volunteered on weekends, and studied Latin all in the name of building a great resume. They are accustomed to excelling and expect to do well on the job from day one.4
  • Sheltered – In the 1950s, parents nurtured their children but may not have shown a lot of outward affection. They were told that picking up a crying baby would only spoil him or her. But in the 1960s, Dr. Benjamin Spock wrote a parenting book that promoted cuddling babies and bestowing affection on children to make them happier and more secure.5 Helicopter parenting came next, and these are the parents of today’s Millennials. Helicopter parents hover over their children, ready to swoop in if anything goes wrong.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Casey-PHOTOSusan Casey

Texas, USA

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Susan Casey is a Project Manager and Agile Coach at FedEx, with a passion for transforming traditional project teams into high-performing, self-organizing agile teams. She has seen first-hand how a more fluid, interactive, and creative environment appeals to employees in the 24-30 year age range. Susan encourages work environment changes, such as open and collaborative spaces, one-on-one sessions at Starbucks, and team meetings conducted outside under the trees on the FedEx campus. She holds brainstorming sessions at off-site locations to encourage a creative and fun environment for employees of all ages. Susan received her Bachelor’s degree from Florida State University, and is working on her Executive MBA degree at The Jack Welch Management Institute. She is a former Project Management Instructor at Southern Methodist University and Collin College in Dallas, Texas, and is a parent to three Millennial boys. Susan holds several PMI and Agile certifications, is a SAFe Program Consultant, and can be contacted at [email protected].

 

How Project Management Enables Businesses to either Fail or Succeed in the Modern Economy

SECOND EDITION

By Chad E. Tennesen

North Texas, USA


Abstract

The triple constraint of scope, schedule and cost provides a well-known framework project managers and leaders rely on every day to manage projects. Regrettably, overreliance on this also quietly breeds opportunities to erode business success. When this business erosion occurs and accumulates over time, it deteriorates a company’s competitiveness to a point where the company may die. It is therefore critical for company leadership and project managers alike to understand the pitfalls associated with a strict adherence to the triple constraint, both for managing projects as well as defining project success, and instead supplement those methods with timely and critical actions which are necessary to ensure vibrant and sustained success.

This paper in particular outlines several “traps” which look good on the surface but through which companies can squander resources by relying too heavily on scope, schedule and cost levers to control projects and measure project outcomes. Examples cite public and highly visible company successes and failures including Blockbuster vs. Netflix, MySpace vs. Facebook, etc. to reinforce the cost of missteps. Proposed actions are suggested for when a project manager feels their company and/or project is enabling a trap. Lastly, this paper also makes a case that beyond simply avoiding the pitfalls, project managers must employ improved risk management and prioritization efforts in conjunction with newer project management methodologies to produce efficiency and generate sustained success.

Introduction

Traditional methods and frameworks of modern project management, such as using the triple constraint of scope, schedule and quality to manage projects, formed the primary teachings of project management in the latter half of the 20th century. While still valid, I believe overreliance on this framework can cause negative consequences such as squandered resources and eventually, weakened competitiveness or even failure.

This paper describes three traps I’ve found which are associated with such an overreliance on the triple constraint framework and offers alternatives using newer methods of Project Management. In addition to avoiding these scenarios I also recommend leveraging risk management and prioritization efforts to further offset and mitigate any potential inefficiency and offer some suggestions on how to do that.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 9th annual University of Texas at Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2015. It is republished here with the permission of the authors and conference organizers.

 


 

About the Author

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Tennesen-PHOTOChad E. Tennesen

Texas, USA

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Chad E. Tennesen, MIM creates business solutions and leads technology teams to produce business results. While the majority of his career and project experience have been focused on developing or supporting software for Fortune 500 companies, he is currently a Board Member for Crider Health Center and Chairman of the Advisory Board for Headway Clubhouse. He helps each of these organizations improve their already strong records of patient outcomes, often by using technology. He has also led or contributed to projects which improved business competitiveness of apparel manufacturing, streamlined operations for a major department store chain, and supported mergers and acquisitions. Chad has a Masters in Information Management (MIM) Degree from Washington University in St. Louis and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Managerial Economics from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY.

Mr. Tennesen can be contacted at [email protected]

 

Management Science methods and methodologies for Project Management: What they model, how they model and why they model

FEATURED PAPER

By Dr. José Ramón San Cristóbal

University of Cantabri

Santander, Spain


Nowadays there is an enormous variety of methods, techniques and methodologies within the broad field of Management Science, all having very diverse characteristics and stemming from various paradigms based on different philosophical assumptions, and, to a lesser or greater extent, drawing on particular bodies of theory. Whilst this plenitude can enhance practice, it also poses problems for project managers who often tend to restrict themselves to one paradigm or even one methodology. The aim of this paper is to assist project managers in understanding both the implicit and explicit assumptions underlying management methods and their principal aims and purposes. Thus, project managers will be able to make a choice as to which methodology is more appropriate for a particular situation.

INTRODUCTION

Project management is anything but universal (Senhar 1998). For sixty years, organizations have increasingly been using projects and programs to achieve their strategic objectives (Bredillet et al 2015). Projects have traditionally been the prerogative of the engineering disciplines, but with the dynamics of business, project management has moved into business’ main street. Today project managers have gained recognition and employment opportunities beyond construction, aerospace and defense, in pharmaceuticals, information systems, and manufacturing. In this context, project managers must not be limited to a monitoring and reporting role at an implementation level. They must be involved at strategic levels with the possibility and authority to effectively influence the direction and course of a project. A good Project Manager must have the skills needed to make sound decisions, consistent with the global strategy of the project, taking into account, not only the relationships of the different actors involved in the project, but also the possible impact of his/her decisions on project performance.

The aim of this paper is to assist project managers in understanding both the implicit and explicit assumptions underlying management methods and their principal aims and purposes, in order to be able to make more informed and critical aware decisions. The paper begins by differentiating the terms methodology, method and technique. Next, the main management science methods classified according to three questions: what they model, how they model, and why they model, are presented. Finally, there is a concluding section with the main findings of the paper.

METHODOLOGY, METHOD AND TECHNIQUE

The terms methodology, method and technique can have several overlapping meanings. A methodology can be the general study of methods of research or intervention, or the particular methods used in a specific project, or a generic combination of methods that is commonly used as a whole. In other words, a methodology is a structured set of methods or techniques to assist project managers in undertaking research or action. Generally, a methodology will develop, either explicitly or implicitly, within a particular paradigm and will embody the philosophical assumptions and principles of the paradigm.

A method is a specific activity that has a clear and well-defined purpose within the context of a methodology. Examples of methods are developing a simulation model, a PERT network or the earned value management method. Methods may be complementary within a methodology if, for example, we combine together statistical analysis, building a simulation, and sensitivity analysis; or methods may also be substitutes. The relation between methodology and method can be seen as the relation between a what and a how (generally, each what has a number of possible hows). Whereas the methodology specifies what type of activities should be undertaken, the methods are particular ways of performing these activities. Finally, a technique is a tool that can be used to perform a particular method, for example a linear programming optimizer.

Although project managers, implicitly or explicitly, use these three concepts, it is only by reflecting on their relationships that helps to assess the scope of the management science method used. As Mingers (2003) states, one way of seeing the interconnection between these three concepts is to realize that the paradigm gives the philosophical support to the general question of why we act and intervene/no intervene in a particular way; a methodology sets out the guidelines on what activities need to be carried out in the intervention, and methods/techniques will describe how the activities are going to be carried out (Mingers 1997, Paucar-Cáceres 2010).

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE

Project Management is discussed both in management science and in operations research. Application of operations research and management science started more than half a century ago, although historically, operations research came first. The scope and ways in which management science, the application of scientific method to management, are conceived and used have changed enormously. Its methods and methodologies have been applied to a large variety of management situations. Management science is not only viewed as the application of classical operations research techniques. It is a recognized discipline that tackles a wider scope of managerial problems with a number of sophisticated approaches and has influenced the field of management and, at the same time, has been influenced by adjacent fields borrowing and adopting frameworks and models from other areas of management (Paucar-Cáceres 2010).

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About the Author

 

pmwj39-Oct2015-Cristobal-PHOTOJosé Ramón San Cristóbal

University of Cantabria
Santander, Spain

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Dr José Ramón San Cristóbal has been a teacher at the University of Cantabria, Spain, since 1998. He obtained his PhD in 2004 and leads the Project Management Research Group at the University of Cantabria. His area of work is management science/operations research applied to project management. His research has focused on fields such as investment criteria; linear and goal programming models; multi-criteria analysis; game theory; network models; etc. He has authored many papers and two books. Dr. San Cristobal can be contacted at [email protected]

 

 

Project Management Report from Milan

REPORT

Eni discovers the largest gas field in Mediterranean Sea; Finmeccanica awarded 7-8 billion euro project in Kuwait; Ariane 6-Vega C development; New high-speed Frecciarossa 1000 train; Expo, a mid-term report; October National Forum for Young Project Managers in Italy

By Luca Cavone

International Correspondent

Milan, Italy


INTRODUCTION

After the summer break we are back this month with a report full of interesting news.

Top contributions are mainly coming from the industrial sector: oil & gas, aerospace and transportation.

We open with one of the news that has been around the world in recent weeks. The discovery by Eni of the largest oil field ever found in the Mediterranean Sea.

Later we report about a couple of news stories from the aerospace industry, Alenia Aermacchi won an order of 7.8 billion in Kuwait and the contract signature of the new Ariane and Vega 6 C launchers.

The new Frecciarossa 1000, the futuristic train of Trenitalia entered in service in June, aimed to bridge the distance between Milan and Rome in 2 hours and 20 minutes. The entire order will be completed in 2017, with a total investment cost of 1.6 billion euro.

Finally, we will provide a mid-term report of Expo 2015. Enjoy the reading!

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About the Author

 

pmwj33-Apr2015-Cavone-PHOTOLuca Cavone

Milan, Italy

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Luca Cavone is a Consultant at JMAC Europe, the Consulting firm of the Japan Management Association. He is mainly focused to support companies in the governance of innovation projects and product development. He has a strong background and expertise in project management methodologies and business practices.

Before joining JMAC he had several years of experience in international projects within the aerospace industry. Together with the consulting activities he’s involved as a lecturer for masters and university courses on project management and innovation management. Since 2014 he’s Adjunct Professor in “Language and Communication Skills for Project Management“ in the Master’s in International Business & Economics degree program at the University of Pavia.

Since 2009 he has been member of the IPMA (International Project Management Association), for which he has held board positions both a national and international level. He’s regularly invited at international conferences to deliver speeches and workshops.

Luca joined the PMWJ in 2013 as an international correspondent in Italy; he can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Luca Cavone, visit the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/luca-cavone/

Interview with PMI Turkey Chapter President Metin Ornek

Project Management Update from Istanbul

By İpek Sahra Özgüler

International Correspondent

Istanbul, Turkey


After a beatiful summer, it is time to face the facts: the colder months have come, the schools have opened, the project management activities have been organized. In this month, two big events will be held in Turkey.

  • Project Management Summit 2015, Istanbul
  • Project Management Summit 2015, Ankara

Metin Örnek, president of PMI Turkey Chapter, answered questions about Project Management Summit 2015 and PMI Turkey Chapter.

Interview with PMI Turkey Chapter President Metin Ornek

Welcome to Mr. Ornek. I’m very pleased to talk with you about the coming event Project Management Summit 2015. What will be special in this year?

During this 2-day conference, top level managers, project managers, academics, scientists, leaders and solution providers will have the opportunity to share experiences, bring new ideas, debate issues, and introduce the latest developments in this largely multidisciplinary field.

Who has hosted the PM Summit 2015?

The conference will be held in Bosphorus University, Istanbul with their academic contribution, between 2-3 October 2015.

What is the topic of the PM Summit 2015 and how many people will be attended?

Main topic of the summit is “New trends in project management”; and the sub themes are Talent Management, Communication, Innovation, Technology, Methods, Entrepreneurship and Agile. Approximately 500 people will attend to summit.

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About the Author

 

141210-pmwj30-Ozguler-PHOTOİpek Sahra Özgüler

Istanbul, Turkey

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İpek Sahra Özgüler graduated from the Istanbul University with the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014. Ipek works as project portfolio manager at TAV IT Project Management Office. TAV IT is a core technology provider and systems integration company specialising in aviation. It delivers turn-key airport systems and infrastructure solutions for various parties at airports, including airport authorities, airlines and ground handling companies. Her main responsibility is to move the organization to the future by executing the organization’s strategy through portfolio management. Before joining TAV IT, she worked for global multinational companies and leading local companies such as Coca Cola, Deloitte, Turkcell Superonline and Havelsan. Over the years, she has gained extensive experience in managing various medium and large scale projects, programs and portfolios.

Her article named “When I Decided to Develop Multi Processing Project Manager’s System” published in the book “A Day in the Life of a Project Manager”. She has published several articles in the PM World Journal and one in PMI’s PM Network magazine. Ipek is actively involved in sailing, writing and discovering new cultures. She can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Ipek, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

ISO/TC 258, ISO Technical Committee for Project, Program, and Portfolio Management, convenes in Toronto, Canada

REPORT

By Jouko Vaskimo

Toronto, Canada and Helsinki, Finland


ISO/TC 258, the Technical Committee (TC) of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) set up to work with standards in the field of project, program, and portfolio management convened for the sixth plenary meeting at Toronto, Canada, on August 24th … 28th 2015. The participants – over 60 representing 19 national standardization agencies – were warmly welcomed by Mr George Jucan, the host of the Toronto event and the Head of the Canadian Delegation to ISO/TC 258, and Mr Miles Shepherd, the Chairman of ISO/TC 258. His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, The Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, and Mrs Kathleen Wynne, Prime Minister of Ontario conveyed their best wishes, welcoming ISO/TC 258 plenary participants.

pmwj39-Oct2015-Vaskimo- ISO PHOTO

ISO/TC 258 Toronto plenary meeting participants (photo courtesy Jouko Vaskimo)

Main ISO/TC 258 initiatives include Working Group WG2 developing an ISO standard on governance of projects, programs and portfolios, WG3 developing a vocabulary regarding projects, programs and portfolios, WG4 developing an ISO standard on program management, as well as Study Group SG5 investigating ISO 21500 maintenance.

At the time of the Toronto event ISO/TC 258 had 36 participating (P) members, 11 observing (O) members, and 16 liaisons.

Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Korea Republic, Luxembourg, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and United States are currently P – members of ISO/TC 258.

Belarus, Belgium, Czech Republic, Egypt, Hungary, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Lithuania, New Zealand, and Uganda are currently O – members of ISO/TC 258.

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About the Author

 

pmwj28-nov2014-Vaskimo-PHOTOJouko Vaskimo

Helsinki, Finland

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Jouko Vaskimo works as Development Manager at Aalto PRO, the Professional Development unit of Aalto University in Espoo, Finland. He is also an International Correspondent and Editorial Advisor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992. Since then he has held project management related assignments with increasing levels for responsibility at Sinebrychoff Ltd, the oldest brewery in Scandinavia; Kemira Engineering Ltd, the leading chemicals manufacturer Finland; DNA Finland Ltd, a large Finnish mobile phone operator; Nokia Business Infrastructure; and Ixonos PLC, one of the leading Finnish ICT consultancies. Jouko holds the IPMA Level C (Project Manager) and Level B (Senior Project Manager) certificates. He is a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter. He received the PMP certificate in 2003. Since October 2007, Jouko has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258. Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at jouko.vaskimo“at”aalto.fi .

To view other works by this author, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

Project Management Events in Argentina during September, October & November 2015

REPORT

Project Management Update from Buenos Aires

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Corresponden

Buenos Aires, Argentina


By the end of the year 2015, the activity of PMI Argentina chapters strongly increases.

Along the months of September, October and November, in different regions of the country are held major international events.

On September 4th in La Plata, it was developed the “Argentina Congress of Project Management”, organized by the PMI Buenos Aires Chapter, with the participation of leaders of PMI throughout the country.

The event started with the presentation of the Community Leader of La Plata, Lic. Marcelo Martin.

Later on, Eng. Gustavo Flouret made a presentation on “Strategic Management in organizations” and Lic. Alejandro Gabay spoke on “Risk Management in Agile”, leading after that to a dissertation on “Maps capabilities and Enterprise Architecture” by Eng. Alejandro Bianchi.

The day ended with a presentation about “Great Conversations Coaching” by Martin Alaimo.

On September 16th, in the city of Buenos Aires, took place the conference on “Analysis of the business during the project life cycle” given by Ignacio Urteaga and Carlos Mari, and on September 24th in the City of Rosario, Province of Santa Fe, it was held the seventh edition of the “Rosario Conference of Project Management” with the presence of a great level of speakers and an audience that exceeds expectations year after year.

More…

To read entire report click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

 

Cpmwj33-Apr2015-Boggi-PHOTOECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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 Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector. Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012. Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016. Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia.

She can be contacted at [email protected] and http://www.activepmo.com/

To view other works by Cecilia Boggi, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/cecilia-boggi/.

 

Proactive PMI Madrid Chapter & Interview with AEDIP President Jordi Seguró

REPORT

Project Management in Spain – monthly report

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain


PMI Madrid Chapter as proactive as usual

The PMI Madrid Chapter started their operations as a Chapter in October 2003. From then, this Chapter has been growing up more and more each year. Their growth has not been only in membership but their member’ services. After our summer period we need to welcome the new Chapter members this month.  On September 26th, the PMI Madrid Chapter counts on 1.633 members. First of all I am focused on the Chapter membership number, to point out the fact that PMI Madrid Chapter will close September month with a new historic number of affiliates. After overpassing the number of 1.600 members, three months later the Chapter experienced a light decrease, then to grow up again by the end of August this year.

Regarding Spain, having more than 6.500 members from last May, our country is keeping the ranking number 9 regarding the rest of EMEA countries; and from February 2015, after overpassing the United Kingdom, is, with more than 8.400 certifications, in the ranking 11th from countries with the major number of PMP certificates. Regarding PMI worldwide, since July 2015 PMI has more than 465.000 members and has 665.000 PMPs certified over the world.

As previous years, even when summer time mean san interruption in the Chapter activities, it is not regarding Chapter Board development activities. Furthermore, these last two months have been particular productive from the point of view of institutional Chapter relationships. Then, the Chapter announced last July about a collaboration agreement with Santa Cruz de Bolivia Chapter, from then we have incorporated two new collaboration agreements with Asunción (Paraguay) PMI Chapter and Caja Marca (Perú) PMI Chapter. Those collaboration agreements lead to the reciprocity in opportunities and benefits to the membership of the Chapters included in that agreement. In that way, these collaboration agreements join the current agreements with Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and Buenos Aires Chapter, and Montevideo Chapter.

PMI Madrid Chapter is working now in two events that will happen on November, and that we hope will count on a broad participation and repercussion in PMI. On one hand, the weekend of November 13, 14 and 15th, will happen in Madrid the annual event called “Leadership Institute Meeting (LIM)” organized by PMI where, for this occasion, the PMI Madrid Chapter has been chosen as a host Chapter. Taking advantage of the attendance from PMI delegates to the LIM, on Thursday evening November 12th, the Chapter will celebrate their Annual PM Congress.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 


 

About the Author

 

A_BUCERO_2014_mayAlfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor
International Correspondent – Spain

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Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting. Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group). He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011. Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/