SPONSORS

SPONSORS

IPMA Education and Training Series: Collaboration between IPMA National Associations and Academic Organizations

SERIES ARTICLE

By Ed Naughton and John Vickery

Dublin, Ireland
________________________________________________________________________

This paper presents a case study of the collaboration between an IPMA® member association and domestic academic institutions. The specific collaboration models have proved to be particularly successful. The Institute of Project Management in Ireland is the IPMA® member association with responsibility for the administration of the IPMA® 4 level certification system.

Approximately 3,500 IPMA® Certified Professionals are currently registered in Ireland and the numbers continue to grow strongly each year.

Since 1993 the Institute has worked closely with the Department of Management and Marketing University College Cork (UCC). They combine the proven project management pragmatism and international reputation of the Institute with the academic expertise of the Department of Management and Marketing UCC. UCC awarded an honorary master’s degree in 2011 to the Institute’s Director General Mr. Ed Naughton in recognition for his contribution to project management development.

In 2014 the Institute also entered into a significant collaboration agreement with the Institute of Technology Tallaght (ITT) – the sole higher education institution in South Dublin County with approximately 5000 students which provides programmes from Level 6 to Level 10 on the National Framework of Qualifications. This article concentrates on this recent agreement.

The authors recognise that this model will not necessarily be suitable to all project management professional bodies/member associations that operate within their own unique contexts. However, they also believe that much can be gained from a closer scrutiny of the lessons learnt in this case.

A key component of ITT’s strategy is that it must continue to engage and strengthen its partnerships with other higher education institutions nationally and internationally and must develop inter-institutional strategic alliances to deliver on its mission and to ensure that it remains a key provider of relevant higher education to the region. To this extent, it has collaborative agreements nationally, with universities in the EU, Brazil, Vietnam and China. ITT acknowledges the important role that academic collaboration has in achieving aspects of its mission that relates to serving its communities, promoting lifelong learning and being an outward looking institution. It is a key aspect of its academic strategy and recognises the benefits of collaborations, both to the institute and to its students.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles is by members of the IPMA Education and Training (E&T) Board or other IPMA leaders on the subject of project management education, training, careers and related topics. More information about the IPMA E&T can be found at http://ipma.ch/education.

About the Authors

pmwj30-Jan2015-Naughton-AUTHOR1 VICKERYJohn Vickery flag-ireland

Institute of Technology Tallaght

Dublin County, Ireland

John Vickery is a Fellow of The Institution of Mechanical Engineers (UK) and also a Fellow of The Institution of Engineers of Ireland. He was formerly Head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and is now Registrar at the Institute of Technology Tallaght. He has extensive experience in quality systems and project management and has managed a number of EU funded projects. He has over 10 year’s industrial experience in the areas of manufacturing, quality, maintenance and management and is currently a member of the IPMA® Education and Training Board.

pmwj17-dec2013-naughton-AUTHOR IMAGEEd Naughton flag-ireland

Institute of Project Management

Dublin, Ireland

Ed Naughton, BE, C. Eng., F.I.E.I, FIPMA, IPMA-a, PMP, is the founder and Director General of the Institute of Project Management of Ireland, the leading authority on the PM profession in Ireland. On the international front, Ed was responsible for initiating cooperation agreements with both the PMI (Project Management Institute) USA and the IPMA (International Project Management Association). He is Ireland’s representative on the IPMA council of delegates, and a former Vice President-Marketing for the IPMA. He was also the first PMP registered in Ireland. Ed has researched, published and presented many articles and papers on project management and is the author of the Irish Project Management Competence Baseline. During his thirty year career, Ed has worked as a project manager and/or project management consultant on a large variety of high profile domestic and international assignments. Ed Naughton is a graduate of University College Dublin (BE, civil), a Fellow of the Institute of Engineers of Ireland, a Chartered Engineer (Ireland), a Professional Engineer in Canada, and holds an IPMA Level A certification. He is former founder and editor of the quarterly international publication “Project Management Practice”. One of Ireland’s most respected experts on the topic of modern project management, Ed is an executive advisor to PM World in Ireland. Ed Naughton was named a Fellow of IPMA in 2013. Ed lives in Dublin and can be contacted at [email protected].

The New Face of Project Management: Are Specialized PMOs and Mobile Tech the Future?

COMMENTARY 

By Mike Sicilia

Senior Vice President and General Manager

Primavera Global Business Unit, Oracle

USA
________________________________________________________________________

The face of project management is changing. Economic fluctuation, evolving risk, and increasingly stringent regulations are creating new challenges for project managers. To meet these challenges and ensure the success of diverse projects across the enterprise, organizations must consider new and innovative methodologies and approaches that can inject innovation into processes.

Illuminating these realities, Oracle recently brought together a group of business leaders who revealed insight into two evolving areas: the role of project management offices (PMOs) and the increasing real-time reach of mobile technology. The Enterprise Project Portfolio Management (EPPM) Board – a steering group of senior executives, academics, and industry experts that looks at how C-level executives can successfully prioritize and manage the project portfolio – raised questions over the long-term value of PMOs and the way mobile technology can transform project management.

Specialized PMOs for Successful EPPM 

Traditional companies have generally accepted that to visualize and deliver large projects, it is best to have a PMO. However, one of the primary challenges facing many larger organizations is a fundamental disconnect that can emerge between project managers and the rest of the business. The EPPM Board was unanimous in its view that, while PMOs are staffed by professionals who are extremely knowledgeable about their discipline, as a group they tended to lack a detailed understanding of exactly how their organizations made money. Simply stated, they had little visibility into the business fundamentals behind a decision to launch a project. And, with that being the case, they were not always viewed as guarantors of strategic and financial project success.

EPPM Board members indicated that PMOs are more successful in “traditional” companies, such as those working on capital projects. However, in more “agile” companies, such as those operating in software development or new media, the group concluded that PMOs did not perform as well. The collective opinion was that these agile companies may prioritize more rapid technological innovation over rigorous EPPM methodologies.

As such, rather than employing a centralized PMO, the EPPM Board members are asserting that some organizations might be better served by a decentralized approach that places project managers/standardization experts within business units, operating as “specialized” PMOs. This approach enables each business unit to look at the risks and rationale behind a project, make comparisons to similar programs, and make decisions that are the best fit for their particular group. Each specialized PMO team can also ensure each project matches the wider corporate strategy before the primary PMO takes action. 

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author 

pmwj30-Jan2015-Sicilia-PHOTOMike Siciliaflag-usa

Senior Vice President and General Manager

Primavera Global Business Unit, Oracle

Mike Sicilia leads Oracle’s Primavera global business unit, which was formed when Oracle acquired Primavera Systems, Inc. in 2008. The business unit focuses on enterprise project portfolio management solutions for project-intensive industries.

Sicilia was named senior vice president and general manager of the Primavera global business unit in 2011. Prior to joining Oracle, he had been at Primavera Systems since 1993, where he started as a programmer, was promoted to director of technical services in the professional services organization, and eventually was named Chief Technology Officer in 2006.

With experience on both the development and services sides of enterprise project portfolio management solutions, Sicilia has a deep knowledge of the needs of project-intensive organizations and how Primavera products and complementary solutions address those needs.

For information about Oracle Primavera, please contact [email protected].

 

Project Management Update from Chile

REPORT 

By Jaime Videla

International Correspondent

Santiago, Chile
________________________________________________________________________

PMI Santiago Chile Chapter

Interview with Hermann Noll, President of PMI Santiago Chile Chapter (year 2014)

Question: Could you tell us your views and experience leading the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter institution? (hereinafter PMI)

Answer: The experience of being in charge and leading an institution that contributes to the growth and development is something full of satisfaction and pride. In this sense I think this is shared by the great human group, nearly 30 volunteer professionals, who have made it possible to achieve that feeling: we provide. It’s a feeling where you stay gratified.

In that sense, one of the great experiences is our tasks ahead, with a group of volunteers’ peers who, from their different perspectives, are generating goals in an atmosphere of complete confidence.

I think personally, it’s an invaluable experience that not only helps you grow professionally, but also contributes to improving communication skills and respect for others.

Q: A month ago was held the 2014 version Tour Cono Sur. It fulfilled the goals? Which plans are for the future?

A: Indeed, we are satisfied with our 2014 Tour, which managed to discuss issues to develop a program that is entering its fourth year. Having a central theme, with top exhibitors in relation to the topics has enabled us to offer a quality event.

That year the event was extended to two days in Santiago and one day in Antofagasta and Concepcion.

The subject line was on innovation, where we find two important issues for our profession: first, innovative projects have very characteristic adjustments due to the conditions of innovation and the application of research that we believe should be known by our colleagues, and second the same innovation by incorporating methodologies and tools that contribute to management and project management. This second point sometimes complicates the understanding of investors who appreciate them as a substitute for the management and administration of projects based on global standards. 

More…

To read entire report, click here

About the Author 

jaime-videlaJAIME VIDELA flag-chile

Santiago, Chile

Jaime Videla, PMP, is the Managing Director for Videla Montero Consultores a project management consultant firm based in Santiago, Chile. He is also senior partner of AccuFast! Cubicaciones, a company provides material takeoff estimating services and engineering projects in Chile. Mr. Videla has 20+ years of project management experience leading utilities, mining and industrial projects (totaling US$222 millions) for large multinational companies like Siemens and ABB, or as a consultant for BHP and Anglo American. Jaime is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 2007, has formal studies in Civil Engineering from Universidad de Chile. He has professional experience working/training in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Germany.

Since 2006 Jaime has been an active member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), assuming the role of director and vice president of communications and publicity for the PMI Santiago Chile Chapter in 2010. His areas of activity today include PMO development; contracting, claim, risk and project management services; project management training and coaching. Author of the e-book “Los 7 pasos para salvar un proyecto (The 7 steps to project recovery)”, he also writes about project management themes on PMOChile blog. In addition, he works as volunteer at Fundación Trascender, an innovative institution that manages a network of volunteer professionals through social projects. Jaime Videla is fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish, lives in Santiago and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Jaime Videla, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jaime-videla-pmp/

Guiding Principles: Commitment to ethics and values can empower leaders of teams, projects, programs and organizations

SECOND EDITION                                                         

David L. Pells

Managing Editor

PM World Journal

Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

Over the last ten years, I have been a party to numerous discussions about professional ethics, rules of behavior, governance and related aspects of program and project management. One lengthy exchange was related to the need for a sort of Hippocratic Oath for project management like that embraced by the medical profession, a “do no harm” sort of statement or commitment.

Many large organizations have published codes of ethics, rules of behavior, philosophical principles, statements of purpose and commitments to good public citizenship. Professional societies publish professional codes of ethics and professional standards of behavior. For example, the Project Management Institute (PMI®) has published a “Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct” that members and those who seek the project management professional (PMP®) certification must agree to.[1] But these are not enough, in my opinion. All program, project and team leaders should think about his or her core values and how they can help both simplify decisions and lead to more successful results.

It is time to raise the level of awareness and discussion on the subject of principled behavior in the project management world, for organizations, managers and teams of professionals. I think it’s time for more leaders, managers and professionals in the project management field to understand and embrace ethical standards, to commit to working on programs and projects that benefit people, and to act in honest, professional and responsible ways. So this month, I want to suggest some guiding principles for managers of programs and projects.

Organizational codes of ethics and professional standards of behavior

Just to clarify some points, most public corporations and many other organizations publish codes of ethics, standards of behavior and other guidelines for employees and contractors. A good discussion of this topic can be found at ethicsweb.ca. [2] That website also offers some good reasons for having a code of ethics [3], guidelines for developing a code of ethics [4], and examples of corporate codes [5]. There are many other examples on the web. For example, I studied those of Texas Instruments,[6] Halliburton,[7] Coca Cola,[8] AT&T, [9] Google, [10] and several other large US corporations. I especially like Google’s overriding principle of “don’t do evil.”

Professional standards are similar to organizational codes of conduct, but are more directly aimed at personal behavior. Some good examples are the Society of Professional Journalists [11], Institute for the Certification of Computing Professionals [12], and International Association of Business Communicators [13]. In addition to PMI, other project management professional associations with published codes of ethics include the Australian Institute of Project Management [14] and Association for Project Management in the UK [15].

The above references to organizational codes of ethics and professional codes of conduct are mentioned to provide background and contextual information. These types of codes are important for a wide variety of reasons, for guiding employee and professional behavior, to provide ethical standards, to reduce risks and to ensure compliance with laws and regulations. However, they often cover many topics, are difficult to remember in detail and often contain requirements for which compliance may be difficult to prove or even demonstrate. This paper suggests that everyone needs a simple set of guiding principles that reflect core values, that are general in nature, and that can be easily remembered and communicated.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally published as an editorial in the January 2012 edition of the PM World Today eJournal. It is republished here with the author’s permission.

About the Author 

david-pellsDavid L. Pellsflag-usa

Managing Editor, PM World Journal

Managing Director, PM World Library

Addison, Texas, USA

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, science, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until December 2011, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PMForum.org website and the PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for governmental and industrial organizations on major programs. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

PMO Framework and PMO Models for Project Business Management

SECOND EDITION                                                         

Darrel G. Hubbard, PE, President

D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC 

and 

Dennis L. Bolles, PMP, President

DLB Associates, LLC

USA
________________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACT

The Project Management Institute (PMI®) in the introduction to its Pulse of the Profession: PMO Frameworks (PMI 2013d) stated: “… discoveries from this exploratory work [2012] was that many [executives and practitioners] are challenged with some of the most basic no­tions about a “PMO:” What do the letters stand for? What kinds of PMOs exist? What are the functions of the various types? Who do PMOs support? Surprisingly, the very same questions existed at all levels of management, from executive level leaders in charge of entire global organizational project and project-program management operations to line managers in charge of operating the single function, departmental, or divisional PMO.”

In our work, we also include the following business management related questions asked by senior business executives: What makes a PMO sustainable? How does a PMO deliver busi­ness benefit and value? What is, and is not, a PMO? Why does the position of the PMO with­in the enterprise matter? How do PMOs relate to the operational side of the business? What are the major steps in establishing a PMO? Is there a standard or guideline for a PMO or its structure? Does the title of the PMO matter? What is a business-oriented framework for PMOs? What PMO Models would create a business-oriented organizational function?

Beginning in 1997, we began researching and publishing answers to groups of those ques­tions. This paper provides an overview of a project business management PMO Framework and PMO Models useable within most enterprises and a related analysis that provides an­swers to those questions from a business management perspective (Bolles & Hubbard 2007a & b, 2008, 2009, 2012, & 2014) (Hubbard & Bolles 2012 & 2013). The PMO framework and associated models presented are based upon our ongoing research on case studies and models for project/project-program/project-portfolio organizations (PMOs) and the application of enterprise-wide project business management to generate enterprise business value and bene­fits.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright. This paper was originally presented at the 8th Annual UT Dallas Project Management Symposium in Richardson, Texas, USA in August 2014. A second updated version of the paper was also presented at the Project Management Institute’s 2014 North American Global Congress in Phoenix, Arizona, USA in October 2014. This further updated version is republished here with the permission of the authors and the UT Dallas PM Symposium organizers. For more about the annual UT Dallas PM Symposium, click here.

About the Authors

dennis bollesDennis L. Bolles, PMP flag-usa

Michigan, USA 

Dennis Bolles, PMP, President – DLB Associates, LLC, has over forty-five years of experience in multiple industries providing business and project management professional services. He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their business strategic objectives with the analysis of their business process improvement needs and development of business and project management capabilities.

He has been a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI) since 1985, received his PMP® certification in 1986 (#81), and is a founding member of the PMI Western Michigan Chapter, serving on its Board of Directors and in several positions since its 1993 inception.

Bolles performs speaking engagements and assists Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) start-up teams begin the planning and implementation processes; conducts on-site organizational project management capability assessments; provides virtual and periodic on-site support for development of business and project management methodologies, policies, procedures, processes. systems, tools, and templates for organizational governance and corporate strategy; assists in the implementation of a project business management methodology that integrates strategic planning, business objective development, portfolio management, program management, and project management processes to achieve strategic objectives and maximize operational efficiency enterprise-wide through the development and management of Project Management Organizations.

Bolles served as a member of the PMI Virtual Community of Practice Advisory Group (VCAG) advising the Manager of Community Development on future program enhancements and initiatives that would increase the value of PMI’s Communities of Practice and further develop their leadership to mature their communities. He was the PMI Standards Project Manager who led the project core team to a successful completion and on-time delivery of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition in 2004. He has served on and has contributed to multiple PMI Standards bodies over the past 20 years.

He is a published author of many project management articles, is a PMI Congress/ Symposium/Chapter speaker, and author of Building Project Management Centers of Excellence, AMACOM, NY, 2002. He is the co-editor of The PMOSIG Program Management Office Handbook, JRoss, 2010. He is the co-author with Darrel G. Hubbard of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of En­terprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts, PBMconcepts, MI, 2012.

He can be contacted at [email protected] and at LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/dlballc01. Visit the PBMconcepts website at www.PBMconcepts.com for information about current and future book projects.

darrel g hubbardDarrel G. Hubbard, P.E.flag-usa

California, USA

Darrel G. Hubbard is President of D.G.Hubbard Enterprises, LLC providing executive consulting and assessment services. He has over 50 years of experience in consulting, line management, and technical positions. He has served as a corporate executive officer; managed the due diligence processes for numerous mergers and acquisitions; managed information technology, proposal, accounting, and project control organizations; was a program manager on engineering projects; was a project manager on commercial projects; and a designated “key person” under government contracts. He has also held executive positions in, and was professionally licensed in, the securities and insurance industries.

He assists organizations, as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their en-terprise’s strategic business and tactical objectives. He provides analysis of their man-agement structures, business processes, general business operations, and project man-agement capabilities, while supplying specific recommendations on business, methodology, and process improvements. Mr. Hubbard also assists companies, as an out-side third party, with the intricacies of the due diligence process in their merger and acquisition activities. He also supports companies in the managerial development and establishment of their Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) and provides work­shops and seminars focusing on the business management aspects of project management.

Mr. Hubbard holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics with a minor in chemistry from Minnesota State University at Moorhead. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Control Systems in California. Mr. Hubbard joined the Project Management Institute (PMI) in 1978 (#3662), is a charter member of the PMI San Diego Chapter, and was deputy project manager for the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition ANSI Standard by PMI. He was the Exhibitor Chairperson for the 1993 PMI North American Congress/Seminar/Symposium, is a published author of many articles, a presenter at several PMI Congresses and other Project Management Symposiums, and a guest speaker at PMI and IIBA Chapter meetings. Darrel is also a Life-Member of the International Society of Automation (ISA).

He is a contributing author to The AMA Handbook of Project Management, AMACOM, 1993 and The ABCs of DPC: A Primer on Design-Procurement-Construction for the Project Manager, PMI, 1997. He is the co-author with Dennis L. Bolles of The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management: Introducing a Business Management Model Integrating and Harmonizing Operations Business Management and Project Management, hardcover – AMACOM, NY, 2007, now in paperback, revised, and retitled The Power of Enterprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management – PBMconcepts, MI, 2014, and of A Compendium of PMO Case Studies: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – PBMconcepts, MI, 2012.

He can be contacted at [email protected] and LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/DarrelGHubbard. Visit the PBMconcepts website at www.PBMconcepts.com for information about current and future book projects.

Welcome to the January 2015 Edition of the PM World Journal

David Pells,

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the January 2015 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ). This 30th edition of the Journal is another full issue, containing 28 articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 34 different authors in 13 different countries. An additional 35+ news articles about projects and project management around the world are included. More than 20 countries are again represented by authors or subjects this month. The primary mission of the journal is to support the sharing of knowledge and information related to program and project management (P/PM), so please share this month’s edition with others in your network.

Invitation to Share Knowledge

We invite you to share your knowledge and experience (and stories) related to program and project management. A wide variety of articles and papers, case studies and reports, book reviews and news stories are included in the PMWJ each month. Share knowledge and gain visibility for you and your organization; publish an article, paper or story in the PMWJ. See our Call for Papers in the news section of the PMWJ this month; if interested in submitting something for publication, check out the Author Guidelines on www.pmworldjournal.net, just email your original work to [email protected].

This month in the Journal

We begin this month with two Letters to the Editor. Russ Archibald in Mexico has commented on Bob Prieto’s December paper on infrastructure challenges. Martin Price in the UK has reacted to Alan Stretton’s first series article in December on the topic of project successes and failures. If you have a reaction to something in this month’s journal, please send an email for publication next month. Let’s see if others agree.

5 Featured Papers by authors in five different countries are included this month. Professors Vladimir Voropajev and Yan Gelrud, with co-author Oxana Klimenko, all based in Russia, have returned with another scientific paper titled “Project Management Mathematical Models for Sales Department of the Organizaiton (on the example from construction industry)”. Bob Prieto in the USA is back with another important paper on “Challenges of Dealing with Uncertainty.” Dr. Paul Giammalvo in Jakarta has authored an update to his previous research on certifications in “Project Management Certifications Benchmarking Research: 2015 Update.” Satya Narayan Dash in India has authored a new paper titled “PMBOK Guide (5th Edition) and Oracle Primavera P6 – a Practical Step-by-Step Approach for Time Management.” Stanislaw Gasik in Poland is the author of “An Analysis of Knowledge Management in PMBOK® Guide.” Featured Papers are serious, research-based contributions to the literature and field of professional P/PM.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author 

david-pellsDAVID PELLSflag-usa

Managing Editor, PMWJ

Managing Director, PMWL

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal (www.pmworldjournal.net) and Managing Director of the PM World Library (www.pmworldlibrary.net). David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including energy, engineering, construction, defense, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice. He was founder and chair of the Global Project Management Forum (1995-2000), an annual meeting of leaders of PM associations from around the world. David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award, PMI’s highest honor, in 1999. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association SOVNET. From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PMForum.org website and PM World Today eJournal. He occasionally provides high level advisory services for major programs and global organizations. David has published widely, spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by David Pells, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/david-l-pells/

Project Management Report from Belo Horizonte

REPORT

A Year of Projects and Non-Projects

By Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto

International Correspondent

Minas Gerais, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

2014 was for Brazil and Minas Gerais State a busy and eventful year, but do not let nostalgia.

It was the year of the FIFA World Cup and elections for president, senators, congressmen, governors and state legislators.

The World Cup has confirmed that the government Project Management in Brazil can`t achieve deadlines, costs, quality, and is not even able to do a good risk management. But, it is very good in communications (only positive agenda) and acquisitions with over pricing. Many of the projects planned to be working during the World Cup so far are not concluded yet. Only in Belo Horizonte can cite the BRT and the International Airport. In the other 11 host cities the situation is not much different.

Interestingly, some private projects such as new hotels also failed to achieve their goals, which shows that the problem is bigger than it looks.

Of course, the fact that the Brazilian national soccer team have missed the tournament, and in a shameful way, also contributed to a certain malaise, which will last for a long time. And the great defeat, it was precisely in Belo Horizonte, when Germany won in a terrible, crippling and historic 7-1.

The elections, held in a very low and very dirty level of debates, confirmed at the national level the Workers’ Party for four more years, which in the end will total at least 16 years of power. In Minas Gerais, the same Workers’ Party left 12 years of opposition back to win the Palace of Liberty. This combination (the same party governing Brazil and Minas Gerais) should favor the State. It is expected that the federal government will invest in Minas Gerais all it failed to do so in the last three opposition mandates.

Thus, it is expected that in Minas Gerais will occur many road, BRT, subway, sanitation, electricity, housing and environmental projects, boosting the state economy and creating opportunities for Project Managers and helping the dissemination and consolidation of Project Management as a way to obtain success and the best use of public money. However, such projects need to be much better managed than the World Cup ones.

More…

To read entire report, click here

About the Author

Manuel-Carvalho-da-Silva-NetoManuel Carvalho da Silva Neto flag-brazil

Minas Gerais, Brazil 

Manuel Carvalho da Silva Neto, MSc, Mech. Engineer and PMP is Fundação Dom Cabral Invited Professor and also Consultant. He is a seasoned professional with over 40 years of experience in Project Management, Process Management and Strategy. Manuel has managed or participated in more than three hundred huge projects across different fields including Steel, Mining, IT, Telecom, Food Processing, Government and Construction, to mention a few. He worked also in projects to implement PMO (Project Management Office) and Project Management Methodology. He has also strong skills in Leading People and Finance. He served as Minas Gerais State Undersecretary for Planning and Budget, from 2007 to 2008. Manuel can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by this author, visit the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/manuel-carvalho-da-silva-neto/

Project Management Update from Milan

REPORT 

Project Management in Italy in 2014

By Luca Cavone

International Correspondent 

Milan, Italy
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

Every year this period is a crossroads that allows us to look back at the last twelve months and at the same time to have a first look at the future of the year that is about to begin.

In this report we will go through the main initiatives in the field of projects along 2014, in a collection of the most significant articles that have accompanied us throughout the year, including the most recent events that took place in November and December.

While waiting to begin the new year with the first initiatives from January that we will report the next issues, I take here the opportunity to wish all the best to our readers for a new year full of success for both professional and personal projects!!!

DECEMBER – 2014 IPMA Italy Annual Conference

On December 10th, IPMA Italy hold in Milan its 2014 National Conference dealing with the main Italian initiative for the new year: EXPO 2015, the International Exhibition will take place for six month in Milan starting from May till October 2015.

The title of the event was: “Italy Protagonist in Project Management: EXPO 2015 a case of Global Program Management & IPMA Excellence Award.”

The conference allowed participants to reflect on the many opportunities that EXPO 2015 is for our country: international visibility, promotion of Made in Italy, new business opportunities and also initiatives and projects from the social aspect.

The narrative of this journey was made directly by the protagonists who daily work for the organization of the event: the focus was then on the management skills that the multiple challenges of such an event requires.

Among the many opportunities, for those working in business projects, Expo is also a great gym for program, portfolio and project management.

Within the participants, many professionals in the field of Project Management attended this unique opportunity for discussion and enrichment. 

More…

To read entire report, click here

About the Author                                                        

130923-cavone-150X184Luca Cavone flag-italy

Milan, Italy

Luca Cavone is a Consultant at JMAC Europe, the Consulting firm of the Japan Management Association. He is mainly focused to support companies in Innovation Management and Product Development Projects typical of R&D and Marketing areas, with an interdisciplinary background of the business processes. In JMAC Luca follows also the study and development of project management methodologies based on the application of Lean Thinking approach. Before joining JMAC he worked several years in the Aerospace industry.  Since 2009 Luca has been actively involved with the International Project Management Association (IPMA); at that time he was between the founders of the Young Crew Italy and was appointed as first chairman. In 2011 he left the position to join the Young Crew Management Board, where he’s currently Head of Membership and Responsible for the Young Project Manager of the Year award. Since 2010 Luca is also a member of the Executive Board of IPMA Italy. Luca is an international correspondent for PM World in Italy; he can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Luca Cavone, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/luca-cavone/.

An Analysis of Knowledge Management in PMBOK® Guide

FEATURED PAPER

Stanisław Gasik, PhD

Vistula University,

Warsaw, Poland
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

PMBOK® Guide, as the very title of this book says, contains the basic, canonical knowledge pertaining to project management. This document may be analyzed from many points of view. The most important is its usefulness for the project management community – practitioners as well as methodologists. But PMBOK ® Guide’s approach to knowledge is also worth analyzing, all the more as the time for developing the new edition of PMBOK® Guide is getting closer. This paper is devoted exclusively to the subject of knowledge management in PMBOK® Guide.

In the first chapter I analyze the very concept of knowledge in PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition – how it is defined. After that I analyze PMBOK® Guide project management activities. And I conclude with suggestions about the approach to knowledge management in future editions of PMBOK® Guide.

What is knowledge?

There is no explicit definition of the concept of knowledge in PMBOK® Guide. This is probably the biggest shortcoming of PMBOK® Guide in this area, the cause of most of the other mistakes, errors and inconsistencies. You cannot apply any concept correctly when you do not know what it is. In some places in PMBOK® Guide (like section 3.8 Project Information; see below) you may get the impression that their authors were afraid of defining knowledge precisely. But there are some statements which suggest the meaning that this concept has there.

Knowledge is not related to project information

There are sections that are new to PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition: 3.8 Project Information and X1.5 describing the well known DIKW (Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom) hierarchy in the project environment. PMBOK® Guide defines what work performance data and work performance information are, but instead of defining the third level of this hierarchy – knowledge – it suddenly defines “work performance reports”. So probably just these reports contain knowledge. Yes, the description of work performance reports (“information (…) intended to generate decisions or raise issues, actions or awareness”) reminds one of some definitions of knowledge, such as that knowledge is “the application and productive use of information” (Davis, Botkin, 1994). But we must note that, according to PMBOK® Guide, the third level of DIKW, originally intended for knowledge, has only “physical or electronic representation”. So there may be no knowledge residing in human brains, according to PMBOK® Guide (!). Another obvious weakness of this modification of the DIKW hierarchy is neglect of the fact that knowledge needed for project execution does not have to be created in a particular project. There are plenty of sources of external knowledge: written, stored in repositories, brought into projects by their team members, without which execution of any project would be simply impossible.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author 

pmwj24-jul2014-Gasik-AUTHOR IMAGEStanislaw Gasik, PhD, PMPflag-poland

Warsaw, Poland

Dr. Stanisław Gasik, PMP is an adjunct professor at Vistula University in Warsaw, Poland. He holds M. Sc. in mathematics and Ph. D. in organization sciences (with specialty on project management), both from University of Warsaw. Stanisław has over 20 years of experience in project management, consulting, teaching and implementing PM organizational solutions. He has lectured at global PMI and IPMA congresses and other conferences. He was a significant contributor to PMI’s PMBOK® Guide and PMI Standard for Program Management and contributed to other PMI standards. His professional and research interests include public projects, portfolio management, project management maturity, and project knowledge management. He may be contacted at [email protected].

Trends in Real-Time Strategic Execution

COMMENTARY 

By Tim Wasserman

California, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Real-time isn’t a trend; it’s a reality. No matter how fast – or slow – a business is able to respond to change, the rate of change and the required speed to respond are constantly accelerating. While many businesses have to push hard to keep up, some high-performing businesses have distinguished themselves as real-time response leaders by:

  • Shifting their perspective towards the future
  • Improving their strategy and execution balance
  • Aligning their structure and culture to engage their teams
  • Emphasizing an enterprise perspective
  • Developing and applying a flexible, process enabling framework to guide decisions

A Perspective Shift

While most businesses use current and historic data to forecast future performance and thereby guide decisions about how to invest time and resources; high performers also take into consideration factors that could occur in the future and how those factors might affect forecasts. These companies know that uncertainty is best managed by seeking insight and preparing for a range of potential outcomes.

As Columbia University Professor Rita Gunther McGrath said, “Leading indicators belong in every company’s strategic tool kit.” For some, like a window manufacturer tracking new building permits, it can be relatively straight-forward. For others, like a PC manufacturer looking at survey data predicting CIO budgets, it can be more complicated.

High performance businesses look at these obvious leading indicators, but they also go a step further and scan the horizon for disruptions to the marketplace that could impede their success or open new opportunities for growth and revenue.

North American railroads failed to adequately predict the disruption that the fracking boom has caused to rail cargo. As a result railroads will leave money on the table in 2015 because they don’t have enough equipment to meet demand, despite indicators almost a decade ago of the potential for this disruption to the U.S. oil and gas and therefore rail cargo markets.

Samsung is on the verge of introducing a smart phone with a foldable, flexible screen. While you can be certain that Apple, HTC and Nokia are exploring the potential impact this disruption will have on the smart phone market, what other businesses should be taking note? This disruption could have a broad impact for suppliers and manufacturers in glass, PCs, mining and other industries. High performing organizations are constantly on the lookout for future marketplace disruptions, especially ones coming from unanticipated directions.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

pmwj30-Jan2015-Wasserman-AUTHORTim Wassermanflag-usa

IPS Learning

California, USA 

Tim Wasserman is the Chief Learning Officer at IPS Learning and the Program Director of the Stanford Advanced Project Management (SAPM) program. Responsible for curriculum development and the IPS/Stanford partnership, Tim relies on more than 25 years of experience developing and implementing enterprise-wide solutions to address the human-capital needs of global enterprises in areas including project and program management; leadership development; talent development and retention management; new employee assimilation; creativity and innovation; sales and service excellence; and quality methodologies. He is a member of the Stanford APM faculty delivering both on-campus and on-site courses and workshops. www.ipslearning.com

Projects and Programs are two different animals, don’t underestimate the gap

COMMENTARY 

By Thomas Walenta, PMP, PMI Fellow

Germany
________________________________________________________________________

Lions are the ‘king of the animals’ and quick killers. They are living in families called prides and live for about 12 years in the wild. Lions hunt in teams mostly led by females for prey, they also eat dead meat if they are not successful in their hunts (more than 50% of all cases). Their hunts are limited to short bursts of sprints, otherwise they are stalking for prey. Humans respect and fear lions, there are man-eaters, and the Romans used lions in their arenas to kill Christians and criminals in a cruel but efficient way. Despite this image of might and power, Lions have not been trained to be used for warfare.

In a way, project managers could be characterized as lions: they work in teams, are efficient, can achieve results in short term, but are not always successful. The best are well respected. They usually are not consulted when it comes to strategy implementation.

Elephants are respected and useful for strategic initiatives. They were heavily used in warfare by Indian, Persian and Roman armies, as well as by the famous Hannibal from Karthago. Elephants are plant eaters and like to live close to waters, they can live for 70 years. Elephants are characterized by living in large families, having good long term memories and caring for each other. Occasionally, Elephants attack and kill humans but in general they are regarded as friendly and peaceful animals.

Like Program Managers, Elephants have been used for strategy implementation, they are respected, work in teams, exhibit a longer timeframe in age and social life and are effective.

Like lions and elephants, Project and Program Managers are not just flavors of the same species. While we agree that lions and elephant are indeed different animals, we still see the perception that project managers and program managers are the same species, just with slight differences in experience and skills. And some say if you push project managers enough, they will transform into program managers and the organization will receive the benefits it longs for. This is not true in general, as we will see from the following paragraphs.

Project and program success rates are (still) not satisfactory. PMI’s Pulse of the Profession Survey 2014 suggests 44% of strategic initiatives are unsuccessful and more than 10% of project budgets are wasted. Other studies support these dimensions of failure, and this is true for the past decades. PMI’s Survey further states as current main reasons for the shortfalls:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author 

141017-pmwj28-walenta-PHOTOThomas Walenta, PMPflag-germany

PMI Fellow

Frankfurt, Germany

Thomas Walenta, PMP, PMI Fellow, was working as Project and Program Manager for IBM from 1983-2014. Most recently he was responsible for a program encompassing all business of IBM with a global client in the EMEA region, with teams in India, Japan and across Europe. He led the PMI Frankfurt Chapter from 1998 to 2005, increasing membership from 111 to 750 and annual budget to 100K Euro.

Thomas had a variety of volunteer positions for PMI, among them being final juror of the PMI Project of the Year award, member of the PMI Board nomination committee, auditor for PMI‘s Registered Education Provider Program, writer/reviewer of PMP Exam questions and significant contributor to PMI‘s first standards about Program Management and Portfolio Management.

In 2005, he was elected by PMI membership to serve a 3 year term on the PMI Board from 2006 to 2008. Being a speaker on global project management events in Tokyo, Moscow, São Paulo and across Europe, Thomas extended his professional network significantly and is regarded as an experienced and skillful advisor and mentor.

Thomas is serving as a member of PMI’s Ethics Review Committee since 2011. He can be contacted via email at [email protected].

To view other works by Thomas Walenta, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/thomas-walenta-pmp/

Why PMP Certification and how it helps the business

COMMENTARY

By Dr. T D Jainendrakumar

Kerala, India
________________________________________________________________________

The PMP certification is the most widely recognized and respected certification all over the world in the field of project management granted by the reputed PMI, USA.

The purpose and goal of this certification program is the development, maintenance, evaluation, promotion, and administration of a rigorous, examination-based, professional certification program of the highest calibre.

This knowledge will enable the certified project managers to perform their duties easily, efficiently and effectively.

This can be explained with an example: while driving a car its tyre got punctured unexpectedly, if you know the correct process you will change the step-in tyre easily by slightly unscrew the wheel nut then lift the vehicle using a Jacky, change the tyre, tight the wheel nut, un-jack the car and tight the wheel nuts thoroughly and you will drive forward and will reach your destination by mitigating the risk, if you don’t know the processes to be followed at that time, probably you may lift the car with the help of a jack, then try to unscrew the wheel nuts, you may unscrew it by taking more effort than actually required to change the step in tyres and you may get exhausted and may reach your destination by fretting and fuming and very late. But if you had the knowledge of processes to follow, things would have been very easy.

This is exactly as in the case of Project management and there is a big difference in doing something with knowledge and without knowledge.

What I would like to say is that the knowledge of PMBOK (Project Management Body of Knowledge) will allows anyone to accomplish more work in less   time, with fewer people in an optimized cost therefore Profitability will increase.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

pmwj30-Jan2015-Jainendrakumar-AUTHORDr. T D Jainendrakumar flag-india

India

Dr. T D Jainendrakumar, PhD, MCA, PMP is an international PMP trainer, EX-Scientist/Principal Scientist/Joint Director, N.I.C, Ministry of Information and Communication Technology, Government of India, Madhyapradesh. He has over 25 years’ of extensive experience in the areas of IT Project management in e-governance at Ernakulam District Collectorate, District Courts of Kerala, Central Administrative Tribunal Ernakulam, Rajeev Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (400 crore project), New Delhi and Principal Systems Analyst in National Informatics Centre, Madhya Pradesh State Centre especially in the following areas of specialization: IT practice management (Project Management Methodologies, Tools and techniques, Standards & Knowledge);IT Infrastructure Management (Project Governance, Assessment, Organisational Instructions & Facilities and Equipments); IT-Resource Integration Management (Resource Management, Training & Education, Career Development & Team Development);IT-Technical Support (Project Mentoring, Project Planning, Project Auditing and Project Recovery); and Business Alignment Management (Project Portfolio management, Customer Relationship Management, Vendor Management & Business performance management).

Teaching Project Management & ICT Subjects for professionals and post graduates. Master of Computer Applications (MCA), a 3 year post graduate course dealing with software Engineering and Project Management from a premier institute Anna University Campus. He is a PMP of PMI USA since 2008. Resource person of PMI, you can see his name in the PMBOK 4th edition and 5th edition published by PMI, USA under the list of contributors for project management. Scored 4.11 out of 5 in the project management (2005) examination conducted by brainbench.com, secured a Masters Certificate in Project Management, and is one among the top scorers (First in India and 3rd position in the world in the experienced category).

Published many international journal papers in PM World Today having cumulative index factors more than 2 in the areas of specialization of Project Management & Information Technology.

Holding a Hon’ Doctorate from Cosmopolitan University, USA in Project Management & Information Technology. Presently working as an independent project management consultant and an International Project management (PMP) trainer. Provided PMP training to the senior officials of big MNCs like M/S. Earnest & Young and He is a visiting professor and sharing his knowledge and experience and to handle classes in Management Information Systems, Quality Management, Project Management and Software Engineering to some of the big universities. He can be contacted at [email protected].

What gets measured gets done

COMMENTARY

Successfully leading profitable business change in the Oil and Gas Project Work Environment in Nigeria

By Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo, CCP, PMP

Warri, Nigeria

________________________________________________________________________

Abstract 

Given the compelling array of benefits that can be derived from the application of earned value management system (EVMS), it is of great concern that this methodology is not practiced as much as it should be in modern day project management practice in the construction and oil and gas industry in Nigeria.

In this paper, the writer argues that the potential lurking in the conscientious application of EVMS in curbing corruption in the construction and oil and gas industry cannot be overlooked by serious minded profit oriented project management practitioners and business owners whose activities revolve around project management in Nigeria.

The vast collection of abandoned projects that adorn the landscape of the construction industry environment speaks volumes. The onus lies on the practitioners themselves to help reduce, if not entirely eliminate, this phenomenon by adding to their arsenal the judicious use of the earned value management system.

Key words: Earned Value Management, Earned Value, Projects; Earned Schedule

Introduction 

It is tough to figure out where you are heading if you do not have a good idea of where you are. The statement ‘what gets measured gets done’ has been described as the ‘soundest management advice’ of all times (Peters, 1986:1). I agree with this statement.

“What gets measured gets done” is a popular saying used to highlight the importance of performance measurement in the work environment. Performance measurements through the use of metrics in businesses around the world are often referred to as Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Key performance indicators, according to Bernard Marr, are the ‘vital navigation instruments used by managers to understand whether their business is on a successful voyage or whether it is veering off the prosperous path’ (Marr, 2012: XXV). 

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

lucky-enajite-edjenekpoLucky Enajite Edjenekpo, CCP, PMPflag-nigeria

Warri, Nigeria

Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo is an oil and gas professional with over 24 years’ experience in project management and operations management. He is currently the Support Services/Nigerian Content Manager at Exterran Nigeria Limited, Nigeria. Lucky holds a bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering and a master’s degree in Engineering Management from the University of Benin (UNIBEN), Nigeria and MBA (Leadership and Sustainability) from the University of Cumbria, UK. Lucky is a Certified Cost Professional (CCP) and a certified Project Management Professional (PMP), driven by passion to advance project management practice and maintenance service delivery. He lives in Warri, Nigeria and can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Lucky Edjenekpo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/lucky-enajite-edjenekpo/

Managing risk and determining better outcomes

PM ADVISORY

By Dennis Sheehan, MAPM, MCMI

Senior Training Consultant, ILX Group

United Kingdom
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

Risk management is a key component for successful project outcomes. Current best practice is to treat ‘risk’ as an uncertainty that could either be a positive opportunity or negative threat. The concept of risk management is gradually seeping into organizations. Yet rather than being a bolt on, it needs to be an integral part of what they do and part of the organization’s culture. The ISO31000 international standard is a vital reference tool for any organization wishing to embed a culture of risk management.

The article also refers to the M_o_R® Guidance for Practitioners approach, which identifies a number of roles within an organization and defines their risk management responsibilities; for example, there is a need for a board-level champion, driving a pervasive risk management culture. An explanation is provided on how to embed risk management within the organization, with four starting points to embed and review the management of risk processes.

Managing risk and determining better outcomes

It is not uncommon for projects to fail. For a project to be successful, it’s not enough simply to manage your project competently. There needs to be a company-wide culture of building risk considerations into every decision. Current best practice is to treat ‘risk’ as an uncertainty that could either be a positive opportunity or negative threat. The aim is to reduce the threats while maximizing the opportunities. The concept of risk management is gradually seeping into organizations. Yet rather than being a bolt on, it needs to be an integral part of what they do and to be part of the organization’s culture.

ISO31000 – a vital tool

The ISO310001 guidelines, published in 2009, are a vital tool for any organization wishing to embed a culture of risk management. ISO31000 encompasses the idea that we should not regard risk as something to be afraid of, but rather something to be aware of.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

pmwj30-Jan2015-Sheehan-AUTHORDennis Sheehan flag-uk

ILX Group

United Kingdom

Dennis Sheehan MAPM, MCMI, is a senior Training Consultant at the ILX Group, the global Best Practice learning company. Dennis began his career as an apprentice engineer working for what was then known as the GPO (now Royal Mail) and later was promoted to the role of Executive Engineer where he was introduced to the world of structured project management.

Dennis now works closely with clients around the world assisting with Best Practice learning on courses such as M_o_R, PRINCE2®and APMP.

For further information visit www.ilxgroup.com or follow ILX on Twitter @ILXGroup

Series on Project Success and Failure: Some deficiencies in published causes of project failures

SERIES ARTICLE

Article 2 of 6 

By Alan Stretton

Sydney, Australia

________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

This is the second article of a series on project successes and failures. The first article (Stretton 2014j) looked at varying criteria currently being used for project successes / failures, and at the very meager data on success / failure rates. The available data gave partial coverage of software projects and mega-projects success / failure rates, but next-to-nothing on any other project types or application areas.

It was concluded that it was vitally important for the project management community to establish and agree on success and failure criteria which are widely applicable; and for project researchers and practitioners to join forces to begin developing comprehensive success / failure data covering all significant project types and project management application areas.

This second article extends the range of the first article by looking at some published causes of project failures. It attempts a classification of these causes which might be useful in helping improve success rates at the three success levels discussed in the first article.

I found two listings of causes of project failures for software development projects, two for unspecified projects at large, and four for major projects and mega-projects. Whilst these are far too few to be in any way representative of the broader situation, some interesting data emerged, as will be seen.

Some 42 different causes of failure emerged, many of them repeated in various listings, as will be seen in the following four tables. The main groupings which emerge from these listings are (in descending order of frequency of citation):

  • Project initiation-related causes of failure
  • Project management (PM) operational-related causes of failure
  • Lack of organizational support causes
  • Project management (PM) leadership-related causes of failure
  • Other (external) causes

The first two groups of causes of failure collectively comprise 70% of all causes sampled. These are then broadly linked to the three “levels of success” discussed in the first article. Some key linkages will be discussed in more detail in later articles.

Finally, a suggestion / challenge is made for the global management community to create a framework to develop and share project success / failure data, covering the widest possible range of project management types and application areas.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This series of articles on project successes and failures is by Alan Stretton, PhD (Hon), Life Fellow of AIPM (Australia), a pioneer in the field of professional project management and one of the most widely recognized voices in the practice of program and project management.   Long retired, Alan is still accepting some of the most challenging research and writing assignments; he is a frequent contributor to the PM World Journal. See his author profile below.

About the Author

141215-pmwj30-new-stretton-PHOTOAlan Stretton, PhD   flag-australia   

Faculty Corps, University of Management

and Technology, Arlington, VA (USA)

Life Fellow, AIPM (Australia) 

Alan Stretton is one of the pioneers of modern project management. He is currently a member of the Faculty Corps for the University of Management & Technology (UMT), USA. In 2006 he retired from a position as Adjunct Professor of Project Management in the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia, which he joined in 1988 to develop and deliver a Master of Project Management program.   Prior to joining UTS, Mr. Stretton worked in the building and construction industries in Australia, New Zealand and the USA for some 38 years, which included the project management of construction, R&D, introduction of information and control systems, internal management education programs and organizational change projects. He has degrees in Civil Engineering (BE, Tasmania) and Mathematics (MA, Oxford), and an honorary PhD in strategy, programme and project management (ESC, Lille, France). Alan was Chairman of the Standards (PMBOK) Committee of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) from late 1989 to early 1992. He held a similar position with the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), and was elected a Life Fellow of AIPM in 1996. He was a member of the Core Working Group in the development of the Australian National Competency Standards for Project Management. He has published over 140 professional articles and papers. Alan can be contacted at [email protected].

To see more works by Alan Stretton, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alan-stretton/.

Risk Doctor Briefing: Seven Questions to Shape the Risk Process

SERIES ARTICLE

Dr David Hillson PMI Fellow, HonFAPM, FIRM

The Risk Doctor Partnership

United Kingdom
________________________________________________________________________

Anyone facing a risky and important decision or project will need to answer seven basic questions. In fact we could shape the risk management process around asking and answering them. If we do then the risk process will become intuitive and natural, easy to follow, and less bureaucratic or forced. The seven basic questions are as follows, together with the related step in the risk process:

  1. What are we trying to achieve? (Establish Context) We cannot start any risky venture without first clearly defining its scope and clarifying the objectives that are at risk. We also need to know how much risk key stakeholders are prepared to accept, since this gives us the target threshold for risk exposure. We must address these factors as the first step of the risk process.
  1. What could affect us achieving this? (Identify Risks) Once objectives and risk thresholds are agreed, we can start identifying risks, which are uncertainties that could affect achievement of objectives (including both threats and opportunities). There are a variety of risk identification techniques, each of which has strengths and weaknesses, so we should use more than one approach. In addition to considering individual risks, we should also address overall risk exposure.
  1. Which of those things are most important? (Assess Risks) Not all risks are equally important, so we need to filter and prioritise them, to find the worst threats and the best opportunities. This will help us decide how to respond. When prioritising risks, we could use various characteristics, such as how likely they are to happen, what they might do to our objectives, how easily we can influence them, when they might happen, etc. We should also consider the effect of overall risk exposure on the final outcome.

What shall we do about them? (Plan Risk Responses) Now we can start to think about what actions are appropriate to deal with individual risks, as well as considering how to tackle overall risk exposure… 

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

Dr. David HillsonDr. David Hillsonflag-uk

The Risk Doctor 

Dr David Hillson CMgr FRSA FIRM FCMI HonFAPM PMI-Fellow is The Risk Doctor (www.risk-doctor.com).  As an international risk consultant, David is recognised as a leading thinker and expert practitioner in risk management. He consults, writes and speaks widely on the topic and he has made several innovative contributions to the field. David’s motto is “Understand profoundly so you can explain simply”, ensuring that his work represents both sound thinking and practical application.

David Hillson has over 25 years’ experience in risk consulting and he has worked in more than 40 countries, providing support to clients in every major industry sector, including construction, mining, telecommunications, pharmaceutical, financial services, transport, fast-moving consumer goods, energy, IT, defence and government. David’s input includes strategic direction to organisations facing major risk challenges, as well as tactical advice on achieving value and competitive advantage from effectively managing risk.

David’s contributions to the risk discipline over many years have been recognised by a range of awards, including “Risk Personality of the Year” in 2010-11. He received both the PMI Fellow award and the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) for his work in developing risk management. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the UK Association for Project Management (APM), where he has actively led risk developments for nearly 20 years. David Hillson is an active Fellow of the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), and he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) to contribute to its Risk Commission. He is also a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and a Member of the Institute of Directors (IOD).

Dr Hillson can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works previously published in the PM World Journal by Dr David Hillson, visit his author showcase at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-david-hillson/

Advances in Project Management Series: There are no shortcuts from Projects to Benefits

SERIES ARTICLE

By Phil Driver

New Zealand

and

Ian Seath

United Kingdom
________________________________________________________________________

Organisations increasingly need to prove convincingly that their strategic Programme and Project Management (PPM) investments lead to worthwhile benefits. In this article, we’ll demonstrate how the PRUB-Validate approach enables you, particularly if you are a Project or Programme Manager, to do this.

Business School and consultancy research consistently shows a frighteningly low success rate in benefits realisation. All too often the aspirational goals of senior managers are frittered away as they get cascaded down from Strategy to the operational realities of Programmes and Projects.

Of course, most Project and Programme Managers will understand that they can’t “realise” benefits since the majority of benefits come about after a project has finished and people start making use of the things that have been created. Whether Sponsors similarly understand this is perhaps more debatable!

What do organisations do?

The fundamental role of all organisations is to create assets (services, products, infrastructure) and enable people to use these to create benefits. This is exactly what PRUB, the OpenStrategy Information Structure defines.

Organisations run Projects that produce Results, which citizens or communities Use to create Benefits. PRUB is the one and only inescapable model of what organisations actually DO. So, it is ideally suited as a framework and way of thinking to help develop strategies, validate them and implement them in projects and programmes.

PRUB defines, uniquely, the smallest set of strategic information that has the highest value to the most people.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK. Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement.

About the Authors

pmwj30-Jan2015-Driver-DRIVERDr. Phil Driverflag-new zealand

New Zealand

Dr. Phil Driver is founder and CEO of OpenStrategies Ltd (Christchurch, NZ). His background in science and engineering management led to his involvement in large-scale industry-sector strategies. That in turn led to his developing an in-depth understanding of the challenges of even larger scale, public sector strategies. The OpenStrategies’ system then evolved through more than a decade of intense engagement with many public and private sector organisations.

A fundamental principle Phil applied was that ‘anyone can design a complicated strategy system but a good designer will develop a simple one’. The resulting OpenStrategies’ system is compellingly simple yet powerful, even for very complex, large scale strategies. Crucially, OpenStrategies doesn’t just underpin the design of strategies – it also guides their validation and implementation.

pmwj30-Jan2015-Driver-SEATHIan Seathflag-uk

United Kingdom

Ian Seath has been helping organisations to increase their capability for continuous improvement for more than two decades. He established Improvement Skills Consulting Ltd. in 2007. Ian has worked with more than 200 clients and helped implement a wide range of approaches to improve customer satisfaction, reduce process cycle-times, drive out waste and actively engage staff in continuous performance improvement. Ian’s experience covers the private, public and voluntary sectors and he has worked with Boards, Managers and Front-line Staff.  He works as a Coach, Facilitator, Project Leader and Trainer.

Advances in Project Management: For whose benefit? Reclaiming the role of users in projects

SERIES ARTICLE 

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire

UK
________________________________________________________________________

Why do we develop projects? Project development and delivery typically result in the creation of new assets and capabilities. Yet, to what extent do we shape the delivery process to reflect the needs and expectations of the ultimate users?

Answering the question is not easy: Perusing the bodies of knowledge reveals very little about users and their role in projects.

The Sixth edition of the APM Body of Knowledge published by the UK’s Association for Project Management begins with the following sentence: “Project, programme and portfolio (P3) management is concerned with managing discrete packages of work to achieve objectives.”

Later guidance elaborates on the role of the project manager, who “must be competent in managing the six aspects of a project, i.e. scope, schedule, finance, risk, quality and resources”. The first real mention of users comes up in the section on change management, which asserts: “projects often conclude with the delivery of an output that is handed over to the client or user organisation.” Even the index offers little further help in elaborating the role, impact or significance of users to a project. The Glossary proves more useful by confirming that users are “the group of people who are intended to receive benefits or operate outputs”.

The Fifth edition of the PMBOK Guide, the PMI’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge confirms that users are included amongst the project stakeholders, as “users are the persons or organizations who will use the project’s product, service or result”. It also expands on their role explaining that they may act as representatives or liaisons to ensure proper coordination, advise on requirements, or validate the acceptability of the project’s results”.

The project management bodies of knowledge offer scant information about dealing with users, understanding their needs, obtaining their feedback, establishing buy in, managing their expectations, or even communicating with users.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of programme and project management books published by Gower in the UK. Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM. Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ. Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement

About the Author

Darren Dalcher, PhDDarren Dalcher, PhD flag-uk

Series Editor

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire, UK

Darren Dalcher, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK. He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London. Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management. Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond. He is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board. Prof Dalcher is an academic editorial advisor for the PM World Journal. He can be contacted at [email protected].

To see other works by Prof Darren Dalcher, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darren-dalcher/.

Project Management Certification Benchmarking Research: 2015 Update

FEATURED PAPER 

Dr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCP, MScPM, MRICS, GPM-m

Jakarta, Indonesia
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

Since 2010, the author has been publishing an annual report, benchmarking many of the more popular, globally recognized project management certifications against both the US Professional Engineer (PE) license as well as Malcolm Gladwell’s “10,000 hour” rule. As over 20,000 copies of the report and the Excel template have been downloaded speaks to the importance of this benchmarking research as the question of “transportability” and “reciprocal recognition” of these credentials is the source of frequent debates.

Some of the key findings from previous year’s research shows that at least in the field of project management, Gladwell’s “10,000 hours” is too low, with 15,000 hours “level of effort” being closer to what it actually takes to produce a “competent” professional level practitioner. Another important finding is that the world’s two most popular certifications, PMI’s PMP and Axelos PRINCE2 do NOT qualify as professional level credentials even using the rather low “10,000 hours” advocated by Gladwell. A more positive trend seems to be emerging and that is as more professional societies add certifications, we are moving away from exam only certifications (i.e. PMI’S PMP and Axelos PRINCE2) and nearly all of the newer credentials involve both exams and peer assessments of competency. (i.e. PM’s PgMP and PfMP. Green Project Management organization, AcostE and Guild of Project Controls) This is positive in so far as it says the practice of applied project management seems to be maturing in line with other “professions”. The other trend which seems to be evolving is based on the fact that the US “Professional Engineer” (PE) license is going to require a Master’s degree starting in 2020, many of the higher end, competency based professional credentials (i.e. Green Project Management and Guild of Project Controls) are starting to recognize the value of advanced degrees as being the mark of today’s “professional level” practitioner and are building recognition for having earned them into the credentialing process.

For those who are not familiar with the evolution of this model, the benchmarking is based on the “level of effort” it takes to qualify for, prepare for and become certified, the underlying philosophy being the more robust the process, and the more it looks beyond the ability to pass multiple choice exams, the more likely it is to validate that the person holding the credential is “competent”.

Essentially, the scoring model upon which this benchmarking is based looks at 12 different components which when added together, yields an overall “level of effort” score:

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note: footnotes and references are included in full paper.

About the Author

PAUL-GIAMMALVO-bioDr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE, MScPM, MRICS, GPM-Mflag-usa-indonesiaflag-italy

Jakarta, Indonesia

Dr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE (#1240), MScPM, MRICS, GPM-m is Senior Technical Advisor (Project Management) to PT Mitratata Citragraha. (PTMC), Jakarta, Indonesia. www.build-project-management-competency.com.

For 20+ years, he has been providing Project Management training and consulting throughout South and Eastern Asia, the Middle East and Europe. He is also active in the Global Project Management Community, serving as an Advocate for and on behalf of the global practitioner. He does so by playing an active professional role in the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International, (AACE); Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) and the Construction Management Association of America, (CMAA). He currently sits on the Board of Directors of the American Society for the Advancement of Project Management (asapm) http://www.asapm.org/ and is on the Certification Board of the Green Project Management Institute. http://www.greenprojectmanagement.org/ He is active as a regional leader in the International Guild of Project Controls. http://www.planningplanet.com/guild

He has spent 18 of the last 35 years working on large, highly technical international projects, including such prestigious projects as the Alyeska Pipeline and the Distant Early Warning Site (DEW Line) upgrades in Alaska. Most recently, he worked as a Senior Project Cost and Scheduling Consultant for Caltex Minas Field in Sumatra and Project Manager for the Taman Rasuna Apartment Complex for Bakrie Brothers in Jakarta. His current client list includes AT&T, Ericsson, Nokia, Lucent, General Motors, Siemens, Chevron, Conoco-Philips, BP, Dames and Moore, SNC Lavalin, Freeport McMoran, Petronas, Pertamina, UN Projects Office, World Bank Institute and many other multi-national companies and NGO organizations.

Dr. Giammalvo holds an undergraduate degree in Construction Management, a Master of Science in Project Management through the George Washington University and a PhD in Project and Program Management through the Institute Superieur De Gestion Industrielle (ISGI) and Ecole Superieure De Commerce De Lille (ESC-Lille- now SKEMA School of Management) under the supervision of Dr. Christophe Bredillet, CCE, IPMA A Level. Paul can be contacted at [email protected].

To view other works by Paul Giammalvo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-paul-d-giammalvo/

PMBOK Guide 5th Edition and Oracle Primavera P6: A Practical Step by Step Approach for Time Management

FEATURED PAPER 

By Satya Narayan Dash, PMP, PMI-ACP

India
________________________________________________________________________

  1. Abstract

While Project Management Institutes’ (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) is one of the most used project management guides worldwide, it is entirely theoretical and does not address the practical usage via a practical tool. In fact, it was not meant to be. Nevertheless, with tools like Oracle Primavera P6, the theoretical principles of PMBOK can be practically implemented. This paper talks about the Practical Applicability of Time Management Knowledge Area, one of 10 knowledge areas in PMBOK, with the help of Oracle Primavera P6.

  1. Introduction

In this paper, the major comparisons between PMBOK and Primavera P6 are outlined with focus on Time Management. There are various major constraints defined in PMBOK guide, [v.i.z.] scope, quality, budget, schedule, resources and risk. Here though the primary focus is on Time Management, parts of Scope Management principles from PMBOK have been taken into account to have a detailed understanding.

This paper is based on PMBOK Guide 5th Edition and Oracle Primavera P6 Professional Release 8.4. The conceptual understanding will remain same for earlier versions of Primavera P6, e.g., R8.3 or R8.2.

To have a complete understanding, certain Input, Tools and Techniques and Outputs (ITTO) of other Knowledge Areas (KA), such as Scope Management KA, Human Resource Management KA and Integration Management KA from PMBOK guide, have been used. In some places of the document, PMP and PMBOK Guide have been used interchangeably. In many places, the software tool has been shortened as Primavera P6 or has been plainly referred as Primavera. 

  1. PMBOK Guide 5th Edition

Every Knowledge Area in PMBOK Guide comes with various Process Areas (PA) or processes. Time Management KA in PMBOK comes with 7 Process Areas, which are:

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author 

satya-narayan-dashSatya Naryan Dashflag-india

India

Satya Narayan Dash is a management professional with varied experiences as Program Manager, Project Manager and PMO. A certified PMI-PMP since 2008 and a follower of Agile/Scrum/XP practices since 2006, he has coached, mentored, and consulted thousands of Project Management professionals worldwide. He has created new management paradigms such as “Practical PMP with MS Project”, “Practical PMP with Oracle Primavera P6” and “Agile PMP” that are used by multiple vendors worldwide. He has a Bachelor of Technology degree in Electronics and Communication Engineering from the National Institute of Technology (NIT), Jalandhar, India.

Satya is a certified PMP from PMI, a certified Agile Practitioner (PMI-ACP) from PMI, a certified MCTS from Microsoft, a certified CSM from Scrum Alliance, a certified Six Sigma professional from Motorola and also a certified Java professional. His web presence is at http://managementyogi.blogspot.com and can be contacted at email: [email protected].

To view others works by Satya Naryan Dash, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/satya-narayan-dash/