SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Project Management Update from Rio

REPORT

By Vitor Vargas

International Correspondent

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

Project management events that happened recently in Brazil:

June 

  • Day 5 to June 8 VIII Brazilian Congress on Project Management in Goiania
  • Day 12 June 15 VIII Cycle Project Management Serra Gaucha

July – nothing scheduled in Brazil

August Events 

  • Congress of Project Management PMI BA-2013 – 14-16 August
  • VI Conference of Project Management – 26/27 August
  • I Forum Global project management PMI Rio +20 – 22 August
  • First Meeting of project management Sergipe 30 and 31 August In Rio de Janeiro
  • Lecture Changes PMBOK 5th Edition and ISO 21500 – 24 July
  • Global Forum on Project Management  – 19 August 2013

Report from VV Consulting

Recently the VV Consulting made a shutdown of production in the producer of gas ship, one of the biggest in the world; the initial duration was for nine days.  After project analysis and replanning, the duration was lowered to seven days.

More…

To read entire report (click here)


About the Author 

vitor-vargasflag-brazilvitor vargas 

International Correspondent 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Vitor Vargas, PMP, MBA, MSc* specializes in project management (and planning) and director of VV Consulting projects with expertise in different segments and sizes such as: Designs UN-BC (Business Unit of the Campos Basin) for Petrobras® his projects receiving three awards, management the PMO in FPTI – Itaipu (the world’s largest hydroelectric) Proyecto de Bayovar-Peru (development of a field of extraction of phosphate), projects of B2B (Business to Business) on one of the largest e-commerce world, coordination of planning in FPSO (unit production and stockpiling of oil in the Basin Campos). He is Certified PMP ® – Project Management Professional – With an MBA in Project Management from Universidade Federal Fluminense UFF ® and Management by IBEC / INPG (Brazilian Institute of Engineering and Cost) and Mastering in Economics. Vitor participated as a founder of Branch PMI-Rio Campos Basin. He has worked in Information Technology since 1996 and since then has developed and participated in the creation of various projects. In 2003 he started to participate in projects in engineering (Petrobras® and Transpetro ®). Active member of the community GP, writing many articles and giving lectures (currently writing a book), professor of MBA IBEC / INPG, UCB, Uniamérica, UDC, CNEC, Unifoa, coordinator of MBA`s project management in the IBEC / INPG . He is also an international correspondent for PM World in Brazil.  Website: www.vvconsulting.com.br; E-mail: [email protected]

Understanding Asia: the limitations of using a home country lens in resolving perceptual differences & tensions

PM ADVISORY

By Meena Thuraisingham 

Australia
________________________________________________________________________

There are many obvious and not so obvious differences between the nature of Asian markets and Western markets that pose challenges at multiple levels for companies and leaders deciding how they will approach their growth ambitions into Asia.  Framing the economic as well as cultural challenges we face using a home country lens is an ever present danger for cross border investment and can frustrate and even derail growth plans in host countries. Some of these distinctions are structural and lie in the respective economic histories, while other distinctions are more cultural in nature and lie in the respective social histories.

Leaving the informal unregulated economies of Asia aside, in the formal economies of Asia there are 3 key characteristics that shape the nature and feel of these markets and the business models used to thrive and prosper there. Keeping in mind that Asia is an extremely diverse region where generalised rules are dangerous, these characteristics are in effect strategic distinctions shaped by the historical and cultural realities of the Asian region:

  • The distinction between focus and opportunity – the developed economy mantra of focus as a strategy, stands in sharp contrast with opportunity as a strategy, evidenced by the number of large Chinese and Korean (chaebols) conglomerates that are a collection of often completely unrelated businesses that have no apparent synergy but driven by the commercial opportunity that presented itself.  GE, Siemens and LMVH are some of the exceptions to this in the west. Most western companies are driven by the reductionist principle – ‘this is what we do well, we will stick with that and deepen our capability, build scale and dominance’. Of course there are dangers in generalising about this given there is evidence that the emergence of the Asian conglomerate in some cases was a consequence of the lack of reliability of essential links in the supply chain rather than opportunistic reasons.
  • The distinction between business and family – in Asia many businesses are owned by family members primarily because of the absence of enforceable regulatory frameworks and somewhat opaque rules that govern the relationship between state and business. When you can’t rely on your business associates, you turn to family members whom you know you can trust. Historically many family companies thrived for generations in Europe but with the fragmentation of family structures in many western countries (in sharp contrast with the continued primacy of the family in Asia), this has dwindled in scale and size. In Asia these family owned enterprises are held together by family traditions operating on rules of trust and intimacy rather than being transactional or contractual in nature as they are in the west. Even in the regulated economies of Asia the impact of relationship trust (as opposed to contractual trust) in commercial undertakings remains strong.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

flag-australiaPressroom_BannerMeena Thuraisingham

Meena Thuraisingham is the author of The Secret Life of Decisions, How unconscious bias subverts our judgments, Gower Publishing, 2013.  Meena is also currently undertaking a PhD program on the impact of cultural factors in investing behavior of listed companies. Based in Australia, she is the founder and director of TalentInvest. For more on these or related ideas contact [email protected]

PM and IT: a sustainable marriage, made in a Cloud

PM ADVISORY 

By Rich Maltzman and Dave Shirley

USA
________________________________________________________________________

The role of project management and the project manager are usually well understood and increasingly well-defined in an organization.  With the increasing need to bring products to the market faster, severely limited resources, including money and people, and the necessity to have a structured approach to the introduction of new products and services, a disciplined approach is necessary.  In order to execute properly on that disciplined approach, someone trained in that discipline is needed, and that person is the project manager.  The role of the project manager then is to use learned skills, experiential knowledge to apply the tools and techniques to successfully manage a project.   The PM role is where the ‘rubber meets the road’ or what we like to call ‘the individual who takes ideas to reality.”

Traditionally, that role included planning organizing and controlling a project, usually from the time the sponsor makes the request for a project through the project’s turnover to ongoing operations.  In sustainable project management, the project manager’s responsibility increases back into the project selection process and beyond project turnover to the ultimate disposal of the product of the project.  The increased responsibility is to assure the sustainability of the project throughout the now extended life of the project, ‘cradle-to-cradle’.  We believe that the effort to make the discipline more sustainable (or green if you will) is getting more and more definition and more attention since the publication of our book Green Project Management, CRC Press @2010.  More books have been published and courses have been written based around our basic tenets or “5 assertions”, as we like to call them;

  1.  A project run with green intent (we now say “sustainability thinking”) is the right thing to do, but it will also help the project team do the right thing.
  1. Project managers must first understand the green aspects of their projects, knowing that this will better equip them to identify, manage, and respond to project risks.
  1. An environmental strategy for a project provides added opportunity for success of both the project and the product of the project.
  1. Project managers must view their projects through an environmental lens. This increases the Project Manager’s (and the project team’s) long-term thinking and avails the project of the rising “green wave” of environmentalism.
  1. Project managers must think of the environment in the same way they think of quality. It must be planned in, and the cost of “greenality” like the cost of quality, is more than offset by the savings and opportunities it provides.

In a nutshell;  (1) green intent of project management gives the team direction to protect scarce resources (people, planet, profits), (2) look to the project charter, work breakdown structure, assumptions, constraints and other  project information to assure that sustainability is considered in all aspects of the project, (3) that consideration provides the strategy to ‘protect’ the project’s success criteria by protecting against failure by not adhering to environmental standards and regulation or stakeholder expectation of sustainability, (4) project managers already look at projects through a variety of lenses, like quality and communications, so by looking at the stakeholder expectations,  and long-term (beyond traditional project management boundaries) in terms of  effects of the project helps to make it more ‘sustainable’ in the future, and (5) sustainability must be as much a part of the project manager’s thinking process as quality, and cannot be something that is added on, but must be planned.

More…

To read entire article (click here)


About the Authors

rich-maltzmanflag-usaRich Maltzman, PMP

Rich Maltzman, PMP, has been an engineer since 1978 and a Project Management supervisor since 1988, including a recent 2-year assignment in The Netherlands in which he built a team of PMs overseeing deployments of telecom networks in Europe and the Middle East. His project work has been diverse, including projects such as the successful deployment of the entire video and telecom infrastructure for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, to the 2006 integration of the PMOs of two large merging corporations. As a second, but intertwined career, Rich has also focused on consulting and teaching, having developed curricula and/or taught at BostonUniversity’s CorporateEducationCenter; MerrimackCollege; NorthernEssexCommunity College; and the University of Massachusetts – Lowell, USA.

Rich has also professionally developed PMP-exam prep courseware, including exams and books. He even edited and was “the voice” for a set of 8 Audio CDs – a major part of a PMP prep course for an international company, for whom he has also facilitated PMP exam study groups. Rich was selected for the Modeling Team for the 4th Edition PMBOK Guide to be published by PMI in 2008, and contributed to the chapters on Quality and Risk. Recently, Rich presented at two international conferences – the PMO Symposium in San Antonio, TX, and the PMO Summit in Coconut Grove, FL, the subject being the development framework for Project Managers.

Currently, Rich is Senior Manager, Learning and Professional Advancement, at the Global Program Management Office of a major telecom concern.  Rich’s educational background includes a BSEE from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and an MSIE from PurdueUniversity. In addition, Rich has a mini-MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s WhartonSchool and a Master’s Certificate in international business management granted jointly from IndianaUniversity’s Kelley School of Business and INSEAD of France. From a Project Management standpoint, Rich received his PMP in 2000 after earning the Stevens Institute’s Master’s Certificate in 1999. He has presented papers on Project Management at conferences in Huizen, The Netherlands, Mexico City and Long Beach, California.  Rich can be contacted at [email protected].

flag-usadave-shirleyDave Shirley, PMP

Dave Shirley, PMP, has been an instructor and consultant, with more than 30 years of experience in management and project management, in the corporate, public, and small business arenas.  He has presented at such prestigious organizations as The Conference Board and the PMI® Global Congress.  Dave has also focused on consulting and teaching at the graduate level, having developed curricula and is currently teaching project management, IT project management and Green IT at Boston University;  and corporate social responsibility and environmental issues at Southern New Hampshire University.  Dave has previously been associated with NorthernEssexCommunity College and New EnglandCollege in the United States.

He coauthored with Rich Maltzman, Green Project Management, CRC Press 2010, and authored Project Management for Healthcare Professionals, CRC Press 2011.  Dave Shirley can be contacted at [email protected]

Using the Communications Styles Instrument for Teambuilding

SECOND EDITION

By Robert Youker

Maryland, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Effective communication is the exchange of meaning with another person or group of persons. Communication is obviously tremendously important in project management where people who may not know each other are teamed together temporarily to accomplish a specific objective. One factor that significantly affects communication is the management style—or personality profile or value orientation—of the persons at each end of the communication.

This paper presents a simple model of four different value orientations or communication styles and a short questionnaire instrument for measuring those four orientations. It then discusses the effect of the interaction of these four communication styles on exchanging meanings for effective project management. It describes how these learnings can be applied in teambuilding and presents exercises to use in teambuilding and training workshops.

There are more than 300 personality profile instruments on the market for describing and measuring various personal traits or styles. Two of the more frequently used are Myers-Briggs and Strength Deployment Inventory (Myers 1986; Porter 1980) (Exhibit 1 in Appendix). All of these can be useful in various degrees, but I have found the Communication Styles Instrument most useful for several reasons (Casse 1981, chapter 9).

The four styles it uses—Action, Process, People, and Idea—are directly related to project management. Unlike Myers-Briggs, the words describing the categories are easily understood and not negative in any way. Also, the user can photocopy the forms, rather than having to purchase expensive forms. The Economic Development Institute of the World Bank has given permission for the use of this document for teaching and training purposes provided the copyright notice is included and the Institute is notified.

The visuals in the solution to Activity 3.1.1 provide more detail on each of the four styles: Action, Process, People, and Idea, and describe the characteristics of each style with regard to content and process. Action-oriented people like to get things done, and tend to solve problems quickly. Process-oriented people like to organize, such as preparing a critical path method (CPM) project schedule chart. People-oriented persons are concerned with human relationships, such as communication among the team members. Idea-oriented people like concepts and new approaches; they may solve a problem in a new way and may create new problems!

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note:  Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. This paper was originally presented at the PMI-96 Symposium in Boston; it is republished here with the author’s permission.


About the Author

flag-usarobert-youker-bioRobert Youker

World Bank (retired)

Maryland, USA

Robert “Bob” Youker is a prolific writer, speaker, and spokesperson for PM practice around the World. A co-founder of both Project Management Institute, and asapm, the American Society for the Advancement of Project Management, he is a long-time contributor to the practice of project management. In addition to the above founding feats, he was a Director of IPMA from 1977 through 1988, taking the seat formerly occupied by Russ Archibald.  In addition to his years of service to PMI, he participated and presented in many IPMA Conferences from 1974 through the early 2000s. He presented keynotes at several of them, and organized panels and workshops in others. He introduced IPMA into a dozen government agencies and businesses all over the World, and in many cases, connected those agencies and businesses with IPMA leaders.

Bob introduced and popularized innovations to the practice of project management, from his work in Xerox in the 1960s, to his leadership in the first manual project management planning and tracking tools (Planalog President, 1968-1974). He published an early book on the Critical Path Method, Analysis Bar Charting, by John Mulvaney. As of today, that book has sold more than 30,000 copies.  In his work for World Bank, Bob developed training that has benefited thousands of project and program managers, and government officials, mostly in developing countries. He performed that training in over a dozen developing countries around the World over a 30 year period, and continues today, to help developing and developed nations. He was the author and developer of the World Bank’s CD-ROM based project management training kit titled “Managing the Implementation of Development Projects”, still available and widely used today.  In the 1970s, to increase Executive visibility for the fledgling practice of project management, Bob engineered the publishing of a Harvard Business Review collection of articles on the subject. He suggested the collection, but was told there were not enough articles for a special collection. He bought copies of the articles, submitted them, and the Harvard Business Review published one of their most popular reprint series, with a number of classic articles on project management.

Bob Youker has contributed massively to the profession or practice of project management, to asapm, IPMA, PMI and society.  He continues to teach several two-week project management courses each year for participants from developing countries at the International Law Institute in Georgetown, Washington, DC, USA.  Bob can be contacted at [email protected].

Welcome to the July Edition

David Pells,

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the July 2013 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 12th edition of the web-based global resource for sharing knowledge about program and project management (P/PM).  This month’s edition is another full issue, with 37 new articles, papers, reports and book reviews by 43 authors in 17 different countries, again reflecting the global nature of our readers and contributors.  An additional 40+ news articles about projects and project management around the world are included.

Reminder – Invitation to Authors

We are constantly seeking good articles, papers and information about program and project management.  If you are an experienced program or project manager, project management professional or professional leader, consider sending us a ‘Commentary’ article about some topic of personal interest.  If you are an academic leader, graduate student, researcher or professional with a paper resulting from serious research that you want to share with the world, consider submitting a ‘Featured Paper’ or ‘Student Paper’.  If you are a PM expert, consultant or executive with a solution to share, send us an ‘Advisory’ article for the next edition.  We publish a wide variety of articles and papers, case studies and reports, book reviews and news stories.  Share knowledge and gain some visibility for you or your organization, publish an article in the PMWJ.  Contact [email protected].

In This Edition

11 authors in seven countries have contributed Featured Papers this month.  Professors Vladimir Voropajev and Jan Gelrud in Russia are the authors of “Mathematical Model of Project Management for the Supplier.” Bob Prieto, Senior Vice President at Fluor Corporation in the USA, has authored another paper entitled “Interaction of Engineering, Construction and Logistics Post-Disaster.”  Michael O’Brochta in Maryland, USA is the author of “Willpower: the Essential Project Leadership Discipline.” Paul Giammalvo in Jakarta, Indonesia has provided another interesting paper entitled “Practical Look at how Private Sector Entrepreneurial Companies use Earned Value. Dr Waffa Karkukly in Canada has authored “PMO: Going Back to Basics.”  Dr. Mohammad Baydoun in Lebanon has authored “Applicability of Selectionism and Trial and Error in Large-Scale Development Projects”. Prof Petros Farantakis, Prof Dimitrios Kamsaris, Stefano Kougoulos and John Petridis at Bilston Community College in UK and Greece are the authors of “Mergers in Construction Project Management.”  These are all serious papers; we hope they are interesting and useful to readers.

Three Series Articles are included this month. Another article is included on the subject of “Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization,” by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha in Brazil.  Dinsmore and Rocha are the authors of the book Enterprise Project Governance, published in the USA by AMACOM in 2012.  Their 6th article this month is on “Dealing with Uncertainty.”

Another article is included this month by Keith Pickavance in UK on the subject of the new contract for complex construction projects from the Chartered Institute of Builders (CIOB). Under the series titled “A New Construction Contract for the 21st Century,” Keith’s article this month is on the subject of “Contractor Design”.

We also include another series article by the IPMA Education and Training Board.  This month’s article, “Project Management Education and Training: An Irish Perspective”, is by Ed Naughton, E&T Board member in Dublin, Ireland.  PMWJ series articles are authored by some of the leading P/PM experts in the world.  We hope you enjoy them.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author

flag-usadavid-pellsDAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He is also the president and CEO of PM World, the virtual organization behind the journal and library.  David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a wide variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award in 1999. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and of the Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.  David has published widely, has spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].   For more information, visit www.pmworldjournal.net and www.pmworldlibrary.net.

Benchmarking Service Excellence: The Nigerian Company Experience

STUDENT PAPER

By Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo, CCC, PMP

Nigeria
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

In the face of growing competition in an economically volatile environment, service organizations are under pressure to reduce service costs while meeting rigorous service level agreement (SLA) levels and shorter response windows. In jeopardy are not only customer satisfaction and loyalty, but overall company growth and profitability.

In this paper, an attempt is made to benchmark a Nigerian maintenance service company with forward-thinking companies that have implemented strategic actions to achieve service excellence.

Given the strong impetus of technology-enabled initiatives, it is noteworthy as revealed in the paper that for the Nigerian maintenance service company, though, the route to significant improvement in service excellence is in the actions of the people assisted by technology, rather than purely the application of technology.

This paper concludes by stating, among other things, that the company should develop the right technician workforce, equip the technicians with the right tools and enable the right level of access to performance results in the drive towards achieving service excellence.

Keywords: Benchmark, Service Excellence, Customer Satisfaction, Loyalty

Chapter 1

1.0                        Introduction

In today’s oil and gas equipment and services market, equipment owners are operating on tighter budgets and making more demands for effective service.

The market environment described as erratic and vibrant has made it necessary for service companies not only to predict service workloads and plan resources accordingly in order not to lose huge cost savings as a result of disproportionate technician and inventory utilization according to an Aberdeen report[i], but to seek the opportunity to improve the predictableness of cost and schedule outcomes.

The Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering [AACE] (2012) states that:

“Total cost management is the effective application of professional and technical expertise to plan and control resources, costs, profitability and risks. Simply stated, it is a systematic approach to managing cost throughout the life cycle of any enterprise, program, facility, project, product, or service.”

In line with this definition, therefore, efforts geared towards lowering service costs can be considered paramount in the management process of the total life cycle cost investment, in my opinion.

This paper describes how benchmarking service excellence helps in identifying aspects of company operations that require improvement thereby resulting in lower service costs and higher customer satisfaction.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

lucky-enajite-edjenekpoflag-nigeriaLucky Enajite Edjenekpo CCC, PMP

Lucky Enajite Edjenekpo is an oil and gas professional with over 24 years experience in project management and operations management.

He is currently the Port Harcourt District Manager at Exterran Nigeria Limited, Nigeria.

Lucky holds a bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering and a master’s degree in Engineering Management from the University of Benin (UNIBEN), Nigeria.

Lucky is a Certified Cost Consultant (CCC), driven by passion to advance maintenance service delivery. He lives in Warri, Nigeria and can be reached at [email protected].


Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a result of a course delivered by Dr Paul Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha in Jakarta, Indonesia.  The paper was submitted to the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International (AACEi) in 2013 in fulfillment of the certified cost engineering consultant (CCEC) requirements, for which the author was a successful applicant.

Sustainability in Project Management Case study project GrownDownTown

STUDENT PAPER

By Roeland Derichs and Bob Valk

University of Greenwich

London, United Kingdom
________________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACT

Sustainability is a hot topic nowadays. Many companies are using this term, but the big question is how many of these companies actually implement sustainability in their business operations and thus are entitled to use this term. Sustainability has many different principles and concepts, which all can be implemented in these operations. To combine all these different principles and concepts and create a complete view of sustainability, a framework was created to see how sustainability is integrated in a project. The project ‘GrownDownTown’ is created by ‘De Groenten Uit Amsterdam’ and Philips is responsible for the LED lighting. The project was tested to the framework and the Maturity Model, to see how the concepts are integrated and the level of consideration of sustainability in terms of resources, business processes, business model and products/services. The outcomes clarify that project ‘GrownDownTown’ mainly has a focus on the environmental concept of sustainability. Philips outsources the knowledge that is needed for the agriculture, to the company ‘De Groenten Uit Amsterdam’. Like how Philips collaborate with ‘Douwe Egberts’. Through these collaborations Philips makes it possible to develop the high quality without the knowledge inside the own organisation.

INTRODUCTION

Sustainability became a hot top in the middle of the nineties (Hart, 1995). The burning challenge of business in the 21st century is to integrate sustainable development principles into core business operations such (Cooper, Hayward, & Neuberger, 2010) as projects. Sustainability is not just for the environment. Although environmental concern is what immediately comes to mind whenever the word “sustainability” is mentioned, there are many languages of sustainability, depending on whatever perspective is under consideration (Badiru, 2010). Thus sustainability has not only something to do with the environment, but also with the economical en social issues (Triple Bottom Line).

Many companies say that they consider or already use sustainability principles in projects or in project management processes (Keeys, 2012), the reality is that sustainability development principles are not largely considered in projects (Labuschagne et. al., 2005 & Gareis et. al., 2010). In project management, the focus is on specific sustainability aspects (environmental, social, construction, techniques, etc.) (Robert, et al., 2002) (Ebner & Baumgartner, 2010).

Businesses want to be sustainable (for their selves or for the outside world) so they develop what they call ‘corporate sustainability strategies’. However it is not clear if and how these strategies contribute to the integration of sustainability issues in projects (Keeys, 2012). There is very little guidance available on what is meant by sustainable project management or the responsibilities of the project management professional (Silvius, Brink, & Smit, 2009). So when there is little guidance available for how to integrate sustainability in projects, how can companies actually do it? The main question of this paper is:

How do (or how can) organisations integrate the concepts of sustainability into the way they execute and manage projects?

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This paper won the 1st prize Student Paper Award – master level at the happy projects ’13 conference in Vienna in April 2013; it is republished here with approval of the authors and happy projects conference organizers, PROJECT MANAGEMENT GROUP at the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration and ROLAND GAREIS CONSULTING.  Learn about the happy projects events at http://www.happyprojects.at/ 

About the authors

roeland-derichsflag-ukflag-hollandRoeland Derichs

 

 

 

 

bob-valkBob Valkflag-ukflag-holland

After Bob Valk and Roeland Derichs graduated for the Bachelor of Built Environment at the University of Applied Sciences in Amsterdam in 2012, they both started the European Master of Real Estate of the University of Greenwich in London. For the course Sustainability during this Master, Bob Valk and Roeland Derichs wrote the paper about Sustainability in Project Management within the project ‘GrownDownTown’. With this paper they won the first prize of the student paper awards on Masters level at the international Happy Projects conference in Vienna in April 2013. At this conference they also presented their paper.  Roland Derichs can be contacted at [email protected].  Bob Valk can be contacted at [email protected]

A New Construction Contract for the 21st Century: Contractor Design

SERIES ARTICLE

By Keith Pickavance

London, UK
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

The old adage that the more complete the design before commencement of a project the less likely it is to end up in delay and dispute is not always remembered by those concerned with complex construction and engineering projects. They may appreciate its inherent good sense, but they will also be aware that it is difficult to apply it on projects that can be conceived many years before design commences and designed and constructed over many succeeding years during which needs, technology and methods change.

Contractors are almost always responsible for fabrication design and, because of the highly technical and specialized nature of 21st century construction operations, it is common to require the Contractor to take responsibility for much of the detailed design, if not also the conceptual design.  It is thus surprising that, whilst so much delay and dispute concerns continuing design,  the current standard forms of contract contain so little concerning the control of design development during construction. Most current forms do not even require the design process to be planned. Nothing is mentioned, for example in the JCT, FIDIC EPC (Silver Book) or NEC3 about continuing design obligations. The JCT design and build form doesn’t even require the Contractor to produce a schedule for the construction of the works, let alone continuing design. The FIDIC Plant Design and Build form (Yellow Book) is unusual in this respect in requiring the schedule to include “the anticipated timing of each stage of design”. However, it fails to say what is meant by a stage of design, so even that is not much help.

Even where a specification requires the design or fabrication processes to be distilled to a schedule the requirement is nearly always that such design or fabrication is to be provided as a separate schedule not linked to the construction schedule, and without any, or any substantial redress for non-compliance.

If a schedule is to react to change and delay then the constituent elements of design, off-site fabrication, procurement, delivery, on-site fabrication and on-site installation need to be integrated into the same schedule, whether it relates to the permanent or temporary works.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This is the 6th article in a series by Keith Pickavance about the CIOB’s new contract for complex construction projects. For information about the new contract, visit http://www.ciob.org.uk/CPC.  The full article includes footnotes for quotations and section references.

About the Author

keith-pickavanceflag-ukKeith Pickavance

Keith Pickavance first qualified as an architect in 1972 and then in 1978 obtained a law degree. After 20 years as an architect in private practice the last 10 years of which also involved construction management, dispute resolution and expert witness services, in 1993 he joined an American company specialising in forensic services and delay analysis. In 1996 he set up on his own again specialising in delay analysis and time management in London and Hong Kong. That practice was acquired by Hill International in 2006, an international construction management and claims consultancy with which he is now appointed an Executive Consultant.

He is a Past President of the Chartered Institute of Building and has led the CIOB’s time management initiative since its inception in 2007.

He is the author of Delay and Disruption in Construction Contracts (4th ed., 2010, Sweet and Maxwell) and numerous other books and articles on delay related issues.

Contact [email protected]

IPMA Education & Training Board’s Series for the PMWJ: Project Management Education & Training – an Irish Perspective

SERIES ARTICLE

By Ed Naughton

IPMA Education & Training Board Member

Dublin, Ireland
________________________________________________________________________

During the last two decades we have witnessed an explosive growth in the interest and application of project management in Ireland. It has been challenging and interesting to participate in this advancement.

From modest beginnings, academic courses, professional training and accreditation programmes have blossomed as practitioners seek to enhance their knowledge, skills and competencies.

This year will represent a major milestone as in excess of 3,000 individuals will have acquired professional accreditation, in the acclaimed IPMA (International Project Management Association) 4 level certification system.

Many of these individuals have become ardent ambassadors for and promoters of the benefits of project management within their work environment. As they climb the corporate ladder, their influence on the application and development of the discipline will contribute to its future health.

There is an ever increasing awareness within organisations that the best utilization of finite and limited resources is through the application of effective project management under the stewardship of competent project managers.

Scanning the landscape

A clear understanding of the state and evolution of education, training, certification and professional practice are particularly important to the future development of the field of project management. Directly observing what practitioners do, how they put in action their knowledge and competencies are a means to understand their practice.

  • Project Management in Ireland – Survey of Practitioners

For the past eight years, the Institute of Project Management and UCC (University College Cork – Ireland’s third largest university) conduct a joint survey across five geographic regions thereby providing a good national perspective.

The results provide insights into the present state of the discipline; identify possible future development areas while at the same time providing guidance to educationalists, practitioners and organisations.  The following tables offer a glimpse of the latest results of our 2012 survey. In this article we concentrate on two interesting topics addressed in the survey:

  • The profile of people seeking to up-skill
  • Career opportunities in project management

Background Profile

The results show that the typical profile of those seeking to up-skill by acquiring an internationally recognised professional accreditation such as that offered by IPMA is:

More…

To read entire article (click here)

Editor’s note: This is the 4th in a series of articles provided by the IPMA Education and Training (E&T) Board on the subject of project management education, training, careers and related topics.  More information about the IPMA E&T can be found at http://ipma.ch/education.


About the Author

ed-naughtonflag-irelandED NAUGHTON

Institute of Project Management

Dublin, Ireland

Ed Naughton, BE, C. Eng., F.I.E.I, IPMA-a, PMP, is the founder and current Director General of the Institute of Project Management of Ireland, the leading authority on the PM profession in Ireland.  On the international front, Ed was responsible for initiating cooperation agreements with both the PMI (Project Management Institute) USA and the IPMA (International Project Management Association). He is Ireland’s representative on the IPMA council of delegates, and a former Vice President-Marketing for the IPMA. He was also the first PMP registered in Ireland.  Ed has researched, published and presented many articles and papers on project management and is the author of the Irish Project Management Competence Baseline. During his thirty year career, Ed has worked as a project manager and/or project management consultant on a large variety of high profile domestic and international assignments. Ed Naughton is a graduate of University College Dublin (BE, civil), a Fellow of the Institute of Engineers of Ireland, a Chartered Engineer (Ireland), a Professional Engineer in Canada, and holds an IPMA Level A certification.  He is former founder and editor of the quarterly international publication “Project Management Practice”. One of Ireland’s most respected experts on the topic of modern project management, Ed is an executive advisor to PM World in Ireland.  Ed Naughton lives in Dublin and can be contacted at [email protected].

Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization

SERIES ARTICLE

Dealing with Uncertainty

By Paul Dinsmore & Luiz Rocha

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

The Development of Risk Management

Before the early 1980s, risk was relatively new to those outside the insurance industry. At that time companies were able to transfer certain risks to insurance companies. These transferred risks related to natural catastrophes, accidents, human error or fraud. Later, companies began to look more closely at financial risks, like exchange rates, commodity prices, interest rates and stock prices. This was the beginning of financial risk management as a formal system.

A major drive towards more formalized approaches to risk management, corporate governance and internal controls resulted from the high-profile collapses of major corporations since the late 1990s. These scandals found executives testifying that they were unaware of unethical activities carried on by their companies.  This prompted new regulatory environments such as Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) in the US, the Combined Code on Corporate Governance in the UK and the Basel II Accord for the banking sector, all with a strong focus on internal controls and making company executives responsible for establishing, evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of their company’s internal control structure.  The most widely accepted definition of internal control was developed by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO): “a process, effected by an entity’s board of directors, management, and other personnel, designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the achievement of objectives in the following categories: effectiveness and efficiency of operations; reliability of financial reporting; compliance with applicable laws and regulations.”

The most contentious aspect of SOX is Section 404, which requires management to produce an annual internal control report which must affirm the responsibility of management for establishing and maintaining an adequate internal control structure and procedures for financial reporting. The report must also contain an assessment of the effectiveness of the internal control structure and procedures of the issuer for financial reporting.

Internal controls are fundamental to the successful operation and day-to-day running of a business and assist the company in achieving their business objectives. The scope of internal controls is very broad. It encompasses all controls incorporated into the strategic, governance and management processes, covering the company’s entire range of activities and operations, and not just those directly related to financial operations and reporting. The scope is not confined to those aspects of a business that could broadly be defined as compliance matters, but extends also to the performance aspects.

More…

To read entire article (click here)

This series includes articles by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha, authors of the book Enterprise Project Governance, published by AMACOM in the USA in 2012.  The articles are extracts and summaries of key topics from their book, providing information and guidance on one of the most important aspects of portfolio, program and project management today – governance.  For information about the book, go to http://www.amacombooks.org/book.cfm?isbn=9780814417461

About the Authors

paul-dinsmoreusa-brazilPaul C. Dinsmore

Paul Dinsmore is President of Dinsmore Associates, and a highly respected specialist in project management and organizational change. A certified project management professional (PMP), he has received the Distinguished Contribution Award and Fellow Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®). He regularly consults and speaks in North America, South America, Europe and Africa.  Paul is the author and / or editor of numerous articles and 18 books, including the AMA Handbook of Project Management. Mr. Dinsmore resides in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

luiz-rochaflag-brazilLuiz Rocha

Luiz Rocha has 35+ years of experience in the industry and business consulting. Luiz worked with Andersen Consulting and Delloite in the USA and Europe when he had the opportunity to manage multi-cultural and geographically dispersed projects in Latin America, North America and Europe. In Brazil he worked with Dinsmore Associates and Petrobras. Luiz is an engineer by background, MSc. in industrial engineering from UFRJ – Brazil, PMP-PMI and IPMA certifications. He is also a published author with two previous books, Business Metamorphosis, in Brazil, and Mount Athos, a Journey of Self-Discovery, in the USA. Luiz can be contacted at [email protected].

Global Business Intelligence for Managers of Programs, Projects and Project-oriented Organizations

SECOND EDITION

By: David L. Pells

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

A decade ago, I explored the subject of the impact of global trends and events on the project management profession with papers presented at PMI’s annual conferences in Long Beach (1998) [1] and Philadelphia (1999) [2], and at the PMI South Africa conference in Johannesburg, South Africa (1999) [3].  During the development of those themes, I outlined a model for systematically evaluating major developments and trends in such subject areas as wars and international relations; national and global politics; global, regional and local economies; industries, including mergers and acquisitions; technology; social changes; and natural disasters and refugee crises.

Over the last ten years, the field of business intelligence (BI) has matured, but has not yet been widely applied in the program and project management field.  There is little literature on the topic.  With continued globalization of economies, politics and society, and in the context of the global economic situation today, it is now time to reconsider the subject.  At the same time, the pace of change seems to be accelerating in so many aspects of business and society.  Futurists and those offering scenario planning to corporate and government leaders are gaining popularity.  Such books as Future Shock and The Third Wave by Alvin Toffler, Mega Trends by John Naisbitt, and other similar books predicting future trends for business are no longer adequate, in my opinion, although they get us thinking in the right ways.  We need a new perspective, a new way for thinking about change and the future in order to be better prepared.  We also need better decision making models.  This is especially true for project-oriented organizations, but also for managers of large programs and projects with multiple stakeholders located in different places.

This paper contains some of my thoughts on these topics, and why they should be taken more seriously by executives, program and project managers, and organizations. This covers such related topics as business intelligence, environmental scanning, trend analysis, stakeholder relations and risk management.  These can all be directly related to program and project management.  But this is a more advanced topic than basic project planning and scheduling; it is therefore addressed to senior executives and experienced program and project managers.

Business Intelligence – the Context & Current Limitations

According to Wikipedia, Business intelligence (BI) refers to skills, technologies, applications and practices used to help a business acquire a better understanding of its commercial context. Business intelligence may also refer to the collected information itself.  BI technologies provide historical, current, and predictive views of business operations. Common functions of business intelligence technologies are reporting, OLAP, analytics, data mining, business performance management, benchmarks, text mining, and predictive analytics.  Business intelligence often aims to support better business decision-making. Thus a BI system can be called a decision support system (DSS). [4]

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

Editor’s note:  Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. This paper was originally published in the PM World Today eJournal in June 2009; it is republished here with the author’s permission.


About the Author

flag-usadavid-pellsDavid L. Pells

Dallas, Texas, USA

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He is also the president and CEO of PM World, the virtual organization behind the journal and library.  David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology, and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from thousands to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award in 1999. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and Russian Project Management Association.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.  David has published widely, has spoken at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

Project Management in Spain – monthly report

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent & Editorial Advisor

Madrid, Spain
________________________________________________________________________

The PMI Madrid Spain Chapter celebrated its 10th Anniversary on June 25th 2013 in Madrid

Last June 25th the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter celebrated in Madrid its 10th Chapter Anniversary. That event joined 250 people in Madrid (HOTEL RAFAEL). The event counted on different speakers, as follows: Mr. Jose A. Puentes, Alfonso Bucero, Julio Carazo, Francisco. Javier Rodriguez, Fabrizio Tesolato, Ignacio Moro y José Luis Portela.

The introduction was delivered by Mr. F. Javier Rodriguez, current PMI Madrid Chapter President.

The PMI Madrid Spain Chapter recognized the efforts and work of all the previous Presidents of this Chapter giving to them a gift as an award to their efforts. After the event we enjoyed some Spanish tapas and soft drinks. A Jazz band played some wonderful music for the attendees’ enjoyment during more than hour at the end of the event.

Ms. Charo Fresneda was the Master of the Ceremony and she contributed highly to this event success through her dedication, effort and professionalism. Thank you very much Charo for your great attitude.

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

About the Author

flag-spainalfonso-buceroAlfonso Bucero

Contributing Editor

International Correspondent – Spain

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI-RMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011.  Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

UK Project Management Roundup

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

It seems the old maxim ‘be careful what you wish for’ is still true as the repercussions from last month’s Government spending plans continue to reverberate in the project world.  A look at the main projects should show how the UK Government approaches project funding.  Also in the news is a major project failure and an update on the energy situation.

Infrastructure Projects

Our illustrious leaders have set out their spending plans for the next 10 years.  The optimistic amongst us feel this is good because it indicates sound planning and allows proper feasibility studies to begin while indicating priorities for the National Portfolio of infrastructure projects.  The pessimistic may feel that there is little new money and many old proposals have simply had a price placed upon them.

A new prison at £100 million might save £20 million a year in efficiency savings and an additional £250 million has been set aside to improve the nation’s high speed broadband.  These seem minor in comparison to the costs for High Speed 2 rail project which has £42.6 billion earmarked.  Our pessimists claim this is a cost escalation of about £10 billion while project savvy observers claim proper contingency has been applied.  Additional funding has been agreed to cover the cost of additional tunneling and environmental mitigation.  This total includes about £8 billion for new rolling stock.

While UK is preparing to invest significant sums to expand its high speed network, France, the pioneers of trains à grand vitesse (TGV) have announced that investment in new lines is being cut.  President Hollande announced last month that the planned €245 Billion investment in transport infrastructure is to be cut to a maximum of €30 million.  This immediately cuts out the 28 new lines planned for development over the next 10 years.  French funding for TGV includes ongoing local government subsidy but ministers claim the high speed network is building up large debts, said to be about €32 billion and rising to more than €61 by 2025.  Makes one wonder what they know that UK doesn’t.

More…

To read entire report (click here)

About the Author

flag-ukmiles shepherdMILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently the Chair of the ISO committees that are developing new ISO 21500 Guidelines for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

Project Management Update from Nepal

REPORT

By Suraj Dahal

Contributing Editor

Kathmandu, Nepal
________________________________________________________________________

Project Management Association of Nepal on April 24, 2013 started its “Project Perspectives”, a professional discussion and interaction series for members of the association, free of charge, to be headed by Mr. Prasad Gyawali, PMP, Life Member, PMAN.

The first speaker was Markus Hällgren, an associate professor at Umeå School of Business & Economics at Umeå University in Sweden also currently a visiting researcher at Stanford University at the department of Sociology, USA, and visiting researcher at Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management, Uppsala University, Sweden. The venue was provided by Nepal College of Travel and Tourism Management.

Markus’s interests are study of organizing processes in extreme environments. He had just arrived in Kathmandu from the Everest Base Camp.

tripleED2tripleED1

Climbing Everest is one of the empirical settings in the research environment TripleED, an international inter-disciplinary group of researchers with different interests and expertise where a common denominator is an interest for less traditional environments and organizational issues therein. They are currently researching the everyday decision making in environments such as high altitude mountaineering and emergency rooms.

He shared about his study on managing this kind of project-like endeavors with other systematically managed projects on topics such as leadership, team dynamics, decision-making processes, experience, and competencies.

“Project Perspectives” is intended to feature project professionals on a regular basis for sharing and networking as well as provide a chance for the members to meet in person and share personal as well as professional updates.

More…

To read entire report (click here)


About the Author

SURAJ-DAHAL-bioflag-nepalSuraj Dahal

Kathmandu, Nepal

Suraj Dahal, an active advocate of the profession of project management, is a management consultant based in Nepal. He is the founding member and General Secretary of Project Management Association of Nepal (PMAN). He has served on the board and was the chief executive of prominent NGOs in Nepal that implemented projects and programs with government, civil society organizations, corporate sector, and development partners. He is a consortial partner of Systemic Excellence Group (http://www.systemic-excellence-group.com/), a global network of independent think tanks for change management. He can be contacted at: [email protected]

Project Management Update from Argentina

REPORTS 

By Cecilia Boggi, PMP

International Correspondent
Buenos Aires
, Argentina
________________________________________________________________________

Last month, was held in Argentina a very important event for the project management community. PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter organized its PM DAY called “Jornadas Cuyanas 2013”, held in the cities of Mendoza and San Luis, with lectures and workshops presented by recognized speakers, sharing experiences and good project management practices applied to different projects in Latin America, and I was glad to be part of both of these events that enrich our profession.

During the session in Mendoza on June 5th, after the opening and welcome words of Mr. Jorge Moreno, Past President of PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter, Mr. Carlos Calderaro shared the lesson learned with the project of the “Vertedero GATUN” of the Panama Canal.

Mr. Victor Orellana Acuña from Chile shared his experience with a lecture about “Challenging and Successful Projects”, talking about the project of remodeling the World Soccer Women’s Championship Stadiums in Chile.

We also had the opportunity of learning from Mr. Mauricio Garay and Mr. Carlos Gonzalez, the Application of PMI Practices to the Construction Project of the Hotel, Resort & SPA, Vines of Mendoza, Tunuyan, Mendoza”.

Closing the day, I had the pleasure of facilitating a workshop about Leadership and Interpersonal Relationship to the Project Team and I was amazed about the great interest and participation of the attendees, showing the growing importance that project management professionals give to soft skills in our country.

More…

To read entire report (click here)

About the Author

flag-argentinaCecilia BoggiCECILIA BOGGI

International Correspondent

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Cecilia Boggi, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and Latin America.

After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private sector.  Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012.  Ms. Boggi is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the years 2014-2016.  Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia. 

She can be contacted at [email protected]  and www.activepmo.com.ar

PM World
Journal
Volume II – Issue VII – July 2013
Summary for webpage
_____________________________
REPORTS
Project Management Update from Argentina
By Cecilia Boggi, PMP
International Correspondent
Buenos Aires, Argentina
________________________________________________________________________
Last month, was held in Argentina a very important event for the project management
community. PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter organized its PM DAY called “Jornadas Cuyanas
2013″, held in the cities of Mendoza and San Luis, with lectures and workshops
presented by recognized speakers, sharing experiences and good project management
practices applied to different projects in Latin America, and I was glad to be part of both
of these events that enrich our profession.
During the session in Mendoza on June 5th, after the opening and welcome words of
Mr. Jorge Moreno, Past President of PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter, Mr. Carlos Calderaro
shared the lesson learned with the project of the “Vertedero GATUN” of the Panama
Canal.
Mr. Victor Orellana Acuña from Chile shared his experience with a lecture about
“Challenging and Successful Projects”, talking about the project of remodeling the World
Soccer Women’s Championship Stadiums in Chile.
We also had the opportunity of learning from Mr. Mauricio Garay and Mr. Carlos
Gonzalez, the Application of PMI Practices to the Construction Project of the Hotel,
Resort & SPA, Vines of Mendoza, Tunuyan, Mendoza”.
Closing the day, I had the pleasure of facilitating a workshop about Leadership and
Interpersonal Relationship to the Project Team and I was amazed about the great
interest and participation of the attendees, showing the growing importance that project
management professionals give to soft skills in our country.
More…
To read entire report (click here)

About the Author
CECILIA BOGGI
International Correspondent
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Cecilia Boggi
, PMP is founder and Executive Director of activePMO, giving consulting
services and training in Project Management and Leadership skills in Argentina and
Latin America.
After graduating with a degree in Computer Science Engineering from Universidad de
Buenos Aires, Argentina, she has managed software development projects and PMO
implementation projects for more than 20 years both in the government and private
sector. Cecilia also has graduated from an Executive Program in Business
Management at Universidad del CEMA. She holds the Project Management
Professional (PMP®) credential since 2003, is certified as SDI Facilitator from Personal
Strengths© and is alumni of the PMI Leadership Institute Master Class 2012. Ms. Boggi
is Past President of the PMI Buenos Aires Argentina Chapter, and is a founding
member of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Chapter and PMI Santa Cruz Bolivia Chapter. She has
been designated by PMI in the role of Mentor of Region 13, Latin America South, for the
years 2014-2016. Cecilia has participated in the development of PMBOK® Guide 5th
Edition, leading the Chapter 9, Human Resource Management, content team and she is
professor of Project Management in some Universities and Institutes in Argentina, Chile,
Peru and Bolivia.
She can be contacted at
and
www.activepmo.com.ar

Mathematical Models of Project Management for the Supplier

FEATURED PAPER

By Prof Vladimir I. Voropaev, PhD

and

Yan D. Gelrud, PhD

Russia
________________________________________________________________________

Annotation

In this article the complex of the interconnected mathematical models intended for project activities management at all stages with participation of interested party – General Supplier, is considered. The use of such models aims at increasing efficiency of the activity, ensures that relevant competences and the desired objectives achievement under various conditions of modalities for the project implementation are put into effect.

KEY WORDS: stakeholder, mathematical models of project management, competence of project management.

INTRODUCTION

In [1], the attempt is made to structure the features of the main interested parties (stakeholders) and construct mathematical models of project management taking them into account. The examples of such models are provided for the investor, customer, project team, main contractor, suppliers and regulators.

Ibid we noted that the choice of methods and project controls is largely determined by the management of which project stakeholder is considered in this case, and under which conditions. Various interested parties in the project differ by their expectations, roles, degree of responsibility and actions. This is due to their various purposes in the project, criteria of success and an assessment of the degree of goal achievement, different values and strategy for the achievement of the objectives. These distinctions can influence significantly project goals and objectives setting, methods used, tools and techniques of problem solving management, focused on their specific requirements. But also in modeling activity of a certain interested party there can be various options of goal settings, connected with various conditions of project implementation. Besides, problem implementation methods of optimized decision making also possess essential diversity.

This article suggests mathematical models intended for management of project execution at all stages with participation of one interested party – General Supplier. For each suggested variant specific conditions to which this model is adequate are considered. At the same time solving techniques which also can be multi-versioning are suggested and analyzed. The use of such models aims at increasing efficiency of General Supplier’s activity, ensures that relevant competences and the desired objectives achievement under various conditions of modalities for the project implementation are put into effect.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Authors

VLADIMIR-VOROPAJEVflag-VLADIMIR-VOROPAJEVVLADIMIR VOROPAJEV

Author, Professor, International PM Expert

Founder, Former President, Chair – SOVNET

Former Vice President – IPMA

Full Member, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences

Moscow, Russia

Professor Vladimir Voropajev, PhD. is Founder and former President and Chairman of the Board of the Russian Association of Project Management, SOVNET. Dr. Voropajev is professor of Project Management at the State University of Management, Moscow, Russia.  He is also Head of the Program and Project Management Faculty for the Russian State Academy’s Program for Professional Retraining and Professional Skill Development for Executives and Specialists in Investment Fields.  He is a full member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences on Information Science and Cybernetics, and of the International Academy of Investments and Economy in Construction. From 1991 to 2001, he was Vice-president and a member of the Executive Board of the International Project Management Association (IPMA), the global federation of national PM associations based in Zurich, Switzerland. He is the First Assessor for several IPMA certification bodies. In 2005 he was awarded IPMA Honorary Fellowship Award. He is also an honorary Fellow of the Indian Project Management Association and a past member of the Global Project Management Forum Steering Committee.  During his 40 years of engineering, scientific, teaching and consulting activities, he has published over 250 scientific research works including 7 monographs and 5 textbooks about the organization and planning of construction, information systems, and project management.  Vladimir serves on the editorial boards of several international project management journals, is a frequent participant in PM conferences worldwide, and provides ongoing counsel and support to PM professional leaders in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Yugoslavia and several other countries.  Professor Voropajev can be reached at [email protected]

yan-gelrudflag-russiaYan D. Gelrud

South Ural State University

Chelyabinsk, Russia

Mr. Yan Gelrud was born in 1947 in  Birobidjan (Khabarovsk Territory). In 1965 he finished a school of mathematics and physics at Novosibirsk. In 1970 he graduated from the mathematical faculty of university at Novosibirsk on “Mathematics” speciality. From 1970 to 1991 Yakov was working in the Research Institute of automated control systems as a head of mathematical division. He took part in creation and adoption of more than 100 automated control systems in different branches of industry.

From 1991 to 1997 Mr. Gelrud was doing business, being director general of “URAL-ASCО-SERVICE”.  Since the 1st of September 1997 till now he works as a professor of the “Enterprise and management” department in South Ural State University. He teaches a multitude of disciplines, such as “Mathematics”, “Theory of probability and mathematical statistics”, “Econometrics”, “Economic and mathematical methods”, “Mathematical methods of decision-making”, “Bases of decision-making methodology”, “Economical evaluation of investments”, “Mathematical methods and models of project management”, “Studies of managerial systems.”

Yan Gelrud has more than 100 publications and speeches on seminars and conferences of different level. His monograph “Project management in conditions of risk and uncertainty” was published recently.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

Intersection of Engineering, Construction and Logistics

FEATURED PAPER

Post-Disaster

By Bob Prieto

USA
________________________________________________________________________

Today’s highly engineered environment requires a new first responder team that includes engineers and constructors. The importance of these new first responders could be seen in efforts to remove bent steel beams in the search for survivors on 9/11; seal levee breaches after Katrina; restore power and water supply after the tsunami at Fukushima; and the massive infrastructure recovery efforts following Super Storm Sandy in New York and New Jersey. These new first responders are also essential for rebuilding after the immediate response phase.

Events of scale change the normal construction process. New logistical challenges emerge and evolve in the post-disaster phase. These challenges include destroyed logistical facilities; competition with other post-disaster aid flows; and disrupted supply chains.

This paper looks at these challenges and offers recommendations to better manage them.

Today’s highly engineered environment requires a new first responder team that includes engineers and constructors. The importance of these new first responders could be seen in efforts to remove bent steel beams in the search for survivors on 9/11; seal levee breaches after Katrina; restore power and water supply after the tsunami at Fukushima; and the massive infrastructure recovery efforts following Super Storm Sandy in New York and New Jersey. These new first responders are also essential for rebuilding after the immediate response phase.

Events of scale change the normal construction process. This is addressed in more detail in a companion paper at this conference. New logistical challenges emerge and evolve in the post-disaster phase. These challenges include destroyed logistical facilities; competition with other post-disaster aid flows; and disrupted supply chains.

Today’s managers charged with designing, building and operating with resiliency in mind must be cognizant of the growing role these new first responders play after events of scale. Their effectiveness and the effectiveness of longer term aid and reconstruction flows are closely coupled by this weakened logistical chain.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)


About the Author

 flag-usabob prietoBob Prieto

Senior Vice President

Fluor

Bob Prieto is a senior vice president of Fluor, one of the largest, publicly traded engineering and construction companies in the world. He is responsible for strategy for the firm’s Industrial & Infrastructure group which focuses on the development and delivery of large, complex projects worldwide. The group encompasses three major business lines including Infrastructure, with an emphasis on Public Private Partnerships; Mining; and Industrial Services. Bob consults with owners of large engineering & construction capital construction programs across all market sectors in the development of programmatic delivery strategies encompassing planning, engineering, procurement, construction and financing. He is author of “Strategic Program Management”, “The Giga Factor: Program Management in the Engineering and Construction Industry” and “Application of Life Cycle Analysis in the Capital Assets Industry” published by the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) and “Topics in Strategic Program Management” as well as over 450 other papers and presentations.

Bob is a member of the ASCE Industry Leaders Council, National Academy of Construction and a Fellow of the Construction Management Association of America. Bob served until 2006 as one of three U.S. presidential appointees to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Business Advisory Council (ABAC), working with U.S. and Asia-Pacific business leaders to shape the framework for trade and economic growth and had previously served as both as Chairman of the Engineering and Construction Governors of the World Economic Forum and co-chair of the infrastructure task force formed after September 11th by the New York City Chamber of Commerce.

Previously, he served as Chairman at Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB), one of the world’s leading engineering companies.  Bob Prieto can be contacted at [email protected].

Practical Look at How Private Sector Entrepreneurial Contractors Use Earned Value (And what “Lessons Learned” this might offer for State and Federal Governments)

FEATURED PAPER

Dr. Paul Giammalvo, CDT, CCE, MScPM, MRICS 

Jakarta, Indonesia
________________________________________________________________________

The fact remains- for state and federal governments as well as large, private sector owner companies, the track record in producing “successful” projects (defined to be delivered reasonably on time, reasonably within budget;  in substantial conformance to the technical requirements without killing anyone or despoiling the environment has been abysmal. (Whether or not the product of the project failed or succeeded it not the topic of this paper, only whether the project itself was a success in terms of the more traditional time, cost, quality, safety, health and the environment)

In the June, 2013 issue of PM World Journal, http://goo.gl/LorHj I explored whether or not small to medium sized contractors, working under the traditional “design>bid>build” contracting process, complied with ANSI 748, and concluded that yes, we do, but with several very important differences.

In this paper, I pick up where I left off in June and will explore in greater detail exactly how small to medium sized contractors (“entrepreneurial contractors” as opposed to large corporate contractors) apply and use earned value and how, by understanding better how we use earned value, the state and federal governments can modify the relevant laws or regulations to gain full advantage that EVM offers.

To start, the simple facts are:

1)    Contractors, in a normally competitive market are working on single digit EBIT margins. There is no room for mistakes. (In a highly competitive or “tough times” market the EBIT margins may well be zero)

2)    Because of the competitive nature of the design>bid>build contracting, where the “lowest responsive bidder” wins the contract, the market forces us from building in too much contingency into our selling price.

3)    On the other hand, with single digit EBIT margins, if we do make a large enough mistake, or a series of mistakes in estimating our costs then we will quickly and unmercifully be driven into bankruptcy.

Thus the cost estimating and scheduling competencies are a core to any successful contractor.   We can neither be too high or too low. And that range is incredibly small.  Meaning our cost and duration estimates MUST be accurate, reliable and precise.

As I closed out last month’s article, I offered a graphic which I have been using for over 40 years.  It dates back to the early 1970’s and my undergrad days where I was taking a course at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) taught by Marvin Gates, PE.  This was when Earned Value was first becoming talked about in construction management and I wrote a now long gone paper, which featured this graphic in explaining how Earned Value worked.

This graphic is important because from the contractors perspective, there is clearly a link between work performed and cash flows.  Yet the way Earned Value is used in most government applications, this clear and unambiguous link is missing.  And that is one of the first weaknesses that needs to be corrected IF we want earned value to become more widely used as a project and program management tool.  Both from the owner and contractors perspective, cash flows are important and you cannot divorce work being completed on a project from the cash flow analysis necessary to fund this work.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)

About the Author        

PAUL-GIAMMALVO-bioflag-italyflag-polandflag-usaDr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE, MScPM, MRICS

Jakarta, Indonesia

Dr. Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE (#1240), MScPM, MRICS, is Senior Technical Advisor (Project Management) to PT Mitratata Citragraha. (PTMC), Jakarta, Indonesia. www.build-project-management-competency.com.

For 20+ years, he has been providing Project Management training and consulting throughout South and Eastern Asia, the Middle East and Europe.  He is also active in the Global Project Management Community, serving as an Advocate for and on behalf of the global practitioner. He does so by playing an active professional role in the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International, (AACE); Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) and the Construction Management Association of America, (CMAA). He also sat on the Board of Directors of the Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards (GAPPS), www.globalpmstandards.org, Sydney, Australia and is active as a regional leader in the International Guild of Project Controls. http://www.planningplanet.com/guild

He has spent 18 of the last 35 years working on large, highly technical international projects, including such prestigious projects as the Alyeska Pipeline and the Distant Early Warning Site (DEW Line) upgrades in Alaska.  Most recently, he worked as a Senior Project Cost and Scheduling Consultant for Caltex Minas Field in Sumatra and Project Manager for the Taman Rasuna Apartment Complex for Bakrie Brothers in Jakarta.  His current client list includes AT&T, Ericsson, Nokia, Lucent, General Motors, Siemens, Chevron, Conoco-Philips, BP, Dames and Moore, SNC Lavalin, Freeport McMoran, Petronas, Pertamina, UN Projects Office, World Bank Institute and many other multi-national companies and NGO organizations.

Dr. Giammalvo holds an undergraduate degree in Construction Management, his Master of Science in Project Management through the George Washington University and was awarded his PhD in Project and Program Management through the Institute Superieur De Gestion Industrielle (ISGI) and Ecole Superieure De Commerce De Lille (ESC-Lille- now SKEMA School of Management) under the supervision of Dr. Christophe Bredillet, CCE, IPMA A Level.  Paul can be contacted at [email protected].

Mergers in Construction Project Management

FEATURED PAPER

By Petros Farantakis, Academic Head, Bilston Community College

Dimitrios  Kamsaris, Professor, Bilston Community College

Stefanos Kougoulos, Lecturer, Bilston Community College

John Petridis, MBA, University of Leicester

UK
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract 

This paper aims at answering the strategic question, “In which way Mergers affect the effective delivery of construction project management”.

The current research was based on the process of the questionnaires and semi–structured interviews and was applied in Greek construction companies engaged in international projects. The findings and the data analysis are presented here-below. Having discussed the findings of this research, suggestion for improvement was given. The limitations of the research were also acknowledged as well as recommendations for further research.

Keywords: project management, merger. 

  1. Introduction

The objective of this paper is to present a topic on international project management and the effect of mergers. The research objective is to attempt to identify the way in which mergers affects the effective delivery of construction project.

Brown and Kaka (2003) states that the construction industry is under achieving and has a poor rate of performance while investing little in research and development. The present is important initially for the company understudy, itself, as well as other companies operating in the same industry, in order to increase peoples’ effectiveness and improve performance. Secondly, the research is important for the academic community and for practitioners who may use the results of this research.

The most important research question that will be determined during the current study is:

  • How mergers contribute to achieve the effective delivery of projects?

The first chapter contains the introductory stage to the research. The second chapter includes the literature review. The purpose is to define the problem and the background of the study. This will include a bibliographical research, through books and up to date journals. In this chapter definitions related to training and project management will be included as well as the relevant theories. The third chapter includes the research design and methodology which will describe the steps that will be undertaken in order to address the research questions, the research approach, and the research techniques.

The fourth chapter includes data analysis and findings resulting from the research expressed through tables, diagrams and descriptions. The last chapter includes the conclusions and recommendations and it will provide suggestion for further study in the future.

More…

To read entire paper (click here)


About the Authors

petros-farantakisflag-ukflag-greeceDr. Petros Farantakis

Co-Author

Dr. Petros Farantakis holds the Academic Director position at Bilston Community College in the UK and, is a teaching Professor for the Open University in Greece. 

 

dimitrios-kamsarisflag-greeceDr. Dimitrios P. Kamsaris 

Co-Author

Dr. Dimitrios P. Kamsaris is a Professor of Organizational Behavior at Monarch UGSM Business School in Switzerland and Visiting Professor of Management at Business Schools in France, UK, Denmark, Cyprus, and Greece. Dr. Kamsaris has completed postdoctoral education at Harvard University. He held CEO and managerial positions in Coca-Cola, Sherwin Williams, Athens 2004, Shell and D Constructions.  Today, he serves as a member of Board of Directors and management consultant in commercial and construction firms.  Furthermore, he trains public & private sector executives in the U.K., Denmark, Cyprus and Greece. Recently, he trained Pakistan Top Governmental Directors in UK.  He is published in business and academic journals and is a chartered member of the Cyprus Human Resource Management Association.  e-mail: [email protected] 

stefanos-kougoulosflag-greeceStefanos Kougoulos 

Co-Author

Mr. Stefanos Kougoulos is a Lecturer at the Bilston Community College in the U.K while he is pursuing his Doctorate in Project Management at Monarch UGSM Business School in Switzerland.  He has extensive experience as a procurement engineer. His main responsibility is within the purchasing and investment department of the major oil seeds processing industry and maritime company in Greece, since 2006.   In the past, he has collaborated with technical naval bureau as a surveyor and drawing engineer. Mr. Stefanos Kougkoulos holds a Master of Science degree in Construction Project Management from Heriot Watt University, as well as a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering. During his postgraduate thesis he conducted a research on the way the Project Success Factors Affect the Residential Construction Projects in Greece.  e-mail: [email protected] 

ioannis-peridisflag-greeceIoannis Petridis

Co-Author

Mr. Ioannis Petridis is an MBA graduate from the University of Leicester. Presently, he is working as a Banking Consultant at Marfin Egnatia Bank (Member of LAIKI Group). 

A note on project management, and different understandings of the nature of professions and professionals

COMMENTARY

By Alan Stretton 

Sydney, Australia
________________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACT 

This is an extension of a one-page article I wrote many years ago in the Australian Project Manager entitled “What is a professional?” (Stretton 1997). That article was written for an Australian audience, and briefly discussed differences in common usages and understanding of the nature of a “professional” between Australia and the USA. It appears that similar differences may also exist in other cross-international contexts. This note expands on two different interpretations of the nouns “profession” and “professional” in a general context, and their relevance to the project context. 

INTRODUCTION

In Stretton 1997 I pointed out that different understandings of what “professional” means had contributed to substantial misunderstandings on both sides in the Australia-USA project management context. These misunderstandings may have diminished in more recent times, but still appear to be significant. Further, there are grounds for believing they may also apply in some other cross-cultural/cross-international contexts. It therefore seems appropriate to expend this topic in a little more detail than was possible in the one page that comprised Stretton 1997. The focus of the following is on different definitions of “profession” and the noun “professional”, and choices made about which interpretations have been commonly adopted by different cultures.

DIFFERENCES CONTAINED IN DEFINITIONS OF A PROFESSION

Definitions of a profession are many and varied. Following are definitions from five different dictionaries, from Australia, UK and USA.

Profession n 

The Macquarie Concise Dictionary

1.   a vocation requiring knowledge of some department of learning or science, esp. one of the three vocations of theology, law, and medicine (formerly known as the professions or the learned professions);

2.  any vocation, occupation, etc. 

The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (my numbering)

1.   A vocation, a calling, esp. one requiring advanced knowledge in some branch of learning or science, spec. law, theology or medicine;

2.   gen. any occupation as a means of earning a living

3.   The body of people engaged in a profession 

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

alan-strettonflag-australiaAlan Stretton, PhD     

Faculty Corps, University of Management

and Technology, Arlington, VA (USA)

Life Fellow, AIPM (Australia) 

Alan Stretton is one of the pioneers of modern project management.  He is currently a member of the Faculty Corps for the University of Management & Technology (UMT), USA.  In 2006 he retired from a position as Adjunct Professor of Project Management in the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia, which he joined in 1988 to develop and deliver a Master of Project Management program.   Prior to joining UTS, Mr. Stretton worked in the building and construction industries in Australia, New Zealand and the USA for some 38 years, which included the project management of construction, R&D, introduction of information and control systems, internal management education programs and organizational change projects.  He has degrees in Civil Engineering (BE, Tasmania) and Mathematics (MA, Oxford), and an honorary PhD in strategy, programme and project management (ESC, Lille, France).  Alan was Chairman of the Standards (PMBOK) Committee of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) from late 1989 to early 1992.  He held a similar position with the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), and was elected a Life Fellow of AIPM in 1996.  He was a member of the Core Working Group in the development of the Australian National Competency Standards for Project Management.  He has published over 120 professional articles and papers.  Alan can be contacted at [email protected].