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Why Become a Certified Green Project Manager® (GPM®)

COMMENTARY

By Mónica González, MBA, PMP, GPM 

Argentina
________________________________________________________________________

When in early 2010 I got engaged with the PMI Global Sustainability Community of Practice, it was because I had a clear understanding of the Sustainability´s criticality as a global imperative to change values of all elements of society. In fact, for PMI the Global Sustainability is the attainment of enduring economic, social and environmental well-being of all elements of society.  But, how to shape this concept into something tangible, that is, for businesses to become sustainable, more sensitive and responsive to the sustainability of the environment and society (or multiple societies) in which business is conducted. The best way, as a Global Sustainability CoP Council member, specifically as marketing service lead, was through spreading the knowledge to PMI members and in particular to community subscribers and users.

But my motivation went beyond that, I felt that as a Project Management Professional (PMP®) I needed to give “a next step” in my professional career to reinforce my commitment within the discipline of Project Management, but also with Sustainability.  In late 2012, and by chance, I began speaking with Joel Carboni, the President of GPM, the sustainability focused project management professional development organization.

I was intrigued by their specialized competency based certification, their approach to project management, and what they teach in their training courses as the curriculum integrates several ISO standards that I have worked with for many years. 

I started the process to apply for the Green Project Management certification (GPM®) and found it to be challenging as it leverages the Crawford-Ishikura Factor Table for Evaluating Roles (CIFTER) model developed by the Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards (at http://www.globalpmstandards.org) GAPPS and measures project outcomes from a Social, Environmental, and Economic perspective.  (The GPM® Certification [1] was just included in the study that was covered by PMWJ Project Management Credentials Compared:  A Follow Up Analysis [2] by Dr. Paul Giammalvo and was ranked pretty high.)   When I was notified that I had passed the assessment, and was a Certified Green Project Manager (GPM®), I began collaborating with Joel and was introduced to other partners who were working to advance sustainability all over the world.

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About the Author

monica-gonzalezflag-argentinaMÓNICA GONZÁLEZ, MBA, PMP, GPM

Mónica González is an Industrial Engineer, Master in Business Administration and has two International Certifications, Project Management Professional (PMP®) of the Project Management Institute and Green Project Manager (GPM®) of the Green Project Management Organization. She has over 25 years of experience in Electrical Companies, in both public and private sectors, specifically in Electric Power Transmission in High and Medium Voltage.

In the past 13 years, she has worked as a Project Manager, involved with developing, establishing,  implementation and maintenance of Organizational (and Integrated) Management Systems according to the International Management Standards, like ISO 9001 (Quality Management Systems – Requirements), ISO 14001 (Environmental Management Systems — Requirements), ISO 26000 (Guidance on Social Responsibility), OHSAS 18001 (Occupational Health and Safety Standard) and the Argentinean  Resolution ENRE 057/2003 Public Safety for Electric Power Transmission in High and Medium Voltage.

From 2002 to 2004, she was part of Communication Committee and Environmental and Sustainable Development Committee of Electricité de France (EDF) Branch America along with colleagues from France, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina.  As PMI member Monica is a founder of the PMI Nuevo Cuyo Argentina Chapter, as a volunteer she serves as Marketing and Communications leader, issuing a monthly newsletter among others.

In addition to integrate the PMI Global Sustainability Community of Practice Council (May´2010-Dec´2012) and support  PMI Educational Foundation as a Liaison in Nuevo Cuyo Chapter, she serves as a committee member for the PC/ISO 236 Project Committee: Project Management; and for the ISO/TC 258 – Technical Committee: Project, Program, Portfolio Management.  From October 2012, Mónica is a member of the Green Project Management Executive Consortium. Currently, she is a Senior Project Manager and works as an independent contractor.  Monica can be contacted at [email protected]

UK Project Management Roundup

REPORTS

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent 

Salisbury, England, UK
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

The New Year has got off to a hectic start with new projects announced by the Government and further policy developments on some super projects in the energy field.  In this report, we look at projects in the capital, developments in the nuclear industry and some ethical issues in major projects.

LONDON PROJECTS 

While the various cases for new airports for London have taken the headlines over the last few weeks, there are other projects that command attention.  The Shard was topped out this time last year and was opened to the public in mid February 2013.  The landmark near LondonBridge has become a perennial second place edifice.  It is the second tallest free standing structure in UK behind the EmleyMoorTransmittingTower and second tallest building in Europe behind Moscow’s MercuryCityTower.  It is, however, the tallest building in the European Union at 1016 feet (309.6 meters) and 95 floors.  The Shard is really just a small building compared to some others either planned or under construction.  The good news is that the team that successfully delivered the Shard has just been selected to build the world’s tallest building in the Saudi Arabian capital Jeddah.

According to reports in the UK press (Times 23 February), Mace and EC Harris are scheduled to manage the construction of the 1400 meter KingdomTower.  It is expected that construction will begin later this year and cost in the region of £780 million.  The tower has been designed by US firm Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill.  Completion is expected in 2018.

Meanwhile, back in London, a new ‘supersewer’ is being planned for the capital.  Plans were announced in 2010 for a 20 mile tunnel to run from west to east and would deal with contamination from overflowing sewers in times of high rainfall.  Many see this £3.6 billion project as long overdue – London’s original sewer system was built in Victorian times under the direction of Sir Joseph Bazelgette.  Reports put the discharge of untreated sewage at 39 million tons annually and Thames Water, the private utility company has devised a new sewer system to deal with this and other problems.

The Supersewer project is not without its critics.  Cost has escalated to £4.1 billion and how the project is to be funded is attracting the attention of several Members of Parliament.  The plan has been met with fierce local opposition – the work affects 14 London boroughs.  It is expected that the project will increase average water bills, currently around £360 a year, by an additional £80.

Councils such as Hammersmith and Fulham are against the plan, claiming that the current plan is ‘gold-plated’.  Council leader Stephen Greenhalgh was reported by BBC News as saying: “We have consistently pushed for a shorter, smarter tunnel that minimises disruption to Londoners.  The gold-plated ‘super sewer’ with a £3.6 billion price tag threatens our parks and will drive many hard-working families into water poverty to pay for it.”

Controversy seems to dog London projects and the possible ‘new’ London Air Hub continues to attract heated debate.  Apart from simple matters such as location and finance, there is a substantial political dimension with observers claiming that the decisions will affect the leadership prospects of the Conservative Party and the Prime Minister as the Mayor of London proposes an alternative to the current government policy.

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About the Author

miles shepherdflag-ukMILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently the Chair of the ISO committees that are developing new ISO 21500 Guidelines for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

Project Management in Spain: Monthly report End of February 2013

REPORT FROM THE PM PROFESSION

By Alfonso Bucero MSc, PMP, PMI Fellow

International Correspondent and Contributing Editor

PM World Journal 

Madrid, Spain
________________________________________________________________________

Bovis Lend Lease gestionará las obras del nuevo centro de Botín en Santander

Diseñado por el prestigioso arquitecto Renzo Piano, representa la primera actuación conjunta de Bovis Lend Lease y Renzo Piano Building Workshop en España. Ambos han colaborado en al menos diez emblemáticos proyectos en todo el mundo, siendo ésta su primera actuación conjunta en España. 

Bovis Lend Lease, empresa líder mundial en Gestión de Proyectos de Construcción ha sido seleccionada por la Fundación Botín para realizar el Project Management del nuevo Centro Botín en Santander. La empresa de Project Management aporta su extensa experiencia, tanto a nivel nacional como internacional, en la gestión de proyectos emblemáticos y edificios singulares de gran complejidad, entre los que se encuentran más de 50 proyectos de museos de primer nivel en todo el mundo, incluyendo el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León en España.

El nuevo Centro Botín, diseñado por el prestigioso arquitecto Renzo Piano, representa la primera actuación conjunta de Bovis Lend Lease y Renzo Piano Building Workshop en España.  Ambos han colaborado en al menos diez proyectos emblemáticos por todo el mundo, como el proyecto City Gate en Malta, actualmente en fase de construcción, o el recientemente inauguradoCentral St. Giles en Londres.

El nuevo Centro Botín convertirá a la ciudad en protagonista del arte internacional además de potenciar la cornisa cantábrica como uno de los ejes culturales más importantes de Europa. No será sólo un museo o un Centro de Arte, sino que su actividad integrará las artes y la educación con un objetivo social. El arte que por sí mismo fertilizará la vida de la ciudad, y el arte como medio para desarrollar

la creatividad a través de un innovador programa educativo de la Fundación Botín.

La inauguración  está prevista para el verano de 2014,  coincidiendo con el 50 Aniversario de la Fundación Botín y la celebración del Campeonato Mundial de Vela Olímpica, que ha sido adjudicado recientemente a la ciudad de Santander.

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About the Author  

alfonso-buceroflag-spainAlfonso Bucero 

International Correspondent

Editorial Advisor – Spain

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, PMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and now nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 29 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010 and the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011.  Mr. Bucero can be contacted at [email protected].

PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATHEMATICAL MODELS FOR THE CUSTOMER

FEATURED PAPER 

By Prof Vladimir I. Voropaev, PhD

and

Yan D. Gelrud, PhD 

Russia
________________________________________________________________________

SUMMARY 

The article considers the mathematical models intended for managing project activity at all stages having one interested party, project customer involved. For the first time, the problem of managing project and product configuration is explicitly formulated and stated. Use of these models is aimed at increasing the efficiency of customer’s activity; using these models ensures implementation of relevant competences and attainment of the objectives set under various conditions of project environment.

KEYWORDS: Stakeholder, project management mathematical models, project management competencies.

INTRODUCTION 

In [1] an attempt is taken to structure the features of the main interested parties (stakeholders) and taking those into consideration to construct project management mathematical models. Examples of such models have been built for investor, customer, project team, main contractors, suppliers and regulating bodies.

We have also pointed out that the choice of methods and tools of project management is determined to a large degree by management of which interested party we are looking at in each case. Different interested parties in a project differ in their expectations, roles, degree of responsibility and actions. This is due to the different goals, success criteria and self-evaluation of reaching their own goals, different values and strategies to achieve the goals. These differences significantly impact setting the project tasks, the management problem-solving methods, tools and technologies used oriented towards theirs specific needs. But when modeling the activity of an individual interested party there may exist different alternatives of formulating these tasks connected with different conditions in which the project is carried out. Other than that, methods of implementation of optimal decision-making problems are also of considerably multivariate nature.

The article proposes the mathematical models intended for managing project activity at all stages having one interested party, project customer involved. For every suggested alternative particular condition which the given model is adequate to and at the same time, methods of finding solution, which could also be multivariate, are proposed and analyzed. Use of these models is aimed at increasing the efficiency of customer’s activity; using these models ensures implementation of relevant competences and attainment of the objectives set under various conditions of project environment.

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About the Authors 

VLADIMIR-VOROPAJEVflag-VLADIMIR-VOROPAJEVVLADIMIR VOROPAJEV 

Author, Professor, International PM Expert

Founder, Former President, Chair – SOVNET

Former Vice President – IPMA

Full Member, RussianAcademy of Natural Sciences

Moscow, Russia 

Professor Vladimir Voropajev, PhD. is Founder and former President and Chairman of the Board of the Russian Association of Project Management, SOVNET. Dr. Voropajev is professor of Project Management at the State University of Management, Moscow, Russia.  He is also Head of the Program and Project Management Faculty for the Russian State Academy’s Program for Professional Retraining and Professional Skill Development for Executives and Specialists in Investment Fields.  He is a full member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences on Information Science and Cybernetics, and of the International Academy of Investments and Economy in Construction. From 1991 to 2001, he was Vice-president and a member of the Executive Board of the International Project Management Association (IPMA), the global federation of national PM associations based in Zurich, Switzerland. He is the First Assessor for several IPMA certification bodies. In 2005 he was awarded IPMA Honorary Fellowship Award. He is also an honorary Fellow of the Indian Project Management Association and a past member of the Global Project Management Forum Steering Committee.  During his 40 years of engineering, scientific, teaching and consulting activities, he has published over 250 scientific research works including 7 monographs and 5 textbooks about the organization and planning of construction, information systems, and project management.  Vladimir serves on the editorial boards of several international project management journals, is a frequent participant in PM conferences worldwide, and provides ongoing counsel and support to PM professional leaders in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Yugoslavia and several other countries.  Professor Voropajev can be reached at [email protected]

flag-russiayan-gelrudYan D. Gelrud

South Ural StateUniversity

Chelyabinsk, Russia

Mr. Yan Gelrud was born in 1947 in  Birobidjan (KhabarovskTerritory). In 1965 he finished a school of mathematics and physics at Novosibirsk. In 1970 he graduated from the mathematical faculty of university at Novosibirsk on “Mathematics” speciality. From 1970 to 1991 Yakov was working in the Research Institute of automated control systems as a head of mathematical division. He took part in creation and adoption of more than 100 automated control systems in different branches of industry.

From 1991 to 1997 Mr. Gelrud was doing business, being director general of “URAL-ASCО-SERVICE”.  Since the 1st of September 1997 till now he works as a professor of the “Enterprise and management” department in SouthUralStateUniversity. He teaches a multitude of disciplines, such as “Mathematics”, “Theory of probability and mathematical statistics”, “Econometrics”, “Economic and mathematical methods”, “Mathematical methods of decision-making”, “Bases of decision-making methodology”, “Economical evaluation of investments”, “Mathematical methods and models of project management”, “Studies of managerial systems.”

Yan Gelrud has more than 100 publications and speeches on seminars and conferences of different level. His monograph “Project management in conditions of risk and uncertainty” was published recently.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

A Look at Joint Ventures

FEATURED PAPER

By Bob Prieto

Fluor Corporation 

USA


 The use of collaborations in accomplishing strategic business objectives has grown considerably over the years with two thirds of the business leaders in a Bank of America Merrill Lynch research survey indicating that they had worked closely in collaboration with at least one other organization and 90% indicating that the future depends on even more collaboration.

These collaborations may take various forms and be driven by factors such as:

  • Scale
  • Complexity
  • Access to technology or intellectual property
  • Satisfying national or local participation goals.

The use of joint ventures (including special purpose vehicle (SPV) and limited liability company (LLC) structures) is a growing practice in the engineering and construction market, driven by the factors above but also by greater use of alternate contracting and project delivery strategies including design build and public private partnerships. While these joint venture structures are all established for finite objectives, the durations of many of them exceed the lifetimes of many companies.

In order to better understand the performance, challenges and areas of focus joint ventures represent, senior engineering and construction industry executives were surveyed to gain a deeper insight. Participants in the survey came from firms experienced in the use of joint ventures each with varying degrees of policies and practices to support their formation and operation.

This paper summarizes the survey findings and recaps with some thoughts on areas requiring added emphasis or effort.

Survey Demographics 

The survey was conducted in January of 2013 among senior executives that had key roles on recent major project joint ventures. These projects included 23 projects and detailed responses from 24 respondents. Projects encompassed the following sectors:

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About the Author 

bob prietoflag-usaBob Prieto

Senior Vice President

Fluor 

Bob Prieto is a senior vice president of Fluor, one of the largest, publicly traded engineering and construction companies in the world. He is responsible for strategy for the firm’s Industrial & Infrastructure group which focuses on the development and delivery of large, complex projects worldwide. The group encompasses three major business lines including Infrastructure, with an emphasis on Public Private Partnerships; Mining; and Manufacturing and Life Sciences. Bob consults with owner’s of large engineering & construction capital construction programs across all market sectors in the development of programmatic delivery strategies encompassing planning, engineering, procurement, construction and financing. He is author of “Strategic Program Management” and “The Giga Factor: Program Management in the Engineering and Construction Industry” published by the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) and “Topics in Strategic Program Management” as well as over 400 other papers and presentations.

Bob is a member of the ASCE Industry Leaders Council, National Academy of Construction and a Fellow of the Construction Management Association of America. Bob served until 2006 as one of three U.S. presidential appointees to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Business Advisory Council (ABAC), working with U.S. and Asia-Pacific business leaders to shape the framework for trade and economic growth and had previously served as both as Chairman of the Engineering and Construction Governors of the World Economic Forum and co-chair of the infrastructure task force formed after September 11th by the New York City Chamber of Commerce.

Previously, he established a 20-year record of building and sustaining global revenue and earnings growth as Chairman at Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB), one of the world’s leading engineering companies.  Bob Prieto can be contacted at [email protected].

Agile vs. Traditional: an Unnecessary War

COMMENTARY

By Jeff Oltmann 

Portland, Oregon, USA
________________________________________________________________________

There’s a War On

There’s a war raging.   On one side are ardent agilists, who advocate managing projects using methods such as Scrum and XP.   On the other side are traditionalists, who prefer waterfall methods.  Just look at the venom in these excerpts from recent articles on project management and product development.

What are these opposing approaches to managing projects?   It’s a bit hard to pin down – and that’s part of the confusion – but here’s a broad distinction.   Traditional methods are planning-driven.  They place a high value on early and thorough planning before executing the plan.  Agile methods emphasize flexibility and incrementalism over detailed planning.  Agile projects string together a series of very short (typically 2 – 4 week) plan-do iterations rather than engaging in lot of advance planning.

Vacation in the Islands

An example may help.  Let’s say that you expect to take a month-long vacation in Hawaii.  If you use a traditional planning-driven approach, months before the trip you’ll study guidebooks, research event listings, plan your daily itinerary, and procure advance tickets to key activities.  When you arrive in Hawaii at the start of your vacation, everything is all laid out, including a pair of hard-to-get tickets to the Jimmy Buffet reunion concert that sold out months in advance.

Alternatively, you could manage this trip as an agile project using one week iterations. Before leaving for the islands, you’ll make a high-level wish list of activities that sound interesting, but you won’t spend much time on detailed pre-planning.   At the beginning of every week on Hawaii you’ll figure out what activities you will do that week based on your wish list, the weather forecast, and the people and places you discovered last week.  This sounds pretty good – it allows you to be flexible and explore your emerging interests, such as accepting a spontaneous invitation to attend an authentic family luau with a local resident that you met the first week.

Who’s Right?

Although this is an exaggerated example, it illustrates some of the pros and cons of each approach.  The traditional approach, with its emphasis on advance planning, is efficient when you have relatively clear knowledge about the future course the project is likely to take, the risk or cost of having to redo things  is low, or advance preparation confers important benefits such as managing long lead time orders.   You plan once and then do (perhaps with minor modifications). This allows you take advantage of opportunities like attending that once-in-a-lifetime Jimmy Buffet concert under the palm trees.

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About the Author

jeff-oltmannflag-usaJeff Oltmann 

Jeff Oltmann is principal consultant at Synergy Professional Services, LLC in Portland, Oregon, USA (www.spspro.com).  He is also on the graduate faculty of the Division of Management at Oregon Health and Science University.  Jeff welcomes your questions and ideas.  You can contact him at [email protected] or read previous articles at www.spspro.com/resources.htm.

The Missing Link In Projects

BOOK REVIEW

the-missing-link-in-projectsBook Title:  The Missing Link In Projects

Author:  Lunga Msengana

Publisher:  Knowres Publishing

Format:  soft cover; 148 pages

Publication Date:   2012

ISBN: 978-1-86922-190-4

List Price: R259.00 (South African Rand)

Reviewer:  Nazanin Mehrooz, PMP

Review Date:              February 2013

________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

This book focuses on the importance role human factors play in Project Management.  Personal aspects can often play a stronger role in success of a project.  Often the focus is on technical aspects which can have less impact on overall results.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book contains 11 chapters:

  1. The human aspect:  The missing link in projects
  2. The art and the science of managing projects
  3. Project management and leadership
  4. Career issues in project management
  5. Project managers as politicians
  6. IQ is so overrated
  7. The real meaning of control in projects
  8. The essence of lessons learned
  9. Systems thinking and project management
  10. Communication and Its Power at the Program Level
  11. Pay attention to your modus operand

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

  • Human aspects are often ignored in projects because they can make one feel vulnerable and often requires internal reflection.  If PMs can address these challenges, the benefits include better facilitation and influencing, gaining team member commitment and building stronger relationship.
  • Trust is a major part of any relationship.  The author lists seven steps which have been most effective in his experience.  They include expecting the best in others, understanding and rewarding open communication, admitting mistakes, acceptance of people/situation and most importantly respecting others.
  • Effective management of human aspects results in stronger leader skills, more effective problem-solving and improved teamwork.  The International Project Management Association (IPMA) focuses on these competencies in their four levels of accreditation.  Having these skills is an essential part of the PM growth path.

Highlights: What I liked!

For Project Managers to effectively lead and inspire, it is necessary to have a balance of both technical and human factors.   Often human factors are challenging but effective management yields to benefits and rewards in all areas of life. 

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About the Reviewer

Nazanin-Mehroozflag-usaNazanin Mehrooz, PMP 

Nazanin Mehrooz was born in Iran and migrated to the USA where she studied software engineering and worked in both defense and telecom industries.  For the past decade, her focus has been IT Application Support, Operations and Service Delivery Management.  Nazanin is an active volunteer for the Dallas and Ft Worth PMI chapters.  She can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Titanic Lessons in Project Leadership: Effective Communication in Team Building

BOOK REVIEW 

titanic-lessonBook Title:  Titanic Lessons in Project Leadership: Effective Communication in Team Building

Author:  Ranjit Sidhu

Publisher:  Multi-Media Publications

List Price:   US$24.95

Format:  soft cover; 115 pages

Publication Date:   2012

ISBN: 9781554891207

Reviewer:  Laura K. Moorhead, PhD, PMP

Review Date:              November
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

One hundred years ago, the passenger ship, Titanic, sank several hundred miles south of Newfoundland on her maiden voyage. In Titanic Lessons in Project Leadership, author Ranjit Sidhu posits that the tragedy was not primarily the result of a failure of engineering, but a failure of effective leadership and communication.

The Titanic was designed to be the most luxurious, safest, and most technologically advanced ocean liner of its day, but key decisions were made to change its design along the way that sacrificed passenger safety for a luxurious sailing experience. Sidhu draws parallels between major milestones in the design, construction, and launch of the Titanic and contemporary project management methods to reveal important lessons in team building and communication to ensure successful projects. 

Overview of the Book’s Structure

Titanic Lessons in Project Leadership is organized into eleven chapters which roughly correspond to the stages and processes of project management in a traditional waterfall project. The eleven chapters are:

  • Chapter 1 – Stakeholders and Strategy
  • Chapter 2 – Definitions and Design
  • Chapter 3 – Construction and Compromise
  • Chapter 4 – Marketing and Media
  • Chapter 5 – Changes and Consequences
  • Chapter 6 – Teams and Tensions
  • Chapter 7 – Communication and Conflict
  • Chapter 8 – Risks and Reframing
  • Chapter 9 – Decisions and Disaster
  • Chapter 10 – Crisis and Collision
  • Chapter 11 –  Conclusions

The book is not meant to be a definitive history of the Titanic nor a definitive analysis of all of the events that led up to the disaster.  Instead the author identifies what she sees as key turning points and decisions that were made to illustrate how these turning points and decisions affected the final outcome. Sidhu also shows how, by using effective communication and leadership, these could have been done differently.

Highlights: What’s New in This Book?

Titanic Lessons in Project Leadership is part of Multi-Media Publications’ Lessons from History Series using catastrophic failures–such as the sinking of the Titanic–and spectacular successes such as the escape of the 220 captured airmen from the German prison camp, Stalag Luft during World War II, to glean important behaviors to avoid as well as behaviors and processes to emulate in our present day projects.

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About the Reviewer

laura-moorheadflag-usaLaura Moorhead

Laura K. Moorhead, PhD, PMP is a Senior Consultant with CGI, a global technologies and business solutions company. She has broad experience in managing information technology projects in manufacturing, distribution, and in the oil and gas industries. Laura is a member of the PMI Dallas Chapter and can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Customer-Centric Project Management

 

BOOK REVIEW 

customer-centric-pmBook Title:  Customer-Centric Project Management

Author:  Elizabeth Harrin and Phil Peplow

Publisher:  Gower Publishing Company

List Price:   US$44.95

Format:  soft cover; 115 pages

Publication Date:   2012

ISBN: 978-1-4094-4312-4

Reviewer:  Nazanin Mehrooz, PMP

Review Date:             December 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Customer-Centric Project Management raises the importance of value management and customer perception.  Often these areas are more accurate indicators of how successful your projects are than measuring results of the triple constraint alone.  Measuring customer’s perception requires collecting feedback from stakeholders at regular intervals throughout the project lifecycle and not just at the end of a project.  This book shares guidance on how to manage this effort and use the results towards improving success on projects.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book contains 9 chapters:

  1. Introducing a Customer-Centric Process
  2. Why Customer Count
  3. Why Collaborative Project Management is Not Enough
  4. Measuring Project Performance
  5. Customer Centricity in Practice: A Case Study
  6. Customer Centricity in a Project Management Environment
  7. Refining Your Customer-Centric Approach
  8. Implementing Exceed
  9. Moving Forward with Customer-Centric Project Management 

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

  • Value Management based on customer-centric views
  • Exceed process introduction and steps to effectively gather feedback
  • Tips on refining processes based on various factors in projects and programs

Highlights: What I liked!

Value management based on business needs and customer perception is not typically the focus of most PM.  This book did a good job of covering these topics.   An area often overlooked is how effectively departments within companies serve each other.  The authors did a good job of highlighting the importance of these topics.  

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About the Reviewer

Nazanin-Mehroozflag-usaNazanin Mehrooz, PMP

Nazanin Mehrooz was born in Iran and migrated to the USA where she studied software engineering and worked in both defense and telecom industries.  For the past decade, her focus has been IT Application Support, Operations and Service Delivery Management.  Nazanin is an active volunteer for the Dallas and Ft Worth PMI chapters.  She can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

The Facilitator’s Fieldbook Third Edition

BOOK REVIEW 

the-facilitators-fieldbookBook Title:  The Facilitator’s Fieldbook Third Edition

Authors:  Thomas Justice, David W. Jamieson

Publisher:  AMACOM Books

List Price:   US $45.00

Format:  soft cover; 470 pages

Publication Date:   2012

ISBN: 978-0-8144-2008-9

Reviewer:      Madison Berndt, PMP and Susan Kennedy, PMP

Review Date:              January 2013
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

As a Project Manager, Business Analyst or Consultant, effective facilitation can be the most visible and challenging aspect of a large scale project.  This book provides useful taxonomies for understanding and discussing facilitated group meetings along with guidelines and templates for planning and implementing the meetings.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book begins with an introductory primer.  We found the Primer and Resources useful because it clarifies the tools and techniques needed to facilitate meetings.  Most of this is not new to an experienced facilitator so the overview is good for reminders and orientation.  The overview and Primers are 10% of the book.

The next three sections deal with the main phases of facilitation:  Preparation, Working with the Group and Implementation (follow-up and action items).  Experienced project professionals will recognize these as aligned with the PMI process categories of Initiation/Planning, Executing/Monitoring, and Closing.

Most of the content is dedicated to detailed guidelines, checklists, and examples for large group meetings.  The information is easily accessible and relevant to anyone working on enterprise level projects that require cross-functional engagement.

We particularly like the way that tasks for each phase are handled.  A task list is provided that clearly defines what is needed and then each task is covered in more detail.  Worksheets and templates are provided throughout. Almost 70% of the book is dedicated to the three phases of facilitation.

Four scenarios are covered in more detail by sections 4 and 5.  These include:

  • uncooperative large groups of selected stakeholders (sound familiar?),
  • working with large groups of self-identified stakeholders,
  • working with multiple groups within large-group meetings, and
  • facilitating in a virtual environment.

The virtual facilitation section is particularly helpful for recommending standards of conduct to be expected from team members.  The condensed coverage and detailed process steps provide a useful resource for integrating the latest technology into meetings.  The detailed coverage of specific scenarios is general enough to be applied in divergent situations. 

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About the Reviewers

madison-berndtflag-usaMadison Berndt, PMP 

Madison Berndt is a Project Manager located in the Dallas, Texas area focused primarily on Business reporting and Business Intelligence related projects.  His experience with end-user development projects includes startups, mid-sized/high growth, and established Fortune 500 companies.  He is a graduate of UT Arlington having earned his Bachelor Science in Economics in 1989 and Masters of Business Administration in 2007.  In 2010 he earned the PMP certification and is an active volunteer with PMI Dallas. Madison can be contacted at [email protected]

susan-kennedyflag-usaSusan Kennedy, PMP

Susan Kennedy, PMP is an award winning project manager with 30 years’ experience.  She has managed over 25 information technology implementation projects across the US, Canada, Mexico, Europe and Asia.  She has taught facilitation classes, and has managed executive meetings around the world.  Susan is known for effectively facilitating contentious issues, and seems to enjoy it.  She is experienced in strategic and operational planning, and is the recipient of several project management and business awards.  Susan Kennedy can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

In This Edition

David Pells,

Managing Editor 

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the March 2013 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), the 8th issue of the new web-based publication serving the world of professional program and project management (P/PM).  This month’s edition of the PMWJ includes 30 new articles, papers, reports and book reviews from 12 different countries, again reflecting the global nature of our readers and contributors.  An additional 40+ news articles about projects and project management around the world are also included

This month’s edition begins with one Letter to the Editor. Luiz Rocha in Brazil has responded to last month’s “Letter to the Editor by Patrick Weaver about  the series title ‘Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization’ By Paul Dinsmore & Luiz Rocha”.  Join in this interesting debate.  If you have any comments or reactions related to anything published in the PMWJ, send us an email.  Sharing knowledge, including reactions and perspective, is the main mission of the PMWJ.

We include an Interview this month, with Prof John-Paris Pantouvakis, authored by Ed Naughton in Dublin.  Professor Pantouvakis is current Chair of the IPMA Education and Training Board, was Project Director for the IPMA 26th World Congress in Greece last year, and is president of PM Greece, the Greek national member of IPMA.  Ed is a contributing editor and advisor to PM World Journal.

Eight authors in 5 countries have contributed Featured Papers this month.  Michael O’Brochta in the USA has authored another interesting paper entitled “You Know You are a Project Manager when ….”  Alan Stretton, PhD in Australia has provided another paper entitled “Notes on identifying needs of multiple internal customers. Professors Vladimir Voropajev, PhD and Yan Gelrud, PhD in Russia are the authors of “Project Management Mathematical Models for the Customer”. Bob Prieto in the USA has authored another good paper on “A Look at Joint Ventures.”  Pieter Steyn, PhD in South Africa has provided an update of his 2011 paper entitled “A Business Model for Programme Managing the Supply Chain Portfolio.”  Jonas Balshoej Ebbesen and Alexander Pope, PhD in the UK are the authors of “Re-imagining the Iron Triangle: Embedding Sustainability into Project Constraints.” These are all serious papers; we hope they are interesting and useful our readers.

Five Series Articles are included this month. Prof Darren Dalcher in the UK has organized another “Advances in Project Management” article and provided an introductory article himself entitled “From Quality to the Pursuit of Excellence”Ron Basu, PhD also based in the UK is the author of the advances series article entitled, “Best Practices of Managing Quality in Projects”.  Ron is the author of the book “Managing Quality in Projects” published by Gower in 2012.

Bill Young, PhD, Australian professional leader currently residing in China, has provided another article in the series called “Dragons, Camels and Kangaroos: Cultural Intelligence for Programme and Project Management”.  Bill’s article this month is titled “China – Cultural Dimensions in International Business.”  Another article is included in our series launched in January on the subject of “Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization,” by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha in Brazil.  Dinsmore and Rocha are the authors of the outstanding book Enterprise Project Governance, published in the USA by AMACOM in 2012.  Their third article this month is entitled “EPG and Corporate Governance (continued) – Alignment with major International Project Organizations.”

Another article is included this month by Keith Pickavance in UK on the subject of the new contract for complex construction projects from the Chartered Institute of Builders (CIOB). Under the series titled “A New Construction Contract for the 21st Century,” Keith’s article this month is on the subject of “Time Management.” These series articles should spur deep consideration and perhaps some debate, authored by some of the leading P/PM experts in the world.  We hope you enjoy them.

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About the Author

david-pellsflag-usaDAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

David L. Pells is Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He is also the president and CEO of PM World, the virtual organization behind the journal and library, and of PM World Services, an executive P/PM advisory firm.  David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a wide variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology, and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award in 1999. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and of the Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.  David has published widely, speaks at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at [email protected].

Maturity Levels of Project Portfolio Management (PPM) and how to set your Own Target Level

SECOND EDITION

By Matti Haukka

Finland
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction

The degree of using personnel resources for program and project type work processes is increasing in all organizations.  It is a fact and a problem that the organizations’ Governance models are not considering this yet. One reason is that management is not even recognizing the changed situation. Even though it is recognized, the challenge is to set the targets regarding the maturity on a reasonable and realistic level.

This presentation is based on several years’ experiences when consulting organizations representing different industries and service business fields as well as the public sector. As a framework for assessing maturity levels this presentation refers to Five Step and Maturity Level Model developed by Project Institute Finland.  The model has already been presented in many IPMA Conference papers.

It has also been used as the framework and flowchart of IPMA Advanced training course “Managing Corporate Portfolios” instructed by the Author and  CEO of Projects of Schiphol Airport Mr. Gerard Geurtjens.

 

The paper is also launching a new term –Project Allocation Percentage (PAP). PAP is very good indicator to most organizations to define the target level for PPM maturity. Finally, the paper presents an approach how the maturity target is related to PAP.

Different types of projects and portfolios and the need of PPM

The principles of this presentation can be applied to any kind of project portfolio. But in case of a delivery project portfolio where the majority of projects are delivered to external customers, some of the ideas and principles are not so relevant.  Therefore, the following questions and the story are highly relevant whenever you have a portfolio of internal projects:

You can ask the question: which is the most critical resource when implementing your strategy: money or personnel resources? I have set this question hundreds of times to management boards and finally, their answer has always been “personnel resources”. That is because you can always get money for good business ideas but if you have a lack of competent resources, that is a more complex problem.

Then I continue with a question: If your old laptop is not functioning properly anymore , and you need a new one (let’s say that the price of this new laptop would be 1 k€), are you allowed just to go and buy one and take the invoice to your book keeper? The answer is always “no”.  You have to fill certain documents and get an approval through a certain governance model.

Then I ask: If you have a good development idea and you want to get together a meeting with four of your colleagues (let’s say that the duration of this meeting is two hours, it means that the labour cost of the meeting is app. 1 k€), are you allowed to do this? The answer is “yes, of course”.

The main point of this story is not say that buying e.g. a new laptop should be allowed without any control, or to say that getting together any meeting should get an official permission. Most of the readers have already got my point: The use of real money is always controlled by our governance systems, but the use of personnel resources are not.

Even if personnel resources were just said to be more critical.

So what is the conclusion of my story? Typical governance models are controlling the use of money but not the use of personnel resources. If most of the projects are implemented using external resources, you do not have such a big challenge. But if a huge amount of your own personnel resources are needed to implement your projects, you have a big challenge. This challenge can be solved only by Project Portfolio Management of a reasonable maturity level (See figure 1).

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Editor’s note:  Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English. This paper was originally presented at the 26th IPMA World Congress, Greece, published in the Congress Proceedings and video recorded (http://pmgreece.gr/video.pdf).  Paper  republished here with permission of the author and PM Greece, organizers of the 26th IPMA World Congress

About the Author                                                                                                                              

matti-haukkaflag-finlandMatti Haukka

Helsinki, Finland 

Mr. Matti Haukka is a Partner and Senior Consultant at Project Institute Finland ltd. and a board member of Project Management Association of Finland.  He has a M.S. degreee in Engineering from Helsinki University of Technology (1985).  His professional experience includes: Operations Planning Engineer, Project Engineer and Project Manager, Valmet Shipbuilding Division and Wärtsilä Marine Engineering 1985-1988; Project and Design Manager responsible for international projects and project business development, Wärtsilä Marine Contracting 1988-1989; Project and Product Manager in charge of project management training and consulting, Dativo 1990; Partner and Managing Director, Project Institute Finland ltd, 1990-2002; Partner and Senior Consultant, Project Institute Finland ltd, 2002 – present; Secretary of the Board, Project Management Association of Finland, 1992-1998; Member of the Board, Project Management Association of Finland, 1998-2001 and 2011- present; and member of the Board, PMI Chapter Finland, 2008-2010.

Matti Haukka has provided tailored project management training for various companies and worked as a consultant for several organizations of different fields since 1989. At Project Institute Finland he has been in charge of developing the ABC Project model™ and held numerous presentations about the topic in international project management conferences. Today he mainly trains experienced project managers, members of steering groups and board of directors and provides consulting services for clients who want to develop their project management cultures. His specialty is project management models and portfolio management. He has been the main instructor of yearly IPMA Advanced Course “Managing Corporate Project Portfolios” since 2006. He also functions as the leader of “Portfolio Management and Program Management – SIG team” in Project Management Association Finland.

Matti can be contacted at [email protected].  For information about Projekt Institute Finland, visit website:  http://www.projekti-instituutti.fi/

Enterprise Project Portfolio Management

BOOK REVIEW 

enterprise-project-profolio-managementBook Title:  Enterprise Project Portfolio Management

Authors:  Richard M. Bayney, Ph.D./Ram Chakravarti
Publisher:  J. Ross Publishing
List Price: US$69.95

Format:  Hardcover, 356 pages
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: 978-1-60427-060-0

Reviewer: Johnny Gan, PMP

Review Date: January 2013
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

“To be successful, we need to do more with less”.

When you read this book titled, Enterprise Project Portfolio Management (EPPM), you may think it’s really big topic to discuss. Richard and Ram, the book authors have put forth a rational and systematic approach to make it simple from the deep content of this topic. A framework like “CREOPMTM”, which is described in much detail in this book, helps get the people side right by surfacing the best projects practically.

Whether you are running a business or a project, your simple goal is making value, or you say “Value Creation”, in a more popular term from business school. You always set up ongoing strategic and financial goals to make value, but you always find all these goals become harder and harder to accomplish under constrained resource conditions. Many times, you think you are lost, and don’t know where your organization is heading. Then I think it’s a good time to introduce portfolio management into your organization’s DNA, and this book is really a good introduction book you may like.

It is difficult to find an industry or organization that has not been impacted by the effects of globalization, mergers and acquisitions, restructuring, cost cutting, and change management. In the past few decades, many large companies are going downhill, not because they do not have any chance in their market, instead, they have too many opportunities to keep them distracted. Therefore how to build up effective EPPM system, how to find out the priority from these market opportunities, how to catch them to become your new value creation? All these questions will push you to read this book, and to find out the right answer from this book.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book is organized into four sections with four accompanying appendices.

Section 1: Introduction to Enterprise Project Portfolio Management (EPPM)

This section introduces basic concepts of EPPM.

Section 2: Prerequisites for EPPM

In this section, you will learn some key concepts: like Strategic Planning, Decision Framing and Data Integrity. 

Section 3: CREOPMTM : A framework for EPPM

This section is core part of the whole book. It discussed how to do the best practice in Portfolio Management step by step: 

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About the Reviewer

johnny ganflag-chinaJohnny Gan, PMP 

Johnny Gan has many years of software R&D experience at HRsmart.com (http://www.hrsmart.com/).  Mr. Gan received his MS degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, USA, and is also certified by the Project Management Institute as a Project management Professional (PMP®). Johnny can be contacted at [email protected] .

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Lean and Digitize: An Integrated Approach to Process Improvement

BOOK REVIEW 

lean-and-digitizeBook Title:  Lean and Digitize:  An Integrated Approach to Process Improvement

Author:  Bernado Nicoletti

Publisher:  Gower Publishing Ltd.

List Price:   US$124.95

Format:  hard cover; 232 pages

Publication Date:   December 2012

ISBN: 978-1409441946

Reviewer:      Michael DeTuncq

Review Date:              January 27, 2013
_______________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Lean Thinking and Six Sigma provide a methodology for analyzing and optimizing physical and organizational flows.  Bernado Nicoletti presents a model that integrates information and communications technology (ICT) with Lean Thinking and Six Sigma in a manner that helps rather than hinders process improvement processes.

This book introduces “Lean and Digitize” as the method to accomplish this.  Nicoletti contends that Lean and Digitize solves the problems of “incomplete alignment of ICT with process improvement initiatives, initiative redundancy, Excessive time lost in the analysis and implementation phases, and the difficulties in the measuring and verifying control improvements.”

Overview of Book’s Structure

Lean and Digitize consists of eleven chapters.  The book is organized into four sections.  The first section is just one chapter.  It is an overview of Lean Six Sigma principles.  The second section deals with the theory of Lean and Digitize.  The third section deals with implementing Lean and Digitize.  The fourth section covers examples of Lean and Digitize in action.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

The book is well researched and documented.  It presents the Lean and Digitize process as the next step in the progression from Lean to Six Sigma to Lean Six Sigma.  The main factor in this evolution is the addition of information and communications technology (ICT) to the Lean Six Sigma processes.  Bernardo Nicoletti’s contention is that ICT generally not applied to Lean Six Sigma projects because “Practitioners considered it dangerous because it introduced rigidity to the processes.”

The Lean and Digitize method consists of 6 macro phases and 21 micro phases.  The macro phases are: 

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About the Reviewer

michael detuncqflag-usaMichael DeTuncq, PMP, PMI-ACP 

Michael DeTuncq is the founder and former owner of Hit! Run! Score!, Inc., an eCommerce team sporting goods business.  He has broad based leadership and project management experience in Information Technology, eCommerce, Retail, Mobility, Internet Marketing, and Business Operations.

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Dragons, Camels and Kangaroos: A Series on Cultural Intelligence for Programme and Project Management

SERIES ARTICLE

China – Cultural Dimensions in international business 

Article 3 in the series ‘Dragons, Camels and Kangaroos’ 

By Bill Young 

Melbourne, Australia and Beijing, China
________________________________________________________________________

The previous articles in this series have outlined the need to build cultural competence as a foundation stone for enabling effective international business and project success in different cultural environments. They emphasized a common aspect in cultural competence: the ability to empathize, understand and respect all national cultures. The second article provided insights into China’s cultural disposition – to help create valuable context for anyone doing business or developing projects in China. It also outlined the need for business leaders and project managers (in China and beyond) to build culturally competent teams as a primary enabler for sustaining effective international business delivery.

This issue’s article focuses on how Cultural Dimensions (conceptual constructs that help put into perspective the features of national cultures) can be used to develop an understanding of behaviors and motivations. Knowing what can potentially motivate or de-motivate people in their work activities and environments is useful in building effective integrated business and project teams. The article explores the use of Cultural Dimensions for business applicability, and also considers their limitations.

Cultural Dimensions have been extensively researched over the past four decades. Notable researchers have included Geert Hofstede, Fons Trompenaars, and Robert House. Hofstede [1] and Trompenaars [2] separately conducted large studies across international organizations such as IBM and Shell respectively. At times they have differed at times in their positions or methodologies – but there is much evidence of convergence in their findings and conclusions. House, the initiator of Project GLOBE, galvanised 170 social scientists around the world to undertake separate studies on Cultural Dimensions relating to leadership behavior [3]. This research took nearly a decade to complete. There have been many others who made similarly significant contributions to the development of Cultural Dimensions.

China’s culture primarily orders how its broader society and commercial sector works. One of the first strategic business steps in such an environment, and it may seem obvious, should be to acknowledge the reality of cultural and related situational differences. As much as globalization has created the modern illusion of everyone being more or less the same, a kind of global homogeneity, this is not the case. This first step is like a vehicle stopping at a stop sign, as opposed to slowing down and rolling through; the latter mode presenting significant risk. The key is to stop and recognise the situation; then to work out what it means, and how it will impact the business / project being conducted. This means developing realistic, as opposed to optimistic, expectations going forward. For example, a project developing budgets or schedules essentially needs to factor in the likely costs, in money and time, that situational (cultural) differences will impose.

This is where Cultural Dimensions can be a helpful starting point. Every individual business or project will find different aspects more or less relevant to their context and will need to bridge the gap from general precept to business use. The following are some examples of Cultural Dimensions in a Chinese context. 

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About the Author

bill-young-bioflag-ukflag-chinaBill Young

PhD, MBA, M.Eng, B.Eng, CPPD, FIEAust, FAIPM.

President and initiator of the Asia Pacific Federation of Project Management (www.apfpm.org) (2010 – current).

Former President (2007-11) Australian Institute of Project Management.

CEO (1985 – current) PMS Project Management Services P/L

Director (2005 – current) of Professional Solutions Australia Limited

Based in: Melbourne and Beijing: <[email protected] >. 

Bill has worked for 31 years in engineering, business, and project management responsible for a diverse range of chemical processing and mining developments. He has worked in Australia, Europe, Asia, North America, and Africa.

After completing a number of Projects in China since 2005, he moved to China with his family in 2009.  He is a consultant and entrepreneur, and a Professor (part time) for the School of Mechanical & Electronic Control Engineering, BeijingJiaotongUniversity.

A New Construction Contract for the 21st Century

SERIES ARTICLE

Time Management 

By Keith Pickavance 

London, UK
________________________________________________________________________

This is the second in a series of articles about the Chartered Institute of Building’s international construction Contract for use with complex projects. In this, we look at an overview of the foundation of the time-control features of CPC2013, the dynamic time model and Progress Records, which set it apart from those of other standard forms of contract currently available. 

The dynamic time model 

Many contracts have programming or scheduling provisions of some sort, but no other standard form currently available sets out what is actually required in the way of quality of scheduling, or provides adequate sanctions for non-compliance. The JCT Standard Building Contract, 2011, for example, one of the UK’s most popular construction contracts, whilst containing some 17 pages of clauses dealing with costs adjustment, has just one on scheduling, which states:

“The Contractor shall without charge provide the Architect/Contract Administrator with his master programme for the execution of the Works identifying, where required in the   Contract Particulars, the critical paths and/or providing such other details as are specified in the Contract Documents.”

Although this contains an invitation to write something more extensive in the specification (and many do) in practice it is often ineffective because the conditions of contract do not provide any relationship with any other time related provisions of the contract, such as recovery, acceleration and extensions of time, nor do they provide any redress for non-compliance with anything specified.

AIA 201 (2007) and AS4000 are equally brief and have the same shortcomings. Although FIDIC and NEC3 contain more in regard to required content, none provide anything by way of which any quality control of scheduling can be exercised, nor any redress for non-compliance. If the Employer wishes to have the opportunity of doing something other than just let the project slip into delay, a different approach to the problem of time management is needed.

CPC2013 is different in that it encourages the Employer to be proactive. Risk, time and cost are to be managed collaboratively and contemporaneously in line with the recommendations of the Society of Construction Law’s Delay and Disruption Protocol. This requires a dynamic critical path network as a time model (or Working Schedule as it is called in CPC2013). It is to be prepared in accordance with a default specification for the design, production and maintenance of the schedule, contained in the Contract Appendices and is to conform to the guidelines in the CIOB’s Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Complex Projects (“the Guide”). It is to be checked by a Project Time Manager, appointed by the Employer to ensure that the time-control requirements of the Contract are complied with, and is to be independently audited from time to time. It is not to be provided on paper, but is to be distributed transparently to all those who need to see it, in editable format in the software in which it was created so that it can be properly interrogated and understood.

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Editor’s note: This article launches a series of articles by Keith Pickavance about the CIOB’s new contract for complex construction projects. For information about the new contract, visit http://www.ciob.org.uk/CPC.  The full article include footnotes for some of the quotations and section references above.

About the Author

keith-pickavanceflag-ukKeith Pickavance

Keith Pickavance first qualified as an architect in 1972 and then in 1978 obtained a law degree. After 20 years as an architect in private practice the last 10 years of which also involved construction management, dispute resolution and expert witness services, in 1993 he joined an American company specialising in forensic services and delay analysis. In 1996 he set up on his own again specialising in delay analysis and time management in London and Hong Kong. That practice was acquired by Hill International in 2006, an international construction management and claims consultancy with which he is now appointed an Executive Consultant.  He is  a Past President of the Chartered Institute of Building and has led the CIOB’s time management initiative since its inception in 2007.  Keith is the author of Delay and Disruption in Construction Contracts (4th ed., 2010, Sweet and Maxwell) and numerous other books and articles on delay related issues.   Contact [email protected]

Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization

SERIES ARTICLE

EPG and Corporate Governance (continued)

Alignment with major International Project Organizations 

By Paul Dinsmore & Luiz Rocha 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

This is the third article of the series Enterprise Project Governance (EPG): How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization. As commented on the previous two articles EPG has evolved in part due to the dynamic changes that have affected overall corporate governance beginning in the 1990s. Pressures from the marketplace, governments and regulatory agencies have placed a disconcerting spotlight on company boards to ensure that decisions and corresponding actions are fully traceable, from the top down.  Since a major part of organizational survival depends on new projects, EPG adds that measure of traceability and corresponding accountability to the basics of corporate governance. This article will cover the view of major project related international organizations about the topic.

The challenge for organizations that rely on projects, programs and portfolios to instigate change and grow value is monumental. It calls for moving from ad hoc execution to an integrated, robust, repeatable and auditable system aimed at increasing the predictability of an organization’s future state. When these requirements are combined with the enhanced expectations of stakeholders, a significant requirement for such robust, predictable and auditable processes emerges.

Enterprise project governance resides under the umbrella of top management and corporate governance and is about ensuring that projects are aligned with overall strategy, are balanced with respect to corporate priorities and  succeed by establishing  a well defined approach which is understood and agreed to by all parties, that the approach is followed throughout the lifecycle of portfolios, programs and projects, and that progress is measured and actions are pro-actively taken to confirm that everything stays on track and that the agreed benefits, products or services are delivered.

Four pertinent views from some international organizations on the governance of project management are summarized below:

APM

The need for more integration of projects with the business environment in which they exist led the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK, a member of the International Project Management Association (IPMA), to produce the document “Directing Change – A Guide to the Governance of Project Management.”  They follow Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) definition of governance as a set of relationships between an organization’s owners, its board, its management, and other stakeholders. The principles of effective project governance are described as well as the information a board needs to be confident that the organization’s projects are managed in accordance with the governing principles. Organizations striving for project success are encouraged to lift their perspectives beyond the delivery of the project itself and onto the broader issues of the project`s benefits and effects on the business.

The APM publication lays out the principles of effective project governance:

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This series includes articles by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha, authors of the book Enterprise Project Governance, published by AMACOM in the USA in 2012.  The articles are extracts and summaries of key topics from their book, providing information and guidance on one of the most important aspects of portfolio, program and project management today – governance.  For information about the book, go to http://www.amacombooks.org/book.cfm?isbn=9780814417461

About the Authors 

paul-dinsmoreusa-brazilPaul C. Dinsmore

Paul Dinsmore is President of Dinsmore Associates, and a highly respected specialist in project management and organizational change. A certified project management professional (PMP), he has received the Distinguished Contribution Award and Fellow Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®). He regularly consults and speaks in North America, South America, Europe and Africa.  Paul is the author and / or editor of numerous articles and 18 books, including the AMA Handbook of Project Management. Mr. Dinsmore resides in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

luiz-rochaflag-brazilLuiz Rocha

Luiz Rocha has 35+ years of experience in the industry and business consulting. Luiz worked with Andersen Consulting and Delloite in the USA and Europe when he had the opportunity to manage multi-cultural and geographically dispersed projects in Latin America, North America and Europe. In Brazil he worked with Dinsmore Associates and Petrobras. Luiz is an engineer by background, MSc. in industrial engineering from UFRJ – Brazil, PMP-PMI and IPMA certifications. He is also a published author with two previous books, Business Metamorphosis, in Brazil, and Mount Athos, a Journey of Self-Discovery, in the USA. Luiz can be contacted at [email protected].

Advances in Project Management: From Quality to the Pursuit of Excellence

SERIES ARTICLE

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire 

UK
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the March PMWJ Article by Ron Basu 

Quality is an elusive concept and topic. Much has been said and done in the name of quality, but the underlying features of quality are yet to generate universal agreement.

Philip Crosby, a major contributor to the quality management movement, asserted that ‘quality is free’. His book with the same title published in 1979 made a strong case for doing it right first time. If you do things right in the first place, you will not need to pay to fix them, or be forced to re-do them later resulting in added costs and loss of reputation and hard earned trust. The case for getting things right from the outset is compelling, as recent recalls of cars and the grounding of new fleets of aeroplanes demonstrate.

Quality has proved to be a prolific pre-occupation for philosophers, as well as industrialists. Indeed, some of the ancient Greek philosophers long recognised that quality is not a single act, but a habit.

One of the best selling books dedicated to exploring the boundaries and meaning of quality is Robert Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance published in 1974. The book has sold over five million copies worldwide. It also holds the distinction of having been originally rejected by 121 publishers, more than any other bestselling book according to the Guinness Book of Records.

Pirsig’s book recounting a journey on a motorcycle across the US, can be read at many different levels. It can be viewed as a travel odyssey, a treatise on the philosophy of life, an exploration of familial relationships, or most crucially a deep philosophical discussion on the meaning of quality. The main character in the book is gradually introduced through a series of flashbacks as a former university professor who spent his life pursuing a quest for the true meaning of quality. The closer he got to a true definition of the term, the more unstable and chaotic his personal situation became. Finally, just as he was close to defining the meaning that he was seeking, he became mentally unstable. As the book begins, the hero tries to recover from the trauma and embarks on a physical journey of discovery. Pursuit of the true meaning of quality thus appears to have cost him his sanity.

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Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK.  Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ by Gower author Dr Lynda Bourne on the subject of “Communicating Upwards with Effect.”  Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement. 

About the Author 

Darren Dalcher, PhDflag-ukDarren Dalcher, PhD 

Author, Series Editor 

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire

UK

Darren Dalcher, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK.  He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London.  Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management.  Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond.  He is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board.  Prof Dalcher is an academic editorial advisor for the PM World Journal.  He can be contacted at [email protected].

Advances in Project Management: The Best Practices of Managing Quality in Projects

SERIES ARTICLE

By Ron Basu, PhD 

UK
________________________________________________________________________

WHY PROJECT QUALITY?

We all agree and accept that as an end user of a product or service we would like it ‘as it says in the tin’, when we want it and at good value for money. Being in a competitive world of consumer choice we also expect it to last. This is the domain of operations, services and supply chain management. And we define it as ‘quality is the consistent conformance to customer experience’ (Basu, 2011). However in the field of project management the importance of quality is not so clear cut. Project managers appear to accept the ‘iron triangle of cost, time and quality’ (Atkinson, 1999) but focus more on ‘on time and budget’ delivery as the success criteria. Quality in projects is mostly relegated to a ‘lip service’ and to several documents with ‘ticking boxes’. As a consequence we find many examples of projects ( such as Wembley Stadium, Millenium Dome, West Coast Rail Upgrade) which were delivered on time and within budget but failed to meet the expectations of end users. Therefore we need to ask ‘how diligent are we in terms of project processes to deliver project objectives’? This is the minimum requirement of ‘what it says in the tin’. Furthermore we should also investigate ‘how good is our project management … as a vehicle for delivering the longer term outcomes and benefits as required by the sponsors and end users’.

FILL THE GAP OF THE ‘IRON TRIANGLE’

There appears to be a knowledge gap in the environment of project management related to the benefits achieved by quality management in comparison to the manufacturing and service operations. The publication of the book (Basu, 2012) is an attempt that sets out to investigate the impact of all aspects of quality in project management. The author’s investigation focuses initially on defining the dimensions of quality in project management and identifying sources of measurement for project excellence. He expands to discuss which tools can be used in the quest for project excellence; and the factors and processes critical to project success and maturity. The text also explores how the successes of supply chain management, Lean Thinking and Six Sigma may be gainfully deployed. In this book, an extensive review of the publications written about managing quality in projects and bodies of knowledge (e.g. PMBOK, PRINCE2) was underpinned by field research and two contemporary case studies (viz. Heathrow Terminal 5 and High Speed 1). A structured implementation of project quality, by those directly involved in project delivery and the project stakeholders for achieving a sustainable outcome of the project is also a valuable contribution of this book.

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About the Author

Ron-Basuflag-ukRon Basu, PhD 

Dr Ron Basu is Director of Performance Excellence Limited and a Visiting Fellow at Henley Business School, England . He is also a Visiting Professor at SKEMA Business School, France. He specialises in Operational Excellence and Supply Chain Management and has research interests in Performance Management and Project Management. Previously he held senior management roles in blue-chip companies like GSK, GlaxoWellcome and Unilever and led global initiatives and projects in Six Sigma, ERP/MRPII, Supply Chain Re-engineering and Total Productive Maintenance. Prior to this he worked as Management Consultant with A.T. Kearney.

He is the co-author of ‘Total Manufacturing Solutions’ , ‘Quality Beyond Six Sigma’, ‘Total Operations Solutions’ and ‘Total Supply Chain Management’ and the author of books with titles Measuring e-Business Performance , ‘Implementing Quality’ , ‘Implementing Six Sigma and Lean’ , ‘FIT SIGMA’ , ‘Managing Project Supply Chains’ and ‘Managing Project Quality’ . He has authored a number of papers in the operational excellence and project management fields. He is a regular presenter of papers in global seminars on Project Management, Six Sigma, Manufacturing, and Supply Chain topics.

 

After graduating in Manufacturing Engineering from UMIST, Manchester, Ron obtained an MSc in Operational Research from StrathclydeUniversity, Glasgow. He has also completed a PhD at ReadingUniversity. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, the Institute of Business Consultancy, the Association for Project Management, and the Chartered Quality Institute. He is also the winner of APM Project Management Award.

Ron lives with his wife Moira in Gerrards Cross, England and has two children, Bonnie and Robi.  He can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK.  The articles are coordinated by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  Prof Dalcher also provides an introduction to the current month’s article, which you can see elsewhere in this month’s edition.”  Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement.

Systemic Innovation and the Role of Program Management as an Enabler in the Engineering & Construction Industry

SECOND EDITION PAPER

By Bob Prieto 

USA
________________________________________________________________________

Periodically it is necessary to step outside of one’s day-to-day frame of reference and question whether a current paradigm will suffice into the future. This paper is intended as one such look at a current paradigm, in this case the engineering and construction industry model. The purpose of this paper is to raise questions, challenge the current paradigm and leave the reader with more questions than he had at the outset of reading this paper.

It will not suggest silver bullets or chart a path to improvement but essentially foster the debate as to whether the engineering and construction (E&C) industry model is broken and whether we should attempt to improve it and whether large programs utilizing a program management approach offer one path to improvement.

Where possible I’ve tried to cite relevant academic work for the curious and interested to pursue further.

My own interest in this question has grown out of early involvement as a member of the then Civil Engineering Research Foundation’s (CERF) work in assessing E&C industry productivity (31, 34) and our apparent lagging in productivity growth when compared to other industries. It has been further stoked by looking at best practices and incremental innovations that I have seen in project partners over the years and recognizing what would be possible at an industry level if these innovations could be more easily systemically adopted across the entire industry. It was as a result of this consideration that my focus shifted from examining poor productivity growth (a symptom) to trying to understand the barriers to systemic innovation (a cure) which seems to be characteristic in higher productivity industries.

Is the Engineering & Construction Industry Model Broken?

The engineering & construction industry is the largest industry in the world. In the United States construction spending totals nearly 9% of Gross Domestic Product or GDP. And in many ways, today’s projects are larger and more complex than any we have faced before. They now include not only mega-programs but also even larger more complex versions that I have previously referred to as “giga” programs (43).

Yet as an industry, since about 1970, our productivity has at best been a laggard as compared to other industries. Cost overruns, unanticipated risks and schedule slippages are still too common. Why is this? And what can be done to change this situation?

Today’s engineering and construction industry model was in many ways established following World War II. It’s structure is “industrial” in nature and based on the “serial specialization” that existed in manufacturing at that time. But the 21st century is not like the late 20th century and experience in other industry sectors have shown that significant productivity gains coincide with industry models that facilitate systemic innovation.

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Editor’s note: Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  This paper was originally published in the PM World Today eJournal, now discontinued, in February 2011.  Paper is republished here with permission of the author.  If you have a good paper that you would like to see republished in the PMWJ, contact [email protected].

About the Author 

bob prietoflag-usaBob Prieto

Senior Vice President

Fluor 

Bob Prieto is a senior vice president of Fluor, one of the largest, publicly traded engineering and construction companies in the world. He is responsible for strategy for the firm’s Industrial & Infrastructure group which focuses on the development and delivery of large, complex projects worldwide. The group encompasses three major business lines including Infrastructure, with an emphasis on Public Private Partnerships; Mining; and Manufacturing and Life Sciences. Bob consults with owner’s of large engineering & construction capital construction programs across all market sectors in the development of programmatic delivery strategies encompassing planning, engineering, procurement, construction and financing. He is author of “Strategic Program Management” and “The Giga Factor: Program Management in the Engineering and Construction Industry” published by the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) and “Topics in Strategic Program Management” as well as over 400 other papers and presentations.

Bob is a member of the ASCE Industry Leaders Council, National Academy of Construction and a Fellow of the Construction Management Association of America. Bob served until 2006 as one of three U.S. presidential appointees to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Business Advisory Council (ABAC), working with U.S. and Asia-Pacific business leaders to shape the framework for trade and economic growth and had previously served as both as Chairman of the Engineering and Construction Governors of the World Economic Forum and co-chair of the infrastructure task force formed after September 11th by the New York City Chamber of Commerce.

Previously, he established a 20-year record of building and sustaining global revenue and earnings growth as Chairman at Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB), one of the world’s leading engineering companies.  Bob Prieto can be contacted at [email protected].