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The Coming Sea-Change in Project Management Science

SERIES ARTICLE

Advances in Project Management

By Michael Hatfield

New Mexico, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Abstract

When Thomas Kuhn published The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (University of Chicago Press, 1962), he introduced into the popular lexicon the term “paradigm shift.” Its original meaning dealt with the gradual shift in the adoption of a given, newly-introduced theory as it displaces commonly-held ideas that fail to adequately explain observed data or phenomena. In the realms of the hard sciences this idea displacement is easily observed and documented, as competing theories can be empirically tested for their validity. This is not so in the so-called management sciences, since the number of parameters involved in testing any theoretical approach within a macroeconomic environment is prohibitively expansive – it’s simply impossible to isolate the contributing elements affecting macroeconomic transactions to the extent necessary to validate a given approach.

Within this environment, almost any reasonable-sounding hypothesis, backed by data that wouldn’t survive scrutiny based on the rules of evidence, can be proffered and furthered well beyond its capacity to explain why things managerial have happened the way they happened, much less provide insights on how future events are likely to unfold. This does not stop bloggers, writers, institute founders, college professors, and many others from attempting to introduce into the zeitgeist notions, structures, ideas, and theories of how management ought to function, many of them suspect at best, fraudulent at worst. The resulting mash of overlapping and competing ideas provides, not clarity, but massive amounts of confusion in the pursuit of validating (or invalidating) project management science ideas, hypotheses, and theories.

This article examines how commonly-held precepts in the body of management science are advanced, and offers a basis for evaluating their validity. The result, I hope, will be a Kuhnian paradigm shift in the way project management is perceived as fulfilling a specific role within the macroeconomic environment.

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About the Author

michael-hatfieldflag-usaMichael Hatfield

Michael Hatfield, MBA, PMP, CCC, EVP, is the author of Game Theory in Management (Gower Publishing, 2012) and Things Your PMO Is Doing Wrong (PMI, 2008), but is probably best known as the author of the long running column in PMNetwork magazine, Variance Threshold.  Besides PMNetwork, his work has appeared in the Project Management Journal, Cost Engineering, Gantthead, People on Projects, The Measurable News, and even in the Nuclear Weapons Journal.  He has worked as an entry-level technician for the Air Force Weapons Laboratory’s Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) test sites, as the director of a National Laboratory’s Project Management Office overseeing a budget of $1.3 Billion (USD), and many very interesting jobs in-between. Michael lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, with his wife and two sons, and can be reached at [email protected].

Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK.  The articles are coordinated by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  Prof Dalcher also provides an introduction to the current month’s article, which you can see elsewhere in this month’s edition.”  Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement.

Value Management: Translating Aspirations into Performance

BOOK REVIEW

DAVIES PPC(250x172)PATHBook Title:  Value Management: Translating Aspirations into Performance

Author:  Roger H. Davies and Adam J. Davies

Publisher:  Gower Publishing Limited

List Price:   US$

Format:  Hard Cover; 261 pages

Publication Date:   2011

ISBN: 9781409409557

Reviewer:      Diane Williams Roberts

Review Date:              November, 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Value Management provides an interesting view of the management of change primarily within public organizations. The book highlights several case studies of program within the U.K. where value management technique either could be or have been applied.

Value Management first looks to define the problem with most programs. Defining and creating value for stakeholders is key to identifying the change required to ensure that both strategic and tactical objectives are realized. The authors create a compelling argument that equating project success to budget spend, wishful thinking and big bang implementations do not align with stakeholder value.

The book then looks at 6 principles defined by the authors to align objectives with stakeholder values. These principles are intended value, modeling value, programming value, aligning value, valuing certainty and tracking value.  The uses of various statistical, neuro-linguistic and causal tools are detailed to provide program managers with strategy maps that can link objectives with a Balanced Scorecard performance management approach.

Value Management finishes up with the JANET (UK) Transformation Program case study. This study shows the change made within a program from start to finish using the 6 principles, strategy maps and Balanced Scorecards to meet the creation of value for stakeholders.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into 3 sections – Problem, Principles and Process.

The Problem with programs is outlined in the first section. This section uses a large number of charts, diagrams and process flow maps to move the reader from realizing the need to define value with stakeholders to understanding how using measurements such as net present value and internal rate of return can align both tactical and strategic objectives.

The second section details each of the 6 principles that the authors predicate should be used to create value for a program. Case studies, statistical models and Balanced Scorecard examples are developed to provide the reader with a roadmap to implementing each of the principles.

The last section evaluates how executives with the struggling JANET (UK) research and education network realized the need for change within their organization. Pressure to reduce the cost of services as well as public desire to move to customers paying for specific value-added services, moved the CEO Tim Marshall to work with his board and staff to achieve this change though the development of a dynamics model using Balanced Scorecards.

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About the Reviewer

diane-williams-robertsflag-usaDiane Williams-Roberts

Diane Roberts is serving as an IT Project Delivery Manager for Essilor of America. Essilor of America is the North American headquarters, for Essilor International. Essilor is the world healthcare device leader in providing corrective lenses to individuals in over 100 countries. Diane Roberts has more than 20 years of experience in management and information technology positions within the research and telecommunications industries.

Diane Roberts directs Delivery activities involving Information Technology for the corporation, which encompasses the identification, analysis, design, build, implementation and support of various applications in support of Essilor’s business needs. Diane Roberts directs IT project and program manager activities that are in support of Essilor’s Enterprise systems including but, not limited to Back Office (ERP) and Warehouse Management systems.

Diane Roberts has staffed organizations, created performance and incentive plans, managed the relationships between IT Delivery and various business organizations including but, not limited to Supply Chain, Finance, Human Resources and Engineering.  She has controlled budgets of up to $50 million and her use of resources and sound Software Development Lifecycle methodology have aided key business users in many organizations to achieve outstanding performance through leveraging technology.

Email Address: [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

The Enterprise Business Analyst: Developing Creative Solutions to Complex Business Problems

BOOK REVIEW

developing-creative-solutionsBook Title: The Enterprise Business Analyst: Developing Creative Solutions to Complex Business Problems 

Authors:  Kathleen B. Hass
Publisher:  Management Concepts Press
List Price: US$ 42/-
Publication Date: 2011
ISBN: 978-1-56726-349-7

Reviewer: Rukhman Ejaz Malik

Review Date: 10/14/2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

The main emphases of this book revolve around the transformation of enterprise business analyst from a tactical, business-focused role to a creative & innovative leadership role.

To manage this transformation, this book presents the path to this transition and the tools to accomplish it.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The entire book is divided into four parts. It starts with the insights into the profession of business analysis. Part 1 presents the current role of business analyst (Chap 1), business analyst’s role from strategy development to strategy execution (chap 2) and suggesting adaptive business analyst for complex project activities (chap 3).

Part 2 contains five chapters focusing on business analyst’s role as creative leader. This includes business analyst as change agent, visionary, and credible leader (Chap 4), fostering team creativity (chap 5), cultivate creativity and innovation in multisite teams (chap 6), tools and techniques to ignite creativity at all levels of the organization (chap 7) and finally managing requirements elicitation to ensure understanding (chap 8).

Part III presents the strategies to foster innovation. It include the ideas of developing products for competitive advantage(chap 9), case for business analyst to help companies to become innovation driven organization(chap10) followed by communication strategies for business analyst to secure management support and approval (chap 11).

Finally Part IV explores innovation driven business practices. Its starts with looking into ways to develop business analyst’s capability and maturity (chap 12), followed by describing the elements needed to build a mature business analysis practice that focuses on innovation. Lastly, it examines the elements of innovation driven portfolio management and the use of center of excellence that works towards best practices of both business analysis and complex project management.

Highlights: What I liked!

I think the most valuable concept presented by Hass in this book is the paradigm shift in the nature of leadership role by single person to that of high performing shared leadership team of experts capable of providing vision, professional competence & credibility, creative thinking as well as producing sustainable change and desired business results. Business analyst being the permanent member of this core team should act as project leader, change agent and creator of innovating thinking for problem-solving and decision-making processes at every level of the organization.

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About the Reviewer

rukhman-ejaz-malikflag-usaRukhman Ejaz Malik, PMP

Rukhman Ejaz Malik is a project management professional with 15+ years of working experience in Education development projects as well as IT and Supply Chain projects with international scope. Domain expertise is in Education planning & management, Geographical information system, Enterprise/web portals, information management, and NetApp storage technologies. Work Experience includes over nine years for United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) at different locations including its Headquarter in Geneva Switzerland, and seven years in the education planning and management sector. Rukhman has an M.S Physics and has completed Post Graduate level studies in Information Technology and Education Planning and Management.  He can be contacted at email: [email protected].

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Don’t Say ‘YES’ NEGOTIATE! A Quick Reference to Better Negotiations, First Edition

BOOK REVIEW

 dont-say-yes-negotiateBook Title:  Don’t Say ‘YES’ NEGOTIATE! A Quick Reference to Better Negotiations, First Edition

Author:  Richard Devin

Publisher:  Multi-Media Publications Inc.

List Price:   US$ 29.95

Format:  soft cover; 128 pages

Publication Date:   2011

ISBN: 9781554891078

Reviewer:      David Lamb

Review Date:              November, 2012

________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Everyone negotiates.  How can one do it better?  Use a methodology?  Use common sense?  Give up?

This book moves the reader from being acted upon to being an actor in the negotiation play.  The motivation is to move from wanting to be liked to wanting to succeed.  Devin’s book presents a series of negotiation strategies and tactics.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Don’t say ‘Yes’ – Negotiate begins with “Think Before You Speak” and works through another 32 brief, but effective, chapters leading the reader through a survey of negotiation strategies.

Think Before You Speak – Shut up.  Listen.  Think.  Then, respond.  It seems so simple and obvious.  So why don’t we do it.  Devin points out that “we like to talk, and we especially like to talk when someone is willing to listen.”  But as he next points out, the someone listening usually will not have your best interest at heart.

Ensuing chapters include: Ask;  Asking for Something You Don’t Want; Ask, Don’t Tell; and on.  I won’t remove the mystery or surprise or joy the reader will have discovering Devin’s path to more successful negotiations, but I do want to partially divulge portions that particularly caught my eye and mind.

Highlights: What I liked!

The chapter “Ask” is a tour de force describing the most basic point in negotiations.  One never gets if one never asks.  Devin discusses how to rephrase the question to elicit more information from the other side.  Then ask again with another twist, always working to learn.  After asking, then listen.  Do not get distracted by pondering about your own next question.  If you ask and are not paying attention, all advantage will be lost.

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About the Reviewer

david-lambflag-usaDavid Lamb

David Lamb has been involved with software development for his adult career and in software project management for a dozen years.  A graduate of Texas A&M in Physics and Statistics.  An avid kayaker and canoe instructor who enjoys river beautification.

He can be contacted at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Improving your Project Management Skills, 2nd Edition

BOOK REVIEW

 improving-your-project-management-skillsBook Title:  Improving your Project Management Skills, 2nd Edition

Author:  Larry Richman, PMP

Publisher:  AMACOM

List Price:   US$29.50

Format:  soft cover; 156 pages

Publication Date:   2012

ISBN: 9780814408759

Reviewer:      Mark Davis, CISM. PMP

Review Date:              November 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

The premise of this book is that people are the greatest cause of project challenges – and for this reason, project managers must develop and demonstrate leadership skills beyond technical competency and project management methods.

A successful project manager is required to use his soft skills to a greater extent than his hard (technical) skills.  Therefore, the secret of project leadership is learning how to grow and leverage these soft skills – interpersonal relationships in particular.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The author presents three detailed projects, each in the form of a “Project Play”. These plays provide examples of a failed project, a project with a reasonably fair result, and a project with a very good outcome.  Each project involves a fairly complex ERP software implementation, with large and diverse project teams that include “Type-A” personalities in decision-making roles.

Each scenario illustrates that 80% of project issues are due to people.  And successful completion of the described project required a flexible project manager with strong interpersonal skills.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

The author emphasized the importance of the project manager building a cohesive team by facilitating team-building events.   Many project leaders make three incorrect assumptions:  1) adults in the workplace naturally know how to work together, 2) we expect everyone to behave in the same manner, and 3) we can resolve differences by simply discussing them with each other in a logical manner.  Consideration should be given to team building prior to and throughout the entire project.

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About the Reviewer

mark-davisflag-usaMark Davis

Mark Davis is an Information Technology Director at Miraca Life Sciences in Irving, Texas, USA. His current role includes leadership of a Project Management Office, IT Risk and Compliance, and Software Quality Assurance. He has an MBA from the University of North Texas and certifications in Project Management and Information Security Management.  Mark can be contacted at [email protected].

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Thinking On Purpose for Project Managers: Outsmarting Evolution, Second Edition

BOOK REVIEW

thinking-on-purpose-2nd-edBook Title:  Thinking On Purpose for Project Managers: Outsmarting Evolution, Second Edition

Author:  Bill Richardson

Publisher:  Multi-Media Publications Inc.

List Price:   US$39.95

Format:  Soft Cover; 340 pages

Publication Date:   2009

ISBN: 9781554890255

Reviewer:      Kasandra Bell, PMP, ITIL

Review Date:              November 2012

________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

The premise of this book is that evolution gave humans powerful but automatic thinking processes that are not appropriate for most current living environments.  Bill Richardson teaches his understanding of why humans think the way they do and then how to overcome this thinking to be more effective.

I believe all humans evolve; starting as babies, learning and growing throughout life.  Not everyone believes that human ancestors were apes and fish; readers who believe in Intelligent Design may have trouble forcing themselves to read past the first chapters.

Mr. Richardson does go on to provide insight into why humans think on autopilot and how to change those thought processes.  40 tools and techniques for changing thought processes and managing projects effectively are included in the book.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book’s structure is well thought out and easy to navigate.  The first section explains why humans are where they are in the evolutionary cycle and why this is a problem.  Mr. Richardson also introduces three case studies used in the second section to illustrate how using his techniques resolved each of the issues in the case studies.

The second section is the explanation of Mr. Richardson’s Thinking On Purpose techniques, the case study solutions, and the Thinking On Purpose Toolkit.  There are a Table of Contents and Index to assist with locating the section or tool that the reader may want to use.

There are over 300 pages in this book; however, there are only about 125 pages of text covering the subject.  The rest of the book is the case studies with charts and diagrams, the Toolkit, Appendices, and the Index, so it is a fairly easy read.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

This book has a compilation of charts and tools from many sources (all with appropriate credit), emotional intelligence topics, biases that may affect project managers, and a fairly easy to understand explanation of how the human brain works.

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About the Reviewer

kasandra-bellflag-usaKasandra Bell, PMP, ITIL

Kasandra Bell currently provides senior project management leadership to IT Shared Services projects at a major university in the North Texas area with multiple campuses in different cities.   She ran her own consulting company prior to that providing program management consulting and project management expertise and training to small and medium businesses, with international clients, in a variety of industries. Kasandra earned her PMP in 2005 and is an active member of the PMI Dallas chapter, including managing their Professional Development Day project.

Kasandra mentors junior project managers and teaches project management basics to college students. She is an award winning newsletter editor receiving recognition from Toastmasters and the Texas Association for Gifted and Talented.  Kasandra can be reached at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected]mworldjournal.net.

Continuous Delivery: The Ultimate Challenge for Software Development Managers

PM ADVISORIES

By Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

and Mike Bowler, CSM

Canada
________________________________________________________________________

In a recent article titled “Agile Methods and The Need for Speed” (http://pmac-agpc.ca/node/565), the author notes that many people are adopting agile development methods in hopes that they can deliver their project faster.  The article goes on to state that, while speed is a possible outcome of agile methods, it is not guaranteed.  Agile projects are more likely to achieve other benefits first, such as reduced technical risk, higher quality, greater likelihood of meeting true requirements, and more.  Yet there are still those elusive speed-related benefits that people strive to achieve in their first agile projects.

To truly deliver software faster, one must look towards cutting down the timespan of all processes in the software development lifecycle from requirements gathering to deployment.  Many who seek faster delivery use agile methods to improve the requirements gathering, design and development processes but are frustrated in their attempts to get a speedier deployment of the new software.  These people often see deployment activities as unnecessarily cumbersome and often without much perceived value.

Perhaps the agile community has contributed to this perception.  We have talked about concepts such as “continuous deployment” for years as if it were just one of the many agile techniques we can employ on our projects.  Yet, this particular technique stands apart from many of the other basic agile techniques such as holding daily stand-up meetings, managing requirements using backlogs, and breaking a project down into iterations which culminate in a demonstration to stakeholders.  Continuous deployment is among the most difficult of agile techniques to employ successfully and requires a very high level of agile maturity and discipline in the team.

Generally, to be successful at continuously deploying software into a production environment, a number of preconditions must be met:

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About the Authors

kevin aguannoflag-canadaKevin Aguanno

With over 20 years of managing complex systems integration and software development projects, Kevin Aguanno is known in the industry for his innova­tive approaches to solving common project management problems. He focuses on three project management specialty areas: agile project management, troubled project recovery, and project methodology consulting.  As a well-known keynote speaker, trainer, and executive coach in agile management meth­ods, Aguanno has taught thousands of people how to better manage high-change projects by using techniques from Scrum, Extreme Programming, Feature-Driven Development, OpenUP and other agile methods. He is a frequent presenter at conferences and private corporate events where he delights audiences with practical advice peppered with fascinating stories from his own experiences in the trenches practicing agile project management.  He has taught for several years at the University of Waterloo and the University of Toronto where he won the coveted SCS Excellence in Teaching Award, and is a regular guest lecturer in software engineering and project management classes at several other universities.

Kevin Aguanno holds a B.A. from the University of Western Ontario, and a Master’s in Project Management from the School of Business and Public Management at George Washington University.  He is a PMI-certified Project Management Professional (PMP), and his competency is certified by IBM as a Certified Executive Project Manager and by the International Project Management Association (IPMA) as a Senior Project Man­ager (IPMA Level B). He is also certified by the Scrum Alliance as both a Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) and Certified Scrum Professional (CSP). He is also certified by the Project Management Association of Canada as a Certified Agile Project Manager (Cert.APM).  Aguanno is an active member of the Project Management Institute (U.S.A.) including the Information Systems SIG, the Association for Project Management (U.K.), the Project Management Association of Canada where he is a founding director and the current President, the Agile Alliance, and the Scrum Alliance.

Kevin is accredited by the International Project Management Association (founded in Switzerland) as a project management competency assessor, and he performs IPMA assessments for the ASAPM in the U.S.A. and the PMAC in Canada, for both of which the IPMA awarded him the honorary designation of First Assessor.  He is the author of over twenty books, audiobooks, and DVDs in addition to a number of articles published in magazines and journals worldwide.  Find out more at http://www.mmpubs.com/catalog/Aguanno–Kevin-i-7.html.

Mike Bowler

Mike Bowler is an experienced agile coach with strong emphasis on both process and technical practices. He works with teams writing software and helps them do that better. He became interested in agile in 2000 and founded XP Toronto that year to get like-minded people together to discuss better ways to ship software. In 2003, after completing the Certified Scrum Master (CSM) designation, he co-founded Scrum Toronto to focus on that methodology. More recently, in 2012, Bowler co-founded Agile Toronto East to better serve the Agile community through Durham Region.  Many agile coaches seem to focus only on the process skills behind agile. In addition to that, Bowler is also very strong with the technical skills such as Test Driven Development (TDD), refactoring, pair programming, continuous delivery and others. He regularly coaches teams on the use of these skills using languages such as Java, Ruby and C#.  Bowler has demonstrated strong leadership skills by running a development shop in the insurance industry, founding two companies and also organizing and running various user groups such as Agile Toronto East, XP Toronto, The Durham IT Association and Scouts Canada. He has a wide range of industry experience including life insurance, medical, automotive, banking, alarm systems and loyalty programs.  Finally, Bowler is an experienced speaker, having given many highly rated presentations at international conferences and local user groups.  More at www.GenXus.com/bowler.

In This Issue

David Pells,

Managing Editor

Addison, Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Welcome to the January 2013 edition of the PM World Journal (PMWJ), a web-based publication serving the world of professional program and project management (P/PM).  We are excited to publish the first edition of our second year, an edition with some great content and some new additions.  We begin the year with the addition of a “Letters to the Editor” section, to allow monthly feedback from readers with an opinion about something published in the PMWJ.  We also introduce two great new series of articles on the topics of Enterprise Project Governance by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha in Brazil and Cultural Intelligence for Project Managers by Dr Bill Young in China.  The entire contents of this month’s edition are briefly described below.

This month’s edition of the PMWJ includes 35 articles, papers, reports and book reviews from 17 different countries, reflecting the global nature of our readers and contributors.  This month’s edition begins with two Letters to the Editor. Mike O’Brochta and Bob Youker in the USA have contributed their reactions to featured papers published in our December 2012 edition.  If you have any comments or reactions related to anything published in the PMWJ, send us an email to share with the rest of the world.  Sharing knowledge, including reactions and perspective, is the main mission of the PMWJ.

Authors in 6 countries have contributed Featured Papers in this issue.  Dr. Pavel Barseghyan, who spends his time between Armenia and the USA, has authored an important paper entitled “New Methodological Approaches for Filling Gaps in Quantitative Project Management.”  Alan Stretton, PhD in Australia has authored a paper entitled “Two broad dimensions of Program Management. Winner Yousman in Indonesia is the author of “Implementation of Engineering Economy in Transport Development: a Case Study of Road Transport”. Prof Dimitrios Kamsara, who lives in Greece but is currently working in the Middle East, is co-author with Prof Charalambos Louca in Cyprus and Stafanos Kougoulos in UK of a new research paper on “Engineers’ job satisfaction within projects developed by the International Construction Industry in MENA region.”  These are all serious papers; we hope they are interesting and useful our readers.

Six Series Articles are includedthis month, with the introduction of two new series. Prof Darren Dalcher in the UK has organized an “Advances in Project Management” article by Michael Hatfield from the USA, “The Coming Sea-Change in Project Management Science”.  Mr. Hatfield is the author of the book “Game Theory in Management” published by Gower in 2012.  Darren has also provided an introductory article entitled “Is there a unified Theory of Project Management?” With this edition, we introduce a new series of articles called “Dragons, Camels and Kangaroos: Cultural Intelligence for Project Managers” by Bill Young, PhD, Australian professional leader currently residing in China.  Bill’s first article is titled “Cultural Intelligence – a requisite competency for international projects.”  We also introduce a new series this month on the subject of “Enterprise Project Governance: How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization,” by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha in Brazil.  Dinsmore and Rocha are the authors of the outstanding book Enterprise Project Governance, published in the USA by AMACOM in 2012.  Their first series article is entitled “What is Enterprise Project Governance.”  Their article is preceded by an introductory article by myself on “The Changing Nature of Project Management,” which mirrors my foreword to their 2012 book.  Finally, in our series section, we include another Risk Doctor Briefing by Dr David Hillson in UK on “Resolving Cobb’s Paradox.”  These are outstanding articles that should spur deep consideration and perhaps some debate.  We hope you enjoy them.

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About the Author

david-pellsflag-usaDAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

David L. Pellsis Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He is also the president and CEO of PM World, the virtual organization behind the journal and library, and of PM World Services, an executive P/PM advisory firm.  David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a wide variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology, and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award in 1999.He is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and of the Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.  David has published widely, speaks at conferences and events worldwide, and can be contacted at[email protected].

Report from Global Young Crew Workshop
October 2012

REPORTS

Young professional Project Managers from all over the world meet in Crete, Greece

by Natalia Majcher

IPMA Young Crew (Poland)

Warsaw, Poland
________________________________________________________________________

From 26th to 28th of October, Hersonissos (Greece) was the center of the project management world, for young professionals. Over 80 young people from 18 countries spent almost one week exploring the insights of the PM world, sharing their experience and planning future collaborations during the IPMA Global Young Crew Workshop.

The Global Young Crew Workshop is an event organized by the IPMA Young Crew and held each year in a different location. Its goal is to provide the participants with a unique training and networking experience, to get them further involved in the Young Crew activities, and to integrate Young Crew participants within the IPMA Family.

“Organising such an important event is an equally exciting and challenging endeavor” states Jannis Soulos, Project manager of the GYCW 2012. “By managing an international team within the IPMA one learns very much and because of the inspiring motivation, willpower and pleasant atmosphere it is also a lot of fun. I can only recommend organising a Young Crew event in your country“.

During the three days of the Global Young Crew Workshop and the following days of IPMA World Congress, participants learned from trainers all around the world, met people interested in the same areas of expertise, shared their knowledge, and bonded with other Young Crew members. “It is truly the place to meet the relevant people in Project Management”, declared Dr. Daniel Collado-Ruiz, 2013 Chairman-elect of the IPMA Young Crew Management Board. “This event combines a perfect networking atmosphere with timely discussions on the present and future of Project Management. Definitely something not to miss”.

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About the Author

natalia majcherflag-polandNatalia Majcher

Natalia Majcher is a member of IPMA Young Crew. She graduated from Gdansk University of Technology as MEng in Management. Currently she is working in an IT consulting company in CRM implementation projects. As a member of Young Crew Poland Natalia is part of various projects on national and international level, both as a team member (GeCCo, Global Young Crew Workshop), initiator and a project manager (e-Meetings). Questions and feedback are highly welcome via [email protected]

About IPMA Young Crew

IPMA Young Crew is a key component of IPMA’s growth and development of the leaders of tomorrow. We are an active network of young professional project managers and students aged 25 to 35 who believe in community and the building of a worldwide young professional project management family. With over 20 member countries, IPMA Young Crew strives to provide experiential learning through interaction and information exchange with young project managers.  More information at http://ipma.ch/young-crew/.

Polaris lessons in Risk Management

BOOK REVIEW

polaris-fleet-ballistic-missileBook Title:  Polaris lessons in Risk Management

Author:  Dr. John Byrne, PMP

Publisher:  Multi-Media Publications, Inc.

List Price:   US$29.95

Format:  Soft cover; 215 pages

Publication Date:   2011

ISBN-13: 978-1-55489-097-2

Reviewer:      Wayne Raley

Review Date:              October 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Risk management is presented from an historical perspective using the Polaris Fleet Ballistic Missile program as a great example to show how to manage risk on a complex large program. Uses the examples of a wide range of risks to suggest how you might approach managing the risks on any project of any size. It covers the options available to you to manage risk.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Following the introduction the book covers the news shattering announcement that Sputnik 1 had been launched and that the U.S. was seriously behind in the technology to deliver nuclear warheads via missiles. It then develops the risk management approaches used to address and manage the associated risks. Risk management is then addressed by developing the following six risk topics. 1) Risk Management Planning  2) Risk Identification  3) Qualitative Risk Analysis  4) Quantitative Risk Analysis  5) Risk Response Planning  6) Risk Monitoring and Control.

The conclusion compares the successful Navy Polaris program to the NASA Apollo program. The program and project approaches used by both agencies are great examples of how to accomplish seemingly impossible objectives with a systematic program and project methodology. The appendices cover various project management topics including earned value management.

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

This book covers both the history and practical application of the then emerging and the now much more mature program and project methodologies in a fashion that is very readable by both history buffs as well as all executives and managers including program and project level professionals. I deem it must reading if your organization deals with complex issues, programs and projects.

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About the Reviewer

wayne-raleyflag-usaWayne Raley

Wayne Raley is a senior IT Infrastructure Program Project Manager with extensive experience with Fortune 500, government and small company strategic planning, implementation, security, service management, monitoring and application deployment. Information technology program / project management, chemical manufacturing, and IT.  Analytical problem solver that thrives on change and team building to solve complex challenges. Solid business acumen with unique blend of large and small data center support skills. Successful Information Technology for banks, airlines, aerospace, chemical manufacturing, process control, sales, sales support, and telecommunications. Focused on achieving results. Manage with vision, leadership and extensive business and IT process knowledge escalating and managing issues and risks. Stakeholders include C-level and above management, business users, support services, multiple vendors, and outsourced resources. Manage requirements, scope, detailed work plans, schedules, cost estimates, resource plans, communications, budgets, dependencies, risks, changes and status.  Contact at [email protected] Garland, TX, USA.

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Enterprise Project Governance
How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization

SERIES ARTICLE

The Evolving Nature of Project Management

Introduction to a new series on Enterprise Project Governance by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha. (1)

David Pells, Managing Editor

PM World Journal

Texas, USA
________________________________________________________________________

Can an organization ever achieve full maturity in its ability to consistently deliver successful programs and projects?  Can an enterprise ever achieve perfection, or near perfection, in the planning and management of all of its projects?  These are not theoretical questions?  What CEO does not want to maximize profits (or mission success), while reducing risks and maintaining the approval and support of key stakeholders, especially customers, investors and shareholders?  What C-level executive does not want her or his programs and projects to be completed successfully, ahead of schedule or under budget, by knowledgeable, experienced and capable project managers?  So are real maturity and near-perfection for project-oriented organizations possible?  Absolutely not!  Not without effective governance.

Over the last two decades, we have seen the project management field grow from a set of applications and methods for managing large individual projects to a wide range of knowledge, skills and technologies for managing multiple projects, programs and portfolios of programs and projects.  In his classic 1998 book Winning in Business with Enterprise Project Management, Paul Dinsmore captured the important global trend of the 1990s, the organizing and managing of multiple projects within organizations with more consistent enterprise-wide processes, systems and techniques, in order to increase efficiency and profitability.

Enterprise Project Management, or EPM as it came to be known, gave rise to the Project Management Office (PMO), now globally recognized as a best practice for EPM and project-oriented organizations.  These led in turn to a much greater focus on the investment and return on investment in professional project management education, training, qualifications, systems development and process improvements.  Many organizations failed in their attempts to implement successful EPM and PMOs, but many others succeeded, especially those with strong executive support, customer orientation and global competition.

During the first decade of the Twenty First Century, the role and importance of programs and projects in many organizations, industries and economies increased dramatically.  This has led in turn to first the awareness, then the sometimes painful understanding, that the success of many programs and projects can dictate the success or failure of the entire organization.  The need to align programs and projects with organizational strategies and missions became obvious; the project portfolio management (PPM) approach was born, and rapidly embraced by industry and project management service and technology suppliers.  In the last few years, the subject of organizational project management maturity has risen in visibility and importance, as enterprise-wide efficiency and performance in project-based organizations and industries have clearly been linked to the maturity of people and processes – in the context of international project management standards and best practices.

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(1) This series includes articles by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha, authors of the book Enterprise Project Governance, published by AMACOM in the USA in 2012.  The articles are extracts and summaries of key topics from their book, providing information and guidance on one of the most important aspects of portfolio, program and project management today – governance.  For information about the book, go to http://www.amacombooks.org/book.cfm?isbn=9780814417461

About the Author

david-pellsflag-usaDAVID PELLS

Managing Editor, PMWJ

David L. Pellsis Managing Editor of the PM World Journal, a global eJournal for program and project management, and Executive Director of the PM World Library. He is also the president and CEO of PM World, the virtual organization behind the journal and library, and of PM World Services, an executive P/PM advisory firm serving several major governmental agencies and programs.  David is an internationally recognized leader in the field of professional project management with more than 35 years of experience on a wide variety of programs and projects, including engineering, construction, defense, energy, transit, high technology, and nuclear security, and project sizes ranging from several thousand to ten billion dollars. He has been an active professional leader in the United States since the 1980s, serving on the board of directors of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) twice.  David was awarded PMI’s Person of the Year award in 1998 and Fellow Award in 1999.He is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM) in the UK; Project Management Associates (PMA – India); and the Russian Project Management Association SOVNET.  From June 2006 until March 2012, he was the managing editor of the globally acclaimed PM World Today eJournal.  David has published widely, speaks at events worldwide, and can be contacted at[email protected].

What is Enterprise Project Governance?

SERIES ARTICLE

Enterprise Project Governance

How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization

By Paul Dinsmore & Luiz Rocha

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
________________________________________________________________________

This is the first article of the series Enterprise Project Governance (EPG): How to Manage Projects Successfully Across the Organization. It will cover the what, why, who, when, and where of EPG.

The field of managing projects shows an ever-broadening scope – from ad hoc single-project approaches to a complex all-encompassing view of portfolios, programs and projects. This evolution peaks at the level of enterprise project governance, the umbrella of policies and criteria that comprise the laws for the sundry components that make up the world of projects.

In real life, scenarios of governance in project management vary from free flowing laissez-faire to formalized corporate PMO oversight. The typical ways project management is handled in organizations are:

  1. Laissez Faire (“whatever will be will be”).  Projects are carried out as required using intuitive approaches or methodologies that vary from one project to another.  Nobody knows how many projects are underway in the company or the status of all the projects.
  1. Departmental (“territorial”). Each department or area develops methodology and practice appropriate for that department. No cross-fertilization exists with other departments.
  1. PMOs, project management offices (“one or several?”). Some companies have multiple PMOs, either at different levels or different regions. They are sometimes connected, yet often operate independently.
  1. Corporate level PMO (“top down oversight”). Here,a chief project officer, or corporate project management office, or strategic project management office, cares for the implementation of strategic projects and for the overall project management practice in the company, including project portfolio management.

EPG goes a step further, proposing an all-encompassing approach to the management of projects across an enterprise, involving all players, including board members, CEO, other C-level executives, portfolio managers, PMO managers and project managers. This book focuses on this over-riding issue of enterprise project governance and shows how the components of projects fit under its protective umbrella.

What is EPG anyway?

Enterprise project governance is a framework residing under the umbrella of top management and corporate governance aimed at ensuring the alignment of the corporate portfolio and its programs and projects with overall strategy, and that actions are pro-actively taken to confirm that everything stays on track to ultimately create value for the organization.

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This series includes articles by Paul Dinsmore and Luiz Rocha, authors of the book Enterprise Project Governance, published by AMACOM in the USA in 2012.  The articles are extracts and summaries of key topics from their book, providing information and guidance on one of the most important aspects of portfolio, program and project management today – governance.  For information about the book, go to http://www.amacombooks.org/book.cfm?isbn=9780814417461

About the Authors

paul-dinsmoreusa-brazilPaul C. Dinsmore

Paul Dinsmore is President of Dinsmore Associates, and a highly respected specialist in project management and organizational change. A certified project management professional (PMP), he has received the Distinguished Contribution Award and Fellow Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI®). He regularly consults and speaks in North America, South America, Europe and Africa.  Paul is the author and / or editor of numerous articles and 18 books, including the AMA Handbook of Project Management. Mr. Dinsmore resides in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

luiz-rochaflag-brazilLuiz Rocha

Luiz Rocha has 35+ years of experience in the industry and business consulting. Luiz worked with Andersen Consulting and Delloite in the USA and Europe when he had the opportunity to manage multi-cultural and geographically dispersed projects in Latin America, North America and Europe. In Brazil he worked with Dinsmore Associates and Petrobras. Luiz is an engineer by background, MSc. in industrial engineering from UFRJ – Brazil, PMP-PMI and IPMA certifications. He is also a published author with two previous books, Business Metamorphosis, in Brazil, and Mount Athos, a Journey of Self-Discovery, in the USA.

Advances in Project Management
Is there a universal theory of project management?

SERIES ARTICLE

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire

UK
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the January PMWJ Article by Michael Hatfield

Teaching project management is a challenge. First, there is the question of where to position the faculty. Should it sit within engineering? Or might it fit better in a business school? Or perhaps it needs to be positioned as a generic discipline, which applies in all domains and endeavours. Then, there is the question related to the philosophical underpinning: namely, is project management a science or an art? The award students obtain should reflect that orientation in its title. Once these aspects are out of the way, all that is needed is the body of knowledge (and the evidence that supports it).

Now, it might be tempting to settle for a set of processes and procedures as they help us to perform tasks more skillfully. Reducing skills into a set of procedures is appealing from a pedagogic perspective as it offers a natural structure that can be translated into a lesson plan and ultimately pared down to a set of steps to be memorised.

However, in reality we all know that the craft and discipline of project management cannot be reduced to chunks of knowledge. The skills, behaviours and interactions of successful project managers rely on understanding the complex interplay between people, organisations and change. Lessons from project failures have taught us to take heed of relationships, expectations, trust, communication, politics, conflict and even human follies and imperfections. Yet these aspects are not included in the formally published bodies of knowledge.

Practitioners increasingly talk about a mismatch between project management theory and practice. Some papers published in the academic literature even contend that project management theory is harmful to project management practice. In an ideal world the two would be intertwined so that practice is the source of theory, and theory leads to improved practice. Drawing on experience could thus become the source for generating the new knowledge required to make sense of the experiences and find their meaning. Continuing to explore and discover enables one to make sense of the environment and begin to address the challenge of uncertainty.

The question is what knowledge can we draw upon? The author of this month ‘s column is offering to take us on a daring journey. Michael Hatfield, author of Game Theory in Management, recently published by Gower, is well known to many project managers for his insightful perspective on the discipline. In his article he challenges us to rethink the received knowledge and evaluate its effectiveness.

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Editor’s note: The PMWJ Advances in Project Management series includes articles by authors of program and project management books published by Gower in the UK.  Each month an introduction to the current article is provided by series editor Prof Darren Dalcher, who is also the editor of the Gower Advances in Project Management series of books on new and emerging concepts in PM.  Prof Dalcher’s article is an introduction to the invited paper this month in the PMWJ by Gower author Dr Lynda Bourne on the subject of “Communicating Upwards with Effect.”  Information about the Gower series can be found at http://www.gowerpublishing.com/advancesinprojectmanagement.

About the Author

darren-dalcherflag-ukDarren Dalcher, PhD

Author, Series Editor

Director, National Centre for Project Management

University of Hertfordshire

UK

Darren Dalcher, Ph.D. HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI is Professor of Project Management at the University of Hertfordshire, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK.  He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management in 2008 and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London.  Professor Dalcher has written over 150 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Software Process Improvement and Practice, an international journal focusing on capability, maturity, growth and improvement. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Gower Publishing of a new companion series Fundamentals of Project Management.  Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies in the UK and beyond.  He is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Academy of Management, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He is a Member of the PMI Advisory Board responsible for the prestigious David I. Cleland project management award and of the APM Professional Development Board.  Prof Dalcher is an academic editorial advisor for the PM World Journal.  He can be contacted at [email protected].

UK Project Management Roundup

REPORTS

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK
________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

The past year has seen some exciting projects complete.  The most high profile events were the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations and the Olympics.  The former showed the world what many observers consider that we do best, major state occasions combined with old fashioned ceremonial.  The Olympics, which covered two sporting extravaganzas when the Paralympics are taken into account, was a high risk programme with several unusual features.  Against this background, other projects attracted far less attention than they might otherwise receive.

QUEEN’S DIAMOND JUBILEE

As many visitors to UK will know, HM The Queen commands great respect and affection in UK and the Commonwealth so the celebrations to mark her Diamond Jubilee were always going to be spectacular.  Members of the Royal Family undertook engagements all over the world as part of these events but the main celebrations took place in UK over the weekend of 2 – 5 June.

Events included many local street parties, entirely informal but all projects in their own right and most seem to have been successful – perhaps the result of close cooperation of project teams.  Risks were many and various but the one constant was the threat of poor weather and the weekend british-forceswas marked by torrential rain.  Most local parties went off successfully, including our own local party which coped admirably with a torrential downpour while British Forces in Afghanistan also managed to mark the occasion (see photo right).

More widely, the National events were notably successful.

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About the Author

miles shepherdflag-ukMILES SHEPHERD

Salisbury, UK

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.   Past Chair and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He is currently the Chair of the ISO committees that are developing new ISO 21500 Guidelines for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at [email protected].

IPMA Festival of Knowledge in Poland

REPORTS

By Prof. Dr. Brane Semolic

IPMA RMB Chairman

Slovenia
________________________________________________________________________

The IPMA Festival of Knowledge in Poland was organized by ProResearch Foundation, that supports and promotes the efficient, proper and safe implementation of research projects, International Project Management Association (IPMA), LENS Living Lab and IPMA Special Interest Group (SIG) Project Management in Research, in partnership with IPMA Poland, University of Science and Technology in Cracow, Industrial Development Agency and National Capital Fund. The media patronage over the Festival was taken by 4PM and INOVA Consulting, while its patron was the National Centre for Research and Development.

IPMA Festival of Knowledge in Poland events:

  1. Workshop of the Special Interest Group ( SIG) Project Management in Research (22.11.2012),
  1. IPMA Festival of Knowledge Forum (23.11.2012),
  1. IPMA Young Crew Workshop 2012 (24.11.2012).

The main event was organized at the University of Science and Technology in Cracow on 23rd of November 2012. This international event was organized for thefirst time in Poland.

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About the Author

Brane-Semolic-bioflag-SloveniaProf. Brane Semolic, PhD

Head of LENS Living Lab- International living laboratory,
Celje, Slovenia
Professor, University of Maribor

Brane Semolic, PhD, is currently head of LENS Living Lab – international R&D living laboratory and professor at the University of Maribor in Maribor, Slovenia and Cranefield College, Johannesburg.   He is President of the Experts Council of Project Management Association of Slovenia (ZPM), and Chairman of the IPMA (International Project Management Association) Research Management Board.  He is also a member of the EU Enterprise Policy Group – Professional Chamber and Issue Manager of the SIG (Special Interest Group) Project Management in EU program NETLIPSE (Knowledge Management of Large Infrastructure Projects).  Brane Semolic has a BSc in Mechanical Engineering (technology), and a BSc, M.Sc.and Ph.D.in Economics and Business Administration (project management and informatics) from the University of Maribor.  Professor Semolic has 35 years of working experience as an expert, researcher, consultant, manager and project manager in industry and for the Slovene government.  He spent four year as Counselor to the Ministry of Science and Technology, Republic of Slovenia (1990 – 1994) and has been a member of the International Association for Project Management (IPMA) since 1982.  He was previously a Professor at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of  Electronics and Computer Sciences, Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Faculty of Logistics (University of Maribor); Dean of GEA College (Global Entrepreneurship Academy) in Ljubljana;  Lecturer in the “European Project Manager” postgraduate education program (joint program with University of Bremen); Co-founder of  the EU education program  “European Master in Project Management”; IPMA Vice president (international events and R&D); President of the Slovenian Project management Association (ZPM); First IPMA foreign assessor in the PM Certification Program in Serbia and Montenegro; Project manager of the 14th  IPMA (International Project Management Association) world congress in 1998; and President of scientific committee of 1st joint ICEC & IPMA Global Congress on Project Management and Cost Engineering in 2006.  He has published more than 400 works on project management and other topics.  He was awarded as ICEC (International Cost Engineering Council) Distinguished International Fellow in 2008.  Professor Semolic can be contacted at [email protected].   Additional information about the LENS Living Lab can be found at http://www.3-lab.eu/ .

Program Management Complexity: A Competency Model

BOOK REVIEW

program-management-complexityBook Title:  Program Management Complexity: A Competency Model

Author:  Ginger Levin, PMP, PgMP

J. LeRoy Ward, PMP, PgMP

Publisher:  CRC Press

List Price:   US$

Format:  hard cover, 203 pages

Publication Date:   2011

ISBN: 9780814408759

Reviewer:      Jan Watson

Review Date:              November 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

This book addresses the interdependency complexities of multiple projects in a program.

The competency model includes a set of competencies program managers need to successfully complete programs and deliver desired benefits.

  • How can a program manager identif the nature and components of complexity?
  • What are the key competencies required of the program manager for success?

The book includes 3 assessment instruments designed for each of these audiences:

–      experienced program managers

–      people considering program management as a career

–      organizations wanting to evaluate the skills of their program managers.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is organized into 4 parts.

It begins with a literature review of program and project management complexity, highlighting key principles and gaps.

The second part presents an overview of competency model for program managers. It is divided into performance competencies and personal competencies. The performance competencies are organized according to the six domains of program management. The eight personal competencies are based on research plus a survey by Program Management Professionals (PgMP).

Following the competency model are three assessment instruments with questions to that help current program managers, organizations, and those considering program management assess the competencies.

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About the Reviewer

jan-watsonflag-usaJan Watson

Jan Watson, PMP, reviewed this book. She is a project manager for Research Now, an online market research global company.  Contact at [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Things Your PMO Is Doing Wrong

BOOK REVIEW

things-your-pmo-is-doing-wrongBook Title:  Things Your PMO Is Doing Wrong

Author:  Michael Hatfield

Publisher:  PMI

List Price:   US$34.95

Format:  soft cover; # of pages 73

Publication Date:   2008

ISBN: 978-1-933890-55-5

Reviewer:      Huma Sohrwardy

Review Date:              November 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

Michael Hatfield’s book covers common challenges and issues that impact the success of a Project Management Office (PMO). It highlights some common, often detrimental approaches that PMO’s take to advance project management and external factors that influence their overall success. The book also provides suggestions on how to overcome some of these challenges.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is divided into three parts:

Part 1: Tactics that Don’t Work

Describes the common pitfalls faced by most PMOs. There are 7 chapters that cover areas like using an authoritarian approach, training and certification to advance project management maturity, forcing a tool, prescriptive procedures and guides and using a graded approach to implement maturity.

Part 2: Tactics that Work

Describes the tactics that work in sustaining a PMO and making it successful. There are 4 chapters that cover topics like cooperation, implementing Earned Value Management (EVM) metrics etc.

Part 3: Hazards Along the Way

Describes the external challenges in a real life environment. There are 5 chapters that cover subjects like organizational politics, rival systems, responses that are on the offensive, etc.

The author succinctly ties all the parts together in the Conclusion section and provides a primer on EVM.

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About the Reviewer

huma-sohrwardyflag-usaHuma Sohrwardy, PgMP, PMP, CSM

Huma Sohrwardy is the Principal/Consultant at HZ Technologies, LLC. She is an experienced IT practitioner with 20+ years of experience in the use and management of Information Technology as a means to delivering business goals and objectives.

Huma has extensive experience in the finance, manufacturing, healthcare and public sectors and has worked as a consultant for the Australian Federal Government.  She holds a Master of Science degree in Computing and PMI’s Program Management Professional (PgMP) and Project Management Professional (PMP) credentials.

She has been a guest speaker at the Applied Project Management Forum at University of Texas Dallas. Her presentation on “PPM Implementation” can be accessed at the Jindal School Of Management website.

Huma can be contacted at : [email protected]

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management

BOOK REVIEW

lean-supply-chainBook Title:  Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management

Author:  Paul Myerson

Publisher:  McGraw Hill

List Price:   US$40.00

Format:  hard cover; 270 pages

Publication Date:   2012

ISBN: 978-0-07-176626-5

Reviewer:      Cora Crowell, MBA, PMP

Review Date:              December 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

This book elaborates on what lean supply chain and logistics is about and contrasts it with the more commonly known lean manufacturing. Supply chain is introduced by defining its scope, which according to the SCOR model, is made up of five management processes such as Plan, Source, Make, Deliver and Return. The book presents ways to implement lean supply chain and logistics by listing the eight types of wastes, lean tools to use and lean opportunity assessment, among others.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The major sections of this book are as follows:

  1. Definition of lean
  2. History of lean manufacturing and evolution of lean supply chain and logistics
  3. How to look for eight sources of wastes and eliminate them
  4. Basic lean tools
  5. Advanced lean tools
  6. Just-in-time (JIT) in supply chain
  7. Implementing lean at the warehouse
  8. Lean global supply chain and logistics
  9. Lean implementation strategies

10. Role of technology in lean implementation

11. Extending lean implementation to suppliers and customers

  1. 12.  Some real lean experiences of prominent companies

Highlights: What’s New in this Book

Myerson has successfully turned the spotlight from lean manufacturing to lean supply chain and logistics. A lean system is a “pull system” where production activities should be in response to what the customers want, not based on forecast. Forecast does not efficiently account for variability, and companies deal with variability usually through inventory which Myerson calls as ”necessary evil”.

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About the Reviewer

phillipines-flagflag-usacora-crowellCora Crowell, MBA, PMP

Cora Crowell is originally from the Philippines. She migrated to the US in 2004. She is currently employed at Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals and is responsible for Quality Assurance and SAP Implementation. She obtained her MBA, concentration in Project Management, from the University of Dallas in Irving, TX, USA. She is a certified Project Management Professional. She currently serves as Workshops Director for the PMI Dallas Chapter on a volunteer capacity.

She can be reached through her email [email protected].

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Managing Offshore Development Projects: An Agile Approach

BOOK REVIEW

an-agile-approachBook Title:  Managing Offshore Development Projects:  An Agile Approach

Author:  Upadrista Venkatesh

Publisher:  Multi-Media Publications, Inc

List Price:   US$ 24.95

Format:  soft cover; 256pages

Publication Date:   2008

ISBN: 9781897326688

Reviewer:      Andrea Carter Barbain

Review Date:              November 2012
________________________________________________________________________

Introduction to the Book

This book is based on the Agile project management methodology experiences of the author, Upadrista Venkatesh.  Venkatesh provides very detailed information on how to use the Agile approach to manage offshore development projects.  The basis of the book discusses how a large number of companies are outsourcing software development projects to other countries such as India.  Due to utilizing more offshore resources, companies must find effective ways to communicate and minimize projects risks as a result of having project resources in various locations with time zone differences.  According to Venkatesh, the agile approach can be used to improve the success of offshore software project performance, communication, and success.  The key is selecting the right project that can efficiently utilize the agile model and processes.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The structure of the book is very unique and well thought out.  The author starts with an acknowledgement section discussing how he is grateful for the interactions through his experiences and people who supported him throughout the book process.  The main portion of the book is divided into ten sections.

The following are the ten sections:

  • A study of the engagement model:  How it all started
  • How to select a project for Agile
  • Resourcing
  • Reduce documentation and create user stories
  • Architecting and designing
  • Setting up the team environment
  • Extended programming and testing
  • Agile quality process
  • Case studies
  • Leader’s orientation

The book begins by discussing the engagement model of how Agile started with background information on the reasons that led to creating the process…

To read entire Book Review (click here)

About the Reviewer

andrea-carter-barbainflag-usaAndrea Carter Barbain, PMP

Andrea Carter Barbain works in the Information Technology (IT) organization at Texas Instruments for 11+ years.   Andrea is an IT business analyst for various sales and internet marketing projects.  Throughout her career she has held several IT roles from UNIX administration, IT team leader, and project manager.   She has a BS degree in Computer Science from Jackson State University and a MS degree in Computer Science from North Carolina A&T State University.  She is an active volunteer of the PMI Dallas Chapter.  In addition, Andrea teaches IT college courses during her extra time as an adjunct instructor and enjoys giving back her time and service to others.  Andrea can be contacted at [email protected].

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of cooperation between the publisher, PM World Inc and the Dallas Chapter of the Project Management Institute (www.pmidallas.org). Publishers provide books to PM World, books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter where they are given to chapter members who commit to providing a book review in a standard format; the reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  Since PMI Dallas Chapter members are generally mid-career professionals, they represent the intended audience for most PM books.  If you are an author or publisher of a book related to program or project management, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact [email protected].

Cultural Intelligence – a requisite competency for international projects

SERIES ARTICLE

Dragons, Camels and Kangaroos

A Series on Cultural Intelligence for Programme and Project Management

Article 1 in the series ‘Dragons, Camels and Kangaroos’

Bill Young

Melbourne, Australia and Beijing, China
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Editor’s note: When you read this title your first question might be: What is the association between these disparate creatures (mythical and real)? The less complex answer is, they are symbolic and immediately conjure up ideas of what they possibly represent. Dragons perhaps China; Camels the Middle East and parts of Africa; Kangaroos, Australia. What has this got to do with the price of fish in Hong Kong! The explanation will be in our series on international cultures.

Bill Young is a part time Professor at Beijing’s Jiaotong University. He lectures in international business management including courses he has developed in cultural dimensions. After three decades of delivering projects globally and with strong experience in international joint ventures he is convinced that there is a much greater need for the development of Cultural Intelligence.

In this series Young discusses aspects of local and national cultures in the context of how they impact international business and project management. The series deals with contemporary culture in the global business environment and explores Cultural Dimensions and how they can be utilised to bring about greater project and business success. The series will include articles focused on different national cultures and how through building understanding of the cultures can make a substantial difference to business success. Article 1: Cultural Intelligence – a requisite competency for international projects outlines why this topic is important.

Cultural Intelligence –

a requisite competency for international projects

Is cultural intelligence really that important? After all there are many key skills that project and business professionals need to possess to succeed in today’s chaotic and competitive corporate world. Culture by its ubiquitous nature is a core element that features subtly across all decision making. Through research and involvement with international business ventures the author has found cultural misunderstanding can have a substantial yet often insufficiently recognized adverse influence on business and Project success.

Definitions or descriptions of national cultures commonly refer to cultivation or improvement and the fulfillment or encompassment of national aspirations or ideals.  According to Lederach1, ‘Culture is the shared knowledge and schemes created by a set of people for perceiving, interpreting, expressing, and responding to the social realities around them’. Or described by Hofstede2 culture is, ‘The collective programming of the mind distinguishing the members of one group or category of people from another’. Category here referring to nations, regions, ethnicities, occupations, and organizations, etc. Hofstede’s programming process, or culturalisation commences at a very early age and lasts into adulthood. Shaped by parents, other elders, siblings, friends, and the social and physical environment people are born into; its history, level of wealth or poverty, safety, artistic creativity and technology.

Culture strongly influences the way people think, feel, and act, and hence shapes behavior and practices both as individuals and within communities…

More…

To read entire article (click here)

About the Author

bill-young-bioflag-australiaBill Young

PhD, MBA, M.Eng,B.Eng, CPPD, FIEAust, FAIPM.

President and initiator of the Asia Pacific Federation of Project Management (www.apfpm.org) (2010 – current).

Former President (2007-11) Australian Institute of Project Management.

CEO (1985 – current) PMS Project Management Services P/L

Director (2005 – current) of Professional Solutions Australia Limited

Based in: Melbourne and Beijing: <[email protected]>.

Bill has worked for 31 years in engineering, business, and project management responsible for a diverse range of chemical processing and mining developments. He has worked in Australia, Europe, Asia, North America, and Africa.

After completing a number of Projects in China since 2005, he moved to China with his family in 2009.  He is a consultant and entrepreneur, and a Professor (part time) for the School of Mechanical & Electronic Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University.