SPONSORS

SPONSORS

eSports Players Status

Myth or Reality?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Nicolas Diaz

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 



ABSTRACT

eSport, competitive video games, is a recent phenomenon that hasn’t stop growing for the last couple of years. However, the growth was so that some aspects are still very amateur and especially players support and contracts. Becoming a pro-player, now is the dream of thousands of children around the world but only a few has the capabilities to make it through, only a few can live of it, because today, it’s still a very unsafe path. That is why in this document, the aim will be finding possible and viable solution to make eSport Athletes status more recognized and safer, using Multi-Attribute Decision making, to compare and evaluate them. The main expectation is to find viable and durable solutions to this problem, and it should also show how new, unique and complex is the eSport ecosystem, and what other aspects need to be developed to not only help eSport players but the whole industry.

Key Words: eSport, Sport, Contracts, Organizations, Players, Ecosystem, Professionals, Amateurs, Competition, Innovation

INTRODUCTION

From bedrooms to stadiums! This is the path of gamers for the last 4 decades. Today eSport, live or online video games competitions, gather millions of players, among which the bests want to become professional and real eSport Athletes, millions of viewers online (70M for the finals of Worlds on League of Legends in November 2017) and involves more and more economical actors like media, event organizations, teams, and now investors from different horizons. In fact, recently, companies like Cleveland Cavaliers, Houston Rockets or Airbus bought spots in different leagues on several games. The video game industry which already is a big one (25.2 billion in 2010 according the Entertainment Software Association) doesn’t stop growing, and eSport could push it to the next level.

2011: League of Legends Worlds – season 1 Finals

2012: League of Legends Worlds – season 2 Finals

2013: League of Legends Worlds – season 3 Finals – Staples Center – Los Angeles

However, as the industry of eSport is growing really fast right now, it appears that it suffers from its youth and kind of lack of experience. And the consequences of this situation are many and on different level. The first victims are the professional players. Back in when the competitions were amateur, 15-20 years ago, players competed for 100€ or for keyboards, and had to manage themselves, creating their own team, and going to events by themselves. But during the last decade, professional structures appeared (Fnatic, G2 Esports, TSM, CLG…) and started managing the players giving them contracts, and working with sponsors. Even though it became more professional, issues still appear very often concerning, Visa, the legal status of eSport athlete from a country to another, revenues, and the value of an eSport contract overall.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director [email protected].



About the Author


Nicolas Diaz

SKEMA Business School
Paris, France

 


Nicolas Diaz
is 22 years old student in Skema Business School, on Paris Campus. Currently in Msc Project & Program Management, he had the opportunity to travel to the United States, at NC States for a full semester, and is globally attracted by travelling, discovering and experiencing new cultures. French, with Peruvian origins, he grew up in a mix culture that brought him a lot, and spent whole his youth in Franconville, not far from Paris. With previous experience has intern, in PSA Peugeot Citroen, he is more attracted by eSport, the New Big Thing, by the competition and the ecosystem itself.